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CIRCULATES EVERYWHERE IN CANADA 

Also in Great Britain United States. 'West Indies, South Africa and Australia. 

HARDWARE-METAL 

A WeeKly Newspaper devoted to tHe Hardware, Metal, MacHinery, 
Heating and Plumbing Trades in Canada. 



VOL. XVII. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, JANUARY 21, 1905 



NO. 3 




CARVERS 
CASED GOODS 
TABLE CUTLERY 



BUTCHERS' 
HUNTING 5, 
POCKET KNIVES 



FOR SALE BY LEADING WHOLESALE HOUSES. 



THE STANDARDSOF THE WORLD. 




CANADA 



Its quality has made it so. 



JOHN LYSAGHT, Limited, Maker*, A. C. LESLIE ft CO., MOHTBEAL 
BRISTOL, ENO. Manager* Canadian Branch. 







The Supremacy 

of Taylor-Forbes goods finds expression in 



Th. 



Montreal Branch : 
9 De Bresoles St. 



VICTOR MANGLE 

Our Mangles have 

A STEEL THIMBLE SUNK INTO THE END 
OF EACH ROLL TO PREVENT CHECKING. 

SHAFTS PROVIDED WITH CASE-HARDENED 

ROLLER BEARINGS, SET IN STEELSHELLS. 

We are the only firm in Canada making Mangles — manufacturing every 
part, from the castings up. We know our product in every detail, and our 
guarantees are broad and trustworthy. 

Circular, with price list, descriptive of the Victor Mangle, on request. 

TAYLOR-FORBES COMPANY, 

The Largest Manufacturers of Hardware io Canada. LIMITED. 

GUELPH, CANADA 



CLASSIFIED UST OF ADVERTISEMENTS ON PA.OE SS. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 21, 1905 



Plumbers' Tools 




RETURNED, y 

L 



RETURNED 

JAN 23 1^ 



BlMiiiiiiiiiniliii:..lB!i«l[ 
Pipe Vices. 





Pipe Vices. 



GET OUR 

PRICES 

ON 

PIPE »» FITTINGS 



ETURNED 
AN 23 1906' 




Solid Pipe Stocks and Dies. 




STYLES 



Write for trade prices. 

RICE LEWIS 




LIMITED 



TORONTtf. 



SON 



/;> 



January 21, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



PATENT 



LOCK- 



< 




B 



AYLISS, 
JONES AND 
AYLISS, Ld. 




ARE 

SOLE OWNERS 

AND 

MANUFACTURERS 



"HE LIC 010" 

LOCK-NUT. 



! BAYLISS, JONES & BAYLISS. 

WOLVERHAMPTON. 

AND 1,39 Z. 1*1 CANNON ST, 






Don't forget to get oeir 
prices for. 



SPRING GOODS 



o 



Made from Vi In. to 2 ins. 
SAMPLE NUT AND COMPLETE LIST MAILED FREE. 



Also Manufacturers of BOLTS, NUTS, PATENT TIE BARS, 

RAILWAY AND TRAMWAY FASTENINGS, IRON AND WIRE 

FENCING, HURDLES, RAILING, GATES, Etc. 



VICTO 
WORK 



I''- WOLVERHAMPTON, (1M0UU(0 ,. 



LONDON OFFICES AND SHOWROOMS: 139 and 141 CANNON ST., E.C. 



BEFORE BUYING 

Lawn Mowers, Lawn Rakes, 
Rubber Hosft. Harvest Tools. 
Shovels and Spades. Paris 
Green, Green Wire Cloth, 
Churns, Wheelbarrows. . . . 

Builders' and Lumbermen's Supplies Always 
on Hand 



THOS. BIRKETT & SON CO., 

OTTAWA, ONT. 



LIMITED 





GEM 



BLIZZARD" 





1HE BEST ICE CREAM FREEZERS 



THE ONLY FREEZERS HADE having Cedar Pails with 
Electric Welded Wire Hoops, Cans of Heavy Tin with 
Drawn Steel Bottoms, Automatic Tin Scrapers. 



in practical use, became 
convenient, compact in 
size, use smallest amount of 
ice and salt, run easily, 
freeze quickly, produce 
smoothly frozen creams or 
desserts with little bother 
and less work. 



ICE 
GHIPPERS 



(i 






American" TWI N FREEZERS 

m aaaaaaMaaaaaaaaaaaaalaaaaaaaMaaaaaaaaaaaaal 

Freezes two flavors of Ice Cream or an Ice or Sherbet 
and Ice Cream at one and same time, in one Freezer. 

Something Entirely New. Never Done Before 

ASK YOUR JOBBER FOR THEM. 
SEND FOR NEW FREEZER BOOK. 

NORTH BROS. MFG. CO. 

PHILADELPHIA, P.A. 





LIGHTNING' 



CROWN 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 21, 1905 



TUF M 



\R 8 



SANITARY 
NEAT AND 
DURABLE 



DAVIDSON'S MILK CAN TRIMMINGS 




IN COMPLETE SETS 

"Broad Hoop" Pattern.— 
Composed of the following : 
1 Broad Hoop Bottom, 1 Cover, 
1 Centre Hoop, 6 inches wide, 
20 gauge, 1 Br. ad Top Hoop. 
I pair Cover Handles, 1 pair 
Side Handles. 



AND 

Milk Cans with Broad Hoop 
Patent Roll Rim Bottoms 

are in use by the most progressive dealers 
throughout Canada, give satisfaction, and are 
justly entitled to their general popularity. 

Our Bound Hoop Bottom has all the ad- 
vantages of a seamless bottom, without the 
strain that spinning entails. 

Bottoms can be sweated on, using very 
little solder. 

Bottoms are concave, draining to the centre, 
and are therefore easy to wash out and will not 
corrode. 

Top bands are shouldered, and all bands 
have retinned edges. 

WE CAN SUPPLY BEST QUALITY TINNED 

IRON AT LOWEST MARKET PRICES. 

WRITE FOR PRICE LIST. 




Heavy Rolled Edges make our patent bottoms 

doubly durable and waggon and factory 

floor protectors. 



The Thos. Davidson ITg. Co., Limited, 



Montreal 






PIG IRON 



Enquire for our prices before buying. 



M. & L Samuel, Benjamin & Co. 



503 Temple Building 



English House— 16 Philpot Lane, LONDON, ENGLAND. 



TORONTO. 



January 21, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Hardware and Metal. 




An Invitation 

\Y7E solicit enquiries from Hardware dealers 
who contemplate changing their line this 
year, and dealers whose ambition it is to buy 
Axes right. Of the quality of Hurd's we can talk 
with a clear eye, but to think of the price we have 
set for next season makes us hot. You'll feel warm, 
too, when you compare 
them from the stand- 
point of quality. 



All 



Patterns 
Weights 
Finishes 





URN ED 

* « r One 



TURNED 

Lewis Bros. & Co. 

Importers and Distributers 

Montreal 

I Toronto Ottawa 

\ Vancouver 

i 

Always address Head Office at Montreal 



January 21, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



GUNS, 

RIFLES, 
REVOLVERS 

PLACE YOUR ORDERS EARLY 

SEE ONE OF OUR REPRESENTATIVES BEFORE PLACING ANY ORDER 
CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED 

E. F. WALTER & CO.,™.. £ Montreal 





NO ONE 

is able to point out a better WASHING MACHINE than 

The New Century 

It is the most complete WASHING MACHINE ever devised — the most economical of 
the operator's strength, and of the fabric ; also of time. Works as nearly automatic- 
ally as possible. Dealers desiring the BEST Washing Machine should sell THE 
NEW CENTURY. Send tor Catalogue. 



THE DOWSWELL MANUFACTURING CO., Limited, 



HAMILTON, ONT. 



WIRE ROPE 




"ACME" Brand 

Highest grade of hoisting rope made. 
Extra tensile strength for heavy work. 
One strand painted green — look for it. 



USE GREENINGS ROPE GREASE 
FOR LUBRICATION. 



THE B. GREENING WIRE CO. 

LIMITED 

HAMILTON, ONT. MONTREAL, QUE. 



NOW 

IS THE TIME TO PLACE YOUR ORDER FOR 

BARB WIRE 



PLAIN- 



Galvanized Wire 

Galvanized Coiled Spring 

Staples 

Wire Nails, Screws 

ALL CANADIAN-MADE GOODS. 



DOMINION WIRE MFG. CO. 



LIMITED 



MONTREAL and TORONTO. 



January 21, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Have You Seen Them ? 

For Beauty, FinisH and Quality, tKe 
"Maple Leaf" Harvest Tools are unexcelled. 




No. "122. Manure ForK 





No. 2-43. Beet ForK. 




No. 108. Hay ForK. 




No. 43. Patent V Blade Hoe. 



TO THE HARDWARE TRADE- 

When placing your order for harvest tools with your jobber it will be to your advantage 
to specify for the "Maple Leaf" Harvest Tools. Should your jobber be unable to supply 
them, send your order to us and it will receive prompt and careful attention. 

The Maple Leaf Harvest Tool Co., Limited, Tillsonburg, Ont. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 21, 1905 



ONTARIO SILVER CO., 

Limited, 

NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA. 

„ , . , FLATWARE, CUTLERY and 

Manufacturers of ELECTRO PLATE. 

Ask for our Catalogue and Quotations. 



Oon't Forget the Name. . . 

NEWMANS INVINCIBLE 

FLOOR SPRINGS 

Strong, Quick, Reliable, Effective. 

Will close a door against any pressure of wind. 
Far ahead of ordinary door springs, poeumntic or 
otherwise. Ask your wholesaler. 

W. NEWMAN & SONS. Birmingham. 



Buy the Best. 




HERCULES 

Sash Cord. 

Star Brand Cotton Rope 

Star Brand Cotton Clothes Lines 

Star Brand Cotton Twine 

For Sale by all Wholesale Dealers. 

Your Customers 

the farmers are looking for a strong, serviceable and 
durable Fence at a reasonabl« cost. You can supply 
t to them in the 

IDEAL 




A GOOD SELLER 

The IDEAL is made of No. 'J Hard Steel Galvanized 
Wire throughout, and has many distinctive features which 
make it absolutely the best fence ever produced. 

It pays dealers to handle fencing that gives beat value 
obtainable. Write for our catalogue of Fencing and Gates, 
showing styles for ever) purpose. 

COILED-SPRING WIRE 

and other Fence Wire unexcelled in quality, shipped 
promptly. 

The McGregor- Banwell Fence Co., Limited, 

WALKERVILLE, ONT. 

Merrick, Anderson A Co., Winnipeg, Man. 

Sole agents for Man. and N.W.T 




DAVID MAXWELL & SONS 

ST. MARYS, ONT., CANADA. 



" Maxwell Favorite Churn." 



Steel Frame Support. 



PATENTED 
FEATURES: 

Improved Steel 

„ „ „ Stand, Roller 

Bearings, and Foot and Hand Lever Drive, and Detachable Driving 
Link. Improved for season of 1904. Steel or Wood Frame as desired 



and Low Wheels, from 12 in. to 



Lawn Mowers. 2 ° jn widths. 

_^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Shafting, Crucible Steel Knives and 

^^— ""^ — —■■^^— ^^— Cutting Plate. 

If your Wholesale House does not offer you these articles 

SEND DIRECT TO US. 





MAXWELL MOWER 



8-in. Low Wheel 



Wheelbarrows. a«£s r . 

^_______^^^_^__ Sizes. 



SPRINGS 





AND 

SPECIALTIES IN 
TEMPERED STEEL 



THE WALLACE BARNES CO., BRISTOL, CONN. 



IMONA/ 



Place Your Orders for GALVANIZ 

AND INSIST ON HAVINt 

"Sword and 

Do not take "Just as Good." FINE GALVANIZING RIGHT COUNT 

Agent for 

J. A. HENDERSON, T. W. & J. WALKER, 

Board of Trade Bldg-., MONTREAL, 



D SHEETS 

roh" 



WOLVERHAMPTON 



TACKS 


Factory equipped with the Make Inquiries 
latest improved machinery. Get our prloes 


AGENTS WANTED 


THOS. H. WYNN, - - HAMILTON 



< 



January 21, 1905 HARDWARE AND METAL 



> 









Binder Twine 



BLUE RIBBON, 650 ft, to the lb. 
REDCAP, - 600 ft. to the lb. 
TIGER, - - 550 ft. to the lb. 
STANDARD, 500 ft. to the lb. 

Still the Favorites of both FARMERS and DEALERS. 



Nothing but Select Fibre Used. 
Skilled Canadian Labor. 

Our Twine is not only evenly spun, but is WELL BALLED. 
This is very important, prevents tangling in Twine Box. 

Write for prices. 

CONSUMERS CORDAGE CO., Limited 

MONTREAL. 

Mills— MONTREAL and HALIFAX. 




7 



i 



1 




HARDWARE AND METAL 
Established Over p/fty Years, 



SIR H MONTAGU ALLAN, 

President 



January 21, 1905 



D. LORNE McGIBBON, 

General Manager. 




ALWAYS UNIFORM 

ALWAYS RELIABLE 

ALWAYS IN DEMAND 



'lor?" 



"Red Star" 

Sheet 

Packing 



HIGH QUALITY 

HONEST SERVICE 

COMPLETE SATISFACTION 



ft 



KGQ wtdT is the original High 
Grade Sheet Packing, a winner all the time. 

Some of the other Packings are good 
Packings, but — 

"Red Star" is without a Rival. 



Write for a Free Sample. 



Sales Branches and Warehouses 



172 Granville St., 
Halifax, N.S. 



Imperial Bank Building, 
Montreal, Que. 



Front and Yonge Sts., 
Toronto, Ont. 



Princess St., 
Winnipeg, Mian. 



Cordova St., 
Vancouver, B.C. 



The Canadian Rubber C? of Montreal. 



Sap Buckets and Spiles 



® 




FLARING OR WEST- 
ERN PATTERN 
SAP BUCKETS 

2 SIZES. 
QUARTS 6 AND 10. 



STRAIGHT PATTERN 
SAP BUCKETS 

3 SIZES. 
NOS. 8, 12, 16. 





E. T. PATTERN SAP 
SPOUTS 

Made from tinned steel. 



We can supply the Eureka 
Sap Spout if desired. 

Tin Plates in all standard 
sizes and qualities. 

we will be pleased to 
QUOTE you. 




MAPLE LEAF SAP SPOUTS 

Made from bronzed steel. 



KEMP MANUFACTURING CO., TORONTO, CANADA 

(SXsXsXSKS)®®®^^ 



January 21, 1905 



Hardware and Metal. 



\ Trade Between Canada and tKe West Indies I 



A 



LTHOUGH Canada has been 
exportirg her products, in- 
cluding breads tuffs, lumber 

and fish, to the British West 
Indies for many years, gen- 
eral trade between the two countries 
has become a considerable item only 
within the last decade. Canadian manu- 
facturers have slowly wakened up to the 
fact that the West Indies present an 
excellent market for their products and 
are now cultivating this trade assidu- 
ously with the result that Canada's ex- 
ports to the Islands totalled over two 
million dollars during the past year, the 
imports being slightly under this figure. 
For 1904 the volume of trade between 
the two countries shows a considerable 
increase over (hat of 1903, both in ex- 
ports and imports, largely owing to the 
preference Canada tow extends to the 
British West Indies. Exports to Ber- 
muda, the Windward Islands and Jam- 
aica during liliil were so large as to tax 
steamers in the Canadian service to 
their utmost capacity. The increase, 
chiefly in mill and farm products, 
flour, millfeeds, oats, potatoes, etc., 
having gone forward in large quantities. 
The prospects for an exchange of Cana- 
dian and West Indian commodities on a 
large scale were never brighter than at 
the beginning of 1905. 

Perhaps the most encouraging feature 
of the situation is the very decided 
preference shown by West Indian mer- 
chants for trading with Canada, provid- 
ing terms and facilities offered are equal 
to those that may be obtained elsewhere. 
In this connection the following extract 
from a recent issue of the Jamaica 
Dailv Telegraph is significant: 

"There is not the slightest doubt that 
Canada is one of the coming great coun- 
tries of the world. There is equally 
little doubt that, just in proportion to 
the increase of its population, it will re- 
quire a vastly increased quantity of 
tropical products. And no intelligent 
man in this polony will venture to ques- 
tion the assertion that Canada is as 
capable of supplying our population with 
foodstuffs, clothing, footwear and build- 
ing materials as the United States." 
FREIGHTS. 

Canada, however, has so far been at a 
serious disadvantage in such matters as 
freights. The majority of West Indian 
buyers are in the habit of buying in less 
than carload lots. Canadian freight 
rates to the seaboard ou less than car- 



load shipments are about fifty pel cent 
higher than carload rates, which makes 
the price laid down in any port in the 
West Indies too high to compete with 
the New York prices, as ocean freight 
appears to be based on measurement 
rather than on quantity, and five cases 
apparently take the same rate per 100 
lbs. as a carload would. The only solu- 
tion seems to be for Canadian exporting 
houses to appoint representatives in the 
West Indies to handle their goods, who 
will he able to work up orders for car- 
load lots in each Island. Houses unable 
to sell a carload of stuff to any one 
Island or individual person might send 
a carload fof two or three Islands con- 




J. CAMERON, 

Traveling representative of the MacLean Trade News- 
papers, who left on Jan 19 for a three months' trip 
to the West Indies. 



signed to one of the Canadian West In- 
dian Steamship Companies for export. 
They would then obtain the export rate 
and secure proper bills of lading for 
their goods in addition to their distribu- 
tion. 

A serious difficulty confronting Cana- 
dian exporters is the fact that not suf- 
ficient attention is paid to the quality 
of goods by West Indian merchants. A 
prominent Canadian tanner who visited 
Bermuda in the Spring of 1904 claims 
that he found the only way to do busi- 
ness there was to carry samples, cut 
cans ami compare quality. In every case 
where comparison of quality was made 
he obtained orders for Canadian goods 
at full prices. There seems to be a class 
9 



of goods packed in Baltimore, U.S., and 
surrounding districts, especially for a 
low-priced export trade, and compari- 
sons have to be made between the differ- 
ent packs in order to understand the 
difference in price. Canadian canned 
goods can be put up as cheaply as in 
any other part of the world when qual- 
ity is taken into consideration. 

STATISTICS. 

Our imports from the British West In- 
dies for the fiscal year ending June 30, 
1903, were $1,829,330, as compared with 
$1,529,170 in 1902, $1,279,952 in 1901, 
$878,617 in 1900 and $906,405 in 1899, 
an increase of over one hundred per 
cent, in four years. By far the biggest 
item is sugar and molasses, the figures 
being $1,094,785 and $349,318 respec- 
tively in 1903. Cocoa beans and cocoa- 
nuts were imported in 1903 to the ex- 
t'.'nt of $91,240, and coffee to the extent 
of $10,168. Fruits, including bananas, 
oranges, lemons and limes, for the same 
year totalled $129,682; spices $16,669, 
salt $17,832 and hides $67,201. 

Canada exported to the West Indies in 
1899, 1900, 1901, 1902, and 1903 mer- 
chandise to the value of $1,752,251, 
$1,698,957, $1,925,047, $1,950,046 and 
$2,184,833. In 1903 the exports were 
divided approximately as follows: bread- 
stuffs, including beans and split peas, 
$239,229; grain products, principally 
Wheat flour, $167,572 ; fish and fish 
products, $944,613, coal, $81,570, drugs, 
dyes, chemicals, etc., $64,148; provisions 
$179,361; vegetables, $73,544, and wood 
and manufactures of wood, $159,127. 

The figures for 1904 have recently 
been nrade public. They show imports 
into Canada from the West Indies of 
;H,S15,828 and exports of $2,170,774. 
The enormous increase in imports is 
principally made up of sugar, of which 
Canada now imports a large proportion 
from the Indies under the preference. 

Canadian exports of coal are not ex- 
tensive, averaging about 16,000 tons per 
annum. In lumber, planks, boards 
and shingles are the principal export, 
valued in l!)04 at $193,921. Of cordage 
the West Indies take $25,262 oi Cana- 
dian makes. Hardware proper is a small 
item amounting' to only $1,191. Steel 
manufactures stand at a little over 

+.;.ooo. 

Though exports of manufactured 
goods are small, as the preceding figures 



Hardware and Metal. 



HARDWARE AND MBTAL 



January 20, 1905 



would indicate, yel there has been a con- 
siderable increase of late" years, particu- 
larly of hcav\ hardware, furn aire and 
boots and shoes. Since the revival in 
the sugar industry larger ipiuiunres ul 
sulphite of ammonia have gone down to 
be used in fertilizing- the canetields. 
This is one of the indirect ways in which 
Canada benefits by the removal of the 
sugar bounties. Business with the West 
Indies generally is steadily improving. 

TRANSPORTATION. 

Direct transportation facilities be- 
tween Canada and the West Indies are 
provided by Canada-Jamaica Line and 
the Pickford & Black Steamship Co.. of 
Halifax, the latter of which has a fleet 
of steamers (one of which, the ' ' Da- 
home, " is reproduced in this week's 
issue of Hardware and Metal) sailing 
from maritime ports every fourteen days 
for West Indian ports. Even now the 
service is taxed to its utmost capacity to 
accommodate the steadily increasing 
volume of international trade, and the 
next year or two will undoubtedly sec 
a number of extra steamers plying be- 
tween Canadian and West Indian ports. 

TORONTO IS HEADQUARTERS. 

Almost every important manufactur- 
ing and business house operating in 
Canada linds, sooner or later, the neces- 
sity of having offices or warerooms in 
Toronto. The latest newcomer is The 
Page Wire Fence Co. of Walkerville, 
who are opening an Ontario headquar- 
ters in the new Millichamp-Coyle Build- 
ing, 84 Wellington street west. From 
these offices and warerooms the Cana- 
dian Sales Department will be operated. 
Mr. E. L. Dyer, the general sales man- 
ager, is in charge. 



Business Men in 
Parliament 



* 



BRITISH CONNECTION. 

Canada's foreign trade is due to some 
degree to British connection. This and 
the quality of goods turned out accounts 
to a great degree for its continual in- 
crease. The Ontario Wlind Engine &. 
Bump Co. of Toronto were favored just 
the other day with an order for two 
complete airniotor outfits for the Im- 
perial Government in one of the Crown 
colonies of West Africa. This order 
came entirely unsolicited, and is the re- 
sult of eight years' trade with the Im- 
perial Government in another colony in 
the Mediterranean which has been en- 
tirely satisfactory to the authorities. 
No greater compliment is needed to be 
paid to a company than such orders in 
the face of world-wide competition. 



G. A. Clare, MP. for South Waterloo. 

Mr. G. A. Clare has sat for Water- 
loo since 1900. He is a native of Pres- 
ton, of German descent, and was edu- 
cated in the public, schools of his home 
town. His business training was se- 
cured in the general store of George 
Kandall & Co., at Waterloo, where he 
was apprenticed as clerk, and where he 
served five years. Returning to Pres- 
ton, he took charge of the Clare foundry, 
then operated by the late John Clare. 
Jn 1881, in company with his brother 
ami Mr. H. C. Hilborn, of Berlin, Mr. 
Clare purchased the business, which has 
been conducted ever since under the 




G. A. Clare, M.P. 

style of Clare Bros. & Co. The firm 
are widely known as manufacturers of 
stoves, hot air furnaces, and hot water 
boilers. A great deal of the credit for 
the remarkable growth of the business 
is directly attributable to the business 
ability of Mr. Clare. 

.Mr. Clare has had a long and honor- 
able career in municipal, county and 
national politics. For ten years he 
presided over the destinies of the village 
as reeve, and upon its incorporation 
as a town he was unanimously chosen 
to be its first Mayor. He also served 
ten years in the Waterloo County Coun- 
cil, and for one year was warden of 
the County. 

In 1891, Mr. Clare received the Con- 
servative nomination for South Water- 
loo, but was defeated at the polls by 
312 votes. Notwithstanding he stuck to 
10 



his task, was defeated aeain in 189(i 
b-' 89 votes, but won the day in 1900, 
with a substantial majority of 218 
votes. Last November Mr. Clare in- 
creased the lead to 365. The town of 
Preston seemed to put party quite aside 
and gave him 524 votes out of a total 
579. 

Mr. Clare's business interests extend* 
to several other manufacturing con- 
cerns in Preston, whilst for the past 
ten years he has sat, on the directorate 
of the Wellington Mutual Fire Insur- 
ance Company. 

QUALITY COUNTS. 

THERE is no article in general use 
in which quality is so important 
a factor as in a brush, but how 
few who buy one are practical enough to 
judge as to its value until they find out 
from actual use whether it is a brush 
that is worth the money paid for it or 
only a sham. To paraphrase the old 
song, one might as well say, "All brush- 
es look alike to me," but when it comes 
to actual use, the question of maker 
will tell the tale every time. The most 
reliable test of the. good brush is the 
maker's brand and name, and one can- 
not go wrong in pinning one's faith to a 
reliable maker's goods. Such a line is 
Boeckh's which are sold by all reliable 
stores from the Atlantic to the Pacific. 
In these brushes absolute uniformity in 
each grade is the motto, so that the 
user can always depend on getting the 
brush he wants. Skilled workmen are 
employed and each and every brush is 
rigidly inspected, and there are, there- 
fore, no "seconds" in Boeckh's brushes. 
Purchasers are particularly requested in 
their own interests to see that each 
brush they buy is stamped with the 
name Boeckh, as this ensures receiving 
the genuine article. 



CHANGE OF ADDRESS. 

Readers kindly note that the Concrete 
Building Block and Machine Co., whose 
offices were at No. 265 Church street, 
have removed to Xo. 32 Church, rooms 
1!) and 20. 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 



WIRE 



Prompt Shipment 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited. 
HAMILTON, ONT. 



January 21. 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Hardware and Metal. 



CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

For the convenience of it* reader* Hardware and 
Mital has opened its column* for the review of catalogue* 
booklet* or other «uch publication* issued by manufacturers 
or wholesale dealers selling to the hardware, plumbing, 
machinery or metal trade*. Retailers desiring such publica- 
tions may also have inserted a note to that effect. It is re- 
queated that when any ot the trade write for any booklet 
mentioned in these columns that they credit Hardware 
and Mbtal as the source of their information 

Sheet Metal Building Material. 

AN except iorially attractive catalogue 
has come to hand from the Halt 
Art Metal Co., Limited, of Gait, 
Ontario, winch deserves more than a 
mere passing mention. In its external 
appearance it is most pleasing;, the cover 
being an appropriate art design repro- 
duced in a salmon shade. Inside are 
reproduced with as near an approach 
to the originals as possible, samples of 
the tivtn's sheet metal products, includ- 
i nu moulding, cornice, freize, mitre, 
border, ceiling, covering wainscoting, 
sidewall and metal siding. The printers 
have succeeded well in getting an ac- 
curate effect in every ease. The cuts 
are large size and purchasers can readily 
estimate the appearance of the goods 
from the illustrations. Ry means of a 
system of numbers, the various designs 
have been catalogued and a telegraphic 
code inserted at the back of the cata- 
logue renders ordering easv. Readers 
of Hardware and Metal should secure 
this catalogue for their files. 

A Striking Calendar. 
Each new year as it comes round, the 
Brantford Carriage Co., Limited, sends 
not a more striking calendar than any 
it has issued in the past. Their 19Q5 
offering is certainly "the best yet" and 
that is saying a great deal. The birch 
hark effect has been retained most ap- 
propriately and on it has been reproduc- 
ed the strong Features of Thayendanega, 
or better. Captain Joseph Brant, after 
whom Brantford was named. The In- 
dian's head is ornamented with feathers 
reproduced in the exact colors and the 
whole effect is most striking and artis- 
tic. The calendar is a large one and 
would prove an attractive ornament in 
any office. Mention Hardware and 
Metal. 

An Anniversary Number. 

In commemoration of the twenty-fifth 
year of its establishment the Canada 
Lumberman comes to hand this week in 
a splendid anniversary edition. The 
publishers must certainly be compli 
merited on the scope of this number, it ^ 
many excellent illustrations, the variety 
of its contributions and the ability of 
its contributors. An appropriate article 
en the history of the publication occu- 



i*"VJ 



!)>V^ 



*w 



ST ; 

The Greatest 
Profit 



can be made from your 
paint department if you 
closely watch every avenue of possible trade. 

Sherwin-Williams 

Preservative Shingle Stains 

(Made with Creosote) 
afford an opportunity for profit and reputation of 
which every S. W. P. agent should take advantage. 

The popular use of stained shingles for roofs and 
sidings makes a good demand for a first class pro- 
duct of this kind. 

S-W. Preservative Shingle Stains combine beauty 
with economy. The colors are all of good tone and 
maximum permanency. The use of creosote gives 
these stains excellent preservative properties, greatly 
increasing the natural life of the shingles. 

Write for prices and samples on wood. 

The Sherwin-Williams Co. 

Canadian Headquarters and Plant, 639 Centre St., Montreal. 
Warehouses: 86 York St., Toronto; 147 Bannatyne St. East, Winnipeg. 



pies a prominent position, followed by a 
description of the "Lumber Industry of 
the Canadian Northwest." by J. L. 
Campbell, sketches of "Pioneer Lum- 
bermen Who are Still With Us" (illus- 
trated), a history of the ••Lumber In- 
dustry of British Columbia," "Saw Mill 
Equipment of the Earlier Days," "Can- 
ada in. Relation to the World's Future 
Timber Supply." and many other valu- 
able articles. 

Canadian General Electric. 
Section 2 of the supply catalogue of 
the Canadian General Electric • Co., To- 
ronto, should prove of value to all hard- 
ware merchants dealing in electric fix- 
tures and supplies. This section is the 
same in style as section one, notice, 1 in 
Hardware and Metal some time ago. It 
illustrates and describes cabinet panels, 
fuse blocks, cutouts, fuses, etc. Twentx 
pages are devoted to fuse plug cabinet 
panels, half-tone illustrations and dia- 
grams of several varieties being given, 
11 



besides descriptions and price lists. 
Eight pages are devoted to cutouts, four 
to rosettes, eighteen to fuse wire, fuse 
blocks ;mh1 boxes, and eighteen to stand 

a rd link fuses. 

Stover Mfg. Co. 

The 1905 catalogue of the Stover Mfg. 
Co., Freeport, 111., of hardware special 
ties and "Ideal" goods, has been issued 
This catalogue is 6x0 inches and con 
tains 93 pages. It is fully and hand- 
somely illustrated. Since the issuing of 
their 1904 catalogue several new lines 
have been added ami these are contain 
ed in the 190.") catalogue. 

The first ten pages are devoted t 
mops, then are illustrated their la<r>o 
brackets, lemon squeezers, many st\.c.. 
of tack hammers, hat (diets, floor cloths, 
draw pulls, door pulls, shutter knobs, 
door buttons, screen Hi handles, 

foot scrapers,, house numbers, shelf 
brackets, shade l-ller fixtures, .pull 
frame clamps, iiarness hooks, iron ami 



Hardware and Metal. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 21, 1905 



other stands, household soldering sets, 
dampers, damper clips, stove pipe regis- 
ters, pulleys, rover lifters, pokers and 
sash pulleys. The last twenty pages are 
devoted to hinges and locks. The index 
is a valuable feature of the catalogue. 

Coal Mining Machinery. 

Of interest to the mining industries 
should be catalogue No. 52 of the Inger- 
soll-Sergeant Drill Co., 26 Cortland 
street, New York, which deals with com- 
pressed air as it is used in coal mining, 
including illustrations and descriptions 
of coal cutters, coal and rock drills, air 
compressors and equipment. This cata- 
logue is the 1905 edition, is 9x6 inches 
and contains 125 pages. There are many 
illustrations of modes of operating the 
different compressed air devices besides 
illustrations of the • machines them- 
selves: and these features considered 
with the complete descriptions accom- 
panying the illustrations make the cata- 
logue a valuable one to those in any way 
interested in coal mining operations. 

A Wrench Catalogue. 

A neat catalogue, showing b^ illustra- 
tions the different actions of an auto, 
matic wrench, in which several new fea- 
tures are being introduced, is being is- 
sued to the trade by the Bullard Auto- 
matic Wrench Co., Providence, R. T. 
Among other things, they claim they 
manufacture the only wrench which will 
turn pipe on a flat surface. It has the 
standard range, is manufactured of the 
best grade of "Drop Forge Steel," and 
has jaws of high grade tool steel. It 
eliminates the necessity of using nut or 
screw in adjustment, and requires but 
the use of one hand, giving the opera- 
tor free use of the other. It is a strong 
wrench, its strength being due to the 
fact that it is strengthened where most 
other wrenches are weakest, namely, at 
the angle of the upper jaw. Readers of 
Hardware and Metal can procure a copy 
of this catalogue by writing to the 
manufacturers. 

Ideal Hardware. 
"Ideal Hardware" is the title of a 
handsomely-printed catalogue, issued by 
the Stover Manufacturing Co., of Free- 
port, 111. The catalogue means jusl 
what it concisely states in the expres- 
sion ideal goods, and within its pages 
mey be seen pictures of hardware spec- 
ialties, which certainly come under the 
heading which they pride themselves in 
quoting. Such work in hardware would 
be hard to equal anywhere, and such 
taste in preparation of a catalogue may 
be safely stated as being unsurpassed 




HAS A "GRIP" 
ON THE TRADE. 

IVER 
JOHNSON 

Revolver Grip. 

Progressive dealers instantly recognized its value — the demand was spontaneous 
As the result of extensive advertising there is already a large demand for this 
revolver. 

Have you placed your order ? 



'DON'T CARRY IT" 



WILL SEND AND GET IT" 



Hammer 

the 

Hammej 



Accidental! 
Discharge 
Impossible! 



New York Office: 
No. 99 Chambers St. 



INTEND TO HAVE IT" 



are signs that } point to the door of your competi- 

tor, who. being alert and keen, realizes that "New Things" 
impart life and activity to his business and who instantly 
recognizes the practicability and selling virtues of the 

IVER JOHNSON Revolver Grip 

Send for new catalogue just issued — a work of art — 
mailed free upon application. 

IVER JOHNSONS ARMS & CYCLE WORKS, 

FITCHBURG, MASS . U.S.A. 



As they modestly put it themselves, the 
increasing demand for their goods is 
conclusive evidence that they use none 
but good stock and employ first-class 
mechanics. They recently added another 
large factory equipped with the latesl 
machinery, and are producing a class of 
goods which seem to be becoming more 
popular every day. 



M 



A NEW LIGHT GLASS. 

ODEKN conditions of buildings, in- 
volving the erection of business 
and other structures in the most 
crowded and restricted areas, and the 
utilization for business purposes, such as 
underground basements and deep stores, 
are responsible for many new inventions 
intended to overcome or minimize un- 
satisfactory conditions, prominent 
amongst which is bad lighting. It is 
claimed, and on good grounds, that the 
"MAXimum Light Glass" causes dark 
interiors to become light. This paten 1 
is a daylight increasing window glass 
combining lenses and prisms arranged in 
the form of a window glass to gather 
the light from the sky and to project 
and diffuse it into all dark and other- 
wise useless apartments and spaces. 
Therefore, if such a glass as this in- 
creases the tight from five to twenty- 
five times, together with complete dif- 

]-2 



fusion, it becomes a most valuable ad- 
junct. It is, moreover, convenient and 
sightly and may be utilized in the form 
of lead lights of various designs. 

The MAXimum Light Glass is made 
in sheets from 42 inches high to 90 
inches in length, the outside of which is 
formed of parallel lens bars of large 
radius, while the innerside is formed of 
parallel bars placed at right angles to 
the lens bars. The function of the ex- 
ternal lens forms is to to refract the 
light in a horizontal direction and it 
makes use of lateral rays which would 
strike at so great an angle that the\ 
would be almost entirely reflected from 
a plane surface. The forms of these 
lens is such that there is no reflection 
from the inner face of the prism, thus 
securing the emission of all rays that 
strike these surfaces. The function of 
the internal prism forms is to refract 
the light in a vertical direction, which, 
combined with the horizontal refraction 
of the external lenses produce nearly 
uniform diffusion of liglit in the room. 
All the light is gathered and utilized, 
i here being a complete absence of glare, 
and all streakiness of effect, which form 
the objectionable defects which are 
found in the use of ordinary Sheet Pris- 
matic Glass. The price of MAXimum 
glass is only slightly in advance of the 
ordinary sheet prismatic glass. 



January 21, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO. 



Wholesale 
only 



HARDWARE MERCHANTS 
38-140 WEST FRONT STREET. TORONTO 



LIMITED 



Only 
Wholesale 



The 0©r*uir»e 
IN/lic-IVIac " 1905 Hockey 



Sticks. 



RETURNED 
JAN 23 190 




RETIJRNED 
JAN 21190 



RETURNED 

JAN 2j 




The wood from which the 
"M1C-MAC" Hockey Stick is 
made is found in young hard- 
wood trees, which have grown 
to the correct shape in the 
woods, and trimmed carefully 
to the shape and finish which 
make it so desirable an article 
to use. 



Look for the trade mark 
"MIC-MAC" when you buy 
Hockey Sticks, and if you find 
it you can feel secure in the 
sticks you get. 



HOCKEY PUCKS. 



i>-cJ& vrned 

m - : 

y# '/ft. 



L> / -'^C r 7^t^>t^ 



tuft vSWa ZJ/ 




THE "GENUINE MIC-MAC" STICKS 

give the best satisfaction. 
Telegraph or Mail Orders Shipped Day Received. 



RETURNED 
JAN 23 1901 



BOKBR'S SKATES. 




H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., lw.™». Toronto. 



Our prleas are right 



GRAHAM NAILS ARE THE BEST 

Faotory: Dufforln Streat, Toronto, Ont. 
13 



We Ship Promptly 



HEATING AND PLUMBING 



January 21, 1905 





JtF.^Z^rruded. 



MANUFACTURERS Of 



fy!crrce6un OrM7nd<s$a/% ^ t ^^ c ^^^z/fe > t^t^^«.^^<5 ? ?^^c' 



MADE IN CANADA 



Porcelain Enamel Bath Tubs, 



Porcelain Enamel Sinks, 



Porcelain Enamel Lavatories, 



Porcelain Enamel Lipped and Plain Urinals , 
Porcelain Enamel Slop Hoppers, 



Porcelain Enamel Factory Wash Sinks, 



THE ONLY MANUFACTURERS OF ENAMELLED WARE IN CANADA 



Head Office and Factory : 

Port Hope, Out. 



Sales Office: 

50 Colborne St., Toronto. 




This neat, attractive and highly efficient urinal has been created to meet the 
demand for a small, convenient and handsome urinal which can be placed in any 
convenient place, where the cumbersome old style apparatuses are inconvenient. It 
is extremely simple, much more hygienic, neat, cleanly and durable. It folds up 
like a jack-knife blade, thus minimizing the space occupied, and preventing all pos- 
sibility of emitting odors. - 

The urinal is made in cast aluminum, with all connections and flush attach- 
ments in heavy nickel. It offers a wide margin of profit for the dealer, and 
sells readily. 

WRITE FOR OUR SPECIAL PROPOSITION 



The James Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Limited 



TORONTO, ONT. 



January 21, 1905 



Hardware and Metal. 




THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF 
MASTER PLUMBERS AND STEAM 
AND HOT-WATER FITTERS OF 
OANADA 

OFFICERS. 
President— Robt. Ross, Toronto. 
Vice-President — A. J Hammond, Winnipeg. 
Secretary — J. A. Gordon, Montreal. 
Treasurer— F. G. Johnson, Ottawa. 

PROVINCIAL VICE-PRESIDENTS. 

Ontario— H. Mahoney, Guelph. 
Quebec — W. R. J. Hughes, Montreal. 
Nova Scotia— James Farquhar, Halifax. 
New Brunswick — W. Watson, Moncton. 
Manitoba — James Mold, Winnipeg. 
British Columbia— James Coughlan, Victoria. 

ONTARIO PROVINCIAL ASSOCIA- 
TION. 

OFFICERS. 

President — Wm. Mansell, Toronto. 

Vice-President— W. J Walsh, Hamilton. 

Financial- Secretary— Lewis LeGrow, Toronto. 

Tretcyrer— J. K. Wilson, Toronto. 

Secretary -W. H. Meredith, Toronto. 

Executive Committee— The officers .and H. 
Mahoney, Guelph ; S. Mellon, Hamilton, and E. 
H. Russell, London. 

MONTREAL. 

President— Thos. O'Connel. 
Secretary — J. Gordon. 

TORONTO. 

President — Robert Ross. 
Vice-President — Geo. H. Cooper. 
Secretary-Treasurer — W. H. Meredith. 

HAMILTON. 

President — S. Mellon. 
Secretary— T. H. Davie*. 



OTTAWA. 

President— Gil. Julien. 
Secretary— I. Thorpe Blyth. 



LONDON. 

President— B. Noble. 
Vice-President — Wm. Smith. 
Secretary -Treasurer — E. H. Russell. 



THE PLUMBING SUPPLIES 
MARKET. 

Quebec. 

Offloe of Hardware and Metal. 
232 McGill Street, 

Montreal, Jan. 20, 1905. 

GENERAL business is better than it 
lias been for a long time at this 
period of the year: in. fact, one 
of the largest wholesale dealers in 
plumbers' supplies, slated that business 
was looking up all over their territory. 
The markets are linn in all 1in°«. and al- 



though no actual change lias la ken place 
in certain kinds of piping, an advance 
was expected in whajl is known to the 
trade as skelp. This was occasioned by 
advances in other materials, coupled 
with the importance attached to this one 
element in the manufacture of piping.* 
I'he building operations all over the 
province, and especially in Montreal are 
going on with great energy. The re- 
ported advance in plumbing fixtures, 
while not announced, is likely to take 
effect almost every day Lqcal prices re- 
main unchanged, and as a living evi- 
dence of great demand for plumbing 
supplies, it might be mentioned that 
there is not an idle plumber to be found 
anywhere. 

Range Boilers — Steadily increasing 
demand has been noticed and new orders 
of considerable dimensions have been 
reported. Prices are unchanged. 
Prices are as follows: Iron clad, 
30 gallon, $6, and 40 gallon, $7.50 net; 
copper, 30 gallon, $22; 35 gallon, $24; 
40 gallon, $28. The discount on copper 
boilers is 15 per cent. 

Lead Pipe — A very firm market with 
a strong advance maintained. We quote: 
Discount 30 per cent, f.o.b. Montreal, To- 
ronto, St. John, N.B., and Halifax; f.o.b. 
London, 15c per 100 lbs extra; f.o.b. 
Hamilton, 10c per 100 lbs extra. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings— Business was 
never better and large sales have been 
made during the week. Prices are un- 
changed as follows: Soil pipe, 
standard, 50 per cent, and 10 per cent. 
i ft list : standard fittings, 50 per cent, 
and 10 and 10 per cent, off list; medium 
and extra, heavy soil pipe, 60 per cent. 
i ff : fittings, 60 and 10 per cent. off. 

Iron Pipe Fittings— Good prices have 
.een available in this market everywhere 
and business has lTeen active with in- 
creasing demand. Quotations are as 
follows: Discounts on all sizes of nip- 
ples up to (i inch, 67 1-2 to 70 per cent. 

Iron Pipe — There are some indica- 
tions of an advance in iron pipe, hut it 
depends upon the material used, such as 
has been hinted at in the preceding mat- 
ter. We quote: Standard pipe, per 
100 feet in length under 1ft feet, 
Black, 1-8 inch, $2.30: 1-4 inch, 
$2.30: 3-8 inch, $2.55; 1-2 inch, $2.85: 
3-4 in., $3.65; 1 in., $5.20; 11-4 in., 
$7.35; 11-2 in., $8.95: 2 in., $12.55. 
Galvanized — 1-4 in., $3.30: 3-8 in., 
$3.45: 1-2 in.. $3.90: 3-4 in.. $5; 1 in., 
$7.20; 1 1-4 in., $10.05; 1 1-2 in., $12.20: 
2 in., $16.85. In the above the discount 
on 1-8, 1-4 and 3-8 in black and 1-4 and 
3-8 in jralvanized is 121-2 per cent.; and 
on 1-2 to 2. inclusive, in black and gal- 
vanized is 15 per cent. Extra heavy 
pipe, plain ends are quoted per 100 feet 
as follows: Black, 1-2 in., $4.20; 3-4 in., 
$5.25; 1 in., $7.55; 11-4 in., $10.55; 

15 



1 1-2 in., $12.75; 2 in., $17.60. Gal- 
\anized-l-2 in., $5.25; 3-4 in., $6.65; 
1 in., $9.55; 1 1-4 in.. $13.25; 11-2 in., 
$16; 2 in., $21.90. The discount on all 
sizes of extra heavy pipe is 12 1-2 per 
cent. Coupling, 1-2 in. to 2 in., 55 per 
cent, discount: nipples, 1-4 and 3-8 
in., 65 per cent., discount, and 1-2 to 
C> in., 70 per cent, discount. 



Ontario. 

office of Hardware and Metal, 
10 Front street east, 

Toronto, Jan. 10, 190.", 

A IS OTHER meeting of the plumbing 
jobbing trade is to be held this 
week when the matter of re-ad- 
justing the prices will be settled. The 
majority of jobbers are of the opinion 
that an advance will take place on all 
brass articles, baths and iron range 
boilers. Travelers are now on the road 
and a few orders are being received for 
boilers, baths, fittings and pipe. Retail 
merchants in the Lake Supei'ior district 
are sending in orders for stock. As 
these are the only merchants who de- 
pend upon a stock-in-trade, the increase 
in orders is expected to be of short dur- 
ation. A few orders calling for iron 
pipe and fittings have arrived which im- 
plies that a fair amount of repairing 
work is being accomplished. 

Lead Pipe — Trade conditions continue 
unchanged. Demand is quiet, and prices 
continue unchanged. We quote: Lead, 
7c; lead waste pipe, 8c: discount 30 per 
cent. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings— Quotations 
remain unchanged as follows: Medium 
and extra heavy pipe and fittings, 60 
per cent.; 7 and 8 inch pipe, 40 and 5 
per cent. 

Iron Pipe Fittings— A fair demand 
is current. Prices are unsteady, and a 
change is expected. We quote nominally: 
Malleable fittings 20 per cent, for Ameri- 
can and 35 per cent, for Canadian: cast 
iron (standard), bushings. 70 per cent.; 
headers, 60 per cent.; flanged and lip- 
ped unions, 60 per cent.; malleable bush- 
ings, 57 1-2 per cent.: nipples up to 
(i inch inclusive, 70 and 5 per cent. 

Copper Range Boilers— Trade is quiet. 
The discount continues unchanged at 1"> 
per cent. 

Galvanized Iron Range Boilers— Trade 
is quiet. Prices continue unchang- 
ed. Our ((notations are: 12 gal- 
lon capacity, standard, $4.50: extra 
heavy. $6.50: IS gallon, standard, $4.75; 
extra heavy, $6.75: 24 gallons, at 
ard. $4.75; extra heav\ - 10 gal- 

long, standard. $5; extra heavy, $7.50; 
35 gallons, standard. $6; extra heavy, 
$8.50; 40 gallons, standard; $7; extra 
heavy, $9.50: 52 gallons, standard, $11; 
extra heavy. $14; (iti gallons, standard, 



Hardware and Metal. 

$18; extra heavy, $20; 82 gallons, staiul- 
m,,,- :,_> ; extra heavy, $24; 100 gallon*, 
standard, $29; extra heavy, $34; 120 
gallons, standard, $34; extra heavy, $40; 
144 gallons, standard, $47; extra heavy, 
$55. 

Iron Pipe— A fair demand is 
noted on this week's market. The 
market is steady. Prices continue 
unchanged. Our quotations are: Black, 
1-4 inch, $2.04; 3-8 inch, $2.06; 1-2 
inch, $2.30; 3-4 inch. $2.88; 1 inch, 
$4.13; 1 1-4 inch, $5.63; 1 1-2 inch. 
$6.75; 2 inch. $9. Galvanized, 1-4 inch. 
$2.86- 3-8 inch, $2.89: 1-2 inch, $3.15; 
3-4 inch. $4.03; 1 inch, $5.78: 1 1-4 inch, 
$7.88; 11-2 inch. $9.45; 2 inch, $12.60. 

Solder— Trade is quiet. Prices are 
unchanged. We quote: Bar solder, half 
and half, guaranteed, is quoted at 
17 3-4c; wijiiny solder at 15 l-2c, and re- 
fined 161-4c. 

Enamelled Ware— The following quo- 
tations on Standard Ideal enamelled 
ware are given: Baths, rolled rim 51-2 
feet, 21-2 in. rim, A quality, $21.25; B 
quality, $17.25; 3 in. rim, A quality, 
$23.60; B quality, $19; 5 feet, 21-2 in. 
rim, A quality, $18.40; B quality. 
$l'/,25; 3 in. rim, A quality, $20.75; B 
quality, $17.25. Lavatories, plate 116D. 
A qualitv. $S.90: B quality $7.50; USD. 
A quality, $5.70; B, $4.80; 120D, A 
quality, $5.00; B qualitv. $4.70; 122D. 
A quality, $5.20; B quality, $4.50. 
Sinks. 18x30 in., flat rim. $2.50. 

Architectural Features of Toilet Rooms. 

By I) Ziner, in Metal Worker 

AT the present time, when a vast 
amount of money is being ex- 
pended on architectural and en- 
gineering enterprises, it is natural that 
the architectural features of toilet 
rooms, both public and private, should 
be found of importance and that especial 
attention should be given to these fea- 
tures in private houses and in large 
apartment hotels, as well as in railway 
depots and public comfort stations. The 
details of arrangement in private dwell- 
ings are so much more simple than they 
are in larger buildings of a puhlic char- 
acter that more space will be devoted 
in this article to the latter type. These 
toilet rooms may be divided into two 
general classes, those which are purely 
public, such as railroad depots and pub- 
lic comfort stations, and others which 
are semi-private, being subject to more 
restrictions and limited as to the class 
of people frequenting them. This class 
of toilet rooms includes those in large 
hotels, dry goods stores and schools. 

SIZE AND GENERAL ARRANGEMENT. 

In any case the designer of the toilet 
rooms must exercise more than ordinary 
care to see that there is no place where 
din or dust can collect, and that all 
parts of the room are readilv accessible 
for cleaning purposes. Whenever possible 
' it is desirable to have the closets, urin- 
als and basins in the same room, as 



HEATING AND PLUMBING 

this insures more direct supervision 
over all the fixtures by those in charge. 
In cases where the funds available will 
not warrant the keeping of an attend- 
ant constantly in the room, this expendi- 
ture can be offset by having a bootblack 
in the men's toilet or a manicurist in 
the women's toilet. By having some 
one in constant attendance in the toilet 
room there is less liability of any dis- 
order and an assurance of more cleanli- 
ness. In many railroad depots and 
municipal public comfort stations a 
system of pay toilet rooms has been in- 
augurated which solves the problem of 
keeping the room clean at a minimum 
expense. These pay toilets are small 
rooms about 6 x 7 feet, with marble par- 
titions extending 8 feet high. Each has 
a closet and wash basin, and is furnish- 
ed with a mirror, soap, clean towels 
and brushes, for which people as a rule 
are willing to pay the small fee charged, 
usually a nickel. These fees not only 
pay for soap and towels, but also go a 
long way toward paying for the services 
of an attendant. 

DECORATIVE FEATURES. 

To most of the craft it will be need- 
less to suggest that every precaution 
should be taken to so arrange all parls 
of the room that there will be no waste 
space, yet ample room be provided for 
all people using the toilet. The floors 
should be laid with a dull white tile. 
These tiles can be readily flushed with 
a hose and are not slippery, while the 
color denotes cleanliness. A wainscot 
of glazed tile should be used, these 
" walls extending up about 7 feet and be- 
ing joined to the floor tiling by a quar- 
ter round tile, so that no corners are 
left for the lodgme'nt of dirt. There 
should be no elaborate decorations on 
the side walls. Simple mirrors, set in 
metal frames and securely attached to 
the side wall, will be sufficient for de- 
corative purposes. The mirrors are al- 
so both useful and ornamental when 
placed at the- back of wash stands, and 
where a double row is placed down the 
centre of a room two mirrors, set back 
to back between the wash stands, are 
very attractive and make use of space 
which would otherwise be wasted. 

TVPE OF HXTTRES. 

The fixtures in publijC comfort stations 
and other places of similar character 
should be of the automatic flushing 
type. In hotels, dry goods stores, etc , 
their use is attended by too great a 
waste of water, and, as most of the 
people using the conveniences will prob- 
ably flush them, automatic devices can 
be dispensed with and the usual type of 
apparatus can be substituted. The urin- 
als should preferably be of one piece of 
earthenware, with a trough outlet. If 
Hie expense of these is too great they 



January 21, 1905 

BRONZE POWDER AND LIQUID 

is used by every steam-fitter. Ask your supply house 
for our goods for best results. Or, if they have not 
got them, write direct to 

*\ E. THORNE 



768 Craig 8treet 
MONTREAL 



29 Mellnda Street 
TORONTO 



. . FULL STOCK . 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWEPrPIFE 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 

a Specialty. 

* CANADIAN SEWER PIPE CO 

HAMILTON. ONT. TORONTO. ON» 

«T JOHNS 0<J£ 



JARDINE PATENT PlfE DIES 

MaKe Hard "WorK Easy. 




The Herbert Jones Co.. Steamfitters, Hamilton, Oot 
lay : — With this Die one man is quite capable of aouomp 
lishing what formerly took two men to perform. 

A. B. JARDINE & CO. 

►Ifrs. TAPS and DIES. 

HESPELER - - - ONTARIO 



GLAUBER 



GUARANTEED 




BEST IN THE WORLD 



January 21, 1905 

THIS IS OUR BRAND 

P-H 



HEATING AND PLUMBING 
TPIIPIE TH^T IS IPIIFIE 




You Want It. 
See that You Get It. 




Hardware and Metal. 



THIS IS OUR TAG. 



/ 




van.zedT"^ TAKE NO OTHER. 

PAGE-HERSEY IRON and TUBE CO., limited, GUELPH, oanada 



Have you 
tried it ? 

Tried what ? 




I'His is in your line of business, and it will 
pay you. 

The Batty Stove ft Hardware Co 

76 YORK ST.. TORONTO. 




Kerr's "Copper Alloy" Disc 

GLOBE VALVES 

are superior to any other disc valves on the 
market for high steam. 

This is a very superior valve, at a moderate 
price. 

TheKERR ENGINE COMPANY 

MANUFACTURERS limited 
WALKERVILLE, ONT., CANADA 



THE BULLARD AUTOMATIC WRENCH 



Instantaneous ad- 
justment to any size 
within its range. 

No cramping or 
wedging. 



PATENTED OCT. 27, 




Increased Leverage, 
Strength and Efficiency. 

No lost motion. In- 
stantly locks and un- 
locks. 

Will not crush the 
lightest pipe. 

Cannot slip. The 
harder the pull the 
stronger the grip. 



Expert mechanics pronounce it 
THE STRONGEST WRENCH ON THE MARKET 

A Monkey, Ratchet, and Pipe Wrench combined. 




Sold by all Jobbers in United States, Canada, and Foreign Countries. 
Manufactured only hy 

BULLARD AUTOMATIC WRENCH CO. WR ™ ™ W S° KLET 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. 



Smith's 
Pipe Patch 

SAVES TIME & MONEY 

Plumbers' Charge 
Plumbers, \ day - $1.00 
Helper - - . .50 

Solder .25 

Charcoal .15 

#1.90 
Smith's Pipe Patch .25 

Send for Green Book of Hardware Specialties. Amounfc 9aved $ ~ 

UTICA DROP FORGE & TOOL CO. SniTH & HEMENWAY CO. 

Mfrs. of Nippers and Plyers. Mfrs. of Cutlery and Hardware Specialties 

„ ., t 296 BROADWAY. NEW YORK CITY. 

Canadian Sample Room: 215Coristine Bldg.. Montreal. ALLEN C. JENKING, Canadian Manager 





HEAT THE WATER QUICK 

and you save fuel. It is a fact which we are 
ready to demonstrate to any dealer's satisfac- 

THE ECONOMICAL 
HOT WATER BOILER 

by its peculiar construction heats the water 
quicker and more economically (hence its 
name) than any other hot water boiler made. 

BOOKLET WILL SHOW HOW. 
AGENTS WANTED. 

P. 6IES. Founder, BERLIN, ONT. 

17 




Hardware and Metal. 



HEATING AND PLUMBING 



January 21„ 1905 



can be made of slate or marble, with a 
continuous water sheet flowing over the 
back. All of these are perfectly sani- 
tary, although the first is preferable. 
The basin should be of a simple design, 
preferably in one piece, and either of 
enameled iron or pottery, as the exigen- 
cies of the case may demand. All Hie 
supply pipes should come from tne hack, 
and the basin wastes should also be 
carried to the back to avoid cutbinc 'he 
flooring and to obviate the danger of 
breaking the pipes through careless:, -ss. 

VENTILATION OF SCHOOL AND INDIVIDUAL 
TOILETS. 

To leave out adequate means of venti- 
lation would be to neglect one of the 
important features of the work. This 
in most cases is best accomplished by 
exhausting the air from the room with 
an exhaust fan. In case a blower sys- 
tem of heating is in use a separate sys- 
tem of fans must be designed for the 
toilet rooms so that none of the vitiated 
air is returned to other portions of the 
building through the heating system. 

The same general features are applic- 
able to schools, but while the fixtures 
will not be so elaborate more care 
should be taken to use automatic appa- 
ratus to provide against stoppages and 
overflows. The same general remarks 
apply to office buildings, except that in 
some cases it may he more desirable to 
have but one toilet room on a floor, 
those for men on all floors of even num- 
bers and for women on floors with odd 
numbers. This permits of using larger 
rooms, with a single soil stack serving 
the entire building, and warrants taking 
a larger space for the stack well. 

Small or individual toilet rooms in all 
classes of buildings mentioned, except 
public comfort stations, should be de- 
signed from the same standpoint as 
those in private houses. If possible, in 
every case there should he windows 
which permit the entrance of direct 
rays of the sun. If this cannot be done 
the place should always be kept well 
lighted. More money is being expended 
each year on bath and toilet rooms. It 
therefore behooves every one having to 
do with this branch of the building 
trade to note well each new improve- 
ment and try to bring before the public 
all ideas in this line that are meiitori- 



A New Gas Burner. 

Medicine Hat Heating and Plumbing 
Company, of Medicine Hat, Assa., are 
placing upon the market a new gas 
burner which will be called the F. N. & 
B. burner. The noteworthy point of the 
new burner is that it economises the 
consumption of gas and costs a third 
the price of other burners of a similar 
nature. 



Building Permits. 

TORONTO. 

Mark Fisher & Sous, office building. 
No. SI Hay street, $30,000. 

E. Whaley, dwelling, Roxborough 
street east, near Chestnut Park plan, 
$7,75(1. 

Canadian Horse Exchange, stable, 
Nos. (ill to (il .larvis street, $3,800 

Mavell & Co., factory, Dufterin street. 
near King street, $10,000. 

.Jones & Moore Electric Co., altera 
lions to facton, No. 2!hi Adelaide, street 
west, $2,500. 



E. Cannon, dwelling, No. 875 Manning 
avenue, $2,000. 

Jas. Burford, dwelling, No. 8 Vermont 
avenue, $2,400. 

H. G. Paul, dwelling, College street, 
near Lippincott street, $2,500. 

W. A. Cotton, dwelling, coiner of 
Dovercourt' road and College street, 
$1,500. 

J. Stark & Co., dwellings, Dufferin 
street, near Lindsay avenue. 

MONTREAL. 

J. A. Murray, St. Hubert street, one 
dwelling, one store, $1,800. 

S. Rucci, Labelle street, one dwelling, 
$1,500. 

Theo. Corhiel, Magdaline street, two 
dwellings, $3,200. 

T. Gundreau, St. Lawrence street, al- 
terations to dwelling and store, $2,000. 



Building Notes. 

A handsome structure, costing $20,- 
000, will he erected in^ the near future 
bv the Catholic Club of Winnipeg. 

W. N. Lailey, architect of Brandon, 
has completed his plans for the erection 
of a new drill hall in that place. 

A conflagration swept over a portion 
of Neepawa, Man., Jan. 12, and de- 
stroyed buildings to the value of $50,- 
000.' 

It is rumored that a large tourist 
hotel will be erected in Vancouver in the 
near future. 

A new church is likely to be built on 
the corner of Royce and Perth avenues, 
Toronto, in the Spring. 

R. E. Smith, furniture dealer, Monc- 
ton, N.B., purposes erecting a large 
warehouse in that city. 

The Western Star Lodge, No. 10, I.O. 
O.F., of Vancouver, will erect a two- 
storey brick building containing stores 
on the ground floor and a large hall 
above. 

A committee appointed by the Dover- 
court Presbyterian church, Toronto, are 
taking steps to erect a new church. 

A hotel, costing $3,000,000, will be 
erected in Montreal by Montreal capi- 
talists. 



REGULATION OF GAS MANTLE 
LAMPS. 

By G, A McKay. 

IN all localities where illuminating gas, 
both the natural and the artificial- 
ly procured, is obtainable, are to be 
found lighting devices which use in 
some manner or other a mantle suspend- 
ed over a bunsen burner. They all work 
on the same general principle, and are 
alike susceptible to certain injurious in- 
fluences thai render them at times al- 
most unsuitable' for anything hut an 
object at which to hurl maledictions, 
hut with a little care and attention, 
they can he made t » > always give entire 
satisfaction to their users. 

The lamp, as il could he called, most 
commonly used, affords no means id' 
reuul a tin.'i' the glow of gas, and very 
often, owing to insufficient pressure, loo 
little gas is admitted to the burner. 
This condition is indicated by the man- 
tle burning bright only at the bottom. 
half-way up its length, or possibly up 
one side, with the balance of the man-, 
He a brownish color. To remedy this. 
remove the gallery or upper portion of 

L8 



the burner, being careful to lift it off 
gently, in order that the mantle may not 
he damaged or entirely destroyed, and 
unscrew the top piece of the bunsen 
tube, which can be done in most cases 
with the fingers. Then enlarge the 
small openings in top of lower pari of 
the bunsen very slightly. At this point, 
it is necessary to caution anyone at- 
tempting this, not to enlarge these open- 
ings too much, as such a condition ^ 
leads t6 effects equally as deleterious 
as the fault, in process of being reme- 
died. It is belter to enlarge the open- 
ings gradually, trying the burner and 
mantle on each time, not forgetting to 
make a new adjustment of the air 
shutter upon each trial, until the 
light is burning satisfactorily. 

Too great an allowance of gas will 
result in the mantle becoming black, 
starting at or near the Ion and spread- 
ing downward. This is caused by the 
accumulation of carbon upon the inside 
of the mantle, and if not remedied, will 
result in such a weight of carbon ac- 
cumulating as is sufficient to cause the 
mantle to break from its support at 
Hie top. If detected in time, this con- 
dition may be remedied by opening the 
air shutter to its fullest extent, and 
turning the gas cock half off. This 
exactly reverses the conditions which 
caused the carbonizing of the mantle, 
and results in its removal. 

Very often a burner that has been 
giving satisfaction for months, yrad- 
ually begins to show a falling off in 
illnminatine- power. Tt will generally 
he found that this is due to an accumu- 
lation of dust over the top of the lower 
portion of the bunsen burner. This can 
be removed by carefully lifting off the 
gallery containing mantle shade, etc.. 
and blowing vigorously into the bunsen. 
1 i' that is not sufficient, remove upper 
niece of bunsen. wipe off the top of the 
lower piece, and (dean out the openings 
with a needle or inn. 

Another, and less common, though 
very perplexing source of complaint, 
arises from the placim-' on the burner 
of a new can mantle, in which the little 
wad of batten, thai usually accompanies 
each one, has become pushed un under 
(he wire gauge. When placed on the 
burner in this condition, the mantle 



SPECIFY 




INJ 

Penberthy Injector Co., 



LiniTED. 



BRASS MFRS. 



Windsor, Ont. 



January 21, 1905 



HEATING AND PLUMBING 



Hardware and Metal. 




There is money in the Paint business, and we 
want to help you get some of it. In helping you, we help 
ourselves, of course. We sell you paint at the right price 
—not cheap stuff, but pure paint — guaranteed and sold 
everywhere, giving satisfaction always. 

We give you nice show cards, nice colors, nice tins. 
Above all we give you quality in the tins, and we give . 
you quantity also. 

You have the customers, but you must please them. 
You can get your price if you have the right paint. 

RAMSAY'S PAINTS .will please them and the 
price will be right. Would you like us to tell you about it ? 
Waiting your reply. 

Yours truly, 

A. RAMSAY & SON COMPANY. 









A ioc. Doctor 

Many a household can have its sink, closets and 
drains cleansed and made thoroughly sanitary 
through the free use of 

Gillett's Lye 

The good use of this knowledge by the salemen 
will multiply the dealer's daily profits. 



E. W. GILLETT COMPANY, LIMITED 



TORONTO 



To Manufacturers' 
Agents : 

Hardware and Metal has enquiries from time to 
time from manufacturers and others wanting repre- 
sentatives in the leading business centres here and 
abroad.. 
Firms or individuals open for agencies in Canada or abroad may 
have their names and addresses placed on a special list kept for 
the information of enquirers in our various offices throughout 
Canada and in Great Britain without charge. 
Address 

Business Manager 

HARDWARE AISD METAL 

Montreal and Toronto 



// '/ 



/ 



/ 



■lA&W.BtBD^ 11 



WATERPROOF 

The roofing that is absolutely waterproof is 
the only one that you should consider for your 
building. Tin and galvanized iron roofs rust 
.uid corrode, causing leaks; and shingles are 
also unsatisfactory on this account, and because 
of their inflammability. 

REX FLINTKOTE ROOFING 

is treated with our own compounds that 
make it waterproof and lire-resisting. 
It i-, used on thousands of factories, 
farms and duellings in the United 
States and Canada. Anyone can lay it. 

Our book, which we 
will scud free, to- 
gether with sam- 
ples, will give you 
valuable points «^ 
on rooting. 

J. A. & Vt. HIRt) & CO., 
lt> 1 ...lit* M !-.■<•(, Boston, Disss. 



TOOK FQR THE BQYVveryro 



THIS IS THE 

OLD STAND-BY 



NO. 233.-WILCOX TACKLE-BLOCK WIRE STRETCHER 




» I i Hi i ■ — rrtlffZiti 




None better on the mar- 
ket unless it is the 
Triumph. 

If your Jobber cannot 
supply, write us for 
prices. 

WILCOX IV1F-G. OO. OF" ONTARIO, Limited 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 21, 1905 



MAXimum LIGHT 
GLASS 

* 

Should not be confused with ordinary Corrugated or Prismatic 
Glass. Involves new principles of daylight. The Only Daylight- 
Increasing Window Glass Combining LENSES and PRISMS. 

No dark rooms or buildings where this Glass is used. A perfect white 
light on dull days. Dark interiors always made light. Prices slightly in 
advance of ordinary Sheet Prismatic. Samples sent on application. 

Send for descriptive booklet. 

HOBBS MANUFACTURING CO., Limited, LONDON, ONTARIO 

Glass Importers and Manufacturers 



THE ? 



* 






WAGGONER EXTENSION LADDER 



is now almost too well known to need description. Its special features are 

Shortening down to half length for easy setting up or for storing away. 
Strengthened by a high carbon steel rod or wire let into a groove at the 

back of each side rail. Patented. 
Light because the strength is got from the steel wire — not from weight of timber 
Handy. It may be used at any length from half to full length. 
Safe. Our patent safety steel lock cannot fail in any point, nor can the 

ladder snap off in use. 

NOTE.— We are giving special terms of payment on goods bought early— drafts bayable June 1st, instead of 
at one month, our usual terms. It will bay you to hut in a fair stock, assorted, to have tbem on hand when 

your customer wants them in a hurry. Write for circulars and brice list. Discounts are quoted in Market 

quotations of Hardware and Metal. 

The Waggoner Ladder Co., Limited 

London, Ont. 

Western dealers please write to E. H. BRIGGS & CO., WINNIPEG, our Western distributers. 



* 
* 

* 



• -J. • 4- ••$•••*•••!• •■*••♦!• ••!••*!"• ••£•••*• •*••!- •*r , » , f«4 , »~!-«"f»4-«4' •-$-••*• ••*• ••f •^••^•••f • -!-•-]-• -I- • -I- • -I- ••!- •-!«•. ;••.;.«.;. 



20 



January 21, 1905 ELECTRICAL GOODS AND SUPPLIES Hardware and Metal. 

\A/o matco Electric Fixtures, Sockets and Cut-Outs 




lectrical Supplies of all Rinds 



PAGE FENCES Wear Best 

It is the fence that has stood the test of time — stands the heariest strain — never sags — the standard the world oyer. In future Page Fences will 
be painted WHITE, which is an added protection against rust in addition to the galvanizing. Order through our local agent or direct from us. 



THE PAGE WIRE FENOE CO. LIMITED, Walkervllle, Toronto, Montreal, St. John, Winnipeg. 



305 



will not work satisfactorily, no matter 
what adjustment is made at the air 
shutter. This condition results in a 
slight escape of gas into the room, and 
is usually indicated by a smell of burn- 
ing cloth, thus denoting the presence of 
the batten, which becomes more or less 
singed. The remedy is obvious. 



MACHINERY AND ELECTRICAL 
NOTES. 

A. R. McDiarmid and J. Clark, both of 
Winnipeg, intend erecting a large mod- 
ern planing mill. 

An export lumber mill with a daily 
capacity of 200,000 feet is to be built 
on the Clayoguot Sound, west coast of 
Vancouver Island. 

A new electric power house is to be 
erected in the vicinity of Sarnia tunnel 
in connection with the hauling of trains 
through, the tunnel. 

Kingston Locomotive Company, King- 
ston, have received the contract for the 
construction of four engines for the 
Temiskaming and Northern Ontario 
Railway. 

It is rumored that R. Robertson and 
J. A. MacMillan, of Nelson, B.C., and 
('. .1. Clayton, of Victoria, purpose erect- 
ing a large steel industry in the vicinity 
of Nelson. 

A. Mowry, a machinist of Moncton, 
N.B., recently succeeded in perfecting 
a new kind of nut lock upon which he 
secured patents in England, United 
States and Canada. His rights have 
been purchased for $14,500. 

GERMAN ESSAY ON CEMENT. 

In June last the Prussian Ministers of 
Public Works, War, Agriculture and 
Trade and Industry, the Imperial Secre- 
tary of the Navy, and the German So- 
cietv of Portland Cement Manufacturers, 
issued a call for a prize competition of 
scientific essays on the chemical pro- 
cesses which take place during the hard- 
ening of hydraulic cements. The com- 
petitors are given until December 31, 
1906, and prizes amounting to lp.OOO 
marks ($3,570) are offered. 




This design a guar- 
antee of quality 



Heavy Red-Brown Wrapping 

FOR EXPRESS PARCELS STRONG, 'TOUGH AKD STIFF 

Canada Paper Co. 



SAMPLES AND PRICES 
GLADLY SENT. 



TORONTO 



MONTREAL! 




USE HOT WATER 



THE 

nop 

THAT 

THE if you want to remove dirt — your customer knows this. 

?.^L~ With a 

NEVER 

SETS 

ON 



TARBOX 
SELF WRINGING MOP 



the HOTTEST water can be used because the hand9 need 
never be wetted. Your customers will certainly buy. 



Order Tarbox Mops from your wholesaler. 



TARBOX BROS., 



Toronto. 






> 




GAS BRACKETS 
AT LOW PRICES 



KblUHNED 




No. 120, Gas Bracket, 
without candle, 80c. 



No. 122, Gas Bracket. Si. 10 



No. 126, Gas Bracket, 
without candle, SI. 00. 



The 



These prices net to the trade only. 

Be«d for bulletins Nos. 10 and 11 for others. Everything in gas supplies and everything electi k-til. 

Saycr Electric Co'y, m^tTe'aT 



21 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 21, 1905 




When In Need of Cans, Serve Your 
Best Interests and Consult Us. 



Acme Can Works 



make the largest as- 
sortment of any fac- 
tory in America of 
TIN CANS by the 
latest up-to date automatic machinery. 



We are the only makers in Canada of 

KEY-OPENING MEAT CANS, POULTRY CANS. 

They are our specialties. 
Manufacturers for Canada of ^—^^^^ 



Jewett's Self-Heating Can. 



We solicit inquiries for prices on 

Baking Powder, Oil, ] 

Syrup, Lye, Paint, 
Varnish, Condensed Milk, 
Poultry, Fruit, Vegetable ) 

ACME CAN 

Ontario Street East, 



Cans ESS? Pails 



\A/OF?KS 

MONTREAL, P.Q 




®*5®*99 5-5* 



1st 



Economy 



j& 



®®53P®«®«55 



Economy is a point the dealer can urge in the 
strongest fashion when selling an 

Empire Queen Range 

The draft devices are scientifically and mechanically 
perfect. The fuel consumption is under perfect control. 
There need be no waste consumption. 

Economy Efficiency Appearance 

are our three watchwords. 



AGENTS WANTED 



The Canadian Heating & Ventilating Co. 



OWEN SOUND, ONTARIO. 



Limited 



"Samson" Milk Can Trimmings. 



Strongest, neatest, most sanitary 
and only one-piece bottom made. 

Has no seams or rivets to cor- 
rode and collect dirt. 



Every bottom in each size is of an 
exact diameter. Being stamped out with 
a die — not spun — there can be no variation as in 
a bottom made in several pieces. 

Requires less solder and work in putting 
together than pieced bottoms — also wears longer. 



RETURNED 




Seotion of " Samson" Milk Can Bottom. 



The McClary Manufacturing Co. 

London, Toronto, Montreal, Winnipeg, Vancouver, St. John, N.B- 



"EVERYTHING FOR THE TINSHOP." 




PATENTED, JULY 23, 1900. 



22 



January 21, 1905 



EDITORIAL 



Hardware and Metal. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



President t 

JOHN BAYNE MACLEAN. 

Montreal. 

The MacLean Publishing Co. 

Limited 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circu- 
late in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. 
Island and Newfoundland. 



OFFICES. 



Montreal 



- 232 McGill Street. 

Telephone Main 1255. 

TORONTO 10 Front Street East. 

Telephone Main 2701. 

Winnipeg, Man. - Room 515, Mclntyre Block. 

Telephone 1846. 

F. R. Munro. 

LONDON, Eng. - - 88 Fleet Street, E.C. 

T. Meredith McKim. 

Telephone, Central 12960. 

Manchester, Eng. - 02 Market street. 

H. S. Ashburner. 

ST. John, N.B. - - No. 3 Market Wharf. 

J. Hunter White. 

New YORK - Room 1241 New York Life Bldg. 

W. T. Robson. 

Vancouver. B.C. - Geo. S. B. Perry. 

Adelaide, Australia, - Steamships Building, 

W. H. Sharland, Jr. 

Subscription, Canada and United States, 82.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere - • 12s 

Published every Saturday. 

cable Add^iJSSKJSS: 



New Advertisementi : 

R'd. Johnson, Clapham & Morris, Manchester, 
Eng. 
Concrete Block Machine Co., Toronto. 
Western Wire and Nail Co., London, Ont. 
Page Wire Fence Co., Walkerville, Ont. 



THE WESTERN HARDWARE CON- 
VENTION. 

WESTERN readers do not need to 
be reminded that the Winnipeg 
Bonspiel is close at hand. The usual 
influx to the city of country merchants 
is expected, and the wholesale houses 
are looking forward to an added im- 
petus to their business and to an oppor- 
tunity to meet their customers person- 
ally. 

To the retail hardware merchant of 
the West the semi-holiday week is, this 
year, a particularly important occasion 
because of the meeting in convention of 
the Western and Manitoba Retail Hard- 
ware and Stove Dealers' Associations. 
It is now nearly six months since these 
Associations were organized, and the 
approach of the first annual conventions 
finds them in a fairly prosperous condi- 
tion. Considering the short time which 
they have been before the trade of the 



West, and remembering that there has 
been no organizer in the field to can- 
vass the merchants of the West, the 
spontaneous response to the call of the 
executive is very gratifying. However, 
there are still many bona fide hardware 
merchants in Manitoba and the Terri- 
tories who have not yet joined the As- 
sociation, and their co-operation is in- 
vited in order that the movement may 
be a complete success. 

Mr. Hardware Merchant of the West, 
are you coming to this convention?, The 
time is opportune, for this is the quiet 
season in the retail trade. Perhaps you 
have not joined yet; perhaps you are 
skeptical as to the benefits of such an 
Association. If so, come and investi- 
gate. A half hour's chat with any hard- 
ware man in Winnipeg will convince the 
most skeptical that the Association ha:; 
been the commercial salvation of the 
Winnipeg hardware trade. Every Win- 
nipeg hardware merchant believes in the 
Association idea and can explain just 
why he is so enthusiastic. A heart-to- 
heart talk with his brethren in the 
hardware trade in Winnipeg, we are con- 
vinced, would persuade the most skep- 
tical merchant between Winnipeg and 
the Rocky Mountains that he cannot af- 
ford to keep outside this movement. 

The formation of this Association now 
when the Western trade is in its infancy 
is a matter of prime importance. The 
complete success of the movement will 
mean much for the future of the Western 
trade. Now is the time to get behind 
the movement and shove. Are you com- 
ing to the convention, Mr. Hardware 
Merchant? 

PROSPECTS IN HEAVY HARD- 
WARE. 

NEVER in the history of Canada 
have the prospects for industrial 
expansion been so good as now. Evi- 
dence of this progress is seen on all sides, 
and every one in touch with iron and 
steel conditions in Canada, which for the 
most part indicate a country's indus- 
trial state, are willin" to predict great 
things for 1905. 

The harvester machinery manufac- 
turing- firms have, probablv. more orders 
on hand now than ever before. This 
means that there will be an increasing 
demand for rivets, burrs, bolts and nuts 
during the year; and wholesale hard- 
23 



ware dealers and heavy hardware job 
bers are of the opinion thai prospects 
for these lines during 1905 are particu- 
larly bright. It is reported by some 
dealers that there is almost certain to 
be an advance in bolts and nuts before 
long. Advances were made on the Am- 
erican market in December, and it is 
thought by some that an advance on the 
Canadian market is in the natural course 
of events. However this is speculative. 
Manufacturers either buy their heavy 
hardware, such as bolts and nuts, rivets, 
screws, nails, etc., direct from jobbers 
or through the retailers in their own 
town. Now manufacturers and contrac- 
tors will be buying even more heavy 
hardware this year than they did last, 
and therefore there is a chance of the 
local retail hardware dealer increasing 
his business with manufacturers and 
contractors in his district if he is ag- 
gressive. This is a field which has to 
be exploited before substantial returns 
can be expected, and therefore the hard- 
ware man, if not already on the right 
side of the local manufacturers and con- 
tractors, should "butt in," to use a 
common expression, and explore the 
field. 



AN IMPORTANT TRIP. 

ON January 19, Mr. John Cameron, 
representing the Maclean Trade 
Papers, left Canada for the West Indies. 
He will make a thorough canvass of the 
Islands in the interests of the circula- 
tion department and at the same time 
will carefully investigate West Indian 
conditions. 

Mr. Cameron has had a long and hon- 
orable connection with the Maclean 
Trade Papers and is well known all over 
Canada. His thorough acquaintance 
with the papers and the trades which 
each represents eminently fits him for 
the duties which lie before him. 

We have brought this matter to the 
attention of our readers, not from any 
desire to magnify the importance of 
what we are doing to extend the inter- 
ests of Canadian trade, but simply to 
let our merchants and manufacturers 
know that Mr. Cameron is willing to be 
of the utmost service to them. 

Should any of our readers desire to 
have Mr. Cameron make investigations 



Hardware and Metal. 



EDITORIAL 



January 21, 1905 



for them, or do any work of a like na- 
ture, they might write to the nearest 
office of this paper and Mr. Cameron 
will he instructed accordingly. Do not 
hesitate to make use of us. 



NOT A HAPPY COMPARISON. 

HON. MR. MACKAY, Minister of 
Crown Lands in the Ontario 
Government, who has been doing some 
of the best work in Northern Ontario 
for the Government in the present cam- 
paign, is not altogether happy in a re- 
cent speech in his comparisons of min- 
isters of agriculture in Conservative 
and Liberal regimes. He pointed out 
that the Liberals had placed the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture in the hands ol 
farmers and not in the hands of brewers 
and others. This was an unkind hit at 
Sir John Calling, the head of the Lon- 
don brewing firm of that name. Sir 
John Carling, when as plain Mr. Carl- 
ing, was really the father of agricul- 
tural education in Canada. He laid the 
foundations for our present system, 
which has done so much to build up the 
wealth, particularly of the Province of 
Ontario, but also of the entire Domin- 
ion. He was one of the most useful 
men in the Dominion Cabinet in its later 
days, but even his own party did not 
know or appreciate his valuable ser- 
vices. 



THE SHIPPERS RESPONSIBILITY. 

WE would like to impart a little 
instruction to the retail trade 
on the question of shipments by freight, 
and at the same time to make a sug- 
gestion to the jobbers. When a shipper- 
has made a shipment by freight, ex 
warehouse, or f.o.b., at point of ship- 
•ment, and has received the transporta- 
tion company's receipt therefor, his re- 
sponsibility for the safe delivery of the 
goods ends. This is a fact of which the 
consignee is apparently oblivious, or 
else he forgot it. The moment any 
hitch occurs, he immediately holds the 
shipper responsible, and appeals to him. 
As a result, shippers are inundated with 
requests and demands which should by 
rights be addressed to the transporta- 
tion companies. 

Of course, the wholesale houses must, 
in self-defence, take up these claims and 
fight them out with the railway com- 
panies in the interests of their custom- 



ers. But very often much annoyance 
and loss of time would be saved were 
the purchaser of the goods to make ap- 
plication to the transportation company 
at the receiving point. 

As an assistance to purchasers, ship- 
pers might do well to consider the fol- 
lowing suggestion. In sending out in- 
voices of goods shipped, include a copy 
of the bill of lading, showing the date 
of shipment, and full particulars. The 
consignee, receiving such a document, 
has in his hand full evidence that the 
transportation company has the goods, 
and he knows just how long they have 
been in transit. He need not, there- 
fore, unnecessarily accuse the shipper of 
delaying shipment, or hold him respon- 
sible for the non-delivery of the goods. 

At the bottom of all the trouble, lies 
the carelessness of the railway compan- 
ies. They are responsible for the de- 



A gentleman who has been traveling 
through Western Ontario in a letter written 
from Hamilton, January 15th, say* : " It 
strikes me that one can go into a hardware 
store and as reasonably expect to get HARD- 
WARE AND METAL there as ten -penny 
nails, and likewise be as sure of getting 
The Canadian Grocer in a grocery 
store as a pound of tea.' ' 



lays and accidents which may befall 
shipments, and until they improve their 
methods and strive to accommodate 
their patrons better, the trounle will 
continue. Still, the consignees of goods 
would relieve shippers very considerably 
if they would handle cases of delay or 
loss themselves. 



RURAL MAIL DELIVERY A 
MENACE. 

WE have always been opposed to 
the principle of free rural mail 
delivery. We have taken this stand on 
the ground that it would unduly increase 
the opportunities of the big city mail 
order houses to injure the trade of our 
country stores. This in itself is a suf- 
ficient reason why no such system 
should be introduced into this country. 
There is another, and an even stronger 
reason. Rural delivery is an accom- 
plished fact in a considerable portion of 
the United States and what has been 
the result? The expenditure in main- 
taining the service has grown far out of 
all proportion to the receipts. The 
•2i 



country has in fact saddled itself with a 
system which is constantly clamoring 
for more money to keep it alive. Within 
a few years, expenditure has leaped 
from one million to thirteen million 
dollars. 

Even this might be overlooked, were 
it not that a most pernicious principle 
is involved. The system has become 
nothing more nor less than a political 
agent. 

The rural pos Lmen are, of course, gov- 
ernment appointees and government sup- 
porters. They cover the country dis- 
tricts thoroughly, and they know every- 
body. They are in a position to do 
many favors, and they do them. By de- 
grees they are working up a formidable 
influence in their district, which can be 
used to immense advantage by the poli- 
ticians. 

So far as the mail carriers are con- 
cerned the scheme works both ways. 
They curry favor with the people on the 
one hand that at election times they 
may influence votes. They hold up the 
government on the other hand for in- 
creased pay. One instance is known 
where a mail carrier obtained a contract 
for $800. Next year he asked $1,200, 
and got it. The third year he actually 
held the government up for $1,800. 

As sure as- the system is introduced, 
it will breed just this kind of trouble. 
In the United States they would now 
like to get rid of it. Can we in Canada 
afford to make the experiment? 



BRASS MANUFACTURERS AT 
HOCKEY. 

The game between the Jas. Morrison 
Brass Mfg. Co. and the J. F. Brown 
x' urniture Co.. of the Western Manufac- 
turers Hockey League, Toronto, was 
played off on Tuesdav evening, January 
17, resulting in a score of 6 to 2 in fa- 
vor of the brass manufacturers. The 
game was keenly contested from start 
to finish. The excellent combination on 
the part . of the winners, coupled wit h 
good support from the defence, enabled 
them to take the offensive during the 
major part of the game. The winners 
lined up as follows: Goal, Cann; point, 
Howard; eoverpoint, Hewitt; forwards. 
W. Morrison, F. Morrison. Hortop and 
Scott. 



January 21, 1905 



HARD WARE AND METAL 



Hardware and Metal. 



IMPROVEMENTS IN THIS PAPER. 

FOR several years the publishers of 
Hardware and Metal. have sought 
to make this paper cover t lie 
widest possible area of usefulness with- 
out curtailing its value to any one class 
of subscribers. 

A development of this aim was the 
"Machinery" department in the paper. 
Recognizing the value of our metal mar- 
kets to the average metal-working manu- 
facturers a persistent attempt, extend- 
ing over several years, was made to con- 
stitute the paper a medium of general 
value to machinery users. 

As is the case in nearly all such in- 
stances, success was attained in much 
greater degree in the subscription can- 
vass than in the securing of advertis- 
ing. 

As the publishers studied the situa- 
tion in the hope of finally making the 
paper just what it should be to get the 
desired support they were more and more 
convinced that the end sought— to de- 
velop a paper which should be the recog- 
nized Canadian authority on machinery 
Blatters— could be best attained by the 
starting of a paper quite distinct from 
Hardware and Metal, yet which should 
follow out the work started in the Ma- 
chinery Department of that paper. 

For some months we have been at 
work to this end. This week we are in 
a position to announce the culmination 
of this effort in the shape of the first 
number of Canadian Machinery and 
Manufacturing News. 

The first issue of the new publication 
was issued last week, but was held back 
for a week until the Post Office Depart- 
ment were prepared to accept its circu- 
lation as bona fide and beyond criticism. 
The paper was mailed on Monday, Tues- 
day and Wednesday, the total edition 
being 9,000 copies. 

Every subscriber of Hardware and 
Metal except exchanges, duplicates, etc.* 
should have received a copy. 

This development leads to a change 
in Hardware and Metal, namely, the 
discontinuance of the machinery de- 
partment in that paper. 

To offset this Canadian Machinery 
will ue sent free till the end of 1905 to 
all paid-up subscribers to Hardware 
and Metal. At the same time much 
energy will be devoted to the improve- 
ment of other features of that paper. 

Mr. Fred. Fisher, a member of the 
staft of the Cockshutt Plow Company, 
of Brantford, has been moved to Otta- 
wa to represent the firm in that city. 



A 



A NOTABLE GATHERING. 

UNIQUE Canadian convention was 

held from January 2nd to 9th 

by the Canadian Rubber Co., of 

Montreal at their executive offices in 

Montreal. 

This was a gathering of all the com- 
pany's branch managers throughout the 
Dominion for the purpose of discussing 
mutual interests, and undergoing a 
course of instruction at the hands of the 
company's manufacturing 1 experts. 

Stenographic reports were prepared 
giving each day's proceedings and every 
participant in the discussion received a 
copy. 

One of the company's officials from 
the Pacific coast traveled over 5,000 
miles to be present, and many of the 
other "pilgrims" cheerfully overcame 
similar distance obstacles. 

The convention was originated by Mr. 
D. Lome McGibbon, the forceful gen- 
eral manager of the Canadian Rubber 
Co., and was a marked success in every 
wav. At the conclusion of the conven- 
tion all who participated were royally 
entertained by Mr. McGibbon at a din- 
ner and theatre party. 



GURNEY FOUNDRY COMPANY 
DINNER. 

A FELICITOUS Wind-up to a three 
days' conference was the dinner 
at the National Club, Toronto, 
Thursday epening last, when the heads 
of departments, office staff and salesmen 
of the Gurney Foundry Co., Limited, to 
the number of about sixty, sat down as 
the guests of the president, Mr. Edward 
Gurney. 

The tables were arranged in the form 
of the letter E, communication around 
which was kept up by a miniature trans- 
continental railway winding its devious 
way from Halifax at one end to Van- 
couver at the other, taking in the 
branch offices of the company on the 
way, the local managers being seated 
opposite their respective towns, while 
at Toronto station opposite the host, a 
capital representation of a cupola op- 
perated by electric lights, fans, and tis- 
sue paper blazes, turned out the stoves, 
heaters and radiators that absorbed the 
energies af those present. This ingeni- 
ous idea was supplemented by the amus- 
ing favors in the shape of toys, taking 
off the characteristics of the donees. 
Some of these hit the mark so well as 
to be the cause of much merriment. 

The first course was served shortly 
after 7.30, and it was nearly nine when 
the host arose to propose the health of 
the King, remarking at the time the 
advantages of the monarchical form of 



government. The toast was righ.1 toy- 
ally received. 

Mr. Gurney proved himself an ideal 
host, and wise toast master as in felici- 
tous terms he welcomed his guests re- 
called their faithful services in the year 
just past, spoke of the necessity for all 
to work together and finally by express- 
ing an unalterable determination to 
confine all speech makers to five minutes. 
1 Lis ruling, judging by the applause 
with which it was received, was a most 
popular one. 

The other speakers of the evening 
were Vice-President Carrick, Mr. Holt 
Gurney, Mr. Lockhart, Mr. Drew, of 
Winnipeg, Mr. Horsman, of Calgary, Mr. 
Lightfooi. of Vancouver. Mr. Caron. of 
Halifax, Mr. Bremer and Mr. Helliwell, 
of Toronto, and all expressed their 
lovaltv to the firm and their confidence 
in the future. 

During the evening songs were render- 
ed in excellent voice by Messrs. Bagley 
and Gibson. 

Before Auld Lang Syne brought the 
gathering to a close a vote of thanks to 
Mr. Gurney was heartily carried on the 
motion of Messrs. Simpson and Carrick. 
Mr. Gurney responded feelingly. 

PERSONAL AND TRADE NOTES. 

Mr. N. L. Paterson, of the Paterson 
Mfg. Co., Toronto, was a visitor in 
Hamilton this week. 

Mr. Booth, of the Corbin Cabinet Lock 
Co., New Brittain, Conn., was a visitor 
to Montreal this week. 

Mr. Francis, of the Francis-Frost 
Paint Co., Toronto, is taking a business 
tour over Western Ontario this week. 

Mr. Jas. Munro, wire manufacturer. 
New Glasgow, N.S., intends establish- 
ing a branch manufacturing plant in 
Winnipeg. 

Mr. R. B. Cherrv of Sergeant & Co., 
New York City, general hardware deal- 
ers, was in Montreal this week calling 
on the trade and reported business 
booming. 

Mr. Dwight W. Grover, vice-president 
of the Keystone Emery Mills, Frank- 
ford, Philadelphia, Pa., was a caller at 
the Toronto office of Hardware and 
Metal this week. 

Mr. Edgar W. Wilkinson, who has for 
some weeks been in Canada representing 
Harrison Bros. & Howson, manufactur- 
ing cutlers and silversmiths, Sheffield. 
Kng., left for England via New York 
this week. 

Mr. Hudson, of Russel & Irwin, New 
Brittain, Conn., manufacturers of build- 
ers' locks, etc., was a visitor in Mont- 
real this week. Mr. Hudson reported 
tha,t his firm was getting their share of 
the Montreal trade, 



Hardware and Metal. 



January 21, 1905 




(For detailed prices see Current Market Quotations, page 60.) 




QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Offloe of Hardware ajjd Metax, 
232 McGill Street. 

Montreal, Jan. 20, 1905. 

Hardware. 

VERYTHING is in full swing 
now ,and commercial men are 
sending in orders which indi- 
cate the general prosperity of 
the country. In some lines 
there is just a sign of awakening for 
Spring trade, such as sporting- goods, 
which means orders here and there for 
guns and shooting accessories. The chief 
event of the week was the advance in 
rivets and burrs, occasioned really by 
the dumping clause in the new tariff of 
Mr. Fielding, the Finance Minister of 
the Dominion. The trade in Canada 
caught on to the American advances 
about the 4th of January and in outside 
circles this action regarding advance 
took effect last week. Old catalogues 
regarding rivets and burrs are therefore 
cancelled and new prices, as well as 
discounts, immediately come into force. 

Hockey Sticks and Pucks— Demand 
is very slow and trade is about over for 
these lines for this season. Quotations 
are as follows: Boys' hockey sticks, 
from $1.50 a dozen up; men's, $2.25 to 
$3.50 a dozen; regulation pucks, $2 a 
dozen; juvenile, $1.15 a dozen. 

Plated Ware and Cutlery— These lines 
have not recovered from the quietness 
after the holidays, and trade is dull . 
Our quotations are as follows: 
Rogers 1847 goods 45 per cent, off list; 
case carvers from $2 to $10 per set; 
scissors in cases 90c to $2. 

Skates — A similar quietness has over- 
taken the skate trade, and trade may be 
considered practically over for this 
season. Our quotations are as follows: 
Halifax pattern, plain, thirty-eight 
cents a pair; nickeled, 60 cents a pair; 
Ladies' nickel plated, plain, 58c a pair; 
good quality, $1.25 a pair; good quality 
concaved, $1.50; nickel plated, 65c a 
pair; high grade, plain, 90c a pair; high 
grade nickel plated, $1.25 a pair; high 
grade nickel plated with puck stop, $1.30 
a pair: high grade nickel plated, con- 
caved, $1.60 a pair. 

Axes — Trade is now being aggressive- 
ly pushed and travelers are out with 
new samples of axes of all descriptions. 
Business is lively. We quote as follows: 
Chopping axes, unhandled, $6 to 
$0.50 n dozen : double bitt axes, $9.50 
to $12 a dozen; handled axes, $7.50 to 
$9.50; Canadian pattern axes, $7.50 a 
dozen. 

Handles— Following the trade in axes 
this line continues to be active with firm 
prices. Our quotations are as follows: 
Axe handles, No. 3, $1.25: No. 2, $1.50 



No. 1, $1.90 a dozen; adze handles, 34 
inch, $1.85 a dozen; pick handles. No. 
2, $1.70: No. 3, $1.50 a dozen. 

Carpet Sweepers — No improvement 
has taken place -in the dullness, and quo- 
tations remain the same : $21 to $31 a 
dozen . 

Food Choppers— Trade is quiet in 
these lines, although there are signs of 
improvement in near future. We quote : 
Smallest size, $1.05 each net; medium 
family size, $1.20 each net; large family 
size, $1.35 each net. 

Sewing Machines— Trade is fair and 
a briskness has been noticed. We quote : 
hand sewing- machines $11.00 each net: 
complete machines with stand, $18.00 
and up, according to quality. 

Lanterns — More business is doing in 
the sale of lanterns. Quotations are : 
Cold Blast, $6; No. Safety, $4 a dozen. 

Sleigh Bells— No more will be sold for 
this season's trade, and naturally these 
goods have been set aside in the big 
stores. There is still considerable de- 
mand, however, from country points. 
Our quotations are as follows: 
Brass team bells, rough. $1.80 to $4.50 
a dozen ; polished, $2.10 to $5 a dozen ; 
nickeled, $2.25 to $5.15 a dozen; brass 
grelots, 38c to $2.25 a dozen; York eye 
bells, pear shaped, $1.35 to $1.75 a dozen : 
shaft gongs, 21c to $2.40 a pair; saddle 
gone-s, $1.10 to $3 each. 

Shovels — For the snow shovelling 
variety the demand has ceased in whole- 
sale order, but for other lines trade is 
active and prices are unchanged. Out 
quotations are as follows: Habitant, 
wood. $2.75 a dozen; Canadian, wood, 
40 per cent, discount] Victor, wood, 35 
per cent, discount ; Steel, straight handle, 
from $2.40 a dozen up; Steel, D handle. 
$7 a dozen up; Childs, steel, 85 cents 
a dozen and up. The new list of Olds 
shovels is as follows: No. 2, $10.50 
per dozen ; No. 4, $11.50 per dozen : 
No. 6, $12.50 per dozen. The discount 
is 45 per cent. 

Barb Wire — A fair trade has opened 
up for the Spring and a number of sood 
orders have been booked . Quotations 
are as follows: $2.75 per 100 lbs. 
f.o.h. Montreal, and $2.50 f.o.b. Cleve- 
land. Oarlots- of 15 tons. $2.40 f.o.b. 
Cleveland. 

Fence Staples— Following the demand 
for barb wire, fence staples have also 
increased and a lnrye business is beinc 
done. We quote: $2.65 per 100 lb kesr 
for bright, and $2.85 for Galvanized: 
25 to 50 lb. nnckages 25c. extra. 
*" PLivets and Burrs— The advance no- 
ticed in last week's paper, according to 
American lists* has been maintained 
throughout the trade. The following 
discounts have been quoted: Best iron 
rivets, section, carriage and wagon box, 



black rivets, tinned do., coopers' rivets * 
and tinned swede rivets, 60, 10 and 10 
per cent.; swede iron burrs are quoted 
at 60 and 10 and 10 per cent, off, copper 
rivets with the usual proportion of burrs, 
60 and 10 per cent, off, and coppered 
iron rivets and burrs, in 5-lb carton 
hoxes are quoted at 60 and 10 per cent. 
off list. 

Screws— A good demand has been no- 
ticed all this week. Trade everywhere 
is active. Discounts are as follows: 
Round head, bright, 82 1-2 per 
cent.; flat head, bright, 871-2 per cent.; 
brass, round head, 75 per cent.; brass, 
flat head, 80 per cent. 

Bolts and Nuts— A general quietness 
has been noticed in this trade, in fact 
a falling off has been reported. 

Wire Nails— There is absolutely no 
change in wire nails. Little trade is 
doing. We quote: $2.20 a keg f.o.b. 
Montreal. 

Horseshoes — A good trade has con- 
tinued, and firm prices are the rule. 
Our quotations are as follows: 
"P. B." new pattern, base price 
$3.50 per 100 lbs.; other brands iron 
shoes, light and medium pattern, No. 2 
and larger, $3.65; No. 1 and smaller, 
$3.90; snow pattern, No. 2 and larger, 
$3.90; No. 1 and smaller, $4.15; light 
steel shoes, No. 2 and larger, $3.80; No. 
1 and smaller. $4.05; featherweight, all 
sizes, to 4, $5.35; toe weight, all sizes, 
1 to 4, $6.60. Packing— Up to three 
sizes in a keg, 10c per 100 lbs. More 
than three sizes. 25c. 

Horsenails — Decided improvement has 
been noticed and much better trade is in 
sight '. 

Sporting Goods— The season is over, 
and although prices are firm, little new 
business has been reported. We 
quote: Centre fire cartridges, list net; 
sporting and military, 10 per cent, ad- 
vance on list; primers, $2.05 per thou- 
sand ; American loaded shells, 20 per 
cent, discount; B. B. caps, $2. per thou- 
sand; C. B. caps, $2.60 per thousand. 
Standard shot, $6.50 per hundred lbs; 
chilled, $7 per 100 lbs; buck and seal, 
$7.50 per 100 lbs; ball, $8 per 100 lbs. 
We quote discounts 15 per cent, f.o.b. 
Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton, London, 
St. John and Halifax. 

Building Paper— An improved demand 
has taken place for Spring deliverv and 
signs of an active trade are in evidence. 

Cordage— Very decided improvement 
is in sight, and a better outlook is re- 
ported than has been recorded for many 
months. 

Cement and Firebrick— Activity will 
hegin in these lines within the next ten 
days and contractors will be busy plac- 
ing- orders for new construction work. 
We quote: English cement, $2 to $2.10; 



26 



January 21, 1906 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal. 



Belgium, $1.70 to $2.10 per barrel ex 
store, and American, $2.15 to $2.35 ex 
cars. 

Coil Chain — No change in prices has 
taken nlace. Quotations are: 5-16 inch. 
$3.90; 3-8 in., $3.75; 7-16 in., $3.55; 
1-2 in.. $3.25; 9-16 in.. $3.30; 5-8 in.. 
$3.20; 3-4 in., $3.05: 7-8 in., $3; one 
inch, $2.95. 

METALS. 

In all kinds of metals a firmness has 
been maintained. This has been most 
notable in pig lead, as it is probable- 
within the next few days a further ad- 
vance may take place. Tin again varied, 
in price, but resumed normal conditions 
without affecting a change in current 
prices. The reported advance probable 
in black sheets and tin plates, had not, 
al the hour of going to press, taken ef- 
fect, but in all the lame circles it is 
expected to operate any dav. A strong 
copper market is reported and stocks 
are firmly held, in fact all metals are in 
good demand. The expected change in 
galvanized iron did not take place, but 
prices are firm and the advance may 
come any day. 

Pig Iron — A good business has been 
carried on and plenty of orders are. re- 
ported. We quote: 

"Disc," No. I $ 1 6-S° delivered Montreal. 

"Dom.," No. i 17.50 

Usual difference in price for lower grades. 

Ferrona No. I $1800 delivered Montreal. 

No. 2 1750 " 

No. 3 16 50 " 

No. 4 16.00 

Londonderry. $18. 50 to J19.00 delivered Montreal. 

Glengarnock 20.00 

Gartsherrie 19 25 " 

Carnbroe 18.50 " 

Carron No. 1 19.50 delivered Montreal. 

(special) 18.50 " 

Ayresome No. 1 18.00 " 

" No. 3 17-5° 

Summerlee 19-5° 

Clarence No. 1 18.00 " 

'' No. 3 17.5° " 

No. 1 Cleveland 18.00 

Bar Iron— A steady market is in 
vogue without any change in prices, 
quotations are as follows: Merchants' 
bar, $1,771-2; horseshoe iron, $2,021-2; 
forged iron, $1,971-2, net cash thirty 
days. 

Tool Steel— Business is good and 
steadily improving. The market is very 
firm. We quote : Black Diamond, 8 
cents to 9 cents; Sanderson's, 8 cents 
to 45 cents, according to grade; 
Jessop's, 13c; Jonas & Clover's, 10 to 
'20c; "Air Hardening," 65c per lb; 
Conqueror, 7 l-2c ; Conqueror High Speed 
steel, 60c. 

Merchant Steel — Business continues 
to improve each week, with a firm mar- 
ket. Our quotations are as follows: 
Sleighshoe, $1,821-2; tire, $1,921-2: 
spring, $2.75; toecalk, $2,421-2; ma- 
chinery (iron finish), $2,021-2; square 
harrow, $1,921-2; reeled machinerv 
steel, $2.75; mild, $1,821-2; rivet, 
$1 .82 1-2 ; net cash thirty days. 

Cold Rolled Shafting— Manufacturers 
are using large quantities and the de- 
mand continues to increase. Our quo- 
tations are: Cold rolled shafting, 3-4 
inch, to 1 7-16, $3.85 per 100 lbs; 



inch and a half to 3 inch, $3.50 per 100 
lbs. 

Canada Plates — An advance has taken 
place in this market and firm prices have 
been obtained. We quote: 52s, $2.45; 
60s, $2.50; 75s, $2.55; full polished, 
$3.60: galvanized 52s, $3.90 to $4: 60s, 
$4.15 to $4.25. 

Elack Sheets — The reported advance 
lias not taken place, although the mar- 
ket is remarkably firm and may be 
changed any day. We quote 28 guage, 
$2.15; 26 gauge, $2.10; 22 to 24 gauge, 
$2.05; 19 to 20 gauge, $2.20; 8 to 10 
gauge, $2.30. 

galvanized Iron— The advance re- 
ported last week has been steadilv main- 
tained throughout the trade and even 
higher prices are expected. Our quo- 
tations are as follows: Queen's Head, 28 
gauge, $4.15: 26 gauge, $3.90; 22 to 24 
gauge, $3.65; 16 to 20 gauge, $3.55; Apol- 
lo, 28 gauge, $4; 26 gauge, $3.75; 22 to 24 
gauge, $3.75; 16 to 20 gauge, $3.40; 
Kleur-de-Lis, 28 gauge, $4; 26 gauge, 
$3.75 ; 22 to 24 gauge, $3.50 ; 16 to 20 • 
gauge, $3.40; Comet, 28 gauge, $3.95; 
26 gauge, $3.70; 22 to 24 gauge, $3.45; 
16 to 20 gauge, $3.40; Bell brand, 28 
gauge, $4; Gorbal's "Best Best," 28 
gauge, $4.15; "Windmill Best," 28 
gauge, $3.95; Sword and Torch, 28 
gauge, $4.05; in less than case lots, 25c 
extra. 

Antimony— -The market is firm and 
prices have advanced to 9 l-2c and 
9 3-4c. 

-fleet Zinc— There is a weak market 
and our quotations are: Case lots, $6.75 
to $7; small quantities, $7 upwards. 

Tin Plates— Prices remain steady with 
a firm market. We quote: Cokes, $3.75 
and charcoal $4. 

Ingot Tin — Prices are very firm with 
market unchanged. Standard price is 
32 to 321-2c. 

Ingot Copper— The market is consid- 
ered more or less speculative, but strong 
in tone and the usual uncertainty is 
ruling. We quote: 16 and 161 -4c. 

Ingot Zinc — A firm market and stead- 
ilv increasing improvements. We quote: 
6 1-2 to 6 3-4e. 

Pig Lead — The market is verv strong 
and advance is likely. We quote : $3.50 
to $3.60 without concession. 

Boiler Tubes — Prices remain firm with 
the demand increasing. We quote as 
follows: Highest grade soft steel, 
British and American tubes, one and a 
half inch, 71-2c; 2 in., 81-2c: 21-2 in.. 
10c; 3 in., 121-4c; 31-2 in., 16c: 4 in., 
20c; 5 in., 45c. Price per foot net. 

Scrap Metal and Old Material— Con- 
siderable activity has awakened in this 
trade and prices though unchanged are 
firm. Our quotations are as follows: 
Heavy copper and wire, 11 3-4 to 12 l-4c; 
light copper, 10 3-4 to lll-4c; heavy 
red brass, 10 to 101-4c; heavy yellow 
brass, 7 3-4 to 8 3-4c; light brass, 51-2 
to 6c; lead, 21-4c; zinc, 2 3-4c to 3c; 
iron, No. 1 wrought, $12: machinery 
scrap, $12 to $13; stoveplate, $10; mix- 
ed country rags. 65 to 75c per hundred 
pounds; old rubbers, 51-2 to 6c. 

27 



ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
10 Front Street East, 

Toronto, Jan, 20, 1905 

Hardware. 

CONDITIONS on the hardware mar- 
ket this week show little or no 
change over last week. For this 
time of the year business is certainly 
brisk in general hardware lines, and 
prospects for a brisk trade during the 
year are exceptionally good. Prospects 
are reported to be particularly good in 
heavy hardware lines, and the founda- 
tion for these prospects is the bright 
outlook for industrial expansion. The 
result of industrial expansion is the 
impetus given to building and allied 
trades and thus this expansion both di- 
rectly and indirectly affects the demand 
for heavy hardware. 

There are no changes in market quo- 
tations to be noted this week. 

Iron Mowers— The demand is normal 
for this time of the year. 

Guns and Ammunition— Trade is 
quiet, as is to be expected. 

Washing Machines— There is the 
usual demand. 

Chain — The normal trade is being- 
done. Probably Februarv will see an 
impetus given to trade. Our quotations 
are as follows: 1-4 in., $6.50; 5-16 
inch, $4.45: 3-8 inch, $3.85; 7-16 inch, 
$3.70; 1-2 inch, $3.55; 9-16 inch, $3.45; 
5-8 inch. $3.35; 3-4 inch. $3.25. 

Step Ladders— We quote at 10c per 
foot for 3 to 6 feet, and lie per foot for 
7 to 10 feet ladders. 

Extension Ladders— Waggoner, 40 per 
cent, off list. 

Galvanized Wire— The recent advances 
hold firm- trade is of course quiet but 
perhaps above normal. Quotations are: 
$2,371-2 f.o.b. Cleveland. 

Coiled Spring Wire— Prices have been 
confirmed but are subject to change 
without notice. Trade is normal. 

Barb Wire — There is more business 
being done now than in December. 
Prices remain unchanged. 

Wire Nails— The situation is unchang- 
ed. There is quite a good demand. A 
fair quotation is about $2.25 f.o.b. 
Cleveland. 

Cut Nails— The recent advances made 
bv Toronto jobbers remain firm. Ham- 
ilton firms are not included in the ad- 
vance. Quotations are: $2.40 per keg. 
f.o.b. Toronto. 

Horseshoes — A very good demand for 
horseshoes is reported for this time of 
the year. We quote as follows: "P.B." 
base, $3.65; other brands are: Iron 
shoes, light and medium pattern, No. 
2 and larsrer, $3.80: No. 1 and smaller. 
$4.05: snow No. 2 and larger, $4.05: 
No. 1 and smaller. $4.30: Heht steel 
shoes. No. 2 and larger, $3.95; No. 1 and 
smaller, $4.20: featherweight, all size«. 
to 4. $5.50; toe weight, all sizes, 1 to 
4, $6.75. If shipped from factory 15c 
less. 

Horsenails— There is a good demand 
with unaltered prices. 

Screws — A good business is being 
done, with prices firm. 

Rivets and Burrs— The new price list 



Hardware and Metal. 



THE MARKETS 



January 21, 1905 



of iron rivets and burrs, issued January 
5, is now obtainable. Trade is good with 
exceptional prospects j.or brisk demand 
< luring the year. New discounts are 60 
and 10 per cent, for both rivets and 
burrs. 

Bolts and Nuts— A verv good volume 
of trade is being done, with bright pros- 
pects for trade during the year. 

Woodenware— Market conditions re- 
main unchanged, and the normal busi- 
ness continues. 

Cordage— Orders are being booked 
well. Prices remain unchanged. 

We quote: Binder twine, Blue Ribbon. 
121-2c; Red Cap, 11 l-2c; Ti<*er, 101-2c; 
and Standard, 91-2c; manila, 141-2c; 
British manila, lie; sisal, 10 l-2c; double 
lathyarn, 10 l-2c ; single lathyarn, 10c ; 
sashcord "Hercules," 30 to 32c; "Star," 
36 to 38c; cotton twine, 3-ply, 24c; 4-ply. 
■_'9c; calking cotton, 161-2 to 17c; cot- 
ton vvaste, colored, 6 3-4c; white, 11 to 
13c. 

METALS. 

There is a firm and brisk market, with 
no change in local quotations. The pros- 
pects for metals durin" 1 the coming year 
are very bright indeed, the large in- 
crease in buying over last year at this 
limp indicating the industrial expansion 
iliat is taking place in Canada. Fully 
three times the business is being done 
now that was being done this time last 
year*. There is nothing of special im- 
portance to be noted this weei*., except 
the increased demand for tin. 

Pig Iron— Buying is being done freely. 
- anadian iron is being sold for delivery 
as late as the latter part of the year 
Quotations are as follows: 

Middlesboro, f.o.b., Toronto HI91 

Hamilton, No. 1, at furnace 18 00 

No. 2, " 17 50 

Midland, No. 1, " 18 00 

No. 2, " 17 50 

Radnor, at furnace 27 50 

Londonderry, at furnace 16 50 to 17 00 

Bar Iron — There is a very good de- 
mand, and prices remain unchanged. 
Our quotations are as follows: $1.80 
f.o.b. Toronto, with discount of 2 per 
cent.: for extras as cut to length, white 
lolling, 2 feet and over, 10c per 
100 lbs; 1 foot and under 2 feet, 15c: 
under 1 foot, 20c; over 20 feet, by spe- 
cial agreement according to length and 
size. 

Tin — The market is steady, and buy- 
in -J- is somewhat brisker than last week. 
Quotations are from 32 to 34c per lb. 

Galvanized Sheets— The market is firm 
and there is a good demand. 

Tin Plates— The recent advances hold 
firm, and there is a very good demand. 

Canada Plates— There are more all- 
bright plates now on the market. The 
market is quiet, and prices remain un- 
altered. 

Brass— The market is active and re- 
cent advances hold firm. Discounts are 
10 ner cent. 

Lead— The market is firm, and there 
is a very good demand. Quotations are : 
Pig lead, $3.60 per 100 lbs; and bar 
Nad, $3.60 per 100 lbs. 

Zinc Spelter— There is a very firm 
market, and the demand is good. Quo 
tations are: 6 1-4 to 6 1-2c. per lb. for 



foreign: and 5 1-2 to 5 3-4c. per lb. for 
domestic. 

Copper — There is a very fair demand, 
and the market is steady. Quotations 
are as follows: Ingot copper, 15 l-2c. 
per lb.: sheet copper, 20c. per lb. 

Cement— With the exception of a 
small demand for inside repairing work, 
trade is practically dead. An advance 
of 10c per barrel on American and Can- 
adian Portland cement is noted this 
week. Some dealers declare another ad- 
vance is likely to occur in the near fu- 
ture. We quote the following prices: 
For carload orders f.o.b. Toronto, Can- 
adian Portland, $1.S0; American Port- 
land, $1.R0. For small orders ex 
warehouse: Canadian Portland, $2 to 
$2.10: American Portland. $2 to $2.10. 

Firebrick— A scarcity is reported in 
all brands of firebrick, but especially in 
"Scotch." Prices are firm, but no ad- 
vance is likely to occur as the dealers 
expect an absence of a strong demand 
for some time. Quotations are: English 
and Scotch firebrick 30 to 35c: Ameri- 
can, low grade. 25 to 30c; high grade 
321-2 to 40c. 

Building Paper — Trade conditions con- 
tinue unchanged. A fair amount of 
orders are arriving. Prices remain un- 
changed. 

Old Material— Jobbers complain of 
quietness in trade this week, this may 
be due to the fact that nothing is be- 
ine oathered in the country owing to 
the poor condition of the roads. There 
is an absence of demand for machinery 
cast scrap from the foundries this week. 
The firm condition of the ingot copper 
market has forced the price of scrap 
copper to advance l-2c per lb. No. 2 
wrought iron advanced $1. Trade in 
scrap zinc is quiet. The general impres- 
sion is that manufacturers will not use 
impure scrap zinc when the r> u re varietv 
can be bought for 5 l-2c an<J 6c per lb. 
Our quotations are as follows: 
Heavy copper and wire. 13c per 
lb: light copper 12c per lb: heavy 
red brass, 10c per lb; heavy yellow brass, 
fie per lb: light brass. 6s per lb; tea 
lead, $2.35 per 100 lbs: heavy lead, 
$2.50 to $2.60 per 100 lbs; scrap zinc, 
3 3-4c to 4e per lb; iron. No. 1 wrought, 
$11: No. 2 wrought, $3; machinery cast 
scrap, $13; stoveplate. $fi to $9; malle- 
able and steel, $5: old rubbers, 5 l-2c per 
lb: country mixed rags, 65c per 100 lbs. 

Coal — Outside dealers are stocking 
once more to meet the Spring orders on 
the part of the consumer and trade this 
week has a brighter appearance. Slack 
still continues scarce and prices are firm. 
Prices continue unchanged. We quote 
following prices: Anthracite in care at 
Briges: Grate, $5.50 per gross ton; egg, 
stove and nut, $5.75 per gross ton; pea, 
$3.50 per gross ton. 

Standard Hocking, soft coal, in cars, 
f.o.b. at mines: Lump, $1.60; 3-4 inch, 
$1.50; run of mine, $1.40; nut. $1; N. 
P. and S., 75c; coarse slack, 50c; box 
cars 10 cents per ton additional. 

Youghiogheny soft coal in cars, 
bonded, at the bridges: 1 1-4 inch, $2.60; 
3-4 inch, $2.50; mine run, $2.40; slack, 
at $1 .90 to $2. 



UNITED STATES METAL MARKET. 

Advance proofs furnished Hardware and Metal by 
The Iron Age, Jan. 19. 1905. 

WITH some minor exceptions, the 
markets all along the line have 
been rather quiet during the 
past week, and there are some alarm- 
ists who show symptoms of uneasiness. 
The very fact that we are producing and 
consuming so enormous a quantity for 
this season of the year seems to inspire v 
doubts as to the possibility of main- 
taining the pace. On the other hand, 
the principal pre-occupation of other 
conservative interests is that we may . 
be in danger of a runaway market as 
the usually busy season, Spring, ap- 
proaches. Powerful influences are ar- 
rayed on the side of keeping prices of 
finished materials at about the present 
level, with the possible exception of 
wire products, and this causes hesita- 
tion on the part of smaller manufactur- 
ers to book much additional business 
when they must cover the raw material 
at the present range of values. Some -of 
them seem to look forward to another 
period of premiums over official prices 
for prompt delivery. 

In spite of the fact that the Steel 
Corporation is turning nearly every 
wheel which it controls the manage- 
ment is forced in many finished lines to 
pro rata shipments in the order in 
which specifications have been received, 
being unable to fill the demands of all. 
The Steel Corporation is running 94 
per cent, of its blast furnace capacity, 
has every steel plant except Coiumbus 
in operation, is operating 99 per cent, 
of the tin plate mills, 98 per cent, of 
the sheet mills and is running full on 
tubes, bars, plates and shapes. 

A considerable tonnage of ore is being 
contracted for. Eastern furnacemen 
have taken several hundred thousand 
tons of non-Bessemer Mesaba ores on 
the basis of $3 per ton, as compared 
with $2.40 per ton last year, and the 
standard iron contents has been lowered 
from 54.5 per cent, of iron, natural 
state, to 53 per cent, this year. The 
Eastern furnaces have alreadv bought 
some considerable quantities of Euro- 
pean and Cuban ores, while Eastern 
home producers are crowded for deliver- 
ies beyond their capacitv. 

The event of the week has been the 
foreshadowed purchase on the part of 
the Steel Corporation of 25.000 tons of 
Bessemer pig at $15.50, Valle^ furnace. 
Otherwise the crude metal markets have 
been exceedingly quiet in all the dis- 
tributing centres. 

The attitude of sellers and buyers as 
to the future has been indicated in the 
East bv the outcome of some large in- 
auiries for the second half of the vear. 
The makers asked an advance of $1 per 
ton over present prices, which the sell- 
ers declined to consider. 

The manufacturers of steel bars at a 
recent meeting reaffirmed the price of 
1.40c at Pittsburg. The only branch in 
which there has been somewhat marked 
activity with an advance of about $3 
per ton has been skelp. There have been 
a number of large transactions in Pitts- 
burg, the eastern and central Pennsyl- 
vania mills participating in the business. 

The steel rail market is quiet. Chi- 
cago reports additional orders, among 
which 20.000 tons for the Illinois Cent- 
ral is enumerated. The rail makers con- 
tinue confident, and count on some verv 
heavv orders later on for the West and 
Southwest. 



2« 



January 21, 1905 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal. 



PORTLAND CEMENT 

CANADIAN, ENGLISH, 

GERMAN and BELGIAN. 

FIRE BRICKS, FIRE CLAY, 

ENAMELLED BRICKS, all colors. 
BUILDING BRICKS. 

SEWER PIPES, CULVERT PIPES, 
WHEELBARROWS, 

FOUNDERS' and CON- 
TRACTORS' SUPPLIES. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

WELLINGTON ST., MONTREAL 

Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 

Manufacturers ot 

Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery where great strength 
is r quired : Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 



'MIDLAND 



JJ 



BRAND. 



Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as Fuel, "Mid- 
land" will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Writ* for Prlo* to Sales Agonts 

Drummond McCall & Co. 

MONTREAL, QUE 
or to 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 

MIDLAND, ONT Limited 

Get our prices for 

GALVANIZED 
f LAT SHEETS 

THE "VANDA" BRAND 

For all purposes requiring the best quality. 

It is "deadflat," well galvanized, true to gauge, 
and specially soft for wnrking-up. We guarantee 
every sheet bearing our brand. 



C.F. JACKSON & CO., Limited 

Wholesale Merchants 

Ormidale Biock, Vancouver, B.C., and 

Liverpool, England 

Direct Importers of: 

Metals of every description, Wire Rope, Portland 
Cements, Firebricks, Ore Backs, Grain Bags, etc.. etc. 



TRADE CONDITIONS IN BRITISH 
COLUMBIA. 

Special Correspondence of Hardware and Metal 

Vancouver, B.C., Jan. 14, 1905. 

WITH the report of the city build- 
ing inspector just published for 
1904, there is already an aptive 
movement in the building projects for 
the coming season. In fact it may be 
said that the coming season is 'ere, for 
there has been no cessation in building 
operations. In the year just past, ibe 
class of buildings erected was largely 
residential, with the exception of two 
or three large public buildings. So far, 
the plans for 1905 show that a large 
proportion of big blocks, three and four- 
storeys, and in one instance a 5-storey 
block, will be erected. In several in- 
stances high prices have recently been 
paid for valuable inside property, and 
on several of these plots it has been an- 
nounced that the intention is to build 
blocks this season. 

Last year's record is almost $2,000,- 
000 in buildings erected, an increase of 
over half a million dollars in excess of 
1903. All present indications would 
warrant the assumption that 1905 will 
see a larger total of building values 
than ever. 

The citv of Victoria, whicn has been 
moving slowly in the building line for 
some years past, has a record for 1904 
which would also indicate that a change 
had come over the capital also. Not 
including the value of the James' Bav 
improvements, and the preparations for 
the big C.P.R. hotel, the record of 
$600,000 is very good, and present in- 
dications are that Victoria will con- 
siderably exceed the million dollar mark 
in new buildings in 1905. 

* • * 

A barge of mammoth proportions is to 
be erected at Wallace's shipyard, False 
Creek, this Winter.. Its dimensions arc 
to be 200 feet lone. 40 feet beam and 
12 feet depth. This monster freight 
carrier is to be used in transporting 
coal from Comox to the new smelter 
built up north on Prince of Wales Is- 
land, south-eastern Alaska, last season. 
Mackenzie Bros., the shipowners, are to 
be the proprietors of the barere, and 
thev have the contract for carrying the 
coal for the smelter people. 

* * * 

An improved pattern of radiator for 
steam or hot water heating has been 
patented by W. Leek, a Vancouver heat- 
ing engineer, and he has just received 
his U. S. certificate of patent, his Cana- 
dian patent having been issued some 
time ago. The central idea of the im- 
provement is to provide for more rapid 
circulation of warmed air after the ra- 
diator has been heated. This is done bv 
means of corrugations crosswise on the 
sections of the radiator. These corru- 
gations are inclined upward from back 
to front, and when the sections of the 
radiator are put together, thev form 
passages between the sections through 
which the air will move from back to 
front instead of straight un. The cast- 
ing of the sections with the corruga- 
tions gives opportunity for improving 
the circulation of the steam inside the 

radiators also. 

* * * 

With a capacity of 30,000 barrels, or 
1,200.000 gallons, the steamer Argyle of 
San Francisco, which was in Vancouver 
harbor last week, is the largest oil- 
tank steamer on the Pacific. She dis- 
29 



IRON 
STEEL 

and 

METALS 

Close prices to wholesale buyers only. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 

509-512 Merchants Bank Building, 
MONTREAL. 



Ask your customers 

if they don't need new pumps. 
If they do, sell them our 

Standard Anti-Freezing Pumps 

They'll appreciate getting a 
pump that doesn't have to be 
thawn out every zero morning. 



McDougall Pumps 
—Made in Canada. 



Write for Catalogue and Prices- 
Trie 

R. McDougall Co. 
Limited 

Gait, Ont. 




BAINES e. PECKOVER 

TORONTO. 

Ontario agents for 

B. K. MORTON & CO'S. 



t< 



ALPHA 



HIGH SPEED STEEL 

AND 

Crucible Cast Steel 

Large stock on hand. Send for Stock 
List 



Nova Scotia Steel 
& Coal Co., Limit.* 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 

Manufacturers of ■■ ■ 

Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIEMENS MARTIN , 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



Hardware and Metal. 



THE MARKETS 



January 21, 1905 



charged 10,000 bbls. of crude oil into 
the B. C. Sugar Refinery's oil-tanks, 
that fuel being used exclusively now by 
the refinery people. As the Argyle had 
25,000 barrels of oil in her holds alto- 
gether, she was compelled to come here 
first as she could not get over the Co- 
lumbia River bar with such a draft as 
that load caused. After lightening her- 
self by discharging here she was able to 
proceed to Portland where she discharge 
pd the remainder of her cargo. The 
steamer is so equipped that her vl.ole 
cargo pan be pumped out in four h« its. 
• • * 

The Kosmos line steamer Amasis is 
due from Hamburg via South American 
ports. She brings 500 tons of nitre 
from Chile, consigned to the Victoria 
Chemical Works, Victoria. 



The interest taken in the sessions of 
the assessment commission now sitting 
in Victoria, is unabated in business cir- 
cles. The arguments of the wholesale 
trade especially, are having some weight. 
It is pointed o.ut by them that the East- 
ern wholesaler who merely sends a tra- 
veler through the province to take or- 
ders, which are filled from factory or 
warehouse in the East, is actually en- 
couraged by the Act, at the expense of 
the local merchant who has his all in 
the province, and has established a 
business which is aiding in the develop- 
ment of the province. It is fully anti- 
cipated that man- changes will result in 
the provisions of the Act as a result of 
representations made by leading busi- 
ness men, and bv such bodies as the 
Victoria and Vancouver Boards of 
Trade, which have taken the matter up 
and appointed committees to press their 
claims. 

The lumbermen are particularly hard 
pressed, they assert. They point out 
that they have to pav for timber li- 
censes, rentals for timber berths, royal- 
ties and dues on timber cut on govern 
ment lands, and then they are taxed on 
personal property assessment, in which 
are included the logs they mav have in 
the water, the lumber they have in their 
yards, and the full value of their plants. 
On their timber and manufactured lum- 
ber, thev claim, they are paying twice, 
and on their plants,' thev claim that it 
is unfair to tax them full value as per- 
sonal property, when the industrv is do- 
ing a great deal toward upbuilding the 
province. They claim the tax is a 
handicap on the lumber industry in- 
stead of a help. 

* * * 

Mr. A. K. Evans, of Colin F. Jackson 
& Co., Limited, left this week for Mex- 
ico in company with Mr. C. E. Harvey 
the representative of the steamship 
company which has contracted with the 
Canadian Government to put on a 
steamer service between British Colum- 
bia and Mexico. Mr. Evans and Mr. 
Harvey go to look into trade openings 
in the southern republic, the former 
wilh tbe view of extending their already 
large business, and Mr. Harvev to size 
up the possibilities for freight for the 
steamers it is proposed to put on the 
route between British Columbia and 
Mexican ports. 

» * * 

Local hardware dealers state that 
while matters are quiet with them a 
number of changes are anticipated in the 
neai future, 



GILBERTSON'S Brand Galvanized Sheets 



COMET 

Agent: ALEXANDER OIBB, Montreal. 



are of high quality, but LOW in price— for 
a guaranteed sheet. 

Makers : W. GILBERTSON £> CO., Limited 
Pontardawe, South Wales. 



GALVANIZED FENCE HOOK IV 



'ENCES- 




WIRE NAILS, COILED SPRING, 
BARB and PLAIN FENCE WIRE, 
OILED and ANNEALED, CLOTHES 
LINE WIRE, STAPLES, etc. 



THE WESTERN WIRE & NAIL CO.. Limited, 



.LONDON, ONT 




THE JOHN MORROW MACHINE 
SCREW COMPANY, Limited 

Manufacturers ot 
Set and Cap Screws, Speeial Milled Work, Engine Studi 
Etc. Cold Punched Nuti of every variety of finiih 
INGERSOLL, ONT. 





Blizzard 



SFOR RATS 
AND MICE 

Swift as lightning, sure as death and sure 
death to the animal. Strong, simple, substantial 
construction. "To get the best trap trade, sell 
the best traps made." 

Write for prices to 

J. M. Mast Mfg. Co., Lititz, Penna. 

Canadian Ag'ts, C. H. Grenfell k Co., London, On'. 




Snap Shot 




Old Nick 



RD. JOHNSON, CLAPHAM & MORRIS. I td , MANCHESTER. ENGLAND 

Before you place your orders for GALVANIZED, CORRUGATED AND DEAD FLAT 
SHEETS, CANADA AND STOVE PLATES, COKE AND CHARCOAL TIN 
PLATES, BAR, HOOP AND SHEET IRON OR WIRE RODS, ask us for quotations. 

Special and prompt attention to Canadian orders. 
Cable Ad.: " Metallicus, Manchester." Codes: Liebers, A. B.C. 425th, Al and Private Codes. 




and CURTAIN 



IXTURI 



Our line comprises all requisites, Fins, Hooks, 
Rings, Pole Ends, Brackets and Sockets. We would 
like an opportunity of quoting you on these goods. 
Keep us in mind and when you want regular or 
special lines, let us know. 



BARCLAY, Bath Row, BIRMINGHAM, ENG 



CONCRETE BLOCK MACHINES 

Sidewalks and Floors Constructed 

Estimates given on Well Curbing, Cisterns, Tanks, Silos, etc. 
CORRESPONDENCE INVITED 

CONCRETE BLOCK MACHINE CO., 32 Church St.. TORONTO 



PITTSBURG METAL MARKETS. 

From the Iron Trade Review, Jan. 19, 190.".. 

Pig Iron— Outside of the sale of 25,- 
000 tons of Bessemer iron to the United 
Stales Steel Corporation there have been 
ao large transactions (hiring the week. 

30 



The demand for charcoal iron has been 
heavy and numerous sales have been 
made. The demand for foundry is not 
heavy and the market has reacted. Sales 
have been made at $16 at Valley furn- 
aces for second quarter delivery. Higher 



January 21, 1905 



TUB MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal 



prices are paid for prompt iron. Forge 
iron continues at $16.25 to $16.50 Pitts- 
burg, while Bessemer is quoted at $16.85. 
Southern iron continues firm at $13.75 
to $14 for No. 2, for delivery the first 
quarter: We revise quotations as fol- 
lows: 

Bessemer, Valley- $16 00 

Bessemer, Pittsburg 17 10 

No. 1 Foundry $17 25 to 17- 50 

No. 2 Foundry 16 85 to 17 35 

Gray forge. Pittsburg 16 25 to 16 50 

Basic, Valley 16 od to 1615 

Basic, Pittsburg 16 85 to 1700 

^teel— Premiums of from $2 to $2.50 
a ton are still being asked on billets and 
bars, and consumers are clamoring for 
deliveries. We quote official prices as 
follows: Bessemer and open-hearth bil- 
lets, 4x4 in., and slabs, up to and in- 
cluding 0.25 carbon, $21 f.o.b. mill, 
Pittsburg, with actual freight to points 
of delivery; 0.26 and including 0.60 car- 
bon, $1 advance: 0.61 to 1.00 carbon. 
$2 advance. Billets smaller than 4x4 
in., $2 advance: sheet and tin bars, $23: 
cut bars. $23.50; foreing billets, $23. 
Bessemer and open-hearth steel rods are 
held at $30.50 to $31. 

Rails and Track Material— The rail 
tonnas-e for the week has not been heavy, 
although a number of larffe buyers are 
expected in the rrarket shortly. Large 
sales of spikes and track material have 
been made to the railroads during the 
week and spikes have advanced to $1.80. 
Lisrht rails are not movin°- very rapidly 
and nrices remain unchanged. 

Bars — Demand for iron bars is not 
as heavy as during the month of Decem- 
ber and slightly lower prices are looked 
for. Specifications on iron bars con- 
tinue heavy and all the mills are oper- 
ating in full. 

Structural Material— New orders for 
structural material continue heavy and 
since the first of the year Pittsbursr con- 
cerns have taken orders for about. 20,000 
tons of work. 

Pipe and Tubes— Two large pipe line 
contracts were placed this week aggre- 
gating nearly 30,000 tons. These are 
the largest nipe line contracts placed 
thus far this year, although the require- 
ments promise to be heavy. Demand 
for merchant pipe continues heavy and 
the market is strong. 

\vire and Wire Nails— The advance in 
wire products expected since the first of 
the year has not been announced and it 
is not believed that it will be made be- 
fore next month. Mills are operating 
at their utmost capacity and the ship- 
ments are the heaviest in the history of 
the trade. New buying is light, how- 
ever. We quote: Wire nails, jobbers' 
carload lots. $1.75: retailers' carloads. 
$1 .80, and less than carloads, $2; paint- 
ed barb wire. $1.90 to jobbers in car- 
loads: retailers' carloads, $1.95, and less 
than carloads. $2.05, with 30 cents for 
galvanizinsr. Annealed smooth fence 
wire is held at $1.60, with the usual dif- 
ferentials to retailers for carloads and 5 
less than carloads. Quotations are all 
f.o.b. Pittsbursr, 60 dnvs. with 2 per 
cent, discount for cash in ten days. Iron 
cut nails are held at $1.85 Pittsburg, and 
steel at $1.75. 



TRADE CONDITIONS IN NEW 
BRUNSWICK. 

Special correspondence of Hardware and Metal. 

St. John, Jan. 17, 1905. 

THERE are few more enterprising 
merchants in Eastern Canada 
than Emerson & Fisher, the local 
hardware people. An instance of their 
enterprise as well as of their growing 
business is the erection of a large ware- 
house and store which is now almost 
icompleted. This building, which is of 
brick, will offer, when finished, a floor 
space of 42,000 square feet. In the 
front it will be six storeys high and in 
the rear an additional storey. Its di- 
mensions are 100 by 60 feet. It will be 
fitted up in the most approved style and 
in a manner which promises to leave 
little to be desired. It is claimed, and 
probably justly so, that this firm's new 
quarters will be larger than those taken 
up by any other hardware firm east of 
Montreal. Possession of them will be 
taken in a few weeks. In addition to 
carrying on their business here, Emer- 
son & Fisher are connected with the En- 
terprise Foundry at Sackville. 
• * * 

A meeting of the Maritime Stove 
Founders' Association was held at Am- 
herst, N.S., a few days ago. The chief 
purpose of the meeting was a discussion 
of prices. The discussion was ftJI. but 
at its conclusion it was unanimously 
decided that the present scale of prices 
be continued. A number of St. John 
people are interested in this associa- 
tion. 

• * * 

Already local hardware men are receiv- 
ing enquiries concerning wire fencing. 
From past experience and present indi- 
cations it would seem that the demand 
for fencing of this kind will be greater 
here this year than in the previous 
years. At all events the outlook at the 
present is fine and the dealers are satis- 
fied. In some quarters an advance in 
price is looked for. Such an advance 
would not be regarded as whollv un- 
reasonable. It must be stated, however, 
that this increase is not expected in all 
quarters. 

• • -* 

Building operations here have been 
well ud to the averaee of late. Con- 
sequentlv the demand for builders' ma- 
terials is very good, although, perhaps, 
not unusually heavy. The prices gener- 
ally have continued about as usual, and 
dealers are satisfied with their trade in 
builders' goods. 

• • • 

The demand for glass in St. John 
does not show much chanee from time 
to time, but is always fairly steadv. 
The two kinds of glass which are sold 
here are the Belgian and English makes. 
The supply of both of these brought 
here is considerable. American glass 
is, of course, not imported here to anv 
degree, if at all. The price of glass is 
at present firm, but shows an advance 
over that of last vear. In some cases 
the increase is as high as ten per cent. 
No further advance of any account is 
anticipated in the near future. 



ENLARGING THETR BUSINESS. 

Tolton Bros., Limited, of Guelph, 
Ont., have just completed the purchase 
of the whole of the business, patterns, 
etc., and good will of the Emerson 
Company, of Tweed, Ontario, who have 
hitherto done a large and prosperous 

31 




Our Sheet 
Metal Fronts 




Offer you splendid ii£^CerlerftJ R 
small cost, for any sUyw-%0 BuuTnnfr. 

We make them coi 
any sized or shaped 
entire metal finish incli 
window caps, cornices, et£^*rT"a gn 
variety of styles. 07* /v - 

They g"Jve a very hand0omV eTfecfr^ 
and enduring - , practical sat 

We give estimates if 
measurements and outline of the buil 
ing. 

Think it over. . 

Metallic R.oofing C^ 

Limited, 

Wholesale Manufacturers. 

Toronto, Canada. 



l 'u&£%<^ -^o4. 



/r 






** 



business in Canada in hay carriers, 
forks and slings, and have gained an en- 
viable reputation* in the sling carrier 
trade. This will, in future, be an im- 
portant department in this already well- 
established and thrifty business. From 
other up-to-date improvements in their 
implements which are now being intro- 
duced, together with engaging the ser- 
vices of Mr. Walter C. Emerson himself, 
of Tweed, Ont., who is a leading man 
in the hav fork and sling carrier trade, 
there is reason to believe that there 
never was a brighter future before the 
firm of Tolton Bros., Limited, of 
Guelph, Ont. 



CAPE TO CAIRO RAILWAY. 

Good progress is being made with the 
Cape to Cairo Railway, according to 
Sir Charles Metcalfe, especially north of 
the Zambesi River on the section known 
as the "northern extension," from Vic- 
toria Falls to Kalomo, a distance of 
100 miles. It is expected that the line 
to the latter point will be opened in a 
few months. 



A GREAT AUTO SHOW. 

At the Paris Automobile Show of 
1904 there were over 800 exhibitors as 
compared with only GO, ten years ago. 
The Grand Palais, where the exhibition 
was held was quite inadequate to ac- 
commodate all the exhibits, and fully 
200 had to be housed in conservatories, 
which had been erected for the big ex- 
position of 1900. Few novelties in auto- 
mobile construction were noticed. 



SIXTEEN DOLLAR ADVANTAGE. 

Vice-Consul-General Hill of the United 
States, stationed at Halifax, figures out 
that the Canadian manufacturer of steel 
rails will have an advantage of $16 a 
ton over the American manufacture. 
This result is arrived at thus: Duty. $f) 
bounty in Ontario on pig iron from 
Canadian ore, $1; Federal bounty, $2.25; 
Federal bounty on steel ingots, $2.25 ; 
special duty ' under "dumping" clause, 
$3.50; total,' $16 a ton. 



Hardware and Metal. 



THE MARKETS 



January 21, 1905 



CONDENSED OR " WANT" 
ADVERTlS EnENTS. 

Advertisements under this beading. 2c. a word first 
insertion; lc. a word each subsequent insertion. 

Contractions count as one word, but five figures (as 
$1,000) are allowed as one word. 

Cash remittance to cover cost must accompany all 
advertisements. In no case can this rule be overlook- 
ed. Advertisements received without remittance 
cannot be acknowledged. 

Where replies come to our care to be forwarded, five 
cent! must be added to cost to cover postage, etc. 

IRON PIPE WANTED 

THREE HUNDRED feet second-hand iron i,ipe 
wanted ; inch and one half or two inch. 
Aaron Child & Son, Graverhurst. (3) 

MANUFACTURERS' AGENT WANTED. 

AN English firm who make a specialty of brass 
tubing, all kinds ; brass and copper sheets, 
German silver, rolled brass and wine, want an 
agent lor Toronto and district. Address Box 209, 
Hardware and Metal, Toronto. (tf) 

AD. WRITERS. 

AD. WRITER— Smart, capable, practical, ope n 
to engagement. Williams, 189 Jarvis street^ 
Toronto. (3) 

I WRITE ADS— Send quarter, and few details, 
I for sample ad. Williams the Adverted, 
189 Jarvis street, Toronto. (3) 

FOR SALE. 

U/INDOW FROST Defied— Secret for dollar; 
** boy can apply. Money back guarantee. 
Williams, 189 Jarvis, Toronto. (3) 

BUSINFSS CHANCES 

HARDWARE Business for sale in a live town in 
Western Ontario, doing a turn over of 814. 000. 
Stock and fixtures $8 000 Apply Box 211, Hard- 
ware and Meial, Toronto. (3) 

SITUATIONS VACANT. 

EXPERIENCED hardware traveler is open for 
position with jobber or manufacturer. Ad- 
dress Box 43, Hardware and Metal, Toronto. 

(3) 



O BALED TENDERS addressed to the undersigned, and 
*** endorsed " Tender for Postal Pneumatic Tube Systems 
for Montreal and Toronto," will be received at this De- 
partment until Thursday, February 9, 1905, inclusively, for 
laying and joining in the City of Montreal, 4,000 lineal feet 
of double line of smooth bored cast iron piping, to be sup- 
plied by the Government, and for furnishing, installing and 
erecting all the necessary special castings, elbows and fit- 
tings, including the terminal receiving and transmitting 
machinery and earners. 

Also for laying and joining in the City of Toronto, 18,000 
lineal feet of double line of smooth bored cast iron piping, to 
be supplied by the Government, and for furnishing, install- 
ing and efecting all the necessary special castings, elbows 
and fittings, including the terminal receiving and transmit- 
ting machinery and carriers. 

All as per plans and specification of John Gait, Chief 
Engineer. 

Plans and specifications can be seen and forms of tender 
obtained at this Department, and at the office of John Gait, 
Chief Engineer, Toronto. 

Tenders will not be.considered unless made on the printed 
form supplied, and signed with the actual signatures ot ten- 
derers. 

An accepted cheque on a chartered bank, payable to the 
order of the Honorable the Minister of Public Works, for 
threeithousand dollars ($3,000.00), in the case of Montreal, and 
nine thousand dollars (.$9,000.00,) in the case of Toronto, 
must accompany each bender, The cheque will be forfeited 
it the part; tendering decline the contract or fail to com- 
plete tin work contracted for, and will be returned in case 
of non-acceptance of tender. 

The Department does not bind itself to accept the lowest 
or any tender. By order, 

FRED. GEIJNAS. Secretary. 
Department of Public Works, 

Ottawa, January 9, 1905. 

Newspapew inserting this advertisement without authority 
from the Department wiir not be paid for it 



HARDWARE CONDITIONS IN MANITOBA. 

(Market quotations corrected by telegraph up till 12 a.m. Friday, Jan. 20, 1905.) 

Office of Hardware and Metal 

Room 515 Mclntyre Block, 

Winnipeg, Man 



RETAIL hardware men are now 
looking forward with keen expec- 
tation to the approaching con- 
vention of the Western and Manitoba 
Associations. Among city retailers 
there is only one opinion, and that is, 
that an association which has been of 
so great benefit to the trade in Winni- 
peg cannot fail to be a great boon to 
the whole Western hardware trade, pro- 
vided the whole trade join in the move- 
ment. It is gratifying, therefore, to 
know that although there has been no 
organizer covering the field, there has 
been an encouraging response from the 
Western trade, and all the indications 
point already to a successful convention. 

* * * 

Wholesale trade is fairly brisk for the 
season of the year. Stocktaking among 
retail merchants in the country has a 
tendency to restrict orders to present 
actual requirements, but the amount of 
business passing 1 is considered quite en- 
couraging. Prices are fairly steady 
throughout, an advance in sisal rope be- 
ing the most important change. Monev 
is still tight, but there is some im- 
provement in country collections. 

Wire— Prices as revised last week 
remain unchanged. We quote: 

Barbed wire, 100 lb f 2 85 

Plain galvanized 6 to 8 3 39 

92 50 2 90 

Plain galvanized 10 3 50 

12 3 10 

13 3 20 

14 3 9° 

IS 4 45 

16 4 60 

Plain twist 285 

Staples 3 35 

Oiled annealed wire , 10 a 96 

11 3 02 

12 3 10 

13 3 20 

14 3 3° 

IS 3 45 

\nnealed wires (unoiled) 10c. less. 

Horseshoes— Prie.es continue firm and 
trade is of normal volume. We quote: 



'orseshoes, iron, No. o to No I .... 

No. 2 and larger 
Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 .. 

No. 2 and larger. 
Steel, No. o to No. 1 

No. 2 and larger. 



U 55 
4 3° 
4 83 

4 55 
4 7° 

4 45 

Horsenails— Former discounts still 
apply. We quote: 

lorsenails, No. 4 — \% in., list price 048 

5—2 o 32 

" 6— 2'/a " o 28 

] 7— 25i " o 24 

8 — 2% " o 22 

9 — 2% " o 20 

10 — 2f4 " o 20 

" II— 2# " O 20 

" 12—2% " o 20 

" 14—354 " O 20 

Discounts on these prices are for "C" brand 
40, 10 and 7'/i per cent., for other brands 55 and 
60 per cent. Add 15c. per box. 

Wire and Cut Nails— The western 
nail market is tinner now than some 
months ago. Business is at present of 
.1 sorting nature chiefly, but the promis- 



ing building' outlook points to 
trade this year. We quote: 
Cut Nails- 
ad 1 in $ 4 00 

3d Kin. i l / t in. . \ 00 

3d iK in 3 65 

4d 1 y, in 3 40 

5 d iK in 3 40 

6d 2 in 3 30 

8d 2% in 3 15 

iod 3 in 3 10 

aod 4 in 3 05 

3od 4'A in 3 00 

4od 5 in 3 00 

Sod 5K in 3 00 

ood 6 in 3 00 



big nail 



Wire Nails — 

1 in 4 co 

iH in 4 00 

itf " 3 °> 



iK 
iH 

2 

2% 

3 

3* 

4 

1% 

5 

5* 



3 4° 

3 4° 

3 3° 

3 >5 

3 10 

3 05 

3 <>i 

3 °° 

3 co 

3 00 

o 00 

Screws— Sorting trade onlv at present. 
Prospects point to an active trade. Some 
sizes are in small supply. We quote: 
Screws, flat head, iron, bright 85 and 10 p.c. 

Round " " 80 p.c. 

Flat ' ' brass 75 and 10 p.c. 

Round " " 70 and 10 p.c. 

Coach 70 p . c . 

Nuts and Bolts— There is no new fea- 
ture to note as prices are steady. We 
quote discounts as follows: 
Bolts, carriage, Ji or smaller 60 and 5 p.o. 

7-16 and up 55 p.c. 

Bolts, machine, H and under 55 and 5 p.c. 

7-16 and over SSP.c. 

Bolts, tire 65 p.c. 

Bolt t nds 55 p.c. 

Sleigh shoe bolts 65 and 10 p.c. 

Machine screws 70 p.c. 

Plough bolts 55 p'c. 

Square nuts, case lots 3c. discount. 

" " small lots 2Xc 

Hex " case lots 3c. " 

smaller lots 2&c. 

Rivets— The discounts on iron rivets 
are now 60 and 10 per cent. We quote: 

Rivets, iron 60 and 10 p.c. 

Copper, No. 8 29(4 

" No. 12 

Coil Chain— Quotations continue 
follows : 



33 
as 



Coil chain, 3-16 inch. 
H inch 



9-25 
7.25 
520 

4 60 
4-45 
4-3° 
4.10 

4-30 



5-16 inch 

" H inch . 

" 7-16 inch 

" % inch . . 

fi inch. . 

Vi inch. . 

Spades and shovels 40 and 5 p."c. 

Harvest tnols 60 p.c. 

..i.ovels — The discounts on spades and 
shovels continue 411 and ."> per cent. Trade 
is normal. 

Harvest Tools— The discount on list 
price is 60 per cent. 

Axe Handles— We quote as before: 
Axe handles, turned, s,g. hickory, doz. 

No. 1 

No. 2 

Octagon extra 2 30 

No. 1 1 60 

x'iles — We quote as before: 

" Arcade " 70 and 10 p.c. 

" Bla-k Diamond " 60 p.c. 

" Nicholson's " 62% p.c. 

Building Paper— Some orders are be- 
ing booked for future delivery and all 
indications point to a very active trade. 
We quote: 

Anchor, plain , 65c. 

70c. 



83 15 
1 90 
1 60 



tarred.... 
Pure fibre, plain .. 
" " tarred. 



67XC 
toe. 



32 



January 21, 1905 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal. 



Ammunition, Etc. — We quote as be- 
fore : 

Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 

50 and s p.c. 

Dominion, C.F., pistol 30 p.c. 

military 11; p.c. 

Ammunition, cartridges, American R.F. ?3V4 p.c. 

C.F. pistol 5 p.c 

C.F. military 10 p.c. advance. 

1 oaded shells : 
# Eley's and Kynoch's soft, 12 gauge 

black 15 00 

chilled, 12 gauge 10 00 

soft , 10 gauge 1 8 00 

chilled, 10 gauge 19 00 

Slio! , Ordinary, per ioo lb 25 

Chilled h 75 

Powder, F.F., kee, Hamilton 475 

F.F.G., Duponts c 00 

Tinware— Discounts continue as be- 
ti re. AYe quote: 

1 uiwarc, picasca, ic untied 70 ana 10 p.c. 

plain 75 and 2% p.c. 

" pieced 30 p.c. 

Japanned ware 37 >4 p.c. 

Enamelled ware, white 45 p.c. 

Famous 50 p.c. 

Imperial 50 and 10 p.c. 

Cordage — The most notable price 
phange this week is an advance in sisal 
refpe. We quote: 

Kope, sisai, 7-10 and larger, basis 10 75 

Manila, 7-16 and larger, basis 15 25 

Lathyarn 11 25 

Axes — Prices are as before. We 
quote : 

Axes, '-hopping S 6 75 to 12 00 

" double bitts 12 00 to 18 00 

Bluestone — As noted last week there 
lias been a recent advance to $5.75. 

Iron ana Steel— The local iron market 
is quiet and former prices are unchang- 
ed. We quote: 

Uai nun { onoio ; 250 

Swedish iron (basis) 4 75 

Sleigh shoe steel 2 65 

Spring steel i. 00 

Machinery steel. 3 5° 

I'ool steel, Black Diamond, too lb 9 5° 

Jessop 13 00 

Black Sheets— F01 ward delivery or- 
ders are being booked quite freely. 
Prices continue as before, We quote: 

UlttCk -i„ts,lulu lugiujc.lCMIU 3 50 

18 to 22 gauge 3 75 

24 gauge 3 g~> 

26 gauge 4 00 

28 gauge 4 10 

Galvanized Sheets— We again quote: 

Apunu, .O ^.i. g 4 CO 

18 and 20 gauge 4 00 

22 and 24 gauge, 4 25 

26 gauge 4 50 

38 gauge 4 50 

30 gauge or 10K 01 4 75 

Queen's Head, 24 gauge 4 25 

26 gauge 4 So 

28 " 4 75 

Tin Plates— We q<iofe prices as be- 
fore : 

I mpiate, IC charcoal, 20 x 28, box .... 10 00 

IX '2 00 

IXX 14 00 

Ingot Tin— Still quoted locally at 35 
cents. 

Canada Plates — We again quote as 
follows: 

Car ada plate, 18x21,18x24 3 25 

Canada plate, 20 x 28 3 50 

Canada plate, full polished 4 00 

Sheet Zinc— The price of cask lots is 
*S. '_>:, per 100 lbs. and of broken lots 
$8 . 75 . 

Pig Lead— Still quoted at $4.50 per 
100 lbs. 



Iron Pipe— We again rraote as fol- 
lows: 

Black iron pipe, l A inch .... 

% " 2 45 

H " 265 

a " 3 00 

H " 380 

1 " s 5° 

itf " 7 45 

iH " 8 95 

2 " 12 30 

Petroleum— We quote as before: 

Silver Star, per gal . . 2*Vic. 

Sunlight " 23HC 

Eocene " 25KC 

Pennoline " 26.'. 

Crystal Spray " 25c. 

Silver Light 23c. 

(In barrels f.o.b. Winnipeg.; 

Prints and Oils— Trade is still rather 
quiet but indications point to an active 
Spring business. Prices throughout are 
rii m. We ouote: 

Wlme lead (pure J $$ 00 10 £5 50 

Bladder putty, in bbls o 02V4 

" in kegs 002% 

Turpentine, pure in barrels $ o 87 

Less than barrel lots o 92 

Linseed oil, raw ° 55 

Boiled o 58 

Lubricating oils, heavy castor machine o 26Vi 

" extra engine o 27 

" dynamo ... o 38 

." " back o 22 

" cylinder $0 50 to o 80 

(as to quality) 

Harness oil o 60 

Neatsfootoil 1 00 

Vegetable oil, 1st pressure 1 ooj^ 

" 2nd pressure 1 09H 

Window Glass— We again quote as 
follows: 

16-uz. O.G., single, in 50-fi. boxes — 

16 to 25 united inches , $2 25 

26 to 40 2.50 

16-oz. O.G., tingle, in 100-ft. cases — 

16 to 25 united inches 4.00 

26 to 40 4.25 

4i to 50 4.75 

5 1 to 6 ° 5.25 

61 to 70 5.75 

21-oz. C.S., double, in 100-ft. cases — 

26 to 40 united inches 6.30 

41 t° 5° 7-35 

51 to 60 8.40 

61 to 70 9.45 

71 to 80 10.50 

81 to 85 11 55 

86 to 90 " 12.60 

91 to 95 14-7° 

96 to 100 " 17-35 



LONDON METAL MARKETS. 

From Metal Market Report, Jan. 17,1905. 

Pig Iron— Mlddlesboro No. 3 foundry 
sold at 48s 41-2d, and Scotch warrants 
at 54s, making prices as compared with 
last week, Is 3d lower for Middlesboro 
and 9d lower for Scotch warrants. 

Tin— Spot tin opened quiet at £130 12s 
(id, futures at £130 15s, and after sales 
of SO tons of spot and 100 tons of futures 
closed firm at £131 5s for spot and £130 
1 7s 6d for futures, making prices as com- 
pared with last week 5s lower for spot 
and 10s lower for futures. 

Copper— Spot copper opened easy at 
£68 17s (id, future at £69 Is 3d, and after 
sales of 400 tons of spot and 600 tons of 
futures, closed easy at £68 12s 6d for 
spot and £68 16s 3d for futures, making 
prices as compared with last week the 
same for spot -and 5s 9d lower for fu- 
tures. 

Lead— The market closed at £12 17s 
(id, niakin"- prices as compared with last 
week the same. 




ON TOP FOR 

40 YEARS 

and looks good for 
another term. 

One Dealer wanted 
for each town in the 

West. A good live pro- 
position for a live man. 
If there is no agency 
in your town/ write 

for our Color Cards, 

etc., or if already handl- 
ing Elephant Paints, 

revise your special Col- 
or Card for 1905, and 

mail it to us. We are 
now ready for it. 



OUR 
Stock is complete. 

Quality the best. 

Prices are right. 



MERRICK, 

ANDERSON 

®» CO., 

WINNIPEG, - - MAN. 



:t:{ 



Hardware and Metal. 



January 21, 1905 




Opening a Warehouse in Winnipeg. 

HENDERSON & POTTS, paint and 
varnish manufacturers, Halifax 
and Montreal, have secured a 
warehouse on Lombard street, Winnipeg, 
where . thev intend carrying a fully-as- 
sorted stock of their goods. 

Mr. Henderson spent a couple of days 
in Montreal this week on his way to 
Halifax from Winnipeg, where he had 
been busy for some time arranging the 
work for the new branch of the com- 
pany. He was quite optimistic as to 
the prospects in the West. 

"The amount of building being done," 
said Mr. Henderson, "in both Winnipeg 
and the West is really remarkable. 
Moreover the people there have learned 
to appreciate quality in paints and var- 
nish." 

"Will you manufacture in Winnipeg?" 
asked Hardware and Metal. 

"Some day, probably. We started a 
warehouse in Montreal nine years ago, 
but as soon as the demand permitted it 
we started to manufacture there as well 
as at Halifax. When the demand per- 
mits it, we will also manufacture at 
Winnipeg." 

'''Who will have charge of the Winnipeg 
agency?" 

"Our present accountant in Montreal, 
John Irving, will have charge of the 
Winnipeg office, while H. V. Lawler, 
who now represents us in Ontario, will 
now represent us in the West." 

A Good Point in Paint Mixing. 

THE influence of temperature on the 
consistency of paint is not always 
sufficiently appreciated either in 
the factory or the painter's shop, says 
an exchange. On the whole, the manu- 
facturer is less liable to deviate from 
the standard of composition on account 
of differences in the consistency of his 
raw materials caused by variations in 
temperature than the painter is when 
the latter thins his paints himself, be- 
cause the manufacturer works to a de- 
finite formula and uses the same relative 
proportion of the various ingredients 
Winter and Summer. The painter, on 
the other hand, mixes his paints by 
judgment only, his sole criterion being 
the ease with which the material can be 
spread with a brush, and this necessar- 
ily implies that the proportion of the 
various thinners varies according to the 
temperature and other local conditions. 
What manufacturers have to bear in 



mind, however, is that if they send out 
in Winter a material compounded in a 
manner suitable for Summer use, or 
vice versa, there is a strong inducement 
offered to the user to tamper with the 
material. This fact is well known to 
makers of enamels and enamel paints, 
and at least one well-known firm of 
makers of a renowned specialty take the 
simple precaution of recommending their 
customers, should they find the tnamel 
somewhat "stout," to stand L ;he car. in 
a pail of warm water before use. Sim- 
ple advice surely, and calculated to save 
time and irritation in investigating 
those wearisome things, painters' com- 
plaints." 

New Use for Prismatic Glass. 
A novelty in the glass business is the 
manufacture of prismatic glass in the 
form of tableware, giving the articles 
made the appearance that is found in 
prismatic glass. The new development 
is causing a great deal of attention, and 
a company has been formed in Pittsburg 



to manufacture this new kind of table- 
ware. 

Paris Green Combine. 

All American makers of pure Paris 
green have formed a combination, and 
their schedule of prices at the present 
time (subject to change without notice) 
is as follows: 

Arsenic kegs, 14£c per ft.; 14, 28 and 
56-ft kits, 16c; 2 and 5-ft. paper boxes, 
16c; 1-ft. paper boxes, 16£c. Terms, 30 
days from date of shipment; one per 
cent, discount off cash in 10 days. 
On all purchases of less than 100 fts. 
ic per ft. advance. On a purchase of 
500 to 1,000 fts. ^c less than above 
schedule. On a purchase of 1,000 fts. 
and upwards, lc less than above sched- 
ule. 

It is, interesting to note that so large 
a firm as the Sherwin-Williams Co. have 
advanced their selling price of Bergers' 
pure Paris green this year, owing to the 
advance in the prices of raw materials, 
and all American makers have done the 
same thing. 



ONE QUART 



If You Could Look Into the Future 



and see the healthy conditions your 
Varnish Business would be in, by 
reason of your having handled 

"Elastilite" 

you would telegraph for some of it 
to be sent by express, as a letter and 
freight would be too slow. 

"Elastilite" Varnish 

always pleases a particular cus- 
tomer. For outside and inside use. 
In tins only, from half pints to one 
gallon. Sealed with our brass cap. 




Interior or Extlkiqr 

PAIL '^ '--?7»\\ '<>* * N 
PUR^DlE^Vl/V \\ 



The Imperial Varnish 
& Color Co. Limited 



TORONTO nr»"> enTADIO 





MANUFACTURED ONLY BY 



The Imperial Varnish and Color Co., 



Toronto, Ont., Canada 



LIMITED, 



Canadian Agents for Buehne's " Had, White and Blue" Brand Steel Wool 



34 



January 21, 1905 



hardware and metal 



mascot 



MASCOT 



BOECKH'S 

MASCOT 

FLAT PAINT BRUSHES 

An all China Bristle line, good lengch stock, polished nic- 
kel ferrules, ebony color handles — a very attractive line, and 
more than that, one that is sure to give entire satisfaction. 

BE SURE AND ORDER THEM 



United Factories, Limited, 



TORONTO, d 



BRANCHES:' 

MONTREAL 
LONDON 




If You Buy 



Varnishes Paints 



Japans 


Colors 


Lacquers 


Glues 


Stains 


Bronzes 


Fillers 


Chamois 



Sponges 



WRITE TO 



LIMITED 



R. C. JAHIESON & CO. 
MONTREAL 

AGENTS FOR ASPINALL'S ENAMEL 




OUR LINES 

Refrigerators, Screen Doors and Window Screens, will 
give prestige to your store, on account of quality and 
price. A post card will bring particulars of what we are 
prepared to do, together with copy of our new Catalogue. 

SANDERSON -HAROLD CO., Limited 

PARIS - - ONTARIO 



35 



Hardware and Metal. 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



January 21, 1905 




Quebec. 

Offloe of Hardware and Metal, 

232 McGill Street. 

Montreal, Jan. 20, 1905. 

TRADE has brightened up consider- 
ably, and now that all the regular 
travelers are on the road collec- 
tions are reported excellent. Linseed 
oil has resumed its normal condition and 
gwat hopes are held out for improved 
conditions during' the year. Large or- 
ders have been received for mixed paints. 
Stocks from country points are report- 
ed light. There seems a lull in the de- 
mand for white lead and some rumors 
are abroad as to the possibility of an 
advance. Our prices are: 

turpentine— Single barrels, 78c per 
gallon; 2 to 4 barrels, 77c per gallon. 
For smaller quantities than barrels 5c 
extra per gallon is charged. Standard 
gallon is 8.6 lbs. The above prices are 
net thirty days, for longer terms prices 
are higher. 

Linseed Oil— Raw, 1 to 4 barrels, 44c; 
5 to 9 barrels, 43c; boiled, 1 to 4 bar- 
rels, 47c; 5 to 9 barrels 46c; delivered 
in Ontario between Montreal and Osha- 
wa at 2c per gallon in advance. 

Ground White Lead— Best brands Gov- 
ernment standards, $4.60 to $4.75; No. 
1, $4.35 to $4.50; No. 2, $4.10 to $4.25; 
No. 3, $3,771-2 to $3,871-2; No. 4, 
$3.40 to $3.50, all f.o.b. Montreal. 

Dry White Lead— $4.50 in casks, and 
in kegs, $4.75. 

Dry White Zinc— Pure dry in casks, 
7c, in 100 lb kegs, 71-2c; No. 1 zinc, in 
casks, 6c, in 100 lb kegs, 61 -2c. 

White Zinc (ground in oil)— Pure, 
25-lb irons, 71-4c; No. 1, 61-4c; No. 2, 
5 l-4c. 

rutty— Bulk in barrels, $1.50; in 25- 
lb irons, loose, $1.80; in tins, $1.90; 
bladdered putty in barrels, $1.75. 

Orange Mineral— Casks, 71-4c; 100-lb 
kegs, 71-2c; smaller quantities, 8 l-2c. 

Red Lead— Genuine red lead in casks, 
$4.50 in 100-lb kegs, $4.75; in less 
quantities at the rate of $5.75 per 100 
lbs; No. 1 red lead, casks, $4.25; kegs, 
$4.75, and smaller quantities, $5.50. 

Shellac Varnish— Pure white, $2.80 
to $3; pure orange, $2.75 to $2.85; No. 
1 orange, $2.45 to $2.60. 

Mixed Paints— $1.20 to $1.40 per 
gallon. 

Castor Oil— 8 3-4 to 9 l-4c in whole- 



sale lots, and l-2c additional for small 
lots. 

Litharge — Ground, in casks, 5c; in 
less quantities, 5 3-4c; flake litharge, 
casks, $5.50; smaller quantities, $6 per 
100 lbs. 

English Paris Green— Pine English 
Paris green, petroleum barrels, 15 l-4c; 
arsenic kegs, 15 l-2c; 50 and 100 lb. 
drums, 16c; 25-lb. drums, 16 l-2c; one 
pound paper boxes, 17c; one pound tins, 
18c; one-half pound paper boxes, 19c; 
one half-pound tins, 20c. Terms, 2 per 
cent, off thirty days, or ninety days net 
from date of shipment. 

Canadian Paris Green— Government 
standard pure Canadian Paris green, 
has advanced 2c. per lb. and is quoted : 
barrels, 15 l-4c; arsenic kegs, 15c; 50 
and 100 lb. drums, 16c; 25 lb. drums, 
16 l-2c; one pound packages 17c; half- 
pound packages, 19c; one pound tins, 
18c. Terms 2 per cent, discount for 
cash in 30 days or 90 days net. 

Ontario. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 

10 Front street east. 

Toronto, Jan. 20, 1905. 

IT is quite noticeable by the increase 
in orders that the travelers are once 
more actively at work. That the re- 
tail merchant anticipates a brisk 
business this coming season is quite ap- 



parent from the fact that large orders 
have been received by the majority of 
manufacturers and jobbers for a gener- 
al line of mixed paints. White lead, 
turpentine and linseed oil are each in 
good demand which implies that there 
is still a portion of the purchasing pub- 
lic not yet educated to the use of the 
manufactured article. Owing to the 
cheapness of white lead, ' ' pure ' ' has the 
best demand. Some small orders have 
been received for No. 1, but, nothing 
has been sold in the lower grades for 
some time. An increase in the demand 
for shellac is noted this week. Condi- 
tions of the linseed oil market are nom- 
inal. Turpentine has taken another ad- 
vance of 2c per barrel. Prices have 
been steadilv advancing at the manu- 
facturing point for some time, but it 
did not effect our prices on account of 
the large stocks held by the local job- 
bers. Now that these stocks are ex- 
hausted and new stock has to be pur- 
chased from the manufacturers a higher 
price will have to rule. Castor oil has 
advancing during the week l-2c per lb. 
and lc for single tins. The glass situa- 
tion remains unchanged. Some job- 
bers are advising their customers not to 
buy more than is really necessary before 
next Fall as they think the labor 
troubles will then be settled and the 
foreign manufacturers will be in a posi- 
tion to supply the Canadian market. As 
far as can be learned the amount of 
glass held by the local jobbers is small, 
in fact, some are trying to purchase in 



IT STIMULATES A DEALER 

TO PUSH HIS BUSINESS, if he has the satisfaction or feeling that he has bought wisely. 
Whether he has or not is evidenced by what is called for most in any particular line. 
If in the wall-coating line, he would not have to be a very close observer to realize that the demand 
is for CHURCH'S COLD WATER 

ALABASTINE 

a wall-coating made from a cement base, that will not rub or scale off. 

ALABASTINE is made in Paris, Canada, by Canadian labor, and from rock taken out of 

Canadian mines. It is TIME TBIED, and TIME TESTED 

ALABASTINE possesses every qualification to help establish and maintain a good trade. The 

fine, up-to-date advertising matter we furnish, and the thousands of dollars expended annually in 

advertising, are potent factors worthy of the consideration of any dealer in business to stay and to 

make money. 

ALABASTINE is in demand all the time, but principally in the spring. Have you ordered 

yet? " Do it Now." For sale by jobbers every where, and by 

The Alabastine Co., Limited, Paris, Ont. 



esa 



36 



January 21, 1905 



PAINT. OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware and Metal. 



Honest Industry and Hard Work Will Win 



We put this old saying in our pipe some 
years ago, and have been smoking it ever 
since. It suits us well. V\ e pa«s it on to 
you as a good thing for your business — that 
is, if you haven't already been using it. 



Granite Floor Paint 

— quick drying and durable. 

Made from the purest and finest m terials, 
and without doubt is the best Floor Paint 
on the market. 

It is a rapid seller. 



STANDARD PAINT & VARNISH CO., Limited, W INDS ™ 



TARIO 



ART GLASS 

UNEXCELLED 
MEMORIAL WINDOWS. 

H. E. St. George, London, Ont. 
IMPORTERS, ATTENTION 

Save money by consigning yo ir importations direct to des- 
tination and pay through freight charges only. Have your 
goods cleared and distributed by 

Turnbull & Henderson 

Customs Brokers, Forwarding and Distributing Agents, 
Vancouver, B. C. Satisfactory service guaranteed. 




A Popular. Profit- 
able and Seasonable 
Line to Handle. 

Dennis' 

Flexible Steel Wire 

Boor Mais 



DENNIS WIRE AND IRON CO. 

Send for Catalogue LONDON, ONT' 



McCaskill, Dougall & Co. 



Manufacturers 



RAILWAY, CARRIAGE AND BOAT VARNISHES. 
HIGH-GRADE FURNITURE and HOUSE VARNISHES. 

MONTREAL. 



ABOUT GLUES 



What kinds do you handle ? 

Are you and your customer s 

- satisfied ? Perhaps we can 

give you a better article at a fairer figure. Our SCOTCH GLUES will be found 

of exceptional strength, and equal to many glues for which much higher prices 

are charged. Let us send samples. 

GROVE CHEMICAL CO. Ltd, fK.V.Jr.'!'!.,. 



TRADE 




MARK 



IVbbles Sf Hoare. 

CORNWALL ROAD STAMFORD STREET. 

LONDON, ENG. 



Manufacturers 01 



HIGH-CLASS VARNISHES ONLY 

Which can be obtained direct from the works 
or from the principal Color Dealers in Canada 




A Few 

Minutes 

I 



will enable 
you to find 
out what you 
need to com- 
plete your 
stock of 
Island City 
Paints ^* >P 
Time is 
money in 
this case. 



P. D. DODS ®L CO., Montreal ^ Toronto & Vancouver 



Hardware and Metal. 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



January 21, 1905 



Announcement 

The 

Canada 
Paint 
Company 



take pleasure in stating 
that with the enlarged 
facilities afforded by 
their new Color House 
they are 
now manu 




Half of the Canada 
paint Company's 
Paris Green output 
for 1905 has already 
been mold. buyers 

SHOULD NOT DELAY 
SENDINO IN THEIR 
ORDERS 



jacturing 
for the 
coming 
season 
sufficient 
Pure Paris 
Green to 
s u p p I y 
the entire 
wants of the Dominion. 
Dealers will, therefore, be 
saved the annoyance of 
importing, the money 
is retained in Canada 
and the quality will, as 
usual, be pure, uniform 
and not excelled by any 
other. 

MADE IN CANADA. 



order to meet the demands of their cus- 
tomers . 

White Lead — Ex-Toronto, pure white 
lead, $4.75; No. 1, $4,371-2; No. 2, $4 
No. 3, $3,621-2; No. 4, $3.35 in pack- 
ages of 25 lbs and upwards; l-2c per lb 
extra will be changed for 12 1-2 lb 
packages; genuine dry white lead, in 
casks, $4.25. 

Red Lead — Genuine in casks of 560 
lbs, $4.25; ditto, in kegs of 100 lbs, 
$4.50; No. 1, in casks of 500 lbs, $3.75 
to $4; ditto in kegs of 100 lbs, $4.25. 

White Zinc— Genuine French V.M., 
in casks, $6 to $6.25; Lehigh, in casks, 
$6 to $6.25. 

Shingle Stain— In 5 gallon lots 75 to 
80c. per gallon. 

Paris White— 90c to $1 per 100 lbs. 

Whiting— 60 to 65c per 100 lbs;. Gild- 
ers' whiting, 75c. 

Shellac— Pure orange in barrels, 
$2.75 to $3; white, $2.85 to $3.10 per 
barrel; No. 1 (orange), $2.25. 

Linseed Oil Our quotation is: Raw, 
1 to 4 barrels, 44c; boiled, 47c; 5 to 9 
barrels, raw, 43c; boiled, 46c, Toronto, 
Hamilton, London, Elora and Guelph, 
net 30 days. Advance of 2c for deliv- 
ery to outside points. 

a urpentine— Single bbls 7Sc; 2 to 4 
ubls, 77c: 5 bbls and over 76c, f.o.b. 
point of shipment, net 30 days. For less 
quantities than barrels, 5c per gallon 
extra will be added, and for 5 gallon 
packages, 50c, and ID gallon packages 
80c will be charged. 

Glues— Broken sheet, in 200 lb. bbls, 
8 to 8 l-2c per lb; cabinet glue, in 
bbls, 111-2 to 12c; emery glue, in 
bbls, 17c; bookbinders', ground, 101-2c: 
lincst American white, 19c: No. 1 Am- 
erican white, 15c per lb. 

Putty— Ordinary, bladders in barrels, 
$1.6.") to $1.75: pure linseed oil, $2 to 
$2.10; bulk in barrels, $1.50; pure, 
$1 .95 to $2; 100 lb kegs 25c extra. 

Plaster Paris— New Brunswick, $2 
per barrel. 

Liquid Paints— Pure, $1.20 to $l'.3o 
per gallon; No. 1, $1.10 per gallon. 

Barn Paints— 60 to 70c per gallon. 

Bridse Paints— 75c to $1. 

Castor Oil— English, in cases, 8 1-2 to 
9c per lb and 10c for single tins. 

Glass— See current quotations at the 
end of this issue. 

Window Glass. 

MONTREAL. 

The chief talk in the trade is the 
Belgium strike. While it was reported 

last week that some dealers were 



threatenine to withdraw quotations, no 
truth in this has been established, it 
may be stated that Montreal window 
glass firms have acted very generously 
to the trade in not advancing prices 
when they had a good opportunity. 
i.arge sums of money could have been 
made by them. We quote as follows: 
1'irst break, fifty feet, $1.70; second 
break, $1.80; first break, 100 feet, $3.25; 
second break, 100 feet, $3.45; third 
break, 100 feet $4; fourth break, 100 
feet, $4.25; fifth break, 100 feet, $4.50; 
sixth break, 100 feet, $5; seventh break, 
100' feet, $5.50; and eighth break, 100 
feet, $6 ; Diamond star, or double thick, 
first break 50 feet, $2.30; second break 
50 feet, $2.50; first break, 100 feet, 
$4.40; second do., $4.80; third do., $5.75; 
fourth do., $6.50; fifth do., $7.50; sixth 
do., $8, and seventh do., $9. Double 
thick, first break, 50 feet, $3.45; second 
do., $3.75; first break 100 feet, $6.75; 
second do., $7.25 ; tHird do., $8.75 ; fourth 
do.. $10; fifth do., $11.50; sixth do., 
$12.50; seventh do., $14; eighth do.. 
$16.50; ninth do., $18: tenth do., $20; 
eleventh do., $24, and twelfth do., 
$28.50 . 

The discount from diamond glass is 
15 per cent, and from double thick is 
331-3 per cent. Terms four months, 
and 3 per cent, discount 30 days. 

Petroleum. 

Refined — Heavy shipments of October, 
November ami December has caused the 
demand to lie somewhat quieter and 
prices arc easier. A slight change is 
noticed in Canadian prime white and a 
range of prices is quoted this week in- 
stead of a set price as formerly. Our 
quotations are as follows: Water white, 
17c; Canadian prime while, 15 to 151-2c; 
American water white. 171-2 to 19c ex 
warehouse. 

Crude— A lessening of the export de- 
mand, causing an overproduction and a 
surplus, results in another general de- 
cline in price. We quote the follow- 
ing prices: Pennsylvania, $1.42; Corn- 
ing, $1.09: Newcastle, $1.34; North 
Lima. 95c; Tiona, $1.57: South Lima, 
90c: Somerset, 83c; Indiana, 90c: Can- 
adian. $1.3S. 



EXPORTS OF PIG IRON DECLINE. 

There were no shipments of pig iron 
from the Middlesbrough district of Eng- 
land to the United States for the eleven 
months ending November 30, 1904. For 
the corresponding period in 1903 there 
were 80,440 tons and in 1902 there were 
156.867 ions. 



3« 




HARDWARB AND METAL 



Just like fishing 

Building up trade is just like 
fishing. 

If you use the right kind of 
bait and cast your line where the 
kind of fish you want are most 
plentiful, you'll quite likely get a 
number of bites. 

Then if you go about it right 
you are pretty sure to land most 
of them. 

Apply the illustration to busi- 
ness 

If you want to catch the 
hardware trade, cast vour line 
where all the good hardware 
merchants in Canada congregate 
every week — looking for bait to 
build up their Dusinesses with — 
in Hardware and Metal. But 

■Suppose results don't come at fust 

What be yew goin' tur dew ? 
Take out yewr ad, and kick yewrself, 

An' go ter f eelin' blew '( 
Uv course yew hain't ; yew're goin tew rish, 

An' bait an' bait ag:r. ; 
Bimeby some nibbles n bites 11 come. 

Then yew'll pull em in. 

Our Department of Advertising 
Service is now providing good 
bait for a number of our adver- 
tisers — and stands ready to help 
a few more in this connection. 

Drop us a line about it. 



Hardware and Metal 



10 Front St. B 
Toronto. 









___ .^asg^ 




RLECTRICITY SIMPLIFIED 

By Prof. T. O'Connor Sloane. 

This work is the simplest ever published on the subject of Electricity, and 
does something not hitherto accomplished. The object of "Electricity Simpli- 
fied " is to make the subject as plain as possible, and to show what the modern 
conception of electricity is ; to Bhow how two plates of different metals immersed 
in acid can send a message around the globe ; to explain how a bundle of copper 
wire rotated by a steam engine can be the agent in lighting our streets ; to tell 
what the volt, ohm. and ampere are, and what high and low tension mean , and 
to answer the questions that perpetually a'rise in the mind in this age of electricity 

158 Pages. Fully Illustrated. • • Price, $1.00. 

THE Mac LEAN PUB/CO., - TORONTO 




!P§lMPUf)fO 
SLQANE 








The Sarnia Hub, Spoke and 
Bent Goods Mfg. Co. 

Sarnia, Ontario. 

We are prepared to fill any orders for 
Heavy Wagon, Sleigh, Buggy, and Cutter Stock 

We make a specialty of heavy stock and can fill orders 
promptly. Made from the best of oak and hickory as we carry a 
large stock of lumber and can make any sizes that may be re- 
quired. We make it a point to fill orders promptly. 

If you are in need of anything in our line we will be pleased 
to hear from you and we will give it our prompt attention. 

J. S. LOUGHEAD & SON, • Sarnia, Ontario 



GLAZIERS' DIAMONDS Sharratt & Newth 

— 43 and 44 Percival Street, ■ London, England 

Contractors to H. M. Government and the Principal English Sneetand Plate Glass Wocks. 
also Established 1815 

Lead Vices, 
Carbon Tools, 
Etc, Etc., 

Agents for Canada: A R amSa y & $011 COIllpaiiy, MOlltreal 

GLAZIER'S DIAMONDS 




Ahead of all others in quality and workmanship. If sparks of fine quality, set 
by experts, are what you require, buy Diamonds of A. Shaw & Son's make. 
Canadian Agent 

OODF-REV S. PELTON 

388 ST. PAUL ST., MONTREAL 



CELEBRATED 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS 



Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers' Shears, 
Tinners' Snips, ete. 





M ; 



ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST. 

R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. KI^TnT'S 1 



SEYMOUR 

SHEAR CO. 



TRADE MARK 



SEYMOUR SHEARS 



HAVE BEEN THE 

Standard for over Half a Century. 

"QUALITY unquestioned." 

Each pair of our shears bears the above trade mark. 




Complete Line TRIMMERS, BANKERS', BARBERS' and TAIL 
ORS' SHEARS, Etc., Etc. 

Henry T. Seymour Shear Company. 

WIEBUSCH & HILOER, Limited, NEW YORK. Sola Agents. 
39 



Hardware and Metal. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 21, 1905 



AN INTERESTING CONFERENCE 



A COMBINATION of machinery 
manufacturers which is rapidly 
assuming very large proportions, 
but of which little has been heard is 
Allis-Chahners-Bullock, limited, Mont- 
real. The directors were present at the 
beginning of the week tor the semi- 
annual meeting and met there the sales- 
men from all parts of the country. So 
well pleased were thev with the pros- 
pects of the Canadian company that they 
have formally pledged the support and 
assistance of the allied companies in the 
United States. 

It is a principle of the president, Mr. 
George Bullock, of Cincinnati, to keep 
in close touch with all departments. On 
Monday accordingly he met the salesmen 
and office staff at the works and ad- 
dressed them upon the policy of the 
company and its relations with the Am- 
erican companies. Mr. R. W. Chapin, the 
second vice-president and general man- 
ager, followed with a paper upon the 
future development of the Canadian 
works and new lines of manufacture that 
may be added. Papers upon different- 
features of the business were also read 
by the members of the staff. 

On Tuesday the salesmen attended a 
demonstration of the special points of 
the Ingersoll-Sergeant drills, coal cut- 
ters and compressors by Mi - . C. M. Mc- 
-.^ergon and a similar demonstration of 
electrical work by the chief engineer; 
Mr. H. A. Burson. 

The Dinner. 

On Tuesday night the directors tend- 
ered a complimentary dinner to the 
salesmen and members of the office staff 
at the Canada Club. 

in the centre of the table was a 
large model in flowers of the crest of 
the company, a. shield bearing the ini- 
tials, A. C. B., banked with maple leaves 
and bound with smilax. The chair was 
occupied by Mr. George Bullock, of Cin- 
cinnati, who is president of the com- 
pany, and the vice-chair by Mr. Edgar 
Macdougall, of Montreal, who is vice- 
president. There were over fifty present, 
all directly interested in the company. 
Among them were: Messrs. B. II. War- 
ren, president; W. Chalmers, treasurer, 
and \Y. II. Whiteside, general manager 
of sales of the Allis-Chalmeis Company 
of New York, Chicago and Milwaukee: 
J. S. Neave, vice-president of the Bul- 
lock Electric Manufacturing Company. 
Cincinnati; R. W. Chapin, second vice- 
president and general manager; Colonel 
Uenshaw, II. .1. Fuller, .7. W. Pyke, Alex. 



Cringle, Phelps Johnson, W. C. Mcln- 
tyre, all of whom are directors; W. C. 
Brown, H. Markland Molson, E. Kirke 
Greene, C. E. Gudewill with others fin- 
ancially interested, and Lieut. -Col. J. 
B. Maclean, of Hardware and Metal. 

The President's Speech. 

Mi-. Bullock, after the toast to the 
King and the President, referred to the 
events of a year ago, when he was ill 
and Mr. Neave closed the negotiations 
for the acquisition of the works. At 
that time the company did not exist, and 
last night there were over 50 present 
all deeply interested in the success of 
Allis-Chalmers-Bullock. They looked to 
their salesmen for success, and had every 
reason to believe they would succeed. 
They looked to the parent companies, the 
Allis-Chalmers Company, the Bullock 
Company, the Ingersoll-Sergeant Com- 
pany, and the Lidgerwood Company, for 
support and assistance. Without their 
sustaining powers the company could 
not exist. He had just returned from 
the Northwest and British Columbia, and 
was convinced that the success of the 
company was assured from that terri- 
tory. He proposed the toast of the 
salesmen, to which Mr. Alfred Collyer 
briefly replied. 

Speeches were delivered by Messrs. Bid- 
lock, Collyer, Warren, Chalmers, White- 
side and Neave, while songs and music 
filled in the rest of a most enjovable 
evening. 



A THREE-DAY CONVENTION. 

ON January 10, 11 and 12 a unique 
convention was held at the new 
home of the Frost Wh*e Fence 
Co., at Hamilton, when about 150 agents 
of the company from all parts of On- 
tario were entertained by the firm. On 
the first day of the convention the visi- 
tors in small parties were personally 
conducted through the extensive works 
and every possible point in the manu- 
facture of the. eornpanv's product was 
explained, the object being to make the 
agents thoroughly familiar with the 
goods they were called on to sell. Mem- 
bers of the firm gave their particular 
attention to each agent during the day. 

On the second day late comers and 
such others as cared to make the rounds 
again were conducted through the 
works and general meetings were held 
at which matters pertaining to the wel- 
fare and development of the business 
were freely . discussed. 

In the evening a banquet at the Royal 



Hotel was tendered the visitors. Mr. 
H. L. Frost, secretary of the company, 
presided and near him sat ex-Aid. Will- 
iam Findlay, Aid. J. M. Eastwood, John 
T. Hall and other prominent gentlemen. 

Before the toast list was proceeded 
with, Mr. Frost was presented with a 
handsome Morris chair and the follow- 
ing eulogistic, address: 
To Mr. H. L. Frost, our Manager: 

We, your local representatives, appre- 
ciating your successful exertions and 
enterprise, in building such a large and 
handsome factory for your growing 
works (which have grown very rapidly 
in the last few years), cannot let this 
opportunity pass without showing our 
appreciation of your untiring efforts and 
kindness to us in all your transactions 
and dealings with us, would present yon 
with this small token of our good will 
and res.iHt. not for its intrinsic value, 
but as a remembrance of our meeting 
here to-night. 

Wishing you and the Frost Fence 
Company many returns of this occasion. 

Signed on behalf of the local repre- 
sentatives of the Frost Wire Fence Com- 
pany : 

George West brook, Echo Place, Ont. 

J. \\ . Kennedy, Cedar Grove, Ont. 

S. oewell, Mount Albert, Ont. 

A. Mc.rkle, Scotland, Ont. 

William Blue, Palmyra, Ont. 

The toast list was as follows : 

"The King "-God Save the King. 

"Hamilton, the Manufacturing City" 
— Ex-Aid. Findlay, Assessment Commis- 
sioner John T. Hall, Aid. Eastwood. 

Song— W. A. Spratt. 

"Our Guests "-W. H. Crow, Wel- 
land; David Ross. Welland; ex-Mayor 
W. J. Best, Welland. 

"Our Customers"— Wm. Bule. 
Palmyra; N. W. Switzer, Streetsville ; 
Ohas. Taylor, Drumbo; E. Misener, 
.'oyle, R. Cronsberry, Virginia. 

"Frost Wire Fence Company, Limi- 
ted"— DArcy Martin, A. L. Page, R. 
H. Macoombe, Jos. Stoneham, H. L. 
Frost. 

"Irost Fence Hockey Team" — Chas. 
Hanson, Chas. Hae'ar, Geo. Peart. Clar- 
ence Morin. 

"The Ladies"-L. Munroe. 

"The Press" was also duly honored. 

On Thursday the entire company 
ooarded a special train and proceeded to 
Niagara Falls for a day*s outing. The 
pleasantest time imaginable was spent 
and on their return to Hamilton, the 
party dispersed to their homes full of 
enthusiasm for the Frost Wire Fence 
Company and its generous management. 



K) 



January 21, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



=| URN 

\m 21 y 




"Jewel" Knife and Scissor Sharpener 

The sharpener has 3 openings, the 2 at the sides to sharpen Scissors and one in the middle for Knives. 

To Sharpen Knives— Place the sharpener upright on the 2 rubber feet, put the blade of the knife in the middle 
opening with the cutting edge pressing slightly against the 2 round sharpeners and draw it toward you. 

If the cutting edge of the blade is very uneven it can be made straight on the 2 flat sides which are filled with 
emery, and after this is done sharpen as above directions. 

On " Jewel " sharpener No. 2 there is on an elastic bed an emery paper to clean rust, etc. The emery paper can 
be easily renewed by removing the tacks. 

To Sharpen Scissors.— Take the instrument in the left hand and lay it on he table so that the iron foot rests on 
the table and with the right hand put the blade of the Scissor (according to the si e of it) in the upper or lower opei ing 
pressing the edge of the blades lightly on the 2 round sharpeners, drawing the blade towards you. Hold the blade so 
that it presses against the flat side of the opening. 

MONTREAL. 



F. W. LAMPLOUGH & CO., 



Cuxfcr 

Window and Sidewalk 

Prisms 



Do Von Want More Business 



STORE 

FRONTS 
OUR 

SPECIALTY 



for 1905 ? 



SEND FOR 
INFOR- 
MATION 



If so, make your premises Bright, Light 
and Up-to-date. 

A Daylight Store Draws Trade. 



LIXFER PRISM CO., LTD., 'oo k.ng st. w ., Toronto. 



FAIRBANKS 



WERE AWARDED THE 



GRAND PRIZE 



AT THE 



LOUISIANA PURCHASE EXPOSITION 

THIS IS THE 

HIGHEST AWARD 

AND THE ONLY GRAND PRIZE GIVEN 
TO SCALES. 



Remember, this was in 
competition with 
the World. 

OUR 

SCALE CATALOGUE 

SENT 

ON REQUEST. 



THE FAIRBANKS CO. 




MONTREAL 



VANCOUVER 



WINNIPEG 



ONEIDA 

COMMUNITY'S 

WELDLESS 

COW TIES. 

Illustration shows the 

NIAGARA W,RE L1NK 

OPEN RING TYPE 



Also made in CLOSED RING, THREE CHAIN 
and DOMINION (or "Short") TYPES. 

Oneida Community Cow Ties can be had of all 
the leading jobbers. We invite correspondence 
where any difficulty is experienced in obtaining 
our goods. 



ONEIDA COMMUNITY, Limited 

NIAGARA FALLS, ONT. 




41 



Hardware and Metal. 



January 21, 1905 




Hardware and Metal would be pleased to receive from any authoritative source industrial news of any sort, the 
formation or incorporation of companies, establishment or enlargement of mills, factories foundries or other 
works, railway or mining news, etc. All such correspondence will be treated as confidential when desired. 

\ CCORDING to an estimate, the 885, a decrease of 1 1-3 per cent, as 

£\ mineral production of Canada compared with the preceding year. Our 

for 1904 will exceed that exports to Great Britain show a much 

of last year by over $3,500,000. The greater shrinkage, having fallen from 

increase took place in gold, silver, lead $125,199,980 to $110,120,896, a decrease 

and coal. It is estimated that during of 12 per cent. 

1904 there were mined 57,050 ozs. of Production of coal and coke in the 

placer gold, 256,135 ozs. of lode gold, Crow's Nest Pass collieries for the year 

3,505,805 ozs. of silver, 36,688,580 lbs. 1904 was higher than in any previous 

of copper, 37,000,000 lbs. of lead, 1,- year. The following table shows the 

668,000 tons of coal, and 272,400 tons production for five years: 

of coke. Consumed 

In England during 1904 the output of in ^"g da ' T^nsT*' Tons' 1 

iron ore was 13,715,645 tons, which is 1900 211,533 8°925 22o"45S 

an increase of 289,641 tons over the 1901 343,860 81,597 425,457 

previous year, but the value, $16,149,- 1902 87,643 33,134 120,777 

685 is less hv $290 820 than in 1903 1903 498,166 162,952 661,118 

685, is less by $290,820 than in 1904. lgfl4 58 1,634 162,366 744,000 

The imports of iron ore during the year Production of coke: 

were 6,314,162 tons, 78 per cent, of 1900 45,445 28,051 73,196 

which came from Spain. 1901 89,678 35,407 125,085 

.... . NT „, , . 1902 87,643 33,134 120,777 

An industrial boom in New Westmm- iqqs 136 650 31 089 167 739 

ster, B. C, and its vicinity, promises 1904 138^976 105^924 244',000 

to be a feature of the present year. companies incorporated. 

Mills that have been closed for ten and Commercial Twine Co., Montreal, 

fifteen years are to be opened, re-fitted capital gtock $10000; purpose to trade 

and run on a very extensive scale. in twine _ col . dage> paper> tar> paint> etc 

Sites have been purchased for the erec- The directors are: j R Converse, J. 

tion of a tannery and several saw and Marsdeil) G Hiam> c Pangmani and 

grist mills. j Oswald, all of Montreal. 

Because of tbe refusal of the mining Brick Mfg and Supply Co., London, 

company to pay $15,426 claimed under share capital $40,000; purpose to manu- 

the Act providing for a tax of 2 per f ac ture and deal in all kinds of builders' 

cent, on all ore mined, the Government ma terial and supplies. The directors 

ordered the seizure of the Le Roi mine are: Wi Tytler, R. G. Wilson, T. Jones, 

near Rossland. However, when the H Singi and j Whittaker, all of Lon- 

seizure was made the company imme- don 

diately furnished a bond sufficient to Wilberforce Lumber Co., Durham, 

cover the amount demanded and the snare capital $40,000; purpose to manu- 

deputy sheriff left the property. facture lumber, railroad ties, shingles, 

Receipts of Canada for the year end- veneer, telegraph poles, pulpwood, etc. 

ing June 30th last, on account of the The directors are: G. Sparling, A. S 

consolidated fund, amounted to $70,- Hunter, and D. Jamieson, all of Dur- 

669,816, and the expenditure of same ham. 

amounted to $55,612,832, thereby show- Gold Stock Manufacturers, Montreal, 

ing a surplus of $15,056,894. The ex- capital stock $20,000; intend to manu- 

penditure (charged to capital was $7,- f ac ture and deal in gold, silver, rolled 

881,718, railway subsidies received $2,- plate) and other jewelry. The directors 

046,878, and $1,130,041 was paid out on are: T . j. Fisher, A. J. Hart, H. J. 

account of bounties. The net debt at r 0SSi rj. Bolt, and P. A. Raab, all of 

the close of the fiscal year was $260,- Montreal. 

867,718, a reduction from the previous Maritime Express Co., Ottawa, capi- 

year of $739,270. tal stock $15,000; purpose to carry on 

Exclusive of corn and bullion, which the business of a general express corn- 
amount to between $7,000,000 and $8,- pany. The directors are: F. H. Crysler, 
000,000 yearly, Canada's total imports c. J. R. Bethune, N. G. Larmonth, and 
from United States in the fiscal year g. G. Chrysler, all of Ottawa, and P. 
1904 amounted to $143,010,578, an in- Gifkins of Kentville. 
crease of 11 per cent, over the imports Buffalo & Leamington Oil & Gas Co., 
of 1903. Of this total $65,466,798 Windsor, share capital $100,000; purpose 
worth was admitted free and $77,543,- to explore and operate for petroleum 
780 worth paid duty. Canada's exports oil, gas and salt. The directors are: 
to United States amounted to $66,856,- E. Wigle, of Leamington; C. L. Meyer, 

42 



township of Pelee, county of Essex; and 
L. J. Gemmell, of Perth. 

Canadian Corundum Wheel Co., Ham- 
ilton, share capital $40,000; purpose to 
manufacture and sell corundum and em- 
ory wheels and emory wheel grinding 
machines. The directors are: L. Sherk, 
H. E. Sherk, G. F. Webb, W. Bell, and 
A. S. Devine, all of Hamilton. 

Stratford Mill Building Co., Strat- 
ford, 'share capital $200,000; purpose to 
manufacture and sell mill machinery, 
boilers, engines, threshers and separa- 
tors and other machinery. The direc- 
tors are: W. Preston, J. B. Greig, and 

E. M. Preston, all of Stratford. 
Higston-Smith Arms Co., Winnipeg, 

capital stock $50,000; purpose to acquire 
and carry on the business of the Higs- 
ton-Smith Arms Co. To deal in all 
kinds of sporting goods. The directors 
are: K. T. Putnam, C. M. Scott, H. 
Archibald, and II. B. Tolton, all of 
Winnipeg. 

Canada Tin Plate and Sheet Steel Co.', 
Morrisburg, share capital $1,500,000 ; 
purpose to manufacture every descrip- 
tion of iron, steel, tin and other metal 
work. The directors are: N. D. Lewis, 
of Wales, England, J. A. Meldrum, W. 
D. Cavendish, A. E. Panter, and B. I) 
Cole, all of Toronto. 

A. Weller & Co., Toronto, share capi- 
tal $40,000; purpose to acquire and as- 
sume and continue as a going concern, 
the business of builders and contractors 
heretofore carried on by the late A. 
Weller and J. Stares. The directors 
are: J. Stares, W. Weller, and J. Wel- 
ler, all of Toronto. 

St. Mary's Quarries, Limited, Si. 
Mary's, share capital $200,000; purpose 
to quarry, manufacture and deal in 
stone, building stone, crushed stone, 
Portland cement, lime, etc. The direc- 
tors are: A. Douglas, T. T. Garner, and 
J. W. Graham, all of St. Mary's; D. 
Bonis, of the township of Blanshard, of 
the county of Perth; and A. Calley, of 
Toronto. 

Anglo-Canadian Leather Co., Mont 
real, capital stock $2,000,000; purpose 
to carry on the business of importing, 
exporting, tanning, manufacturing and 
dealing in hides and leather of every de- 
scription. The directors are: B. Shaw, 
Boston, Mass.; C. T. Shaw, T. D. Stew- 
art, B. A. Shaw, and F. C. Bush, all 
of Montreal. 4 

Acme Mfg. Co., Toronto, share capi- 
tal $10,000; purpose to manufacture, 
deal, and sell all kinds of weighing 
scales, scales machinery, engines, boil- 
ers, motors, motor vehicles, electrical 
appliances, electrical machinery, im- 
plements, plumbers' supplies, foundry 
supplies, etc. The directors are: J. T. 
Eastwood, N. Murphy, E. E. Wallace, 

F. Hodgson, and A. J. Walker, all of 
Toronto. 



January 21, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their ad- 
vertisement in Hardware and Metal. 




"THE ENILYN" SAW BENCH 

Made in 6 sizes. Best value obtainable. Specially 
designed for export With or without "Emlyn ' 
Patent Guard. Sole maker — 

CHARLES D. PHILLIPS, 

Cables — Emlyn Engineering Work* 

"Machinery." Newport. Newport. Mon., England 



"The Tool Holder People" 

Armstrong Bros. 

Tool Company 

Manufacturers uf Armstrong Patent Lathe and Planer 
Tools and other machine shop specialties. 

617-621 Austin Ave., CHICAGO, ILL. 




STREET PAVING and SIDEWALKS a SPECIALTY 

SILICA BARYTIC STONE CO. 

OF ONTARIO Limited 

Head Office : 

Ingersoll, Ontario. 

Walter Mills.GeneralManager 

Ask for quotations for 

Septic Tanks. 



Wat-r Proof Floo'S tor 
Malt Houses, Brewer- 
ies, Slaughter Houses, 
Cheese Factories, Cel 
lar, Stable Floors, etc 



"MAPLE LEAF" 
Stitched Cotton Duck Belting 



< 
< 

< 



< 




o 
m 



o 

O 



"Maple Leaf" is made of the best cotton duck, 
woven to our special formula. 

" Maple Leaf" is the truest running belt on the 

market. 
" Maple Leaf" is superior to either Rubber or 

Leather, and in many places will 

do work that no other make of 

belt will. 

" Maple Leaf" is suitable for all kinds of factories, 
mills, etc., for power and carrying 

Main Drive Belts a specialty. 

Ask for " Maple Leaf" and take no other. 

Beware of Imitations 

MANUFACTURED ONLY BY THE 

Dominion Belting Company 

Limited 

MAHILTON, ONTARIO. 

Use our " Maplb Lkaf " Belt Dressing. 



THE ACME LATHE & PRODUCTS CO.. LTD. 

TRAFFORD PARK, flANCHESTER. 

We have arranged to carry a large stock of Square and Hex Cap Screws, Square 
Set Screws. Bright Bolts. Washers, etc., in Canada, and can deliver from Canadian 
stock after February 1st., 1905. It will pay you, if you are a buyer of these goods, to get 
in touch with us. 

Temporary Offices 

25 Queen City Chambers, Church St., TORONTO. 



Clauss Brand BARBERS' Shears 
FULLY 



WARRANTED. 

Solid Steel and Steel Faced. Hand forged from Finest Steel 

These Shears are especially tempered for the purpose they are intended 
FULL NICKEL PLATE FINISH. 
Write for Trade Discounts. 

CLAUSS SHEAR CO., 169 Spadina Ave., Toronto, Ont. 

H. k B. SINGLE GUN AUTOMATIC AND NON-EJECTING 




12, 16 and 20 Gauge, 
Steel and Twist Barrels 



Superior in Design, Workmanship 
and Finish, and the most popular 
Gun on the Market. 



Simplest 
Take Down ' 
Gun Mad* 




BABBIT 




N90p ; f. 
N9 | 

STAR 
SPECIAL I 
HERCULES 
METALLIC 
IMPERIAL 



THE 



(anaoa Metal (p. 



William StJORONTO. telephone main 1729. 




Cap Screws, Set Screws, 
Machine Screws, 

Cold Pressed Nuts, 

Studs, Coupling Bolts, 

SPECIAL MILLED WORK, Etc 

CANADA FOUNDRY CO, LiM 

Head Office and Works; TORONTO, ONT 

DISTRICT OFFICES, 

MONTREAL, HALIFAX, OTTAWA, WINNIPEG, 
CALGARY, VANCOUVER, ROSSLANO, 




43 



Hardware and Metal. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 21, 1905 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their ad- 
vertisement in Hardware and Metal. 

ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
13 St. John Street, Montreal 



Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishing to be represented in Canada. 



Orlan Clyde Culien.G.E.L.L.M. 

Counseller at Law U.S. Supreme Court. 
Registered Attorney U.S. Patent Office, 

U.S. and Foreign Patents, Caveats, Copy- 
rights and Trade Marks. Military a n ^ 
Naval Inventions a specialty. Address, 

Box 264, Station G, Washington, D.C. 

GUN SHOP and MODEL SHOP 

Warren White Sulphur Springs, 

Totten P.O., Virginia. 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights &c. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. Handbook on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice, without c harg e, in the 

Scientific American. 

A. handsomely illustrated weekly. Largest cir- 
culation of any scientific journal. Terms, $3 a 
year ; four months, $1. Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN & Co. 36lBroadwa ^ New York 

Branch Office, 625 F St., Washington, D. C. 



"OH, YES!" 




THE 

Banner 

LEADS. 

QUALITY 

TALKS. 



Take the Best 

at the 

Same Price. 



LARGESr OIL WELL, DAEGH1EST LIGHT. 

For sale by all prominent dealers. Made by the 

Ontario Lantern & Lamp Co., 

HAMILTON, ONT. 




ONTARIO. 

Teeswater Light & Power Co., Tees- 
water, have sold to W. H. Green. 

J. Smith, planing mill owner, Tillson- 
burg, has sold to West & Jackson. 

The foundry owned by J. L. Connor. 
Ottawa, has been damaged by fire. 

Fensom Elevator Co., Toronto, have 
suffered loss to woodwork department 
by fire. 

G. H. White, plumber and tinsmith, 
Port Colbome, has assigned to D. H. 
McLeod. 

The business of T. Bullyment, harness 
merchant, Owen Sound, is advertised 
for sale. 

W. A. MacDonald, hardware mer- 
chant, Park Hill, has sold to Brewer & 
Harrison. 

W. Saunders, manufacturer of lum- 
ber, Dutton, has admitted W. F. Kendall 
as partner. 

W. G. Whyte & Co., hardware mer- 
chants, Arnprior, have dissolved part- 
nership. W. G. Whyte continues. 

W. H. Howey, harness maker, Delhi, 
has assigned to R. A. Dickson. A 
meeting of 'creditors was held January 
19. 

The stock of the Fishleigh hardware 
store, Gorrie, was sold by auction at 
London on January 6 to Mr. Davis, of 
Mitchell. 

QUEBEC. 

Jos. Lambert, Jr., contractor, Mont- 
real, is dead. 

Cote & Fils, saw mill owners, Belisle's 
Mills, have assigned. 

Drolet & Forget, plumbers, Montreal 
(Maisonneuve), have dissolved partner- 
ship. 

T. M. Morgan, cement manufacturer, 
Longue Pointe, is offering' 10c on the 
dollar. 

0. H. Skroder and D. M. Campbell 
have registered under the style of Camp- 
bell & Skroder, lumber merchants, Kis- 
kissink. 

MANITOBA ANU N.W.T. 

Western Implement Mfg. Co., Winni- 
peg, is advertised for sale by tender. 

J. H. Wilson, hardware merchant, 
Neepawa, has sold to Geo. Kellington. 

G. A. Denwoody, dealer in agricultural 
implements, Neepawa, has suffered loss 
to premises by fire. 

Munro & Heatherins'ton, dealers in 
agricultural implements, Garfcwright, 
have dissolved partnership. 

The assets of the estate of Knox Bros. 
& Faija, lumber merchants, Gladstone, 
were sold by auction on January 18. 

G. Smiley, dealer in lumber and agri- 
cultural implements, Manor, is to be 
succeeded by G. & J. J. Smiley on 
March 1. 

NEW BRUNSWICK. 

Jas. Pender & Co., nail manufacturers, 
St. John, have suffered slight damage to 
plant by fire. 

44 



CONDENSED MACHINERY ADVERTISE* 
MENTS. 



YEARLY CONTRACT RATES. 

100 words each insertion, 1 year $30 00 

" " 6 months 17 00 

" " " 3 months 10 00 

50 " " 1 year 17 00 

" " " 6 months 10 00 

25 " " 1 year 10 00 



MACHINERY WANTED. 



Items under this heading inserted free for readers of 
Hardware and Metal 



STRONG C>lumn Drill — To swing about 36-in.; 
must be in good order and (heap ; also a port- 
able engine and boiler, about 10 h-p, Bridge 
Works, Mitchell, Ont. 

\W ANTED — One second-hand clam shell digger, 
' » with traveling derrick, complete ; and one 
second-hand locomotive, from 15 t<-> 20 tons ; must 
be in good condition. A. G. Creasor, Owen 
Sound 

WANTED — Sawing Machine — new or second- 
hand ; for sawing stove wood. Box 278, 
Port Elgin. 

WANTED — Screw-cutting lathe — in — for motor 
cycle. Horton, London, Ont. 



MACHINERY FOR SALE. 



Rates for first insertion 2c. a word, and for subsequent 
insertions lc. a word. 



BOILER FOR SALE— 60 h.p., second-hand, 
return tubular boiler, good as new ; bargain. 
Address Box 41, Hardware and Metal. 

ENGINE FOR SALE— 16 h.p.; stationary, side 
crank. Price $75. Address Box 37. Hard- 
ware and Metal, Montreal. 

ONE second-hand gap lathe; swings 40 in. and 
26 in.; 12-ft. 6-in. bed. Address Box 748, 
Montreal. 







NE second-hand shafting lathe, 26-in. swing, 
20-ft. bed. Address Box 748, Montreal. 



STANDARD SCALES, valve = , trucks, steam 
specialties; W. I. pipe and fittings, machine 
tools, mill supplies, scale repairing a specialty: 
prompt delivery from stock; write for prices. The 
Fairbanks Co., Toronto. 

A/IARINE Engines and Boilers — Large assort- 
■ '» ment ; send for stock list Doty Engine 
Works Co., Limited, Goderich. 

MACHINERY for Sale— Two large die presses; 
' I one large iron drill ; cheap for immediate 
sale; in fir;,t-class order. United factories, Lim- 
ted, 164 Adelaide West. 



SITUATION WANTED. 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEER — Long practical 
experience in fitting up and taking charge ; 
also estimating and consulting. J. Pearce, New 
Liskeard, Temiskaming, Ont. 



Macdonald & Watson, mill and lum- 
ber merchants, Huntsville, have dis- 
solved partnership. J. A. Macdonald 
continues. 



janrary 21, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



The Way 
to Value 
Horse Nails 



What is meant by value ? It is 
a ratio — one thing as compared 
with another. You must therefore 
have a standard of value ; hence 
there are standards for weights and 
measures ; standards for wheat and 
so forth. 

What is " No i Manitoba 
Hard ? " It is the best wheat the 
country produces — therefore se- 
lected as a standard. 

What does the " C " brand on 
a box of Horse Nails mean ? That 
it represents the best " made in 
Canada," and has been accepted as 
such for forty years by the Hard- 
ware and Farrier trade, as the 
highest standard for Horse Nails. 

The best Horse Nails are the 
most economical to use, and you 
can always be sure of getting the 
best by ordering the " Q " brand. 

We make them by our own 
special process, from the best ma- 
terial known in the world for the 
purpose — Swedish Charcoal Steel. 
They will outwear any other nail. 

All the leading wholesale hard- 
ware firms have the " C " brand 
for sale. Your preference in order- 
ing solicited. 



Canada Horse Nail Co. 

MONTREAL. 



CANADIAN DISTRICT CHAMPIONS. 

FE. MUTTON, Canadian manager 
. for the National Cash Register 
Co., has just returned with his 
staff from attending the annual two 
weeks' convention of the firm at Dayton, 
Ohio. The following gentlemen from 
Canada were present: F. E. Mutton, 
district manager for Canada; A. Black- 
well, .sales agent, Montreal, Que.; J. M. 
Roy, sales agent, Province of Quebec ; 
J. J. Quinn, sales agent, Province of 
Quebec; J. P. Mason, sales agent, city 
of Montreal; J. A. Hossack, salesman, 
city of Montreal; A. Gr. Fiddis, sales- 
man, city of Montreal; R. E. Van Dyke, 
sales agent, Nova Scotia; F. W. Thomas, 
sales agent, New Brunswick; Win. 
Brizzolari, sales agent, Northwest Ter- 
ritories; B. L. Robinson, sales agent, 
Northwest Territories; G. A. Christie, 
sales agent, Northwestern Ontario; C. 
H. Collins, sales agent, city of Toronto ; 
W. J. Irvine, salesman, city of Toronto; 
W. W. Digby, sales agent, Southwestern 
Ontario; W. A. Harston, sales agent, 
Northwestern Ontario; W. D. McDon- 
ald, sales agent, Western Ontario; J. 
D. Roberts, sales agent, Central Ontario; 
W. E. Wright, sales agent Eastern On- 
tario; J. T. Brownrigg, office manager, 
Toronto, Out.; H. A. Scott, salesman, 
Toronto office; C. J. Whipple, sales 
agent, Manitoba; C. S. Faul, office man- 
ager, Winnipeg, Man.; J. E. Mclntyre, 
sales agent Manitoba; 0. K. Morris, 
salesman, Winnipeg, Man.; Jas. Ander- 
son, salesman, Manitoba; Jas. W. Du- 
Laney, manager Canadian factory, To- 
ronto, Ont. 

The delegates also included represen- 
tatives from all parts of the world. 

The Canadian representatives had the 
satisfaction of bringing home with them 
a beautiful silk banner as the champion 
selling district of the world for National 
Cash Registers. The banner is being 
proudly displayed by Mr. Mutton in the 
offices of the company in the Rossin 
House block, King si reel west, Toronto. 



ANNIVERSARY NUMBER. 

M. T. Richardson Company, publish- 
ers, No. 27 Park Place, New York, have 
just issued the 25th anniversary number 
of the "Blacksmith and Wheelwright," 
a trade magazine devoted to the condi- 
tions of the blacksrnithing and cariiagc- 
building industries. A special cover has 
been designed for this number, the sub- 
ject being a rustic blacksmith and 
carriage shop', showing the blacksmith 
busily engaged shoeing a horse. Among 
the articles is one with illustrations ex- 
plaining how to build a democrat wag- 
on; another describes a model shop, 
while still others deal witli prominent 
blacksmiths, power-driven shops, hints 
on varnishing, how to make hatchets, 
how to weld, etc. 



45 



BOOKS FOR 
BUSINESS MEN 



Manufacturing Cost 

By H. L. C. Hall. 

I>ealt with along general lines and not from the stand- 
point of any particular industry. 

The whole organization and conduct of a factory from 
the purchasing agent to the salesman are considered ex- 
haustively. An invalnahle work. 

Descriptive pamphlet on request 



Cloth bound, 

Price, postpaid, 



$3.00 



Business Short Cuts 

In Accounting, Advertising, Book- 
keeping, Card Indexing, Corres- 
pondence, Management. 

Compiled by a Board of Experts. 

These methods are practical ; in daily use by experts who 
charge *25.00 to xlOO.OO a day for their services. 

Descriptive pamphlet on request 

Cloth bound, Ct f\f\ 

Price, postpaid, S>I.UU 



Thome's Twentieth 
Century Book-keeping 
and Business Practice 

A new and model work on Bookkeeping. Not a re-written 
work, but an absolutely new book from cover to cover. Not 
an old or out-of-date method or illustration in it. 

It constitutes an Illustrated Dictionary. It contains 
Three Sets of Accounts -Models worked out in detail, and 
a host of special forms for special uses. Corporation 
Accounts are treated with special care and thoroughness. 
There is no other book which will so easily teach you to be a 
good bookkeeper. 

Descriptive pamphlet on request 

Bound in half leather, 

Price, postpaid, 



$3.00 



Hardware Store 
Business Methods 

Compiled and Edited by R. R. Williams, 

Hardware Edhor of the I ROM Ace. 

The thorough and practical treatment of the important 
subjects discussed, the embodiment in these articles of the 
experience of men of ability and enterprise, the suggestive- 
ness of the principles and maxims thus presented, will, it is 
hoped, render the volume useful to many and tend to elevate 
still further the business methods of the hardware trade. 



Cloth bound, 

Price, postpaid, 



$1.00 



The American 

Hardware Store 

A Manual of Approved Methods 
of Arranging- and Displaying 
Hardware. 

By R. R. Williams, 

Hardware Editor of the Iron AGE. 

This liook is descriptive of the hest methods of accom- 
modating and displaying the large variety of goods which 
are carried in stock in representative American and Cana- 
dian hardware stores. Copiously illustrated, and worth 
many times its cost to every progressive hardware dealer. 

Cloth hound, 6 ; + x 9 4 , 
576 pages. Price, postpaid, 



S3.00 



ADDRESS 
TECHNICAL BOOK DEPARTMENT, 

MacLEAN PUBLISHING CO. 

LIMITED 

TORONTO 



Hardware and Metal. 



January 21, 1905 




fill Hold Dp a Shelf! 

That's what a shelf bracket is for. 
For this purpose there can be Nothing Bet 
ter. Nothing Cheaper than the BRADLEY 
STEEL BRACKET. It is well Japann ed, Strong 
and Light. The saving in freight is a good profit, 
aside from the lower price at which the goods are 
sold. Order direot or through your jobber. 

ATLAS MFC. CO., 

New Haven, Conn.. U.8.A 

Subscribe to the 

OIL HID COLQURMAN'S JOURNAL 

for news of the Oil, Paint, Soap, Varnish 
Chemical and Drysaltery Trades. 

Subscription. $2.00 per year from date. 
Sample for 10 cents. 

SCOTT, GREENWOOD A CO. 

19 LUDOATE HILL LONDON, ENO. 



Order a stook of 

"Windmill Best" 
Galvanized Sheets 

Cut Prices Quality Right 

Made by 

John Summers & Sons, Ltd. 

STALYBRIDGE. ENO. 

Weekly output, 2,000 tons of sheets. 
Canadian Agent, 



F. HANKIN, 



Montreal 



R3 

f VGRK, 

friaf^ 



See that 

YORK METAL POLISH 

is the one you sell. 

It beats every other 
kind. , ULlSfll 

Matchless for metals. 

Liquid or Paste 

10c. SIZES AND UPWARDS 

Get it from your jobber 

ANGLO-CANADIAN SUPPLY GO. 

29 Church-St., TORONTO. 



The original ana only Genuine, 
Preparation for Cleaning Cut- 
lery. 6d. and Is. Canister* 



OAKEY'S 

'WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE POLISH 

JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 

MANUFACTURERS OP 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Hills, London, England 

Agent : 

JOHN FOEMAN, 644 Craig; Street 

MONTREAL. 




Welsh Tin Plate Industry Active. 

THREATENED industries, like 
threatened men, not only live 
long, but appear often to increase 
in robustness as they get far advanced 
"ii life's journey. Such certainly ap- 
pears to be the case with the tin plate 
industry of Smith Wales, which, says the 
Iron and Coal Trade News of London, 
has probably never been enjoying a 
greater measure of prosperity, measured 
by the nnmher of hands and of mills 
employed, than it is having at this mo- 
ment. About a month ago— and presum- 
ably at the present time— there were no 
fewer than .'i!>4 tin plate mills employed 
in Great Britain, and these collectively 
found work for 19,760 workpeople. We 
should compute this record as equal to 
an output of fully half a million tons 
of tin plates per annum. The number of 
mills actually built appears from the 
Board of Trade returns to be materially 
larger, and the number actually engag- 
ed was 4(i greater than a vear ago. A 
considerable number of mills have lately 
been engaged on the production of black 
plates and sheets, and to this extent the 
output of tin plates has been affected. 
The extremely local character of the in- 
dustry is indicated by the fact that 384 
of the 394 mills at work are in the 
South Wales. Monmouthshire and 
Glamorganshire districts. 

Chicago's Stove Business. 

THE Chicago Tribune of recent date 
^ays : "Stove manufacturers in 
Chicago estimate an increase in 
business for the year just past of about 
10 per cent. There lias been something 
of a revival of the use of hard coal stoves 
since the passing of the unpleasant days 
when prices went almost out of reach on 
the anthracite strike. Wholesale stove 
dealers had to contend with the fact 
that large stocks were carried over from 
the former vear. The year closes with 
the trade in much belter condition than 
it began and with I he foundries turning 
mil more slock, lor which there is ready 
demand. There was a noticeable dis- 
placement of oil stoves and other con- 
trivances used when coal was a I high 
prices. Liberal sales are reported of the 
small class of stoves which use any kind 
of coal or weed and are of the hoi blasl 
46 



order, which became popular during the 
strike. A leading radiator company es- 
timates about .") pier cent, increase in the 
sale and distribution of water and steam 
heating apparatus. Cost of production 
was increased by higher prices for steel 
and iron.'' 

More Stove Poetry. 
There seems 1o be a mania for expa- 
tiating in verse on the merits of various 
brands of stoves. Here is a good one 
from the American Artisan: 

Hot and hottest ! we should say, 
Here's I lie new heat of to-day. 
Here's the Heater— and no less, 
That is just its business, 
Red hot is its record past, 
Nothing's like the Globe Hot Blast. 

It's the winner everywhere, 
Regulated by the air, 
All is in the draft, you know. 
Make it fierce or soft and low, 
Shut it off, tour fire will last 
Days inside the Globe Hot Blast. 

Tis the loveliest of the line, 

It is fine and superfine, 

'Tis a jewel on your hearth 

And the Best stove on the earth; 

All the others are outclassed 

By the famous Globe Hot Blasl. 

It is rich and it is rare, 

'Tis the Heater everywhere, 

Saves in fuel what it cost 

In the first six months of frost ; 

\'<> stove yields a heat so vast 

As the charming Globe Hot Blast. 

It is gorgeous, neat and clean, 
And will please wherever seen, 
It will do just what you please 
For it's managed with all ease ; 
Made to warm you and to last 
Is the modern Globe Hot Blast. 

A New Heating Device. 

CS. L. BAKER, a St. Joseph, Mo., 
colored man, has invented a heat- 
ing apparatus which it is claimed 
will produce heat without the use of com- 
bustion al all. friction being Hie agency 
employed. 

Baker's invention consists of a steel 
tube surrounded by a jacket and inside 
of the tube a wooden roller cut into 
four triangular seel ions and arranged 
about a steel shaft. The wooden roller 
is live inches in diameter, and the inside 
of the tube in which it runs is six inches 
in diameter. The water chamber out- 
side of the lube is ten inches in diameter, 
leaving four inches in the water cham- 
ber. The model is about three feet long. 
It is Baker's claim that the machine 
will finally do away with combustion for 
all purposes except possibly foundry 
furnaces and in other cases where great 
heat is required. For all ordinary heat- 
ing' purposes the machine he has invent- 
ed will sullice. 






January 21, 1905 



S o larine 
Bar Polish 

Best and cheapest preparation for 
polishing: — Brass, Copper, Steel, 
Tin, Zinc, Bar Fixtures, Kitchen 
Utensils. 

A rapid cleaner expressly designed 
for all kitchens. 

For Ontario, Address 

H. F. FALKINER, 

SO George St., TORONTO 



E. T. Wright & Co., Hamilton, Oil 




HARDWARE AND METAL 

Arrow Brand Asphalt Ready Roofing 



A PERMANENT 

and Handsome Roof. 







Will bring you profitable trad* and satisfied customers. Comes in rolls ready to 
lay, all ready corered with gravel. Requires no experienoe to lay, and lasts 
for years without further attention. 

A. C. JENKING, Sole Agent, 
Room 210 Coristine Building, - MONTREAL. 

Sole agents being appointed in each district. Write to-day 





INIIflnm -air 



Ridgely's Model B 
Trimmer 

In conjunction with our famous 
THREE-PIECE STRAIGHTEDGE 

makes an outfit for trimming paper 
that will do the work in one-sixth the 
time it takes to do it with a knife or 
shears, and do it accurately. Guar- 
anteed to give perfect satisfaction. 
For full particulars address 

THE RIDGELY TRIMMER CO., 

Manufacturers, 
Paper Hangers' Supplies, 

SPRINGFIELD, OHIO, U.S.A. 

Send for Catalogue No. 16. 



MILK CANS, 

MILK CAN TRinniNGS, 
SAP BUCKETS, 
SAP SPOUTS, 
DAIRY PAILS, 

STRAINER PAILS, ETC. 



67 

-Wood age has passed 

-Iron age has come 

-So has Cutt's All Metal Ash Sifter. 

-The best sifter made, bar none. 

-Retails for 25c. 



68 

— Gentlemen, your orders. 

— We ship to the north pole, and 

nearer points. 

— Would like to ship some to you. 



c. m. currs & co., 



SOLE 
MAKERS 



Toronto Junction, Ont. 



This is Looking -around Season for the Range Buyer 

Not so much buying yet, but a good deal of hard thinking. What you 
have to show now is what they will judge you by when the day of pur- 
chase comes. If you show the lookers an 

OXFORD 
CHANCELLOR RANGE 

the balance will be in your favor 

You should have a sample on your floor now, and your 
season's order should shortly be in our hands. 

The GURNEY FOUNDRY CO., Limited 




Toronto 



Winnipeg 

CORRESPONDENTS 



Vancouver 



The Uurney-Massey Co., Limited, flontreal, Que. 



The Qurney Standard Hetal Co., Limited, Calgary, Alia. 



47 



Hardware and Metal. 



January 21, 1905 



THE OFFICE END 



DEVOTED TO THE 
OFFICE STAFFS OF 
BUSINESS 
ESTABLISHMENTS 



FORMING A JOINT STOCK COMPANY. 

A few items of general interest to the Bookkeeper after the formation of 

a Joint Stock Company or the amalgamation of industrial concerns. 

By H. R. W. 

IT would be impossible to give a set of opening 
entries applicable to every business, as it would 
depend largely upon the arrangement made with 
the vendors in regard to the transfer of their 
business, but in a general way, the "assets" trans- 
ferred should be debited, crediting "Shareholders of Old 
Company," the "Liabilities" credited, debiting "Share- 
holders of Old Company," the balance in the "Share- 
holders" account showing the amount of stock held by 
them in the new company, the completing entry being: 
"Shareholders of Old Company" Dr. 
To Capital Stock account Cr. 
If stock is offered for public subscription the entries 
for "General Ledger" purposes might be made as fol- 



lows: 



(For Amounl 
Cash Dr. 



Shareholders Acct^ Dr. 
To Capital Stock account Cr. 
of Stock Subscribed.) 



To Shareholder Cr. 
(as instalments are received on subscription) 
thus closing "shareholders" account in the general 
ledger. 

If various classes of stock are subscribed for, such 
as first preference, second preference or common, these 
divisions may be credited instead of simply using the 
term "capital stock." 

As a rule, shareholders are treated collectively in the 
"General Ledger," one, two or three accounts being- 
kept according to the class of shares subscribed for, the 
accounts for the individual shareholders being kept in 
the stock ledger. 

A First Difficulty. 
Probably the first difficulty with which the office man 
will have to contend when the amalgamated company has 
not taken over the accounts receivable or payable of the 
individual companies, will occur upon receipt of a 
cheque or money order, the amount of which includes 
accounts due both to the old and new companies. Let 
it be supposed, for instance, that Bentley & Jones owe one 
of the old companies $10 and the amalgamated company 
$15, the latter being subject to cash discount of 2 per 
cent. Upon receipt of the cheque or money order, the 
remittance may be entered in the cash book of the new 
company as follows: 







c.d. 


amt. 




$24.50 
9.80 


30 


$14.70 


Less amt. of account for Old Co. 



The amount posted to the credit of Bentley & Jones in 
the books of the new company being $15, made up of 
•ash $14.70 and cash discount 30c, the balance $9.80 be- 



ing entered in the cash book of the old company in the usual 
way, together with cash discount, if allowable. The 
new company may pay over the amount of each individual 
balance due or the aggregate amount due at the end of 
the day or week. 

When goods are returned after the amalgamation has 
taken place, which were charged prior to the date of 
transfer, the correct method, although it may appear on 
first sight a roundabout way of arriving at the desired re- 
sult, is to credit the goods through the books of the 
old company at the price originally charged, and, if 
necessary, transfer such credits, by means of cross en- 
tries, to the books of the new company, charging at the 
same time or at the end of a stated period all goods thus 
returned and credited to the new company at cost price. 
If this course were not pursued, the goods would be taken 
into stock by the new company and a liability assumed 
by crediting the customer at the selling value, whereas 
such goods should be taken into stock at cost, as the old 
company had originally made the profit on them. As the 
success of a business depends to a large extent in these 
busy days upon the system employed, a few suggestions 
as to handling the office department, after an amalga- 
mation may not be amiss. 

A Few Suggestions. 

The aim should be to dispense with all unnecessary 
work without destroying in any way the history of 
transaction, the question continually before the office man 
being, "Is there a possibility of this work being done 
in a shorter or simpler manner and yet obtain the neces- 
sary result?" 

Each branch should keep its own cash book in the form 
of loose sheets, which may be kept on files, a duplicate 
sheet of each day's transactions being sent to the head 
office where it shall be audited, filed and posted. 

Vouchers for sundry payments should accompany the 
sheets and should be vouched for by the manager of the 
branch . 

An additional check on the cash would' be to have the 
balance on hand on a certain day, say on the end of the 
month, deposited in the bank, and the pass book entered 
by the bank and sent to the head office for verification. 

All accounts should be kept at the head office, both 
personal and impersonal. 

Each office may keep its own bank account, and re- 
mittance by draft made to head office for all over a stipu- 
lated amount. 

All accounts payable should be settled by the head 
office, unless goods are settled for in cash when purchased 
by the branch, in the latter case the vouchers being sent 
as usual with the cash sheet. 

The invoicing may be done by the individual office in 
triplicate, one copy sent to the customer, one copy to the 
head office for posting medium, and the third filed in the 
branch office for reference only. 



' 



48 



January 21, 1905 



THE OFFICE 



Hardware and Metal. 



Thli lilt li (or the purpose of placing retailers, 
manufacturers' jobbers and other readers in 
touch with reliable and competent accountants 
and auditors whose services are so frequently 
required for suoh purposes as opening books, 


Leading Canadian 
Accountants and Auditors 


adjusting and auditing accounts, arranging part- 
nerships or organizing joint stock companies, 
devising special office systems, making collec- 
tions and investigations, handling estates, mak- 
ing valuations, etc. 


DAVID HOSKINS, F.C.A. 

Chartered Accountant, Auditor, Financial Valuator. 

*7 Wellington Street East, - - Toronto, Canada. 


This Space (15 a Year. 


JENKIN8 & HARDY, 
Assignees, Chartered Accountants, 
Estate and Fire Insurance Agents. 

1BX Toronto Street. . Toronto. 

465 Temple Building, Montreal. 

100 William 8treet, New York. 



This list Is for the purpos* of placing manufac- 
turers, wholesale and retail merchants and other 
readers throughout Canada, and firms abroad 
doing business in Canada, in touch with the 
legal profession throughout the Dominion, for 
the oolleotion of accounts, legal representation, 


LEGAL CARDS. 


organization of companies, the arrangement or 
dissolution of partnerships, or assignments, as 
well as all other matters of a legal nature. 

For advertising rates apply to MaoLean Pub- 
lishing Co., Limited, Montreal or Toronto. 


TOPPER, PHIPPEN & TUPPER, 

Barristers, Solicitors, Etc. 

Winnipeg, - Canada. 


ATWATER, DTJOLOS * OHAUVIN 

Advooates. Montreal. 
Albert W. Atwater, K. 0. Consulting 
Counsel for City of Montreal. Ohas. 
A. Duolos. Henry N. Ohauvin. 


This Space $15 a Year. 


This Space 815 a Year. 



Educational Department. 


The following Institutions for the education 

of business men's sons and daughters are 

recommended by this paper : 


1889. 

The Belleville Business College, Limited, 

Business firms get the best results by applying to us 10 days before vacancies 
occur in their employ. 

See Catalogue pages 21. 27, 33, 41. 

J. A. Tousaw, , BELLEVILLE, i J. Frith Jeffers, M.A , 
Secretary. / ONTARIO. t President. 


TELEGRAPHY SHORTHAND 

-OTTAWA, ON T.~ 

BOOK-KEEPING TYPEWRITING 


St. Margaret's College, Toronto 

A Boarding and Day School for Girls. 
Thorough courses in every department. 
Only teaohers of the highest academical and professional standing employed. 

GEORGE DICKSON, M.A., MRS. GEORGE DICKSON 

Director. Lady Prinoipal. 


One inch space in thi» dept. $45 per year. 



Special Advertising Rates have been 
arranged for space in "The Office," 
and will be gladly quoted on request. 



HOTEL DIRECTORY. 



NEIL McCARNEY, PROP. 



W. C. McCARNEY, Manager 



THE PROVINCIAL 

Leading Commercial Hotel. GANANOQTJE, ONT. 

Located in Heart of Business Section. Ten First-class Sample Rooms. 

HOTEL GRAND 

O F. BAKER, Prop. GALT, ONT 

First-class accommodation for Commercial Men. 



ALCOHOLISM 

The best treatment for all persons afflicted with the 
disease of drunkenness is known only to Dr. MacKaye 
Address : City Hall, Montreal, Que. Absolutely privat. 
treatment. 



LirilO GR4VLRE PRINTING 

Send for Sample Book. 

Beautiful designs in Letterheads, Billheads, etc., in 
the new Litho-Gravure Style. Looks just like an 
engraved plate. It is much cheaper, but don't look 
t. Send stamp for samples. 

G. A. Weese & Son, 44 Yonge St., Toronto. 



STANDARD 
TELEPHONE SETS 




FOR SALE 



$5.00 per set. Slightly used but in good order 

Apply to 

SALES department: 

178 Mountain St.. - Montreal, Que. 

OS 

To any local manager of the Bell Telephone 
Company of Canada. 



49 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 21, 1905 



Everything counts, and the 

POINTS IN FAVOR OF OUR GOODS 

are many 

Ready Roofing, Sheathing and Black ^§^ Diamond Tarred Felts, 
Building Papers, Fibre — Manilla Wrappings, etc. 

Ask for our quotations they will interest you. 



FELT FACTORY 

Harbour and Logan Sts., MONTREAL 



PAPER MILLS 

JOLIETTE, QUE. 



ALEX. McARTHUR & CO., LIMITED 



62 IVIoOII_L_ 



MONTREAL 



CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS. 



Jan. 21, 1905. 
These prices are for such qualities and 
quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
loweBt figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 

%uently make purchases at better prices. The 
Iditor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list, as the desire 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

TIN. 

[,amb and Flag and Straits— 

56 and 28-lb. ingots, 100 lb. $32 00 $33 00 
TEMPLATES. 
Charcoal Plates— Bright. 

M. L.S., equal to Bradley- Per box. 

I 0, usual sizes tb 50 

IX " ° °° 

IXX " .,„., 9*0 

Famous, equal to Bradley— 

10 «J5 

IX *25 

IXX 9 75 

Raven and Vulture Grades— 

I C, usual sizes J J™ 

t y " 5 UU 

IXX ' 575 

IXXX " 6 50 

"Dominion Crown Best"— Double 

Coated, Tissued. p er box. 

IC 5 50 

IX «j» 

IXX 7 50 

" Allaway's Best"— Standard Quality. 
TC 45 

IX 5 50 
I £ X „ 6 50 

Coke Plates— Bright. 
Bessemer Steel— 

I C, usual size, 14x20 3 40 

I C , special sizes, base 3 70 

20x28 7 50 

Charcoal Plates— Terne 
Dean or J. G. Grade— 

I.C., 20x28, 112 sheets .... 7 50 

IX., Terne Tin 10 50 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 
Cookley Grade— 

X X, 14x56. 50 sheet bxs. ) 

" 14x60\ " [ ■■■■ 7 00 

" 14xG5, " > 

Tinned Sheets. 

72x30 up to 24 gauge 7 25 7 50 

'• 26 " 7 75 8 00 

IRON AND STEEL 

Montreal. Toronto 

Common bar, per 100 lb 1 77} 1 80 

Refined " " 2 02/. 2 06 

Horseshoe Iron " 2 02... 

Hoop steel, 14 to 3-in. base 

Sleigh shoe steel, " .. 1821 — 

Tire steel 1 925 .... 

T. Firth & Son's tool steel - 

Speedicut 60 

Annealed speedicnt 65 

Self hardening 35 

Belt tool sleel 12 

Warranted 09 

Bent sheet steel 12 

B K. Morton & Co.— 

"Alpha" highspeed 65 

annealed 70 

" M " Self-Hardening 50 

" I " Standard 14 

"BC" 009 

mias & Colver's tool steel 10 20 

"Novo" 65 

•' annealed 70 

Ohas. Leonard 08 09 

Crucible Steel Co. 

Rex high speed steel. . 65 75 

SeirHsnl'-iiiiio 45 50 



Crucible Special 017 

Silver steel 13 

Black Diamond 10 11 

Sandersons Crucible steel 03 09 

Superior " 12 13 

BABBIT METAL. 
Syracuse Smelting Works : 

Aluminum, genuine 45 

Government, " 44 

Tough, " 40 

Hard, " 40 

Dynamo 9 30 

Special 25 

Harmony 22 

Car Box 20 

Extra 15 

The Canada Metal Oo. : 

Imperial, genuine 40 

Metallic 30 

Hercules 20 

Star 15 

No. 1 12 

No. 2 10 

No. 3 06 

No. 4 05 

BLACK SHEETS. 

Montreal. Toronto 

10 gauge 2 30 2 30 

12 and 14 gauge 2 30 2 35 

17 " 2 30 2 40 

22 to 24 gauge 2 35 2 50 

26 " 2 40 2 65 

28 2 40 2 70 

COPPER WIRE. 
Discount, 50 per cent. 

CANADA PLATES. 

Ordinary 2 50 

All bright 4 00 

Galvanized Canada Plates- 
Ordinary. Dom. 
Crown. 

18x24x52 4 25 4 35 

" 60 4 50 4 60 

20x28x80 8 50 8 70 

" 94 9 00 9 20 

GALVANIZED SHEETS. Queens 
Fleur-de-Lis. Gordon Crown.Comet Bell. Head 

16 gauge 3 50 

18 to 24 gauge . . 3 50 3 50 3 75 3 50 
26 " .. 3 75 3 75 3 90 3 75 

28 " . . 4 00 4 00 4 05 4 00 

American brands, $4.00 for 10? oz. 
Less than case lots 10 to 15c. extra. 

CHAIN. 
Proof coil, 3-16 in., per 100 lb. 7 00 10 00 

i " 5 60 

5-16 " 4 45 

"J " 3 85 

7-16 " 3 70 

i " 3 55 

5-16 " 3 45 

8 " 3 35 

J " 3 25 

Halter, kennel and post chains, 40 to 40 and 
5 per cent. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Tie out chains 65 p.c. 

Stall fixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain 45 p.c. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, discount 
35 p.c. [ °ount 40 p.c. 

Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis- 
COPPER. 



Casting, car lots. 



Ingot. 



Bars. 



Per 100 lb. 
, . . . 15 50 



Cut lengths, round, } to J in. . 21 00 23 00 
round and square, 

1 to 2 inches.... 21 23 00 
Sheet. 

Plain, 16 oz, 14x48 and 14x60 .... 20 00 

Plain, 14 oz., 21 00 

Tinned copper sheet 24 .00 

Planished 32 00 



~ — "• i 

J- 40 per cent, off list. H 



Braziers' (in sheets). 

4x6 ft., 25 to 30 lb. each, per lb 22 

" 35 to 45 " " .... 21 

" 50-lb. and above " .... 20 

BOILER AND T.K. PITTS. 

Plain tinned 

Spun 

BRASS. 
Rod and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge, 15 per cent. 

Sheets, hard-rolled, 2x4 23 

Tubing, base, per lb 234 

ZINC SPELTER. 

Foreign, per 100 lb 6 25 6 50 

Domestic " " 5 50 5 75 

ZINC SHEET. 

5-cwt. casks 7 00 

Part casks 7 50 

LEAD. 

Imported Pig, per 100 lb 3 60 

Bar, per lb 05 

Sheets, 24 lb. sq. ft., by roU 06* 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lb. " 06 

Note. — Cut sheets 4c. per lb., extra. Pipe, 
by the roll, usual weights per yard, lists at 7c. 
per lb. and 35 p.c lis. f.o.D. Toronto. 

Note.— Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 
8-f , lengths, lists at 8c. 

ANTIMONY. 

Cookson's per lb. 104 11 

SHOT. 

Common, $6.50 per 100 lb.; chilled, $7.00 
per 100 lb.; buck, seal and ball, $7.50. Dis- 
count, 15 p.c. Prices are f.o.b. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Terms, 2 p.c. for cash in thirty days. 

PLUMBING GOODS. 

BATH tubs. 

Zinc 6 00 

Copper, discount 20 per cent, off revised list. 

BATHS. 
Standard Ideal Enameled. 

5l-ft. 2i in. rolled rim, 1st quality 21 25 

5J " " " 2nd " .... 17 25 

54 3 " "1st " .... 23 60 

5? 2nd "... 19 00 

5 21 " " 1st " .... 18 40 

5 " " " 2nd " .... 17 25 

5 3 " " 1st " .... 20 75 

5 " " " 2nd " .... 17 25 

Plate 116 D, lavatories 1st quality. ... 8 90 

" 116 D, " 2nd " .... 7 50 

" 118 D, " 1st " .... 5 70 

" 118 D, " 2nd " .... 4 80 

" 120 D, " lBt " .... 5 60 

" 120 D, " 2nd " .... 4 70 

" 122 D, " 1st " .... 5 40 

" 122 D, " 2nd " 4 50 

Sinks 18 x 30 in flat rim 2 50 

CLOSETS. Net. 

Fittings 1 00 

Plain Simplex Syphon Jet 9 00 

Emb. " ..9 50 

Fittings 1 25 

Low Down Elgin or Teutonic, plain . . 6 00 
Low " " emb... 6 50 

Connection 1 25 

Plain Richelieu 4 25 

Emb. " 4 50 

Connections 1 25 

Basins, P.O., 14-in 63 

Basins, oval, 17 x 14-in 1 56 

Basins, " 19 x 15-in 2 Ou 



IRON PIPE. 



Black pipe— 
i inch 



Per 100 feet. 



2 03 
2 14 
2 29 
2 87 

4 12 

5 62 

6 75 
9 00 



Galvanized pipe — 

!inch 2 36 

" 2 96 

. " 3 14 

J " 4 02 

1 " 6 77 

11 " 7 87 

14 " 9 45 

2 " 12 60 

Malleable Fittings— Canadian discount 20 per 
cent.; American discount 35 per cent. 

Cast Iron Fittings— Standard bushings 65 
per cent.; headers, 60; flanged unions, 
lipped, 60 ; malleable bushings, 574; nip- 
ples, up to 6 in., 70 and ."» 

PLUMBERS BRASS OOOHS. 

Standard Compression work, dis. 60 & 10 p.c. 
Cushion work, discount 50 per cent. 
Fuller work, discount 70 per cent. 
6 dozen lots and over of the above, extra dis- 
count 10 per cent. 
Lever handle Stops and Waste, discount M 

per cent. With in lots of 2 dozen and over 

an extra discount of 10 per cent. 
J. M.T. Globe, Angle and Check Valves, dis 

count 55 per cent. 
Standard Globe, Angle and Check Valves, 

discount 65 per cent. 
Kerr's special standard globes and angles 

discount 55 percent. 
Kerr's Jenkin disc, copper-alloy diBC and 

heavy standard valves, discount 55 percent. 
Kerr's standard brass checks, discount 55 p.c. 
Kerr's standard brass disc steam radiator 

valves, discount 65 per cent. 
Kerr's Jenkin disc, copper-alloy disc radia- 
tor valves, discount 65 per cent. 
Kerr's quick - opening hot - water radiator 

valves, discount 65 per cent. 
Weber's (Kerr) patent straightway g.ite 

valves, brass, discount 50 per cent. 
Weber's (Kerr) patent straightway gate 

valves, I. B.B.M., discount 60and lOpercent. 
J. M. T. Radiator Valves discount 55 per cent. 
Standard Radiator Valves, discount 65 per 

cent. 
Patent Quick - Opening Valves, discount 70 

per cent. 

No. 1 compression bath cock net 1 75 

No. 4 " " " 1 90 

No .7 Fuller's " 2 10 

No. 4J, " " 2 25 

Patent Compression Cushion, basin 

cock, hot and cold, per doz. , $31 ; 5 and 10 

per cent, discount. 
Patent Compression Cushion, bath 

cock, No. 2208 2 25 

Square head brass cocks, discount 55 percent 

" iron " " 50 to 60 " 

Thompson Smoke-test Machine $25.00 



RANGE BOILERS. 



Copper, 30 gallon. 



" 22 00 

" 24 00 

40 " 28 00 

Discount ofT copper boilers 15 per oent. 



GALVANIZED IRON RANGE HOI1.ERS 



Capacity. 
Gals. 

12 

18 

24 

30 

35 

40 

52 

66 

82 
100 
120 
144 



Standard 

4.50 
4.75 
4.75 
5.00 
6.00 
7.00 
11.00 
18.00 
21.00 
29.00 
34.00 
47 00 



Extra heavy 

6.50 

6.75 

6.75 

7.50 

8.50 

9.50 
14.00 
20.00 
24.00 
34.00 
40.00 
55 00 






50 



January 21, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



American Steel & Wire Co. 



New York 

Empire Building 



Montreal 

N.Y. Life Building 



Chicago 

The Rookery 



BARBED WIRE GALVANIZED PLAIN WIRE 

PLAIN TWIST CABLE FENCING 

Telegraph and Telephone Wire; Mattress, Broom, Weaving Wires of 
every desoription; Rail Bonds, Bale Ties, Special Wires for all 
purposes, Springs, Horse Shoes, Wire Rope, Cold-drawn Steel 
Shafting. 



SOIL PIPE AND FITTINGS. 
Med. and Extra heavy pipe and fittings, dis. 60 

per cent. 
7 and 8-in. pipe, discount 40 and 5 per cent. 

solder. Per lb 

Bar, half-and-half, guaranteed 17 J 

WipiDg 154 

Refined 16} 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

COLORS IN OIL. 
1-lb. tins, pure. 

Venetian red, per lb 08 

Chrome yellow 15 

Golden ochre 08 

French " 06 

Marine black 04 

Chrome green 10 

French permanent green 13 

Signwriters' black 15 

WHITE LEAD. Per 100 lb. 

Pure 4 75 

No. 1 4 50 

No. 2 .... 4 25 

No. 3 3 874 

So. 4 3 50 

unro's Select Flake White 4 75 

Elephant and Decorators'Pure 4 75 

Monarch 5 00 

Deoorator's Pure 4 75 

Essex Genuine 4 25 

Sterling Pure 5 00 

Island City Pure 5 00 

RamBay's_Pure Lead 4 75 5 00 

Ramsay's Exterior 4 50 4 75 

RED LEAD. 

Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per cwt $4 25 $4 50 

Genuine, 100 lb. kegs, " .... 4 75 

No. 1, 560 lb. casks, per cwt 4 00 

No. 1, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 4 25 

WHITE ZINC. 

Extra Red Seal 06 08 

French V. M 06 06} 

Lehigh 06 06} 

DRY WHITE LEAD 

Pure, casks 4 25 

Pure, kegs 4 50 

No. 1, casks 4 00 

No. 1, kegs 4 25 

PREPARED PAINTS. 

In }, ) and 1-gallon tins. 

Pure, per gallon 1 20 

Second qualities, per gallon 1 00 

Barn (inbbls.) 60 90 

The Sherwin-Williams paints 1 35 

Canada Paint Co. s pure 125 

Toronto Lead & Color Co's pure 1 25 

Sanderson Pearcy's pure 1 20 

Standard Co. 's "New Era." 130 

" Globe " barn 60 70 

Francis-Frost Co. 's "Ark " B'd 125 

" British Navy deck 1 50 

Henderson & Potts's "Anchor" 1 35 

Ramsay's paints, Pure, per gal 1 20 

Thistle, " .... 1 00 

Outside, bbls 55 65 

Island City House Paint 1 25 

Floor " 1 25 

Sterling House Paint 120 

" Floor " 1 10 

National 1 05 

PARIS GREEN 

BERGERS' ENGLISH. 

Petroleum, barrels, per lb 15} 

Arsenic, kegs 15) 

50 and 100-lb. drums 16 

25-lb. drums 16) 

1-lb. paper boxes 17 

1-lb. tins 18 

)-lb. paper boxes 19 

4-lb. tins 20 

Terms— 2 per cent off 30 days, or 90 dayB 
net 



PUTTY. 

Bulk in bbls 1 45 

Bulk in less quantity 1 70 

Bladders in bbls 1 V0 

Bladders in kegs, boxes or loose 1 85 

25-lb. tins 1 80 

12) lb. tins 2 05 

Bladders in bulk or tins less than 100 lb. 1 85 

VARNISHES. 

In 5-gal. lots. Per gal. Net. 

Carriage, No. 1 1 50 1 60 

Pale durable body 4 10 4 25 

rubbing 2 85 3 20 

Gold size, japan 1 50 1 60 

No. 1 brown japan 85 90 

Elastic oak 1 50 

Furniture, extra. 110 125 

No. 1 90 100 

Hard oil finish 1 35 1 50 

Light oil finish 160 170 

Damar 1 75 2 00 

Shellac, white 2 40 2 50 

orange 2 30 2 40 

Curpentine, brown japan 1 10 1 20 

" black japan 1 10 1 20 

'' No. 1. 85 90 

Elastilite varnish, 1 gal. can, each. . 2 00 

Granitine floor finish, per gal 2 75 

Maple Leaf coach enamels ; size 1, $1.20 ; 

size 2, 70c; size 3, 40c. each. 
Sherwin-Williams' kopal varnish, assorted 
case, from to 1 gal., $2.50. 

GLUE. 

Common 08 08) 

French medal 10 14 

White, extra 18 22 

Gelatine 

Strip 18 20 

Coopers 19 20 

Huttner 

Ground 12 16 

Cologne, genuine 



ADZES. 
Discount 20 per cent. 

ANVILB. 

Wright's, 80-lb. and over 1< 

Hay Budden, 80-lb. and over " 

Brook's, 80-lb. and over 



APPLE PARERS. 

Woodyatt Hudson, per doz., net 4 50 

AUGERS. 

Gilmour's, discount 65 and 5 per cent, off list. 

AXES. 
Chopping Axes 

Single bit, per doz 7 00 10 00 

Double bit, " 10 00 18 00 

Bench Axes, 40 per cent. 
Broad Axes, 25 per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boys' Axes 6 25 7 00 

Splitting Axes 7 00 12 00 

Handled Axes 10 00 

AMERICAN AXE AND TOOL CO. 

Red Ridge, boys', handled 5 75 

hunters 5*25 

Underhill American Bench Axes, 40 p.c. 
AXLE GREASE. 

Ordinary, per gross 600 700 

Best quality 10 00 12 00 



HARDWARE. 

AMMUNITION. 
Cartridges. 

B. B. Caps Dominion, 50 and5 and 25 per cent. 

American 82.00 per 1000. 

C. B. Caps American, $2.60 per 1000. 

Rim Fire Pistol, discount 30 p.c, American. 

Rim Fire Cartridges, Dominion, 50 and 5 p.c. 

Central Fire, Military and Sporting, Amer- 
ican, idd 20 per cent, to list. B.B. Caps, 
discount 40 per cent., American. 

Central Fire Pistol and Rifle, list net Amer. 

Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes, Domin- 
ion, 30 per cent. 

Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary, Dominion, 15 per cent. American 

10 per cent, advance on list. 

Loaded and empty Shells, "Trap" and 

" Dominion " grades.25 per cent, discount. 

American 20 per cent, discount. Rival 

and Nitro, 10 per cent, advance on list. 
Brass Shot Shells, 55 per cent. 
Primers, Dom., 30 per cent.; American, $1.75 
Wads. per lb. 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

)-lb. bags $0 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 
Best thick white card wads, in boxeB 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 35 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 each, 

12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge ^ 25 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M. 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9 and 10 gauges 70 

7and 8 " 90 

5 and 6 " 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 ,T 1 65 

5 and 6 " 1 90 

&1 



BELLS. 

Hand. 



Brass, 60 per cent. 
Nickel, 55 per cent. 

. Cow. 

American make, discount 63J per cent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 
Door. 

Gongs, Sargant's 5 >0 8 00 

" Peterboro', discount 50 »nd 10 
per cent, of! new list. 

Farm. 

American, each I .IS 3 00 

House. 

American, per lb 35 40 

BELTING. 
Extra, 60 per cent. 
Standard, 60 and 10 per cent. 
No. 1, not wider than 6 in., 60, 10 and 10 per 

oent. 
Agricultural, not wider than 4 in., 75 per cent. 

BITS. 

Auger. 
Gilmour's, discourt 60 per oent. 
Rockford. discount 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings Gen., net list. 

Car. 
Gilmour's, 47) per cent. 

Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent. 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Diamond, Shell, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Nail and Spike, per gross 2 25 5 20 

BLIND AND BED STAPLES. 

All sizes, per lb 07J 12 

BOLTS AND NUTS 

Carriage Bolts, common ($1 list) Per cent. 

" " 3-16 and} 60 and 10 

" 5-16 and! 55 and 5 

" " 7-16 and up 55 and 5 

" full sq. ($2. 40 list) 60 
" " Norway Iron ($3 

list) 60 

Machine Bolts, all sizes, 1 and 

less 60 

Machine Bolts, 7-16 and up 60 

Plough Bolts 55 and 5 

Blank Bolts 55 and 5 

BoltEnds 55 and 5 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 70 

Coach Screws, cone point 70 

Nuts, square, ail sizes, 4c. per lb. off. 

Nuts, hexagon, all sizes, 4}c. per lb. off. 
Stove Rods per lb., 5) to 6c. 

BOOT CALKS. 

Small and medium, ball per M. 4 25 

Small heel " 4 50 

BRIGHT WIRE U0OD8. 

Discount 624 Der cent. 

BUTCHERS' CLEAVERS. 

German per doz. 6 00 9 00 

American " 12 00 18100 

BUTCHER KNIVES. 

Baileys per doz. 60 130 



BUILDING PAPER, ETC 

Tarred Felt, per 100 |h i g5 

Ready roofing, 2-ply; not under 45 lb. 

per roll o 90 

Ready roofing, 3-ply, not under 65 lb., 

per roll \ 15 

Carpet Felt per ton 45 00 

Heavy Straw Sheathing per ton 35 00 

Dry Sheathing per roll, 400 sq. ft. 40 

Tai- " " 400 " 50 

Dry Fibre " 400 " 55 

Tarred Fibre " 400 " 65 

O.K.&I.X.L.... " 400 " 70 

Resin-sised ' 400 •' 45 

Oiled Sheathing " 600 " 100 

Oiled " .... " 400 " 70 

Root Coating, in barrels per gal. 17 

Roof " small packages " 25 

Refined Tar per barrel 5 00 

Coal Tar " 4 00 

Coal Tar, less than barrels per gal. 15 

Roofing Pitch per 100 lb. 1 00 

Slater's felt per roll 60 



BULL RINGS. 
Copper, $2.00 for 2)-inch, and $1.9 or 2-incfi. 

BUTTS. 

Wrought Brass, net revised list. 

Cast Iron. 
Loose Pin, discount 60 per cent 

Wrought Steel. 

Fast Joint, discount 70 to 70 and 5 per cent. 
Loose Pin, discount 70 to 70 and 5 per cent. 

CARPET STRETCHERS. 

American .per doz. 1 00 1 50 

Billiards " g 50 

CASTORS. 
Bed, new list, discount 55 to 57) per cent. 
Plate, discount 52) to 57} per cent. 

CATTLE LEADERS. 

Nos. 32 and 33 per gross 7 50 I 50 



CHALK. 

Carpenters' Colored, per gross 45 7£ 

White lump per cwt. 60 85 

Red 05 06 

Crayon per gross 14 6 18 

CHISELS. 

Socket, Framing and Firmer. 

Broad's, discount 60 and 10 per cent. 

Warnock's, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 

P. S. & W. Extra, discount 60 and 10 per ceo t. 

FOODS— STOCK. 

Colonial Stock Foods, 50c. packages, 

per doz 14 00 

" " " SBC. pkgs., " 2 00 

' 10c. " " 75 

" " " 25-lb. pail, each 1 80 

Poultry Foods, 25c packages 1 25 

Cough Powders, per doz 1 25 

Worm " " 1 25 

Internation 1 Stock Foods, $1 packages, 

perdoz 8 00 

International Stock Foods, per pail 2 75 

perbbl.... 10 50 
Poultry " $lpkgs.,perdz. 8 08 
Worm Powders. 50c.pkg8. 4 80 

Pine Healing Oil. per doz ... 8 00 
Pheno-Chloro,$lpkg8.,per doz 8 On 

Hoof Ointment 8 00 

Compound Absorbent 16 00 

Also 25c. pkgs. at $2 per doz. 50c. pkgs. »t 
4 per doz 

CLOTHES REELS. 

Davis Clothes Reels, dis 40 per rent 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 21, 1905 



An Every Day Occurrence With Us 

is the receipt of letters from customers who have used our Wire Edged Ready 
Roofing and who are so well pleased with the material that they want more. 



The Paterson Mfg. Co., Limited 



Toron-to and IN/loirtr* 



CONDUCTOR PIPE. 
Plain or Corrugated. 

B-inch per 100 feet 3 00 

t « " " 4 00 

J •• ' " " 5 25 

I •• " " 6 75 

6 " .'.'.:.' " " 900 

CRADLES, GRAIN. 

Canadian, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 
CROSSCUT SAW HANDLES. 

8. & D., No. 3 per pair 6 174 

8.&D., " 5 f; 022i 

S.&D., " 6 " 015 

Boynton pattern v Mi 

DOOR SPRINGS. 

Torrey s Rod per doz. .... 1 85 

Coil. 4 to 11 in 95 165 

English " 2 00 4 00 

DRAW KNIVES. 

Ooach »nd Wagon, disoount 50 per cent. 
Carpenters' disoount 60 and 10 per oent. 

DRILLS. 
Hand and Breast. 
♦Hilars Falls, per doz., net list. 

DRILL BITS. 
Morse, discount 374 to 40 per cent. 
Standard, discount 50 and 5 to 55 per cent. 

FAUCETS. 

Common, cork-lined, discount 35 per cent. 

EAVETROUGHS. 

10-lnob per 100 ft. 10 00 

elbows (stovepipe.) 

5 and 6-inch, common per doz. 1 20 

7-inch " 1 35 

Polished, 15c. per dozen extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 
Disoount 50 and 10 per cent., new list 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 
Iron, discount 40 per cent. 

FACTORY MILK CANS. 
Disoount off revised list, 40 per cent. 

FILES AND RASPS. 

Great Western 70 and 10 per cent. 

Arcade 70 " 10 

Kearney & Foot 70 " 10 

Disston's 70 " 10 

American 70 " 10 

J/Barton Smith 70 " 10 

MoClellan 70 " 10 

Eagle 70 " 10 

Nioholson, 60 and 10 to 60, 10 and 6 

Royal 80 

Globe 70 to 75 

Black Diamond. 6j and 10 to 60, 10 and 5 per 

cent. 
Jowitt's, English list, 25 to 274, per cent. 
Nicholson File Co.'s "Simplicity " file handle, 

per gross 85c. to $1.50 





GLASS. 






Wi 


idow. 


Box Price. 








Star 


D. 


Diamond 


Size United 


Per 


Per 


Per Per 


Inches. 


50 ft. 


100 ft. 


50 ft. 100 ft. 


Tnder 26 




3 80 




5 06 


26 to 40 




4 00 




5 44 


41 to 50 




4 50 




6 56 


51 to 60 




4 75 




7 50 


61 to 70 




5 00 




8 62 


71 to 80 




5 30 




9 38 


81 to 85 








10 75 


86 to 90 








12 30 


91 to 95 








15 00 


ffito 100 . . . . 








18 00 


96to 100 








18 00 



GAUGES. 

Marking, Mortise, Etc. 
Stanley s. discount 50 to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 
Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33 . . . .each 1 65 2 40 

GILLETT'S POWDERED LYE. 

1-case, $3.70 ; 3-case, $3.60; 5-case and over, 
$3.50. 

HALTERS. 

Rope, f-inch per gross ! 00 

Rope, I " " .... 12 00 

Rope, | to f-inch .... " .... 14 00 

Leather, 1-inch per doz 4 00 

Leather, 1J " " .... 5 20 

Web " .... 2 45 

HAMMERS. 

Nail. 
Maydole's, discount 5 to 10 per cent. Canadian 
discount 25 to 274 Per cent. 
Tack. 

Magnetic per doz. 110 120 

Sledge. 

Canadian per lb. 6 074 084 

Ball Pean. 
English and Canadian, per lb. 22 25 

HANDLES. 

Axe, 2nd growth, per doz. net 3 00 4 00 

Store door ...perdoz. 100 150 

Fork. 
C. & B., discount 40 per cent., revised list. 

Hoe. 
C. & B., discount 40 per cent., revised list. 
Saw. 

American per do» I 00 1 25 

Plane. 

American per gross 3 15 3 75 

Hammer and Hatchet. 
Canadian, discount 40 per cent. 

HANGERS. doz. pairs. 

Steel barn door 8 00 10 00 

Stearns, 4-inch 4 50 

5-inch 6 00 

Zenith 9 00 

LaDe's covered — 

No. 11. 5-foot run 8 40 

No. 114, 10-foot run 10 80 

No. 12, 10-foot run 12 60 

No. 14, 15-foot run 2100 

Steel, covered 4 00 1100 

" track, 1 x 3-16 in(100 ft) ... . 3 75 

" Ux3-16in(100ft) .... 4 75 

HARVEST TOOLS. 

Discount 60 per cent. 

HATCHETS. 

Canadian, discount 40 to 424 per cent. 

Shingle, Red Ridge 1, per doz 4 40 

2, " 4 85 

Barrel, Underhill 5 00 

HAT ENAMEL. 

Henderson & Potts' ' Anchor Brand " 

HINGES. 

Blind, Parker's, discount 60 per cent. 

Heavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb 064 

5-in., " 06} 

" 6-in., ' 06 

" " 8-in., " 055 

10-in., " 054 

Light T and strap, discount 65 and 5 per oent. 
Screw hook and hinge — 

6 to 10 in per 100 lb 4 50 

12 in. up " .... 3 25 

Spring, No. 20, per gro. pairs 10 50 

Spring, Woodyatt pattern, per gro., No. 5, 
$17.50; No. 10, $18; No. 20, $10.80; No. 
120, $20 ; No. 51, $10 ; No. 50, $27.50. 



HOES. 

Garden, Mortar, etc., discount 60 per cent. 
Planter perdoz. 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE. 

Tinned c&4G, 35 per oent. 

HOOKS. 

Oast Iron. 
Bird oage per doz. 50 1 10 



Clothes line, No. 61.. " 00 70 

Harness " 60 12 00 

Hat and coat per gro. 1 10 10 00 

Chandelier perdoz. 50 100 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought hooks and staples Canadian dis- 
count 60 per cent. 

Wire. 
Hat and coat, discount 60 per cent. 

Belt per 1,000 .... 60 

Screw, bright, discount 60 per cent. 

HORSE NAIL8. 
"P.B." Brand, 55 to 60 per cent. 
"C brand, 40, 10 and 74 per cent, off list I Oval 
"M" brand, 55, per cent. 1 head 

"Monarch," 50 and 74 per cent. 
' ' Peerless " 50 per cent. dis. 

HORSESHOES. 

F.O.B. Montrea 1 

"P.B." brand, new pattern, base $3 50 

"M." brand, base 3 65 

Add 15c. Toronto, Hamilton, Guelph. 

JAPANNED WARE. 

50 per cent. 
Star... perdoz. 3 00 3 25 

KETTLES. 

Brass spun 74 per cent, discount off new list. 

Copper per lb. 30 50 

American, 60 and 10 to 65 and 5 per cent. 

KEYS. 

Lock, Canadian dis. 40 to 40 and 10 per cent. 
Cabinet, trunk and padlock, 
American per gross — 60 

KNOBS. 

Door, japanned and N.P., per 

doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin per doz. 2 75 3 25 

Bronze, Genuine ... . " 600 900 
Shutter, porcelain, F. & L,. 

screw per gross 1 30 2 00 

White door knobs perdoz 2 00 

HAY KNIVES. 
Net prices. 

LAMP WICKS. 
Discount, 60 per cent. 

LADDERS, EXTENSION. 

Waggoner Extension Ladders, dis. 40 per cent. 

LANTERNS. 

Cold Blast perdoz. 7 00 

No. 3, "Wright's" " 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner. ... " 4 00 

Dashboard, cold blast " 9 00 

No. ■ 5 75 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

Porcelain lined per doz. 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized " 187 3 85 

King, wood " 2 75 2 90 

King, glass " 4 00 4 50 

All glass " 50 90 

LAWN MOWERS FOR 1905. 

Woodyatt, lOJ-in., 14-in. cut $ 8 50 to $11 00 
Star, 9 -in. " 6 00 to 6 50 

Daisy, 8 -in. " 5 25 to 5 75 

Philadelphia.74-in. " 6 00 to 7 50 

Woodvatt.104 in., ball bearing 13 25 to 18 00 

Grass Boxes 1 75 to 2 00 

King Edw'd, 12-in., 14-in. cut 9 00 to 10 00 
Horse Lawn Mowers, "Special." 
Discount, 50 per cent., with freight conces- 
sions in quantity shipments. 

Maxwells Sons: 

10'/ 2 -in. high wheel 7 50 10 00 

9-in b 50 6 25 

8-in 4 90 5 50 

Discount 50 per cent. 

LOCKS. 
Canadian, 50 to 50 and 10 per oent. 
Russell k Er wi d . . . per doz. 

52 



Cabinet. 
.Eagle, discount SO per cent. 

Padlocks. 

English and Am per doz. 50 (00 

Eagle, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

MACHINE SCREW*. 

Iron and Brass. 
Flat head, discount 25 per cent. 
Round head, discount 20 per cent. 

MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths' per doz. 1 25 1 50 

Carpenters', hickory, " 1 25 S 75 

Lignum Vitae " 3 85 6 00 

Caulking, each 60 2 00 

MATTOCKS. 

Canadian per doz. 5 50 6 OC 

MEAT CUTTERS. 

American, discoun 3J per cent. 

German, 15 per ceu 

Gem each 115 

MILK CAN TRIMMlNUd. 

Discount 25 per cent. 

nails. Cut. Wire. 

2d J 30 3 25 

3d 2 96 2 90 

4and5d 2 70 2 65 

«and7d 2 60 2 55 

8 and 9d 2 45 2 40 

10 and 12d 2 40 2 35 

16and20d 2 35 2 30 

30, 40, 50 and 60d (base) 2 30 2 25 

Fob. Toronto. 
Cut nails in carlots 5c. less. 
Wire nails in carlots are $2.20 (base). 
Steel cut nails 10c. extra. 
Miscellaneous wire nails, disoount 15 per cent. 
Coopers' nails, discount 30 per cent. 

NAIL PULLERS. 

German and American 1 75 2 50 

NAIL SETS. 

Square, round and octagon, 
per gross 3 38 

Diamond 1 00 

POULTRY NETTING. 

2-in. Mesh, 19 w.g., dis. 60 per cent. 

2-in. Mesh 16 w.g. and heavier, 50 p.o. 
OAKUM. 

U. S. Navy per 100 lb 8 75 

Plumbers " .... 3 00 

OILERS. 

McClary e Model galvanized 
oil can, with nump, 5 gallon, 
per dozen 10 00 

Davidson oilers, discount 40 per cent. 

Zinc and tin, discount 50, 50 and 10 per cent 

Copper per doz. 1 25 3 50 

Brass " 1 50 3 50 

Malleable, discount 25 per cent 

GALVANIZED PAILS. 

Dufferin pattern pails, discount 475 P«r cent 
Flaring pattern, discount 474 P«r cent. 
Galvanized washtubs, discount 474 per cent 

PIECED WARE. 

Discount 40 per cent off list, June, 1899. 
10-qt. flaring sap buckets, discount 40 per cent 
6, 10 and 14-qt. flaring pails dis. 40 per cent. 
Creamer cans, discount 40 per cent. 

PICKS. 
Per dozen 600 SOO 

PICTURE NAILS. 

Porcelain head per gross 1 35 1 50 

Brass head " 40 100 

PICTURE WIRE. 

Tin and gilt, discount 75 per cent 
PINE TAR. 

4 oint in tins per gross ... 7 80 

1 " " " ... S 60 

PLANES. 
Wood bench, Canadian discount 40 per cent., 

American discount 50 per cent. 
Wood, fancy Canadian or America 37 

40 per oent 



January 21, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



sturN 

AN 23 



sd^*" 



iAs 30 



% 




The 

Champion 
Filing 
Device 



Vertical System of Filing- 

The illustration shows the style used by order departments and considered 
by business men the "Acme of Filing Devices." All correspondence 
filed vertically (on edge) in a Manilla Folder, so that the correspondence of any 
one concern is always together and can be referred to instantly. A card 
will bring a circular. Now's the time to write. 

Full Line of Office Furniture and Labor-saving Devices in Stock 

The Office Specialty Mfg. Co. 




LIMITED 

Factory : Newmarket. 
New Premises : 97-103 Wellington St. West. 
WATCH FOR OPENING OF NEW BUILDING 



55 Yonge St., Toronto. 



PLANE IRONS. 

English perdoz. 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 

Button's genuine, per doz. pairs, discount 

371 to 40 P er cent - 

Button's imitation perdoz. 5 00 9 00 

German " 60 «0 

PRESSED SPIKES. 

Discount 20 per cent. 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse perdoz. 55 100 

Axle " 22 33 

gorew " 027 1 00 

Awning " 35 2 50 

PUMPS. 

Canadian cistern 1 80 3 60 

Canadian pitcher spout 1 40 2 10 

PUNCHES. 

Saddler's perdoz. 1 00 1 85 

Conductor's " 3 00 15 00 

Tinners', solid perset .... 72 

" hollow per inch — 100 

RAKES. 

Wood per doz. net 1 20 up. 

RAZORS. per doz. 

Elliots 4 00 1800 

Geo. Butler's 4 Co. s 4 00 18 00 

Boker's 7 50 11 00. 

King Cutter 13 50 18 50 

Wade & Butcher's 3 60 10 00 

Oarbo Magnetic 15 00 

Griffon Barber's Favorite 10 75 

8riffonNo. 65 13 00 

riff on Safety Razors. 13 50 

Griffon Stropping Machines 13 50 

Lewis Bros ' " Klean Kutter" 8 50 10 50 

Hindoo 10 50 14 00 

Orgsteom's Swedish 3 50 10 00 

Henckels 7 50 20 00 

Clauss, 50 and 10 percent. 
Clause Strops, 50 and 10 per cent. 

REGISTERS. 

Discount 40 per cent. 

RIVETS AND BURRS. 

Iron Rivets, black and tinned, 60 and 10 p c. 
Iron Burrs, discount 60 and 10 per cent. 
Copper Rivets, with usual proportion burrs, 45 

per oent. 
Copper Burrs only, discount 30 and 10 per oent. 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivets, 4-lb. 

packages lc. per lb.; J-lb. packages 2c. lb. 

RIVET SETS. 

Oanadlan, discount 35 to 371 per cent. 

ROPE, ETC. 

Sisal 011 

Pure ManiUa 14', 

"British" Manilla 11 

Cotton, 3-16 inch and larger 21 23 

" 5-32 inch 25 27 

" Jinch 25 28 

Russia Deep Sea 16 

Jute 009 

Lath Yarn, single 10 

douhle 101 

Sisal bed cord, 48 feet per doz. 65 

" 60 feet " 80 

" 72feet " 95 

RULES. 

Bexwood, discount 70 per cent. 
Ivory, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

SAD IRONS. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished. ...per set 80 

No. 50, nickle-plated, " 90 

Common, plain 4 50 

plated * 50 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER 

B,tA. sand, discount, 40 and 5 par cent 
naery, discount 40 per oent. 
Sajtsst (Jturtan't) 5 to 10 per oenL advines 
an Mat 



SAP SPOUTS. 

Bronzed iron with hooks per 1,000 7 50 

"Eureka" tinned steel, hooks " 8 00 

SAWS. 

Hand, Disston's, discount 12} per cent 
S. & D., discount 40 per cent. 

Crosscut, Disston's per foot 35 55 

S. & D., discount 35 per cent, on Nos. 2 and 3. 

Hack, complete each 75 2 75 

" frame only each 50 125 

SASH WEIOHTS. 

Sectional per 100 lb. 2 00 2 25 

Solid " 1 50 1 75 

SASH CORD. 

Per lb 28 30 

saw sets. per doz. 

Lincoln and Whiting 4 75 

Hand Sets. Perfect 4 00 

X-Cut Sets, " 7 50 

SCALES. 

Gurney Standard, 40 per cent. 

Gurney Champion, 50 per cent. 

Burrow, Stewart & Milne- 
Imperial Standard, discount 40 per cenc. 
Weigh Beams, discount 35 per cent. 
Champion Scales, discount 50 per cent. 

Fairbanks standard, discount 35 per cent. 

Dominion, discount 55 per cent. 

" Richelieu, discount 55 per cent. 

Warren's new Standard, discount 40 percent. 
1 ' Champion, discount 50 per cent. 
" Weighbeams, discount 35 per cent. 

SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's perdoz. 65 100 

SCREEN DOORS. 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, walnut 
stained, 4-in. style per doz. 6 50 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, yellow and 
green stained, 4-in. style... .per doz. C 75 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, in natural 
colors, oil finish per doz. 8 75 

3. in style 20c. per dozen less. 

SCREWS. 

Wood, F. H , bright and steel, discount 87} 

per cent. 
Wood, R. H., bright, dis. 82} pei cent. 

" F. H , brass, dis. 80 percent. 

" R. H., " dis. 75 per cent. 

' ' F. H., bronze, dis. 75 per cent. 
1 R. H., " dis. 70 per cent. 
Drive Screws, die. 87} per cent. 
Bench, wood perdoz. 3 25 4 00 

" iron " 4 25 5 00 

Set, case hardened, dis. 60 per cent. 
Square Cap, dis. 50 and 5 per cent. 
Hexagon Cap, dis. 45 per cent. 

SCYTHES. 

Per doz. net 6 00 9 00 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 

Canadian, disoount 40 per cent. 

SHEARS. 

Clauss, nickel, discount 80 per cent. 
Clauss, Japan, discount 67} percent. 
Ciauss, tailors, disoount 40 per oent. 
Seymour's, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 

Canadian, discount 45 per cent. 
SINKS. 

Cast iron, 16x24 85 

18x30 1 00 

18x36 140 

SNAPS. 
Harness, German, discount 25 per cent. 
Lock, Andrews' 4 50 11 50 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

1, li-lb per lb 37 

2-lb. or over " 34 

SQUARES. 

Iron, No. 492 ■•••....perdoz. 190 2 15 

" No. 493 " 2 40 2 55 

" No. 494 " 3 25 3 40 

Steel, disoount 80 and 5 to 65 per cent. 

Try and Bevel, discount 50 to 52} per cent. 
STAMPED WARE. 

Plain, discount 75 and 12} per oent. off re- 
vised lias. 

Retinned, diBcount75percent. off revised list 



STAPLES. 

Galvanized 3 00 

Plain 2 80 

Coopers', discount 45 per cent. 

Poultry netting staples, discount 40 per cent. 

STOCKS AND DIES. 
American discount 25 per cent. 
STONE. 

Washita per lb. 28 60 

Hindostan " 06 07 

slip " 09 09 

Labrador " .... 13 

" Axe " .... 15 

Turkey " .... 30 

Arkansas " 150 

Water-of-Ayr " .... 10 

Scythe per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind, 40to2001b.,perton 25 00 

" under 40 lb., " 28 00 

" 200 lb. and over 3100 

STOVEPIPES. 

5 and 6 inch, per 100 lengths 7 00 

7 inch " ' r .... 7 50 

TACKS, BRADS, ETC. 

Carpet tacks, blued 80 and i5 

" tinned 80 and 20 

" " (in kegs) 40 

Cut tacks, blued, in dozens only 80 

" } weights 60 

Swedes cut tacks, blued and tinned— 

In bulk 80 and 10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk 85, 12} and 12} 

" brush, blued and tinned 

bulk 70 

Swedes, gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75andl2} 

Zinc tacks 35 

Leather carpet racKS 55 

Copper tacks 50 

Copper nails -. 52} 

Trunk nails, black 65 and 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Clout nails, blued 65 and 5 

Chair nails 36 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finishing 40 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

" " solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle nailr, in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in doz- 
ens only 60 

Zinc glaziers' points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers. . 90 and 10, 

bulk.... 40 

Clinch and duck rivets 45 

TAPE LINES. 

English, ass skin per doz. 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather 5 50 9 75 

Chesterman's each 90 2 85 

steel each 80 IOC 

TINNERS' SNIPS. 

Perdoz 3 00 15 00 

Clauss, discount 35 per cent. 

THERMOMETERS. 

Tin case and dairy, 75 to 75 and 10 per cent 

traps (steel.) 
Game, Newhouse, discount 25 per cent. 
Game, H. & N P. S. & W , 65 per oent. 
Game, steel, 72}, 75 per cent. 

TROWELS. 

Disston's, disoount 10 per oent. 

German per doz. 4 75 i 00 

S. k 1)., discount 35 per cent. 

TWINES. 

Bag, Russian per lb. 



27 
24 
27 

Mattress per lb. 33 45 

Staging " 27 35 



Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply 

,r " 4-ply 



VISES. 

13} 
012; 
3 50 
5 50 

Saw Vise 4 50 100 

Columbia Hardware Oo. 
Blaokamiths' (discount) 60 percent. 

" Derellel (disoount) 46 per aent. 



Wright's. 

Brook's 

Pipe Vise, Hinge, No. 1 . . . 
K " No. 2... 



ENAMELLED WARE. 

White, Princess, Turquoise, Blue and White 

discount 50 per cent 

Diamond, Famous, Premier, discount 50 and 

lOper cent 

Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent, discount 

50, 10 and 10 per cent. 
Premier steel ware, 40 per cent. 
" Star " decorated steel and decorated whit 

25 per cent. 

WIRE. 

Smooth Steel Wire. 

No. 0-9 gauge $2 25 

}0 " 60. extra. 

}1 " lJo. " 

12 20o. " 

}3 30o. " 

}4 40o. " 

15 ' 55o. " 

16 " 70o. " 

Add 60c. for coppering and 82 for tinning. 
Extra net per 100 lb. — Oiled wire IDc, 

spring wire 81.25, special hay baling wire 30c, 
best steel wire 75c, bright soft drawn 18c., 
charcoal (extra quality) 81.25, paoked in casks 
or cases 15c, bagging and papering lOo., 50 
and 100-lb. bundles 10c, in 25-lb. bundles 
15c., in 5 and 10-lb. bundles 25c, in 1-lb 
hanks, 50o., in }-lb. hanks 75o., In }-lb. 
hanks 91. 

Fine SteeL Wire, discount 27} per cent. 
List of extras: In 100-lb. lots: No. 17, 
fS-No. 18, J5.50-NO. 19, 86-N0. 20, 16.66- 
No.21. $7-No. 22, $7.30-No. 23. 87,65-No. 
?>1'„*%-% 25 ' *V No - I 6 . »9.50-No. 27, 
flO-No. 28, Sll-No. 29. $12-No. 30, $13-^ 
No.31 JI4-N0. 32, 815-No. 33, 116-No. 34, 
817. Extras .net— tinned wire, Nos. 17-15, 
$2-Nos. 26-31, 84-Nos. 32-34, 86. Coppered, 
. 5c.— oiling, 10c.— in 25-lb. bundles.iloo.— inJ 
and 10-lb. bundles, 25c— in 1-lb. hanks, 25c 
— in }-lb. hanks, 38c.— in }-lb. hanks, 50o.— 
packed in casks or cases, 15c— bagging or 
papering, 10c. 
Brass wire, discount 60 per oent. off the list. 
Copper wire, discount 60 per cent, net oas> 

30 days, f.o.b factory. 
Galvanized wire, ner 100 lb.— Nos. 4 and 6, 
83.70 to 83.70-Noa. 6, 7. 8, 83.16 to 11.11 
-No. 9. 82.55 - No. io, 13.20 to 15 29 
-No. 11, 83.25 to $3 25 -No. 12, Hi* 
« N £A 3 A *2 v 76 - No - 14. $3.75 to83.75-No 
15, 84.30-No. 16. 84.30. Base sizes, Nes. 
6 to 9, 82.37} f.o.b. Cleveland. In oarlots 
12}o. less. 
Clothes Line Wire, regular 7 strand. No. 17 
14.66; No. 18. 82.90; No. 19, 82.60. Hollow 
?» ,tl 2! n £ No If, 84.30; No. 11 82.70: No. 
1», $2.35; No. 20, $2.30, f.o.b. Hamilton, 
Toronto,' Montreal 

WIRE FENCING, 

Galvanized barb 2 50 175 

Galvanized, plain twist 2 50 1 75 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, $2 30 fo 
small lots and $2 20 for carlote. 

COILED SPRING WIRE. 

HighCarbon, No. 9 $2 70 

No. 11 lie 

No. 12 2 N 

WIRE CLOTH. 
Painted Soreen, -per 100 so. 1 t. , net . . 1 6t 
Terms, 2 per cent, off 30 days. 

WASHING MACHINES. 

Round, re-acting per doz 56 00 

Square " " it 00 

Eclipse, per doz 48 00 

Dowswell " 3* 00 

New Century, per doz 71 OS 

Connor Improved 33 00 

Daisy 48 00 

WRINGERS. 

Leader per dot. 30 Ot 31 Ot 

Royal Canadian " 14 N 

Royal American 84(1 

Sampson .... $J It 

Lightning * M 

Terms, 4 months, or 3 per oent. 10 days. 

WaOCOHT IRON WASSfSBA 

Canadian make, disoount 40 ner oasst 



53 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 21, 1905 



IF YOU INTEND MAKING ALTERATIONS WRITE 

US FOR PRICES AND PARTICULARS 

OF OUR 




We can make boxes to fit your present shelving 
...THE... 

Bennett Manufacturing Co. 

PICKERING, ONT. 



CONNOR'S O. K. ROTARY WASHER. 




OTT. 





No experiment, but a trade winner. Dealers who ndle 
this washer say they sell easier than any other. Write for 
our catalogue and price list. 
J. H. CONNOR &S0N, LTD.. Manufacturers OTTAWA. 







INDEX TO ADVERTISERS. 



A 

Accountants and Auditors 49 

Acme Can Works 22 

Acme Lathe 4 Products Oo 43 

Adams Co 56 

Alabastine Co 36 

American Shearer Mfg. Co 56 

American Steel and Wire Co 51 

Anglo-Canadian Supply Co 46 

Armstrong Bros 43 

Atlas Mfg. Co 46 

B 

Bamett. G. & H. Co outside back cover 

Batty Stove and Hardware Co 17 

Bayliss, Jones 4 Bayliss 1 

Belleville Business College 49 

Bell Telephone Co 49 

Bennett Mfg. Co 54 

Bird, J. A. 4 W., 4 Co 19 

Birkett, Thos., 4 Son Co 1 

Bradst reefs 56 

Bullard Automatio Wrench Co 17 

c 

Canada Foundry Co 43 

Canada Horse Nail Co 4.i 

Canada lion Furnace Co 29 

Canada Metal Co 43 

Canada Paint Co 38 

Canada Paper Co 21 

Canadian Cordage and Mfg. Co — 

inside back cover 

Canadian Heating 4 Ventilating Co . . . 22 

Canadian Rubber Co 8 

Canadian Sewer Pipe Co 16 

Olauss Shear Co 43 

Concrete Bdg. Block 4 Machine Co ... . 30 

Connor, J. H., 4 Sons 54 

Consumers' Cordage Oo 7 

Covert Mfg. Co 56 

Oullen, Orlan Clyde 44 

Outts, 0. M. 4 Co 47 

D 

Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Oo 2 

Dennis Wire and Iron Co 37 

Deseron'o Iron Co 29 

Dods, P. D., 4 Co 37 

Dominion Belting Oo 43 

Dominion Wire Mf g Co 4 

Dorken Bros. & Co outside front cover 

Dowswell Mfg. Co 4 



E 

Educational Dept 49 

Erie Specialty Co 56 

F 

Fairbanks Oo 41 

Felmar, Fred 32 

G 

Gibb, Alexander 30, 44 

Gies, Philip 17 

Gilbertson, W., & Co 30 

Gillett, E. W„ Co., Ltd. 19 

Glauber Brass Co 16 

Greening, B., Wire Co 4 

Grove Chemical Co 37 

Gurney Foundry Co 47 

Gutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. Co — 

outside back cover 

H 

Hamilton Cotton Co 6 

Hamilton Rifle Co 54 

Harrington 4 Richardson Arms Co 43 

Heinisch, R., Sons Oo 39 

Henderson, J. A 6 

Hobbs Mfg. Co 20 

Howland, H. S.,Sons4Co 13 

Hyde, F. 4 Co 29 

Imperial Varnish and Color Co 34 

International Stock Food Co 

inside back cover 

Ironside, Sons & Oo 56 

Iver Johnson Arms and Cycle Works. . 12 

J 

Jackson, C. F.. 4 Co 29 

Jamieson, R. O., 4 Co 35 

Jardine, A. B., 4 Co 16 

Jenking, A 47 

' Jones 4 Barclay 30 

K 

Kemp Mfg. Co 7 

Kerr Engine Co 17 



L 

Lamplough, F. W., & Co 41 

Legal Cards 49 

Leslie, A. C, & Co 29 

Lewis Bros. 4 Co 3 

Lewis, Rice, 4 Son inside front cover 

London Rolling Mill Co. .inside back cover 

Loughead, J. S. Co 39 

Lufkin Rule. Co inside back cover 

Luxfer Prism Co 41 

Lysaght, John outside front cover 



M 

Maple Leaf Harvest Tool Co 5 

Mast, J. M., Mfg. Co 30 

Maxwell, D., 4 Sons 6 

Merrick, Anderson 4 Co 33 

Metallic Roofing Co 31 

Metropolitan Business College 49 

Morrison, James, Brass Mfg. Co 14 

Morrow, John, Machine Screw Oo 30 

Morton, B. K., & Co 29 

Munn & Co 44 

Munderloh 4 Co 21 

Mc 

McArthur, Alex., & Co 50 

McCaskill, Dougall 4 Co 37 

McClary Mfg. Oo 22 

McDougall, R., Co 29 

McGregor-Banwell Fence Oo 6 

N 

Newman, W., & Sons 6 

Nobles 4 Hoare 37 

North Bros. Mfg. Co 1 

Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Oo 29 

o 

Oakey, John, 4 Sons 46 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co 53 

Oneida Community 41 

Ontario Lantern and Lamp Co 44 

Ontario Silver Co 6 

Ontario Tack Co 10 

Ontario Wind Engine and Pump Oo. . .. 43 



Page-Hersey Iron and Tube Oo 17 

Page Wire Fence Oo 21 

Paterson Mfg. Co 52 

Penberthy Injector Co 18 

Phillips, Chas. D 43 



Ramsay, A.. 4 Son Co 19 

Richard Johnston; Clapham 4 Morris. 30 

Ridgely Trimmer Co 47 

s 

Sadler 4 Ha wo rt h outside back cover 

Samuel, M. 4 L. . Benjamin, 4 Co 2 

Sanderson-Harold Co 35 

8ayer Electric Co 21 

Scott, Greenwood & Co 46 

Seymour, Henry T., Shear Co 39 

Sharratt 4 Newth 4 

Shaw, A., 4 Son 39 

Sherwin-Williams Co 11 

Silica Barytic Stone Co 43 

Smith 4 Hemenway Co 17 

Solarine Metal Polish 47 

Standard Ideal Sanitary Co 14 

Standard Paint and Varnish Works... 37 

St. George, H. E 37 

St. Margaret's College 49 

Summers, John, 4 Sons 4g 



Tarbox Bros 21 

Taylor-Forbes Oo outside front cover 

Technical Boo k and Advt 45 

Thompson, B. IS. H, Co. outside back cover 

Thome, R. E 15 

Tu rnbull 4 Henderson 37 

u 

United Factories 35 

w 

Waggoner Ladder Oo 20 

Wallace Barnes 10 6 

Walter, E. F., 4 Co 4 

Weese, O. A.. 4 Son 49 

Western Wire Nail Co 30 

Wilcox Mfg. Co 19 

Wright. E. T., 4 Co 47 

Wynn. T. H 6 



54 



January 21, 1905 



Hardware and Metal 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Accountants and Auditors. 

Hoskins, David, Toronto. 
Jenkins & Hardy, Toronto. 

Aluminum Castings. 

Canadian Aluminum Works Montreal. 

Anvils. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Art Glass 

St. George, HE., London, Ont. 

Ash Sifter. 

Cutts, C. M., & Co.. Toronto Junction. 

Axes. Hatchets, Scythes, etc, 

American Axe k Tool Co. Montreal. 

Babbitt Metal. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 
Fairbanks Co.. Montreal and Toronto. 

Barristers, Solicitors, etc. 

Atwater, Duclos k Chauvin, Montreal. 
Tupper, Phippen & Tupper, Winnipeg. 

Belting, Hose, etc. 

Canadian Rubber Co. of Montreal. 
Dominion Belting Co., Hamilton. 
Gutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. Co., 

Toronto. 
Sadler & Haworth, Montreal & Toronto. 

Bicycle Sundries. 

Millen, John, & Son, Montreal and To- 
ronto. 

Bird Cages. 
Wright, E. T., k Co., Hamilton. 

Box Straps. 

vVarminton, J. N., Montreal. 

Brass Goods. 

Jones & Barclay, Birmingham. 
LewiB, Rice, k Son., Toronto. 
Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Nicklin, J., k Co., Birmingham, Eng. 
Penberthy Injector Co.. Windsor, Ont. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Brushes and Brooms. 

Ramsay, A., k Son Co.. Montreal. 
United Factories. Toronto. 

Business Brokers. 
The Locators, Winnipeg. 

Carpenters' and Builders' Tools 
and Supplies. 

Covert Mfg. Co., West Troy, N.Y. 

Fairbanks Co., Montreal and Toronto. 

Howland, H. S. Sons & Co., Toronto. 

Hyde, F., k Co., Montreal. 

Lamplough, F. W. & Co., Montreal. 

Lewis Bros, & Co., Montreal. 

Lewis, Rice, k Son, Toronto. 

Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, Mich. 

Merrick. Anderson kCo., Winnipeg. 
Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto. 

Newman & Sons, Birmingham. 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Ontario Tack Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Phillips, Chas. D., Newport, Eng. 

Smith & Hemenway Co., New York. 

Silica Barytic Stone Co., Ingersoll, Ont. 

Stanley Rule & Level Co., New Britain. 
Conn. 

Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Waggoner Ladder Co., London, Ont. 

Wilcox Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 

Carriage and Waggon Ac- 
cessories. 

Covert Mfg. Co., West Troy, N.Y. 
Lougheed. J. S., & Co., Sarnia, Ont. 

Cattle and Trace Chains. 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 
Oneida Community Co., Niagara Falls. 

Churns. 

Maxwell, David, k Sons, St. Marys. 

Clippers — All Kinds. 

American Shearer Mfg. Co.,Nashua,N.H. 
Burman & Sons, Birmingham, Eng. 

Clothes Reels. 

Waggoner Ladder Co., London, Ont. 

Concrete Block Machines. 

Conorete Block Machine Co.. Toronto. 

Cordage 

Canadian Cordage and Mfg. Co., Peter- 
borough, Ont. 
Consumers' Cordage Co. , Montreal. 
Hamilton Cotton Co., Hamilton. 

Cork Screws. 

Erie Specialty Co., Erie, Pa. 

Customs Brokers. 

Turnbull& Henderson, Vancouver, B.C. 

Cutlery — Razors, Scissors,, etc. 

Birkett, Thos., k Son Co., Ottawa. 
Butler, Geo., k Co., Sheffield, Eng. 
Clauss Shear Co., Toronto. 
Dorken Bros. & Co , Montreal. 
Heinisch's, R., Sons Co., Newark, N.J. 
Lamplough, F. W., k Co., Montreal. 
Silberetein, A. L., New York. 
Smith & Hemenway Co., New York. 
Walter, E. F., k Co.. Montreal. 
Wiebueoh k Hilcer, New York. 



Educational. 

Belleville Business College, Belleville. 
Metropolitan Business College, Ottawa 
St. Margaret 8 College, Toronto. 

Electric Fixtures. 

Canadian Aluminum Works, Montreal. 
Falk, Stadelmann & Co., London, E.C. 
Morrison James, Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Munderloh & Co., Montreal. 
Sayer Electric Co., Montreal. 

Engravers. 

Legg Bros. , Toronto. 

Files and Rasps. 

Bamett Co., G. & H, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Disston, Henry & Sons, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Grose, Walter, Montreal. 

Financial Institutions. 
Bradstreet Co. 

British America Assurance Co., Toronto. 
Canadian Bank of Commerce, Toronto. 
Confederation Life Ass., Toronto. 
London Guarantee and Accident Ins. 

Co., Toronto. 
Metropolitan Bank, Toronto. 
Reed, Jos. B, k Sons. Toronto. 
Western Assurance Co., Toronto. 

Firearms and Ammunition. 

Hamilton Rifle Co., Plymouth, Mich. 
Harrington & Richardson Arms Co., 

Worcester, Mass. 
Iver Johnson's Arms and Cycle Works, 

Fitchburg, Mass. 
Walter, E. F., k Co., Montreal. 

Food Choppers. 

Enterprise Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lamplough, F. W., & Co., Montreal. 
Smith k Hemenway Co., New York. 

Gas Lamps and Sundries. 

Auer Light Co. , Montreal. 

Falk, Stadelmann|& Co., London E.C. 

Glaziers' Diamonds. 

Sharratt k Newth, London, Eng. 
Shaw, A., k Son, London, Eng. 

Glue. 
Grove Chemical Co., Lancashire, Eng. 

Hardware Specialties. 
Erie Specialty Co., Erie, Pa. 

Harvest Tools. 

Maple Leaf Harvest Tool Co., Tillsou- 
burg, Ont. 

Horseshoe Pads. 

Canadian Rubber Co. of Montreal. 

Horseshoes and Nails 

Canada Horse Nail Co., Montreal. 

Hot Water Boilers. 

Gies, Philip, Berlin, Ont. 
Gurney Foundry Co., Toronto. 

Ice Cream Freezers. 

Dana Mfg. Co., Cincinnati, Ohio. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Ice Cutting Tools. 

Erie Specialty Co., Erie, Pa. 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Injectors — Automatic. 

Penberthy Injector Co. , Windsor, Ont. 

Iron Pipe. 

Page-Hersey Iron and Tube Co., Guelph. 

Iron Pumps. 

McDougall, R., Co., Gait, Ont. 

Keys. 

Millen, John k Son, Montreal. 

Ladders — Extension. 

Waggoner Ladder Co., London, Ont. 
Lamps. 
Falk, Stadelmann & Co., London, E.C. 

Lanterns. 

Kemp Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Ontario Lantern Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Wright, E. T., & Co., Hamilton. 

La wn Mo wers. 

Maxwell. David. k Sons, St. Marys Ont 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Ledgers and Office Stationery. 

Weese.G. A. k Son. Toronto. 

Lumbermen's Supplies. 

Birkett. Thos., k Son Co., Ottawa. - 

Lye. 
GUlett, E. W., Co., Limited, Toronto. 

Machinery. 

Armstrong" Bros. Tool Co., Chicago, 111. 
Canada Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Fairbanks Co., Montreal and Toronto 
Jardine, A. B., k Co., Hespeler, Ont. 
Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville, Ont. 
Morrow MaohineScrew Co., Ingersoll, Ont. 
Ontario Wind Engine and Pump Co., 

Toronto. 
Penberthy Injector Co., Windsor. 

Mantels. 

Batty Stove and Hardware Co., Toronto. 

Manufacturers' Agents. 

Uibb, Alexander, Montreal. 



Metals. 

Booth Copper Co., Toronto. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co., Midland, Ont. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 

Deseronto Iron Co., Deseronto, Ont. 

Gibb, Alexander, Montreal. 

Gilbertson, W., Pootardawe, Wales. 

Hankin, F., Montreal. 

Ironside, Son k Co., London, Eng. 

Jackson, O. F., k Co., Vancouver, B.C. 
• Johnston, Rd., Clapham & Morris, Man- 
chester, Eng. 

Kemp Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Leslie, A. C. & Co., Montreal. 

London Rolling Mills Co., London, Ont. 

Lysaght, John, Bristol, Eng. 

Morton, B. K., k Co., Sheffield, Eng. 

Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Co., New 
Glasgow, N.S. 

Samuel, Benjamin & Co., Toronto. 

Thompson, B. k S. H. & Co., Montreal. 

Metal Lath. 

Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto. 

Metal Polish, Emery Cloth, etc. 

Anglo-Canadian Supply Co., Toronto. 
Solarine Company, Chicago. 
Oakey, John, k Sons, London, Eng. 

Metallic Window Screens. 

Cutts, C. M., & Co., Toronto Junction. 

Milk Cans and Trimmings. 

Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Kemp Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
McClary Mfg. Co.. London. Out. 
Wright, E. T, & Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Mops. 

TarboxBros., Toronto. 

Office Furniture. 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Paints, Oils and Glass, 

AlabastineCo.. Paris, Ont. 
American Window Glass Co., Montreal. 
Berry Bros., Detroit and Walkerville. 
Canada Paint Co. , Montreal. 
Consolidated Plate Glass Co. , Toronto. 
Dods, P. D., k Co., Montreal. 
Dominion Linseed Oil Co., Montreal. 
Imperial Varnish and Color Co., Toronto. 
Jamieson, R, 0. , k Co. , Montreal. 
Lucas, John, &Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Luxfer Prism Co., Toronto. 
McArthur, Corneille k Co., Montreal. 
McCaskill, Dougall k Co., Montreal. 
Merrick. Anderson k Co., Winnipeg. 
Nobles & Hoare Londeu, Eng. 
Queen City Oil Co., Toronto. 
Ramsay k Son, Montreal. 
Sherwin-Williams Co., Montreal. 
Standard Paint and Varnish Works, 

Windsor, Ont. 
Thome, R. E., Montreal. 

Painters Tools and Supplies. 

United Factories, Toronto. 
Waggoner Ladder Co., London, Ont. 

Patent Solicitor. 

Cullen, Orlan Clyde, Washington, D.C. 

Perforated Sheet Metals. 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton 

Plumbers' Topis and Supplies. 

Bullard Automatic Wrench Co., Provi- 
dence, R.I. 
Fairbanks Co.,->Montreal. 
Gauber Brass Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Gies, Philip, Berlin, Ont. 
Jardine, A. B., k Co , Hespeler, Ont. 
Millen, John, & Sons, Montreal. 
Morrison, Jas., Brass vlfg. Co., Toronto. 
Page-Hersey Iron k Tube Co.. Guelph. 
Standard Ideal Sanitary Co., Port Hopa, 

Portland Cement. 

Hyde, F., k Co., Montreal. 

Thompson, B. k S. H. k Co., Montreal. 
Poultry Netting. 

Page Wire Fence Co., Walkerville, Ont. 
Greening, B., wire Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Refrigerators. 

Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Sanderson-Harold Co., Paris, Ont. 

Roofing Supplies. 
Bird, J. A. <fc W., <fc Co., Boston. 
Jenking, A. C, Montreal. 
McArthur, Alex., <fc Co., Montreal. 
Metal Shingle & Siding Co., Preston, Ont. 
Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto. 
Paterson Mfg. Co., Toronto k Montreal. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Saws. 

Disston, Henry, &Sons, Philadelphia, Pa 
Shurly & Dietrich, Gait, Oct. 

Sap Buckets and Spouts. 

Kemp Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Scales. 

Fairbanks Co., Montreal and Toronto. 
Gurney Scale Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Merrick. Anderson k Co.. Winnipeg. 
New- Warren Scale Co., Montreal. 

Screen Doors and Windows. 

Sanderson-Harold Co., Paris, Ont. 
United Factories, Toronto. 

Screws, Nuts, Bolts. 

Acme Lathe ProductsJCo. , Manchester. 
Bayliss, Jones & Bayliss, Wolverham- 

ton, Eng. 
Canada Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Morrow, John, Machine Screw Co., 

Ingersoll, Ont. 

Sewer Pipes. 

Canadian Sewer Pipe Co., Hamilton 
Hyde, F., k Co., Montreal. 

ShelfBoxes. 

Bennett Mfg. Co., Pickering, Ont. 



Shelf Brackets. 

Atlas Mfg. Co., New Haven. Conn 

Ship Chandlery. 

Lewis, Rice, k Son, Toronto. 
Silver-Plated Ware. 

Ontario Silver Co., Niagara Falls. 
Toronto Silver Plate Co., Toronto. 
Standard Silver Co., Toronto. 
Weeton, G., Mfg. Co., ToJonto. 

Sporting Goods. 

Fisher, A. D., Toronto. 
Lewis, Rice, k Son, Toronto. 

Stable Fixtures. 

Greening, B. Wire Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Oneida Community Co., Niagara Falls, 

Ont. 
Metal Shingle& Siding Co., Preston, Ont 

Stamps, Stencils, etc. 
Superior Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Steel Castings. 

Montreal Steel Works, Montreal. 

Steel Rails. 

Algonia Steel Co— Drummoud, McCall 

k Co., Agents, Montreal. 
Jackson, C. F., k Co., Vancouver, B.C. 
Morton, B. K., & Co., Sheffield, Eng. 
Nova Scotia Steel k Coal Co., New Glas- 
gow, N.S. 

Stock Food. 

Colonial Stock Food Co., Toronto. 
International Stock Food Co., Toronto. 
Naisbitt Co., Toronto. 

Store Lighting. 

Auer Light Co., Montreal. 
Grose, Walter, Montreal. 

Stoves and Tinware, Radia- 
tors, Furnaces, etc. 

Adams Co., Dubuque, Iowa. 

Batty Stove & Hardware Co., Toronto. 

Canadian Heating k Ventilating Co., 

Owen Sound. 
Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Gies, P., Berlin, Ont. 
Guelph Foundry Co., Guelph. 
Gurney Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Kemp Mnfg. Co., Toronto. 
McClary Mfg. Co., London. 
Merrick, Anderson <fc Co., Winnipeg. 
Stewart James Mfg. Co., Woodstock. 
Telephone City Stoves, Brantt'ord. 
Western Foundry Co., Wingham. 
Wright, E. T.,& Co., Hamilton. 

Stove Polish. 

St. Arnaud Freres, Montreal. 

Tacks. 

Ontario Tack Co., Hamilton. 
Wynn, T. H., Hamilton. 

Traps. 

Mast, J. M., Mfg. Co., Lititz, Pa. 

Vises. 

Lamplough, F. W., k Co., Montreal. 

Wall Coating. 

Alabastine Co., Paris, Ont. 

Wall Paper. 

Staunton's Limited, Toronto. 

Wall Paper Trimmer. 

Ridgeley Trimmer Co., Springfield, 

Warehouse Trucks. 

Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 

Washing Machines, etc. 

Connor, J. H., k Son, Ottawa. 
Dowswell Mfg. Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Taylor Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Wholesale Hardware. 

Birkett, Thos., k Sons Co., Ottawa. 
Canada Hardware Co., Montreal. 
Howland, H. S., Sons k Co., Toronto. 
Kennedy Hardware Co., Toronto. 
Lewis Bros, k Co., Montreal. 
Lewis, Rice, k Son, Toronto. 
Merrick, Anderson k Co., Winnipeg. 

Window and Sidewalk Prisms. 

Hobbs Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 
Luxfer Prism Co. , Toronto. 

Window Cards and Signs. 

Martell-Stewart Co., Montreal. 

Wire Springs. 

Henderson, J. A., Montreal. 
Wallace, Barnes Co. , Bristol, Conn. 

Wire, Wire Rope, Cow Ties, 
Fencing Tools, etc. 

Bayliss, Jones k Bayliss, Wolverham 

ton, Eng. 
American Steel and Wire Co., New 

York, Montreal, Chicago. 
Dennis Wire and Iron Co., London, Ont. 
Dominion Wire Mnfg. Co., Montreal and 

Toronto, 
Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 
Ironside, Son k Co. , London, Eng. 
McGregor - Banwell Fence Co., Windsor, 

Ont. 
Merrick, Anderson k Co., Winnipeg. 
Oneida Community, Niagara Falls. 
Owen Sound Wire Fence Co., Owen Sound 
Page Wire Fence Co., \V*Lkervi!le. Ont. 
Walter. E. F. k Co., Montreal. 
Western Wire & Nail Co., London, On 

Woodenware. 

Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 
United Factories, Toronto. 
Waggoner Ladder Co., London, Ont. 

Wrapping Papers. 

Canada Paper Co., Tomato. 
McArthur, Alec, * Co., Moatreal. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 21, 1905 




COVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy, N.Y 

Auto Screw Jack 

Harness Snaps, Chain, Rope and Web 
Goods, etc. 

FOR SALE BY JOBBERS AT MTRS. PRICE 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 

»BjAl*««» *V^^f Largest Variety, 
^tl^zZ^yv! To " et . H""* Electric Powerl 

' < ^'/ ARE THE BEST. 

Highest Quality Grooming and 
Sheep-Shearing Machines. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

SEND FOB CATALOGUE TO 
. American Shearer Hfg. Co., Nashua, N.H..BSA 

Wiebusch & Hilger, Limited, special New York 
representatives, 9-15 Murray Street. 





IRONSIDE FOR IRON 

88 l Vs P H l WD LT r'e I .VK IRON, STEEL, METALS, BARS, PLATES, 
SHEETS. BOLTS and NUTS, TIN PLATES, Etc. 

Sole Licensees for PAGE'S PATENT WIRE STRETCHER, and we 

are willing to sell the right of manufacture in Canada on a Royalty basis. 

IRONSIDE'S PATENT WIRE CUTTERS, guaranteed to cut „ y wir. 

We publish a "Canadian Metal Price List" monthly. Quotations In Dollars and Cants. 
(C.I.F.) We will send this, and- our "Weekly Market Report" on reeelpt of address. 

IRONSIDE, SON & CO., Mft* London. Eng. 



TO MANUFACTURERS' 
AGENTS : 

Hardware and Metal has enquiries 
from time to time from manufacturers and 
others wanting representatives in the leading 
business centres here and abroad. 

Firms or individual open for agencies in Canada 
or abroad may have their names and addresses 
placed on a special list kept for the information of 
enquirers in our various offices throughout Canada 
and in Great Britain without charge. 



Address 



Business Manager 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

Montreal and Toronto. 



Want Ads. 



In this paper cost 2 cents per word first 
insertion, 1 cent per word subsequent in- 
sertions. Contractions count as one word, 
but five figures (such as 81.000) may pass 
as one word. Cash remittance to cover 
cost must in all cases accompany orders, 
otherwise we cannot insert the advertise- 
ment. When replies come in our care 5 
cents additional must be included for for- 
warding same. Many large business deals 
have been brought about through adver- 
tisements of 20 or 30 words. Clerks can be 
secured, articles sold and exchanged, at 
small expenditure. 

MacLEAN PUBLISHING CO., Limited 
Montreal and Toronto. 



DIAMOND EXTENSION STOVE BACK 



They are easily 
adjusted and 
fitted to a stove 
by anyone. 

Please your 
customers by 
supplying them 
immediately 
with what 
they want. 



Patented, July 11th, 1893. 



Canadian Patent, June 14th. 1394. 




EXTENDED. 



Sold by 
Jobbers 
of - - - 

Hardware 
Tinware 
and 
Stoves. 



Manufactured by THE ADAMS COMPANY. Dubuque, Iowa, U. S. A. 
TAYLOR-FORBES CO.. Limited, Guelph, Ontario. 

...ESTABLISHED 1849... 



Capital and Surplus, $1,500,000. Offices Throughout the Civ ; lized World. 

Executive Offices : Nob. 346 and 348 Broadway, New York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers information that reflects the financial condition and 
the controlling circumstances of every seeter o mercantile credit. Its busiuess may be defined as of the 
merchants, by the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information no 
effort is spared, and no reasonable expanse considered too great, that the results may justify its claim as an 
authority on all matters affecting commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have 
been steadily extended, and it furnishes information concerning mercantile persons throughout the 
civilized world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, jobbing 
and manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and business corporations. 
Specific terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of its offices. Correspondence Invited. 

IN CANADA 



HALIFAX, N S. 
OTTAWA, ONT. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



OFFICES 

HAMILTON, ONT. 
QUEBEC, QUE. 



LONDON, ONT. 
ST. JOHN, N.B, 
WINNIPEG, MAN. 

TH0S. C. IRVING, Gen, Mas. Wetter* Canada. Toronto. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



Walker Cork Screws 

Over seventy varieties to select from. Every one 
tested and guaranteed. Write for Cork Screw 
Catalogue with new and original illustrated poem, 
" Sir Cork Screw's Soliloquy." 

ERIE SPECIALTY COMPANY, Erie, Pa., U.S.A. 



January 21, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



IRON 



Bars ia Flats, Rounds, Squares, 
Ovals, Half-Ovals, tialf-Roundsand 
Bands. Also Wrought Washers. 
QOOD QUALITY. PROflPT SHIPMENT. 



London Rolling Mill Co. 

Limited, 
LONDON, CANADA. 



STEELI 





MEASURING TAPES 

Steel, Metallic, Linen, Pocket, Ass Skin, 

Pat. Leather, Bend Leather, Etc, 

ARE THE BEST AND MOST POPULAR TAPES IN THE WORLD. 
YOUR STOCK IS NOT OOMPLETE WITHOUT THEM. 

LUFKIN RULE CO., Saginaw, Mich, U.S.A. 



London Office and Warehouse— 48 Lime St. 



New York City Branch- 280 Broadway. 



For sale by ALL PROMINENT CANADIAN HARDWARE JOBBERS. 



Have You $50? 



And do you want to invest it profit- 
ably and safely ? If you will believe 
us there is no better investment in 
your reach to-day than to secure an 
agency for 

INTERNATIONAL 
STOCK FOOD 

-This food is the best in the world. 
— It is the best advertised. 
— It is the most generously supported in 
in the selling. 

We help our agents with samples, 
fine literature, etc. We advertise his 
business and build up his sales. 

Write us for the agency for your district. 

INTERNATIONAL STOCK FOOD CO. 

TORONTO 



CANADIAN CORDAGE i IFG. CO., Limited 

CORDAGE 



OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



MANILA ROPE, 

SISAL ROPE, 

LATHYARN 



BINDER TWINE: 



SISAL, 



STANDARD, 

MANILA. 



All qualities and lengths, 500 ft., 550 ft., 600 ft., 650 ft. to the pound. 



We guarantee our goods to be absolutely Pure and free from all sub- 
stances calculated to inorease weight. Consumers will find on careful 
test that our goods are the Most Economical, Highest quality, Lowprioes. 

Wire. Write or 'Phone 

Canadian Cordage & Mfg. Co. 

Long Distance 'Phone 162 LIMITED 

PETERBOROUGH, ONTARIO, CANADA 




AND METAL 



January 21, 1905 



Black Diamond File Works j 

G. & H. Barnett Company $ 



PHILADELPHIA 



Twelve 



Medals 



i 




Awarded 
By JURORS at 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 



►'»-*-^%/'%'%,-%^%^%/^%.' 




"Redstone" 
Sheet Packing 

For use in highest pressures fo 
Steam, Hot or Cold Water and 
Air. Packs equally well for al 
No trouble with leaky joints 
when they are packed with 
" REDSTONE, " The most 
satisfactory packing on the 
market. Try a sample lot and 
be convinced of its merits. 

Manufactured solely by 

THE GUTTA PERCHA & RUBBER MFG. CO. 

OF TORONTO, LIMITED. 

Temporary Offices: 

15 East Wellington Street, Toronto. 

Branches— MONTREAL, WINNIPEG. 



We have in stock the following 
metals and shall be pleased to quote 
you lowest market prices on appli- 
cation : 

Pig Lead 
Ingot Tin 
Ingot Copper 
Sheet Zinc 



B.&S.H.TH0MPS0N&CO. 



LIMITED 



53 St. Sulpica Street, MONTREAL 



SADLERsH AWORTH 

K 1 







"E&tvos 



rr 



Standard 



» . 







WifM^^ 



WAREHOUSES 3c FACTORIES 

AT 

MONTREAL^ TORONTO. 



January 28, 1905 



HARDWARE AND MBTAL 



ALWAYS 
READY 
FOR USE 




Full Hollow 

Oround $2.5o Each 

Double Concave for 

extra hard beards, $3.00 

8end for free book, "HINTS TO SHAVERS." 



The Ontf£M**& RAZOR 



No Honing I No Grinding ! 

No Smarting after Shaving. With ordinary careful use will 

KEEP AN EDGE FOR YEARS WITHOUT HONING. 

Booklet coming — if you will ask for a copy, with trade discount. 
FOR SALE BY LEADING JOBBERS. 
FIRM OF _ , v „„ 

7 Cutlery 



A. L. SILBERSTEIN, <'-"' 

MAKERS OF // 



459-461 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. 



Don't forget to get our 
prices for,. 



SPRING GOODS 



o 



BEFORE BUYING 

Lawn Mowers, Lawn Rakes, 
Rubber Hose, Harvest Tools, 
Shovels and Spades, Paris 
Green, Green Wire Cloth, 
Churns, Wheelbarrows. . . . 



Builders' and Lumbermen's Supplies Always 
on Hand 



THOS. BIRKETT & SON CO., 

OTTAWA, ONT. 



LIMITED 



oth " To t„r T s b u t "YANKEE TOOLS" 

SCREW DRIVERS 



ARE 

ETTER 



No. 10 * II— RATCHE T> right ana ] e ft band and rigid 




The NEWEST, CLEVEREST and QUICKEST SELLING TOOLS 
of the KIND. 

DRILLS 





No. 40— AUTOMATIC DRILL, with Ratchet. Movement. 



No. 30— SPIRAL RATCHET-rightand left hand and rigid. 
No. 31— " " (heavy pattern.) 

No. 20- " " right hand only. 




Chuck a»d 8 Drill Points 

for spiral ratchet 
screw driver. 



Countersink, 

for spiral ratchet 
screw driver. 



No 12 RATCHET. 

tr.j. .with stub blade. 





No. 60— POCKET 
SCREW DRIVER. 



No. 43-AUTOMATIC DRILL, for light drills only. 

(IK 

No. 44— AUTOMATIC DRILL, with adjustable tension on spring. 






No SO— RECIPROCATING DRILL, for wood ormttals. 
SOLD BY LEADING JOBBERS 
SEND FOR OUR NEW "YANKEE" TOOL BOOK 

NORTH BROS. MFG. CO 

PHILADELPHIA, F>a. 



HARDWARE AND MBTAL 



January 28, 1905 



SAP SPOUTS 



Patented 1896 



STEEL 



_££> 




Supplied with or without hooks 



-"EUREKA" 

Sap Spouts are ever popular, be- 
oause they are economical and 
durable, safe and secure, no leak- 
age, easily inserted, do not injure 
the tree, secure full flow of sap. 
All packed in cardboard boxes, 
100 eaoh. 




SAP BUCKETS 




Cuts show 

Full Size 

of Spouts. 



SUBSTANTIALLY MADE 



Long Pattern 




IMPERIAL" 

TAPERED 




Western Pattern 



SLIGHTLY FLARING, FITS CLOSELY TO THE TREE 
AND WILL NOT OVERFLOW UNTIL NEARLY FULL. 



Made from heavy tinned shee s 
especially adapted 

FOR COVERED 
SAP 
BUCKETS 



The THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., Limited, . . . MONTREAL 



PIG IRON 



Enquire for our prices before buying. 



M. & L Samuel, Benjamin & Co 



503 Temple Building 

English House 16 Philpot Lane, LONDON, ENGLAND. 

i 



TORONTO. 



January 28, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



IC~*> 






'<&, 



Woolly Wealth 

( \P course there is money in wool ; but there is just as much in 
selling the wool growers — shears. Let us give you two or 
three reasons why our line is so popular with sheep raisers : First, 
they are superior in material and finish ; Second, they give absolute 
satisfaction ; Third, you'll know if you show them to your customers. 



RETURNED 
JAN 28 190$ 

7 A 




No. 3. 6-inch full polished blades and bow- 




No. 6. Trowel ahank, full polished blades and b< 



Toronto 
Ottawa 

Vancouver 



Always address 

Head Office at 



Lewis Bros. & Co. 

Importers and Distributers 

Montreal 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 28, 1905 



GUJSS, 

RIFLES, 
REVOLVERS 

We are sole agents for one of the largest and 

best equipped Fire Arms manufacturers in Belgium, and can talk prices with anyone. 

CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED 

E. F. WALTER &. CO., M i£! Montreal 





ALMOST AUTOMATIC 

The " New Century" Washing Machine is provided with two oil tempered steel 
springs which engage at each extreme point and tend to reverse the motion. 

As the tub is revolved back and forth, the motion of the Washer constantly changes 
the position of the clothes, exposing all parts alike to the rubbing surface, and to the 
atmospheric and mechanical action of the water. 

THE "NEW CENTURY" WASHING MACHINE is the acme of Washing 
Machine Development. It should be sold by every dealer genuinely concerned about 
having the best things. Send for descriptive catalogue. 



THE DOWSWELL MANUFACTURING CO., Limited, 



HAMILTON, ONT. 



WIRE ROPE 




"ACME" Brand 

Highest grade of hoisting rope made. 
Extra tensile strength for heavy work. 
One strand painted green — look for it. 



USE GREENINGS ROPE GREASE 
FOR LUBRICATION. 



THE B. GREENING WIRE CO. 

LIMITED 

HAMILTON, ONT. MONTREAL, QUE. 



NOW 

IS THE TIME TO PLACE YOUR ORDER FOR 

BARB WIRE 



PLAIN- 



Galvanized Wire 

Galvanized Coiled Spring 

Staples 

Wire Nails, Screws 

ALL CANADIAN-MADE GOODS. 



DOMINION WIRE MFG. CO. 



LIMITED 



MONTREAL and TORONTO. 



January 28, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Have You Seen Them ? 

For Beauty, FinisH and Quality, tKe 
"Maple Leaf" Harvest Tools are unexcelled. 




No.'122. Manure ForK 




P* 



No. 2-4-3.! Beet ForK. 



No. 138. Spading ForK. 





No. 106. Hay ForK. 



L^L 




No. 155. SocKet Field Hoe. 




TO THE HARDWARE TRADE 



No. 43. Patent V Blade Hoe. 



1 



When placing your order for harvest tools with your jobber it will be to your advantage v ^->" 

to specify for the "Maple Leaf Harvest Tools. Should your jobber be unable to supply 
them, send your order to us and it will receive prompt and careful attention. 

The Maple Leaf Harvest Tool Co., Limited, Tillsonburg, Ont. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 28, 1905 



ONTARIO SILVER CO., 



Limited, 
NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA. 

„ . . , FLATWARE, CUTLERY a 

Manufacturer* of ELECTROPLATE. . . 

Ask for our Catalogue and Quotations. 



NEWMAN'S PATENT 
INVINCIBLE FLOOR SPRINGS 

Combine all the qualities de-irable in a Door 
Closer. They work silently an 1 effectually, and 
never get out of order. In use in many of the 
public buildings throughout Great Britain and 
the Colonies. 

MADE SOLELY BY 

W. NEWMAN A SONS, Birmingham. 



TRADE WITH E NGLAND 

Every Canadian who wishes to trade 
successfully with the Old Country 
should read 

"Commercial Intelligence" 

(The address is 168 Fleet St., 
London, England.) 

The cost is only 6c. per week. (Annual 
subscription, including postage, $4.80.) 

Moreover, regular subscribers are allowed 
to advertise without charge in the paper. 
See the rules. 



Qflan Clyde Cullen, G.E.L.L.M. 

Counsel ler at Law U.S. Supreme Court. 
Registered Attorney U.S. Patent Office, 

U.S. and Foreign Patents, Caveats, Copy- 
rights and Trade Marks. Military and 
Naval Inventions a specialty. Address, 

Box 264, Station G, Washington, D.C. 

CUN SHOP and MODEL SHOP 

Warren White Sulphur Springs, 

Totten P.O., Virginia. 



The Never Scald Kettle Handle 

Made to Fit Any Size of Kettle 




No More Scalds— Lid Can't Come Off 

The lid is held securely in place by lugs at each side. 
It can't slip, nor can the steam reach the hand. Veget 
ab<es cant fall out Many footsteps saved by not 
having to run and get a cloth to drain water off vegetables 
boiled in the Never 8cald Kettle. For sale by 

E. T. WRIGHT & CO., Hamilton, Cau. 




DAVID MAXWELL & SONS 

ST. MARYS, ONT., CANADA. 

"Maxwell Favorite Churn." ansa; 

— — — — _ — — _— — — — ^— Improved Steel 

Stand, Roller 
Bearings, and Foot and Hand Lever Drive, and Detachable Driving 
Link. Improved for season of 1904. Steel or Wood Frame as desired. 



Steel Frame Support. 



f onr« All nrwj a*r< High and Low Wheels, from 12 in. to 

LdWIl luOWClS. 20 in - widths. Cold Rolled Steel 

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Shafting, Crucible Steel Knives and 

^~" ™ ~ ™~ "" ™ ~ ~™"""~" Cutting Plate. 

If your Wholesale House does not offer you these articles 

SEND DIRECT TO US. 





MAXWELL MOWER 



8-in. Low Wheel. 



Wheelbarrows. &■££ 

___^^^^^^____^^^_ Sizes. 



SPRINGS 

ALMOST ANYTHING IN THIS LINE. 

s».» DROP FORGINGS 

Submit Sample* or Specifications for Prices. 

THE WALLACE BARNES CO., - - BRISTOL, CONN. 



TACKS 


Factory equipped with the Make inquiries 
latest Improved machinery. Get our prloes 


AGENTS WANTED 


THOS. H. WYNN, - - HAMILTON 



SWORD 



AND 



to count, 



Tru© to gauge, Trt 

and Truly what 

we represent them to be— 

-FIRST QUALITY- 

Agent for 

A. HENDERSON, T. W. & J. WALKER, 

Board of Trade Bid?., MONTREAL, . WOLVERHAMPTON 



January 28. 1905 HARDWARE AND METAL 



r 



, 



! 



Binder Twine 



BLUE RIBBON, 650 ft. to the lb. 
REDCAP, - 600 ft to the lb. 
TIGER, - - 550 ft. to the lb. 
STANDARD, 500 ft. to the lb. 

GOLDEN CROWN, 500 ft: to the lb. 



Still the Favorites of both FARMERS and DEALERS. 



CONSUMERS CORDAGE CO., Limited 

MONTREAL. 

Mills- MONTREAL and HALIFAX. 



g » > p i * m i um n m t+t »< * mh i i ***i t* \ w i*nmii m m* mt im^m i \ mm>* 



If SHEAF BRAND is preferred to any of the above, we are prepared to supply 
it, as we are the Proprietors of this Trade Mark. 

Nothing but Select Fibre Used. j 

Skilled Canadian Labor. 

Our Twine is not only evenly spun, but is WELL BALLED. 
This is very important, prevents tangling in Twine Box 

Write for prices. 






SIR H. MONTAGU ALLAN, 

Pretldent 



HARDWARE AND METAL 
Established Over Fifty Years. 



January 28, 1905 



D. LORNE McQIBBON, 

General Manager. 




ALWAYS UNIFORM 

ALWAYS RELIABLE 

ALWAYS IN DEMAND 



v «o e n»« 



"Red Star" 

Sheet 

Packing 



HIGH QUALITY 

HONEST SERVICE 

COMPLETE SATISFACTION 



H 



l\6CI Ot3T is the original High 
Grade Sheet Packing, a winner all the time. 

Some of the other Packings are good 
Packings, but — 

"Red Star" is without a Rival. 



Write for a Free Sample. 



Sales Branches and Warehouses 



172 Granville St., 
Halifax, N.S. 



Imperial Bank Building, 
Montreal, Que. 



Front and Yonge Ms., 
Toronto, Ont. 



Princess St., 
Winnipeg, Man. 



Cordova St., 
Vancouver, B.C. 



The Canadian Rubber C? of Montreal. 



V®®®®&§)®@^^ 



Sap Buckets and Spiles 




FLARING OR WEST- 
ERN PATTERN 
SAP [BUCKETS 

2 SIZES. 
QUARTS 6 AND 10. 



STRAIGHT PATTERN 
SAP BUCKETS 

3 SIZES. 
NOS. 8, 12, 16. 




E. T. PATTERN SAP 
SPOUTS 

Made from tinned steel. 



We can supply the Eureka 
Sap Spout if desired. 

Tin Plates in all standard 
sizes and qualities. 

We will be pleased to 
quote you. 



MAPLE LEAF SAP SPOUTS 

Made from bronzed steel. 



KEMP MANUFACTURING CO., TORONTO, CANADA 



®(5XS)®®(5XS)®S^ 



January 28, 1905 



Hardware and Metal. 



} 



•WH* 



Report of the World's Copper Trade 



THE year 1904 has been more pros- 
perous in the copper trade than 
the season preceding', which was 
in turn a decided improvement upon 
1902, and 1905 promises to be even bet- 
ter, from the standpoint of the produc- 
ing interests. The year closes with Am- 
erican copper selling at about 15 cents 
per pound, an advance of about 2 cents 
from the average price of the first nine 
months, with good prospects that a high 
price will be held well into 1905. The 
leading mines, by virtue of economies 
effected after the drop in the price of 
the metal in October, 1901, have made 
lai'ge net earnings, and dividend dis- 
bursements by American mines have been 
larger than for several years previous. 
The leading Spanish mines, among which 
the Rio Tinto is preeminent, have done 
well; and the earnings of the Mansfield, 
Germany's leading mine, have shown a 
nearly complete recovery from the ex- 
tremely low figures of 1902. The Greene 
Consolidated, of Mexico, has reached the 
stage of steady dividends, and the net 
profits, disbursed to shareholders and 
placed to surplus and amortization funds, 
have been quite satisfactory with the 
larger number of the world's great cop- 
per mines. 

INCREASED CONSUMPTION. 

The rate of increase in the consump- 
tion of the leading metals, and also of 
coal, averages very closely to 6 1-2 per 
cent., compounded annually, but copper 
and nickel are in excess of this percent- 
age. Nickel being a metal of compara- 
tively recent use, the percentage of an- 
nual increase is abnormal, while in the 
case of copper the electrical demand of 
the past fifteen years is responsible for 
a material increase from the regular 
ratio of annual gain established for the 
other metals, and maintained by copper 
as well, until about the beginning of the 
last decade of the nineteenth century. 
Contrary to the generallv accepted im- 
pression, the electrical demand for cop- 
per is not the principal source of con- 
sumption, the engineering trades taking 
at least half of the total output, while 
electrical demands are estimated vari- 
ouslv. by different statisticians who have 
given study to the matter, as but 22 to 
27 per cent, of the total output. Small 



as the percentage of electrical demand 
may appear, it is an entirely new use, 
and has stimulated the copper trade to 
remarkable activitv during the past 
twelve years. Great. as are the amounts 
being invested in new copper mining en- 
terprises in various parts of the world, 
the work is being undertaken none too 
soon. The normal increase in the 
world's consumption now exceeds 
100,000,000 pounds annually — an amount 
greater than the output of the Rio 
Tinto, Calmut & Hecla, Anaconda, or 
Boston & Montana, and as at least five 
years and several millions of dollars are 
required for the opening of a really 
great copper mine, the effect of the work 
now planned will not be felt in any ap- 
preciable degree for several years to 
come, and cannot be felt in their full 
force for five or ten years in most cases, 
bv which time the demand for the metal 
will have increased to remarkable fig- 
ures. 

FUTURE COPPER PRODUCTION. 

The great copper consuming indus- 
tries of the world are giving great at- 
tention to the question of future copper 
supply, since so many are dependent 
upon the metal that anv serious shortage 
would be nothing less than an interna- 
tional calamity, many of the heavy con- 
sumers are apprehensive of a future 
copper shortage, but Horace J. Stevens 
does not share in these fears. He thinks 
however, that the stimulus of large de- 
mand may lead to periods when con- 
sumption treads uncomfortably close 
upon the heels of co-production. It 
should not be forgotten, however, that 
copper supplies possess a greater degree 
of resiliency than is the case with any 
other metal, and old copper, from corn- 
ices, ship's bottoms, brewerv kettles and 
a thousand and one sources, has a habit 
of coming out very freely, in quantities 
aggregating tens of thousands of tons, 
whenever there is an era of high metal 
prices. 

WORLD'S COPPER PRODUCTION. 

The following table aives the actual 
copper production of the world for 1902 
and 1903 and estimated production of 
ii/o-i, from the most reliable data in 
hand at the close of the year. The total 
for 1904 is more likely to prove slightly 



too high than to be found too low, but 
it is a close approximation to the actual 
output, final figures of which will not be 
available for about six months. 

(Gross tons ) 

Country. 1904. i9°3- i9°2 

United States 349 866 31 1 ,536 294,297 

Mexico 52.5 00 4S.3 I S 35.785 

Spain and Portugal. 50,000 49 74° 49.79° 

Chili 33,000 .-U.ioo 28,930 

Japan 32,000 31,360 29,775 

Australasia 30,000 29,000 28,640 

Germany 31,500 21,205 21,605 

Canada 21,500 19,320 17.485 

Russia 10,000 10,320 8,000 

Cape Colony 7. 2 5° 5.230 445° 

Peru 7,000 7,800 7.58 -> 

Norway 6,000 5,915 4.5°5 

Italy 3.250 3,100 3,370 

Newfoundland 2,000 2,060 2,oco 

Bolivia 2,000 2,000 2,000 

Austria-Hungary.. 1,500 1,385 1,500 

Turkey 1,500 1,400 1,100 

Miscellaneous 1300 1,090 1,295 

Totals 632,166 578,867 542167 

The United States shows the greatest 
actual and relative increase in produc- 
tion, there being an increase of about 
12 per cent, over 1903. Canada has 
made a fair gain, although not so great 
as was hoped at the beginning of the 
year. 

UNITED STATES LEADS. 

The copper production of the rjniled 
States is so much larger than that of 
any other country that a special discus- 
sion of the copper production in that 
country will prove of interest. The State 
of Arizona shows the greatest increase 
in production over the other states, both 
actually and proportionately, and in 
1904 stands where Michigan stood in 
ly03. 

In 1880 the United States furnished 
17 per cent, of the world's copper sup- 
ply, and in 1904 it produced 55 per cent, 
of the world's production. 

Outside of the United States, Mexico 
is the most important source of the cop- 
per supply. Canada has but one large 
mine, the Granby, but has several others 
of more than average promise. The 
principal mines of Cuba are being un- 
watered and prepared for the resump- 
tion of production on a lar»e scale. The 
important mines of Venezuela remain 
idle because of the political unrest. Sev- 
eral new mines of importance are being 
opened in Spain. The highly promising 
copper resources of the Scandinavian 
peninsula are not being developed as 
rapidly as their promise warrants. Nor 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 2o\ 1905 



are Turkish mines producing copper in 
keeping with their possibilities. In 
Cyprus some copper properties are un- 
dergoing exploratory and development 
work. There are small mines in Siberia 
which apparently might be made large 
mines. Persia has important copper re- 
sources lying untouched except for a 
little native mining and smelting. Indian 
copper mines are idle. Manchuria has 
copper deposits of promise, on which 
work was started shortly before the out- 
break of the present war, and Korea 
also has the making of mines, which will 
receive attention later. China has some 
very small and very old copper mines, 
and makes perhaps 5,000,000 to 8,000,- 
000 pound yearly, all consumed at home, 
in addition to which large quantities are 
now being imported. The awakening of 
China, already begun, must result in 
the development of important mines of 
copper. 

The increase in copper production in 
Japan is due principally to the en t e y3L/^ 
prise of the Japanese in adopting the^ 
latest machinery and methods of niining£^>« — /j^3 
and metallurgy. In South Africa de- 
velopments are being made in many 
districts. In regard to the other coun- 
tries little new can be said. 

THE LEADING PRODUCERS. 

The important producing interest of 
the world may be divided into a few 
groups. These include : The Amalga- 
mated Copped Co., Phelps Dodge & Co., 
New York; the Rothschild interests, in- 
cluding the Rio Tinto, Spain, and the 
Boleo, Mexico; Calumet & Arizona; 
Calumet & Hecla : the Greene Consoli- 
dated; the Heize interests; the Copper 
Range Consolidated Co., and the Mans- 
feld mine. 



personal interests are bound up with the 
development of the great West, he is 
peculiarly interested in the best solu- 
tion of the transportation problem of 
the West and his fellow countrymen will 
have confidence in the soundness of his 
judgment. 

The story of Mr. Ashdown's business 
career reads like a romance. Born in 
England, he came to Canada when eight 
years old, and he started out in life a 
young boy without a cent and with no 
prospects except those which were 
promised by his own native ability and 
strength of will. When eleven years of 
age he was serving behind the counter 
at his father's store in Weston, near 
Toronto. A little later he worked on a 
bush farm in Brant township, and the 
rough labor of a pioneer life developed a 
rugged constitution which has stood 
him in good stead ever since. 

RETURNED ?£. Q A 




MR. ASHDOWN HONORED. 

IT is seldom that a Government ap- 
pointment commands the unquali- 
fied approval which is accorded 
throughout Western Canada where he is 
best known as the appointment of J. II. 
Ashdown, of Winnipeg, to the seat on 
the Transportation Commission left vac- 
ant by the death of the late John Bert- 
ram, of Toronto. It is recognized that 
the chief transportation problem of Can- 
ada is how to serve most efficiently and 
economically the rapidly-growing needs 
of the West, and it is fitting that a 
Western man thoroughly conversant with 
the needs of the West should be given 
the appointment. 

Throughout Western Canada, Mr. Ash- 
down is constantly referred to as one of 
the most conspicuous examples of the 
self-made man who has achieved his suc- 
cess in the West. A business man whose 



J. H. Ashdown. 

When eighteen years of age, he became 
tinsmith's apprentice for John Zryd, of 
Hespeler, and for three 'years he worked 
steadily at his trade in that village. 
He then went to Chicago and from that 
city to Kansas. Perhaps it was in Kan- 
sas and Illinois that he began to realize 
the possibilities of the western half of 
the continent, but he had not forgotten 
Canada, and in June, 1866, he entered 
the Red River Settlement. 

It was not a prosperous time 'for the 
district which now includes the Western 
metropolis, and it was certainly no 
place for the faint-hearted pioneer. It 
was the troublous time before the first 
Riel rebellion, discontent was rife and 
the country was in financial straits. 
In putting down the Riel rebellion Mr. 
Ashdown took some part, and he was 
one of the prisoners shut up in Fort 
Garry. In 1871, in partial recognition 
of his services, he was appointed a Jus- 

10 



tice of the Peace, — a position which' in 
those days was no sinecure. 

Mr. Ashdown's business history is in 
part the history of Winnipeg. He sup- 
ported himself the first Winter cutting 
timber in the Assiniboine bush. A little 
later he returned to his trade as tin- 
smith, and the older citizens of Winni- 
peg still delight to point out the little 
old shop where he carried on his first 
business enterprise in the West. They 
like to compare it with his magnificent 
wholesale warehouse and the imposing 
retail store which is now being built on 
the site of that destroyed by fire last 
October. 

Your Winnipeg citizen feels that Mr. 
Ashdown's successful business career is 
typical of the story of Western progress. 



CANADIAN CIVIL ENGINEERS IN 
SESSION. 

The nineteenth annual meeting of the 
Canadian Society of Civil Engineers 
was held in Montreal on Tuesday, Wed- 
nesday and Thursday of this week. At 
the Tuesday session a general business 
meeting was held in the morning and 
luncheon served at the rooms of the 
society at noon. In the evening the re- 
tiring president, Col. W. T. Anderson, 
gave his address. The members visited 
the works of the Dominion Bridge Co., 
the Dominion Wire Mfg. Co., the Do- 
minion Wire Rope Works, and the works 
of Allis-Chalmers-Bullock, Limited, on 
Wednesday morning, and were enter- 
tained to luncheon by the Dominion 
Bridge Co. The annual dinner was held 
at the Windsor Hotel in the evening. 
On Thursday the following papers were 
read: "The Construction of the Can- 
adian Niagara Power Co.'s plant," by 
C. B. Smith, Ma.E., M. Can. Soc. C.E.; 
' ' The Effect of Load Factor on the cost 
of Electric Power," by E. M. Archi- 
bald, B.Sc; "Maps and Man Making 
in Canada," by James White, Geogra- 
pher for the Dominion Government. 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 



WIRE 



Prompt Shipment 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited. 
HAMILTON, ONT. 



January 28, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

For the convenience of its readers Hardware and 
Metal has opened its columns for the review of catalogues 
booklets or other such publications issued by manufacturers 
or wholesale dealers selling to the hardware, plumbing, 
machinery or metal trades. Retailers desiring such publica- 
tions may also hare inserted a note to that effect. It is re- 
quested that when any of the trade write for any booklet 
mentioned in these columns that they credit Hardware 
and Metal as the source of their information. 

Wire Rope and Cloth. 

THE B. Greening Wire Co., Limited, 
of Hamilton, have issued their 
1905 catalogues of wire rope and 
wire cloth and perforated metals. The 
first gives tahles of crucible cast steel, 
best plow steel, acme brand steel and 
Siemens-Martin steel wire rope ; Swedish 
hoist ropes, galvanized iron and steel 
ropes for all purposes; Lang's lay wire 
rope; extra pliable tiller rope; pliable 
sash cord; galvanized wire strands; 
rope fittings, etc. The catalogue devot- 
ed to wire cloth and perforated metals 
is profusely illustrated and supplies 
lists of all the various lines manufac- 
tured by the company. Numerous inter- 
esting tables of sizes are supplied in 
both catalogues which' must prove in- 
dispensable to users of these goods. 

Wood-Working Machinery. 
What might almost be termed a 
monumental work on wood-working ma- 
chinery is the splendid new catalogue of 
the Macgregor, Gourlay Co., Limited, of 
Gait. This voluminous book is bound in 
flexible cloth boards, ornamented, and 
with title executed in gold. The pages 
are large size enabling the adequate 
reproduction of illustrations of the 
numerous machines manufactured by the 
company. These illustrations have been 
admirably executed and stand out clear 
cut from the pages of the catalogue. 
By means of tin blocks the bodies of 
the machines are better emphasized and 
outlined. The contents include illus- 
trated descriptions of surface planers; 
planing and matching machines, hand 
planers and jointers, moulding machines, 
shaping, panelling and dove-tailing ma- 
chines, tenoning, mortising and blind 
machines, boring machines, band, scroll 
and sawing machines, saw tables and 
gaining machines, sandpapering ma- 
chines and a miscellaneous asortment of 
other machines used in the wood-work- 
ing trade. The Macgregor, Gourlay Co. 
are certainly to be congratulated on this 
excellent catalogue. 

A Calendar Free. 
Readers of Hardware and Metal wish- 
ing an attractive and substantial calen- 
dar may obtain such a one free by ad- 
dressing a request to the Alabastine Co., 
Limited, Paris, Ont., mentioning Hard- 



>-^> 



Do it Now! 

Now is the time to round out your paint 
stock and put the Sherwin-Williams Full 
Line on your shelves. 
The demand for paint and varnish specialties is 
increasing each year, as the public realizes more and 
more the necessity of using special material made for 
each particular purpose. 

The Sherwin-Williams Full Line will enable you to 
meet every demand for paints and varnishes with a 
best quality product, and every sale will increase your 
reputation as a "money's worth" dealer. 

Write us today for Full Line particulars. Do it now. 

The Sherwin-Williams Co. 

Canadian Headquarters and Plant 619 Centre St., Montreal. 135 

Warehouses: 86 YorK St., Toronto; 147 Bannatyne 
St., East, Winnipeg. 



ware and Metal. This calendar is of 
tin, smd is designed as a wall hanger. 
It is beautifully decorated in several 
colors. Through two pillars, with a 
classic arch springing from one to the 
other, one sees a pretty landscape, in 
the foreground of which stands a church, 
and the whole constitutes a capital ad- 
vertisement for Church's Alabastine. 
Mounted thereon is a calendar which 
may be renewed each successive year on 
application to the Alabastine Co. 

The disastrous fire which visited this 
company last year seems to have taken 
nothing away from their enerev or pur- 
poses, and they are after business with 
old-time determination. So thoroughly 
have they made known their product 
that we venture to say that a good many 
people, some of them dealers at that, 
think that "Alabastine" is descriptive 
of a certain kind of wall coatings in 
general, forgetting that it is a proprie- 
11 



tary name, the right to use 'which is 
vested solely in the Alabastine Co., of 
Paris . 

Ice Cream Freezers. 
In a neat little booklet of 24 pages 
the North Bros. Mfg. Co.. of Philadel- 
phia, describe their 1905 line of ice 
cream freezers. The practical feature 
which distinguishes the freezers of this 
company are the "automatic twin 
scrapers," which insure automatic and 
continuous scraping of the frozen cream 
from the side of the can. The scrapers 
are hung on a dasher so that their lower 
ends rest on the bottom of the can. and 
the friction between ends of scrapers 
and can bottom when in motion moves 
the scrapers against the side of the can 
and holds them there positively and con- 
tinuously. The North freezers are made 
of cedar with electric-welded wire hoops, 
which are guaranteed not to fall off or 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 28, 1905 



break. Their bottoms are of drawn 
steel and will not leak, break or fall out 
of t he body of the can. Further in- 
formation can be obtained by writing 
f< r a copy of the booklet. 

"Lumen." 

What is "Lumen?" Any dealer who 
would like to know is advised to send 
for an illustrated pamphlet on the sub- 
ject, issued by the Lumen Bearing Co.. 
Buffalo. N.Y., and 114 Jarvis street, 
Toronto. The booklet gives a clear and 
comprehensive idea of the physical and 
mechanical characteristics of "Lumen," 
that will enable the engineering and 
mechanical force to properly and in- 
telligently design and specify "Lu- 
men" bearings and also serves to 
demonstrate to the business or com- 
mercial heads the superior advantages 
of the use of "Lumen" as a purely 
business proposition. The booklet has 
been well executed and serves its pur- 
i ( se admirably. 



Trade Conditions in 

Birmingham 



By H. B. 



Birmingham, January 12. 1905. 

IT is too early in the new year to 
speak with any confidence of the 
trade prospects of 1.905. But hope- 
Fulness is in the commercial air, and if 
markets are at prsent none too active 
the tone is strong. So far as raw ma- 
terials are concerned there is a '"eneral 
stiffening in the iron and steel trade, 
while the rise in copper, and consequent- 
ly in brass, is e< inpel liii<> manufactur- 
ers to revise their price lists. Signs of 
;i revival in trade were distinctly indi- 
cated at the quarterly meeting of the 
iron trade held in Birmingham to-day. 
A much larger amount of business was 
transacted than was anticipated, and 
thimeh prices For marked bars remained 
i nchanged. For unmarked bars and angle 
iron inquiries were general and a fair 
rmount of business done at advanced 
I rices. Willi marked bars at £8, goo'd 
merchant brands of unmarked Found 
In- vers at £6. and prices generally showed 

an improvement of "is to 7s (id per ton 
upon those oF last year. At a largely 
attended meeting of the Unmarked Bar 
Association an advance was decided up 
on of 5s per ton, and the Gas Strip As- 
sociation recorded a similar increase. 
Orders were reported as more numerous 
and the oiiIIook encouraging. With 




HAS A "GRIP" 
ON THE TRADE. 

IVER 
JOHNSON 

Revolver Grip. 

Progressive dealers instantly recognized its value — the demand was spontaneous 
As the result of extensive advertising there is already a large demand for this 
revolver. 

Have you placed your order ? 



'DON'T CARRY IT" 



'WILL SEND AND GET IT- 



INTEND TO HAVE IT 



Hammer 

the 

Hammi 



Accidental! 
Discharge 
Impossiblel 



are signs that 



-t> point to the door of your competi- 



Naw Vork'Offica: 
No. 99 Chambers St, 



tor, who. being alert and keen, realizes that "New Things" 

impart life and activity to his business and who instantly 
recognizee the practicability and selling virtues of the 

IVER JOHN SOH Revolver Grip 

Send for new catalogue just issued — a work of art — 
mailed free upon application 

IVER JOHNSONS ARMS & CYCLE WORKS, 

FITCHBURG, MASS., U.S.A. 



spelter touching £26,' the difficulties of 
profit making by manufacturers are en- 
hanced, but with increasing demand Avill 
come increase in profit. Galvanized sheets 
changed hands at £10 12s 6d average, 
F.o.b. Liverpool for 25 g'auee in bundles 
and were in good demand. 

Steel is also active, and the meeting 
was well attended by representatives 
From the North of England, South Wales 
and also bv agents of American and 
German Finns. Welsh Bessemer tin plate 
bars ruled £4 7s 6d to £4 10s. and 
Siemen's 5s above those prices. Best 
Welsh sheets £8 10s for singles and 
thick doubles: £8 15s light doubles. 
and £0 5s for lattens: whilst Staf- 
fordshire prices were £9 10s for 
singles, and £10 for doubles. Staf- 
fordshire quotations for sheet bars ruled 
at $4 10s to $4 12s (id net. billets 2s 
less; bars £6 to £6 5s: best boiler plates 
£7 to £7 5s: angles. £5 5s to £6 5s: 
sheets, doubles, £7. less discount. 
• » » 

The bicycle trade is somewhat disor- 
ganized through the continual attempts 
by some of the largest firms to bring- 
out cheaper and cheaper, and conse- 
quently, of course, lower grades of nia- 

12 



chines. There is the rumor of a five 
guinea machine to be shortly placed upon 
the market. Uncertainty on the point 
of price has delayed the makers of 
components in deciding upon details 
of patterns, etc.. for the coming season, 
and this is naturally acting adversely 

upon employes. 

• • • 

There is an improving demand for all 
kinds of hardware, and home require- 
ments for ironmongery are good. The 
Falling off of the season demand for 
jewelry has left this important Birming- 
ham industry in a very depressed con- 
dition. But makers of Spring - novelties 
in belts, chains and the many metallic 
Icnicls knacks with which the feminine 
mind delights to decorate the Feminine 
body, are fairly heavy. 

• • • 

Taking the country as a whole, we 
would say that while there has been a 
very marked improvement in the cotton 
and woolen trades of the north, the 
hardware and general trades show those 
signs of gradual and cautious improve- 
ment that following upon a lengthened 
state of stagnation presage a turn in 
the tide which makes for a full flow. 



January 28, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO. 



Wholesale 
only 



HARDWARE MERCHANTS 
138-140 WEST FRONT STREET. TORONTO 



LIMITED 



Only 
Wholesale 



RETURNED t <^ 
JAN 28 190 r 

^7A 



u/v^L^faj* 



Thi 






<&$ 




"Stewart" Patent 
Chicago Knife and Handla. 



NEW OMIOAOO 

HORSE CLIPPING MACHINE 



1902 





rUKN 
U 10 



A clipped horse dries out from sweating in 20 

minutes and can sleep without risk 

of getting cold. 



" New Chicago," 1902 

It is made with all Cut Gearing from solid metal. The teeth are milled not cast, 
and engage with hardened steel pinion. It has positive power— no belts to slip, no lost 
motion ; every turn of the wheel is sure to bring 28 vibrations of the knife blade. 




RNED 
28 190 



Norse Singers 



RE1 VRNED 
JAN 28 190 

T 




The " 20th Century" Horse Clipper 

It is suspended from the ceiling by a rope permitting all parts 
of the horse to be reached with facility. Turns easy, and cuts as 
fast as any machine made. 

Requires no experience to work it. 



FOR HORSE CLIPPERS AND COMBS SEE OUR HARDWARE CATALOGUE 




URNED 

128 190 



Horse Singers 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., um.t.d. Toronto. 



GRAHAM NAILS ARE THE BE8T. 

Feotory: DutTerln Street. Toronto Ont. 
IS 



We Ship Pronptlf 



Hardware and Metal. 



HEATING AND PLUMBING 



January 28, 1905 



^M^n//a^rt^J^ 







MANUFACTURERS OF 



^rce/ae* ^^^<«C^^<-^^<»2^Ma^i^«^t^^ci^^?^^^w 



MADE IN CANADA." 



Porcelain Enamel Bath Tubs, 



Porcelain Enamel Sinks, 



Porcelain Enamel Lavatories, 



Porcelain Enamel Lipped and Plain Urinals, 
Porcelain Enamel Slop Hoppers, 



Porcelain Enamel Factory Wash Sinks. 



THE ONLY MANUFACTURERS OF ENAMELLED WARE IN CANADA 



Head Office and Factory : 

Port Hope, Out. 



Sales Office: 

So Colborne St., Toronto. 



The Latest Innovation ! 

The Morrison Folding Urinal 

is the latest, most efficient and by far the most attractive urinal 
offered to the trade. It is made of cast aluminum, and is very dur- 
ably constructed. It closes up like the blade of a knife, and is 
extremely neat. It occupies but a very little space, and may thus 
occupy a space impossible to the old style urinals. RETuRNhL) 

The margin of profit is exceptionally large, -iw"- *^ -^ 

Write for special propositiorT^^r 





aovwr 



Tbe James Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Limited 

TORONTO, ONT. 



January 28, 1905 



Hardware and Metal. 




THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF 
MASTER PLUMBERS AND STEAM 
AND HOT -WATER FITTERS OF 
OANADA. 



President— Robt. Ross, Toronto. 
Vice-President — A. J Hammond, Winnipeg. 
Secretary — J. A. Gordon, Montreal. 
Treasurer — F. G. Johnson, Ottawa. 

PROVINCIAL VICE-PRESIDENTS. 

Ontario— H. Mahoney, Guelph. 
Quebec — W. R. J. Hughes, Montreal. 
Nova Scotia — James Farquhar, Halifax. 
New Brunswick — W. Watson, Moncton. 
Manitoba— James Mold, Winnipeg. 
British Columbia— James Coughlan, Victoria. 

ONTARIO PROVINCIAL ASSOCIA- 
TION. 

OFFICERS. 

President — Wm. Mansell, Toronto. 

Vice- President— W. J. Walsh, Hamilton. 

Financial- Secretary — Lewis LeGrow, Toronto. 

Treasurer— J. K. Wilson, Toronto. 

Secretary— W. H. Meredith, Toronto. 

Executive Committee — The officers and H. 
Mahoney, Guelph ; S. Mellon, Hamilton, and E. 
H. Russell, London. 



MONTREAL 

President— Thos. O'Connel. 
Secretary — J. Gordon. 



TORONTO. 

President — Robert Ross. 
Vice-President — Geo. H. Cooper. 
Secretary-Treasurer — W. H. Meredith. 



HAMILTON. 

President — S. Mellon. 
Secretary— T. H. Davies. 



OTTAWA. 

President— Gil. Julien. 
Secretary — y. Thorpe Blyth. 



LONDON. 

President— B. Noble. 
Vice-President — Wm. Smith. 
Secretary-Treasurer — E. H. Russell. 



THE PLUMBING SUPPLIES 
MARKET 

Quebec. 

Office or Hardware a_nd Metal, 
232 McGM Street. 

Montreal, Jan. 27, 1905. 

AT this time of the year the plumb- 
ing business is not generally in 
a very active condition. Accord- 
ing to best advices this season so far 
has opened up much earlier than usual 
and gives promise of being unusually 



brisk throughout. Brass goods and or- 
dinary plumbing .supplies have been 
somewhat quiet of late, but the market 
has picked up materially and is now 
i|iiite active. In heavier material there 
is not so much movement. Heating 
goods are very brisk and manufacturers 
and dealers are well satisfied with what 
is being done in these lines. While 
prices in iron pipe are stiffer, there has 
been no advance, but such is expected 
in the very near future. For some time 
past concessions have been obtainable 
on many lines of plumbing and heating 
goods, but owing to the strength and 
general advance in raw material, such 
are no longer given. 

Range Boilers— The demand for these 
lias not fallen off to anv noticeable ex- 
tent, although at this season there is 
usually a decrease. Prices are unchanged. 
Prices are as follows: Iron clad, 
:i0 gallon, $6, and 40 gallon, $7.50 net; 
copper, 30 gallon, $22; 35 gallon, $24; 
40 gallon, $28. The discount on copper 
boilers is 15 per cent. 

Lead Pipe— Although the raw material 
has advanced considerably, prices on 
lead pipe continue as before. There is 
a big demand. We quote as follows: 
Discount 30 per cent, f.o.b. Montreal, To- 
ronto, St. John, N.B., and Halifax; f.o.b. 
London, 15c per 100 lbs extra; f.o.b. 
Hamilton, 10c per 100 lbs extra. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings— Orders for 
these have increased and shipments are 
being made to all quarters. Prices are 
unchanged as follows: Soil pipe, 
standard, 50 per cent, and 10 per cent. 
off list: standard fittings, 50 per cent, 
and 10 and 10 per cent, off list; medium 
and extra heavy soil pipe, 60 per cent, 
iff; fitting's, 60 and 10 per cent. off. 

Iron Pipe Fittings— Business in these 
has been very satisfactory. We quote as 
follows: Discounts on all sizes of nip- 
ples up to 6 inch, 671-2 to 70 per cent. 

Iron Pipe — Indications point to an 
early advance in iron pipe, as raw ma- 
terial has been much firmer. Although 
prices quoted are the same, the market 
is much stronger, and concessions that 
were obtainable before_can no longer be 
had. We quote: Standard pipe, per 
100 feet in length under 19 feet. 
Black, 1-8 inch, $2.30; 1-4 inch, 
$2.30: 3-8 inch, $2.55; 1-2 inch, $2.85; 
3-4 in., $3.65; 1 in., $5.20; 11-4 in., 
$7.35; 11-2 in., $8.95; 2 in., $12.55. 
Galvanized— 1-4 in., $3.30; 3-8 in., 
$3.45; 1-2 in., $3.90; 3-4 in., $5; 1 in., 
$7.20; 11-4 in., $10.05; 11-2 in., $12.20; 
2 in., $16.85. In the above the discount 
on 1-8, 1-4 and 3-8 in black and 1-4 and 
3-8 in galvanized is 12 1-2 per cent. ; and 
on 1-2 to 2, inclusive, in black and gal- 
vanized is 15 per cent. Extra heavy 
pipe, plain ends are quoted per 100 feet 
as follows: Black, 1-2 in., $4.20; 3-4 in., 

15 



$5.25; 1 in., $7.55; 11-4 in., $10.55; 
11-2 in., $12.75; 2 in., $17.60. Gal- 
vanized— 1-2 in., $5.25; 3-4 in., $6.65; 
1 in., $9.55; 11-4 in., $13.25; 11-2 in., 
$16; 2 in., $21.90. The discount on all 
sizes of extra heavy pipe is 12 1-2 per 
cent. Coupling, 1-2 in. to 2 in., 55 per 
cent, discount; nipples, 1-4 and 3-8 
in., 65 per cent., discount, and 1-2 to 
6 in., 70 per cent, discount. 



Ontario. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
10 Front Street East, 

Toronto, Jan. 27, 1905. 

ABETTER class of orders are be- 
ing received by the supply houses 
this week. From eastern and 
northern Ontario baths, fittings and pipe 
are in good demand which implies that 
contract work is well under way. The 
merchants of Western Ontario and the 
vicinity of Rainy River district are send- 
ing in a fair amount of orders for pipe 
and solder. The recent meeting held 
by the members of the local supply- 
houses has resulted in a general advance 
of prices, but owing to the fact that 
they have all been busily engaged tak- 
ing stock no prices have as yet been 
fixed. However it is expected that by 
next week higher prices will reign on 
the majority of articles. The most 
marked advance is expected to be made 
in enamel and solid porcelain ware. The 
advance in solder which- should have 
occurred some time ago has now taken 
place showing an increase of 1 cent. 
The momentary quickening of the pulse 
of trade last week, caused by the re- 
ceipt of orders from merchants in the 
Lake Superior district, has now ceased. 
In the expectation of the Winter season 
being short, many outside jobbers are 
preparing for their Spring work, and 
an increase of contract orders is ex- 
pected next week. 

Lead Pipe— Trade conditions continue 
unchanged. Demand is fair, and prices 
continue unchanged. We quote: Lead, 
7c; lead waste pipe, 8c: discount 30 per 
cent. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings— Quotations 
remain unchanged as follows: Medium 
and extra heavy pipe and fittings, 60 
per cent.; 7 and 8 inch pipe, 40 and 5 
per cent. 

Iron Pipe Fittings— A better demand 
is current. Prices are expected to ad- 
vance. We quote nominally as follows: 
Malleable fittings 20 per cent, for Ameri- 
can and 35 per cent, for Canadian: cast 
iron (standard), bushincs, 60 per cent.; 
headers, 60 per cent.; flanged and lip- 
ped unions, 60 per cent. : malleable bush- 



Hardware and Metal. 



HEATING AND PLUMBING 



January 28, 1905 



ings, 60 per cent. ; nipples up to 
li inch inclusive, 70 and 5 ner cent. 

Copper Range Boilers— Trade is quiet. 
The discount continues unchanged at 15 
!^er cent. 

Galvanized Iron Range Boilers— Trade 
is quiet. Prices continue unchang- 
ed. Our quotations are: 12 gal- 
lon capacity, standard, $4.50; extra 
heavy, $6.50; 18 gallon, standard, $4.75; 
extra heavy, $6.75; 24 gallons, stand- 
ard, $4.75; extra heavy, $6.75; 30 gal- 
long, standard, $5; extra heavy, $7.50; 
35 gallons, standard, $6; extra heavy, 
$8.50; 40 gallons, standard, $7; extra 
heavy, $9.50; 52 gallons, standard, $11; 
extra heavy, $14; 66 gallons, standard, 
$18: extra heavy, $20 ; 82 gallons, stand- 
■ id. $^1 • extra heavy, $24; 100 gallon-, 
standard, $29; cacti a hoavv, $34; 120 
gallons, standard, $34; extra heavy, $40; 
144 gallons, standard, $47; extra heavy, 
$55.' 

Iron Pipe— A stronger demand is 
noted on this week's market. The 
market is steadv. Prices are firm and an 



advance is anticipated. We oiuote: Black, 
1-4' inch, $2.04; 3-8 inch, $2.06; 1-2 
inch, $2.30; 3-4 inch, $2.88; 1 inch, 
$4.13; 1 1-4 inch, $5.63; 1 1-2 inch, 
$6.75; 2 inch, $9. Galvanized, 1-4 inch, 
$2.86- 3-8 inch, $2.89: 1-2 inch, $3.15; 
3-4 inch, $4.03; 1 inch, $5.78; 1 1-4 inch, 
$7.88; 11-2 inch, $9.45; 2 inch, $12.60. 

Solder— Trade is brightening up. 
Prices have advanced 1 cent. We quote : 
tsar solder, half and half, guaranteed, 
is quoted at 18 3-4c ; wiping solder at 
161-2c, and refined 17 l-4c. 

Enamelled Ware— The following quo- 
tations on Standard Ideal enamelled 
ware are given : Baths, rolled rim 5 1-2 
feet, 21-2 in. rim, A qualitv, $21.25; B 
quality, $17.25; 3 in. rim, A quality, 
$23.60; B qualitv, $19; 5 feet, 21-2 in. 
rim, A qualitv. $18.40: B quality, 
$J7.k5; 3 in. rim, A quality, $20.75; B 
quality, $17.25. Lavatories, plate 116D, 
A qualitv. $8.90: B qualitv $7.50; 118D, 
A quality, $5.70; B, $4.80; 120D, A 
quality, $5.60; B qualitv. $4.70; 122D, 
A quality, $5.20: B quality, $4.50. 
Sinks, 18x30 in., flat rim. $2.50. 



A PERFECT SEWERAGE SYSTEM FOR RURAL 
HOMES, SCHOOLS AND FACTORIES. 



IT is perhaps no exaggeration to say 
that, having regard to the frequency 
with which it comes up for con- 
siderajtion, and many other circum- 
stances, the question of properly dis- 
posing of sewage is one of the most im- 
portant matters with which the health 
authorities throughout the country have 
to deal, and yet it is a remarkable fact 
that in these days of popular education, 
when the people enjoy the benefit of free 
literature and lectures on fruit grow- 
ing, dairying, domestic science, etc., that 
a knowledge of so important a subject, 
and one so closely allied to their physi- 
cal and moral welfare is confiend to a 
limited number. 

True, a vast amount of experimenting 



SEPTIC TANK SYSTEM. 

In the matter of public sanitation, -the 
question of disposing' of sewage in small 
,towns and villages as well as in less 
populated districts, where by reason of 
its great cost a general system of sew- 
erage is impossible, is daily becoming 
of greater importance, and as the title 
"f my paper would indicate, that is the 
phase of the question with which I pro- 
pose to deal. The system to which I 
intend to refer is known as the septic 
tank system, and I believe that nearly 



STURNFn J 





Fig. 1 



has been done during recent years, and 
the matter has received a great deal of 
attention from scientific men, the results 
of whose labors have been freely dis- 
cussed at medical conventions and re- 
ported in medical journals, but the 
valuable information so obtained has 
not reached the great mass of the people 
at all. 



all who have studied it are agreed that 
it is at once the most natural, most sci- 
entific, simple and economical system in 
use -to-day, and speaking from a person- 
al knowledge of scores of the systems, 
I am in a position to say that it is 
worthy of all the good things that are 
said of it. 

I realize, that, apart from a descrip- 
16 



BRONZE POWDER AND LIQUID 

is used by every steam-fitter. Ask your supply house 
for our goods for best results. Or, if they have not 
got them, write direct to 

R. E. THORNE 



768 Craig Street 
MONTREAL 



29 Melinda Street 
TORONTO 



. . FULL STOCK 



Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWERP1PE 



Doable Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

« CANADIAN SEWER PIPE CO. 

HAMILTON. ONT. TORONTO. 0*1. 

*T. JOHNS QUE 



JARDINE PATENT PIPE DIES 

Mahe Hard "WorK Easy. 




The Herbert Jones Co., Steamfitters, Hamilton. Ont 
say :— With this Die one man is quite capable of accomp 
lishing what formerly took two men to perform. 

A. B. JARDINE & CO. 

►Ifrs. TAPS and DIES. 

HESPELER . • ONTARIO 



u 



GUARANTEED 




i 

< 

(0 

i 


X 

n 

0) 

(o 



BE8T IN THE WORLD 



January 28, 1905 

THIS IS OUR BRAND 

P-H 



H BATING AND PLUMBINQ 

XPIIPE THAT XS FIFE 




You Want It. 
See that You Get It. 




Hardware and Metal. 



THIS IS OUR TAG 



TAKE NO OTHER. 



BLACK AND GALVANIZED. 

PAGE-HERSEY IRON and TUBE CO.. limited, GUELPH, oanada 



Have you 
tried it ? 

Tried what ? 




This is in your line of business, and it will 
pay you. 

The Batty Stove S Hardware Co 

76 YORK ST., TORONTO. 




KERR'S GENUINE WEBER 

GATE VALVES 

have many imitations, but none equal the 
" real " article, made by us. Be sure you get 
" Kerr's " Every valve made of the best rel 
metal, and beautifully finished. 



Tbe KERE ENGINE COMPANY 

LIMITED 

WALKERVILLE, ONT., CANADA 



The BULLARD AUTOMATIC WRENCH 



Instantaneous ad- 
justment to any size 
within its range. 

No cramping or 
wedging. 



PATENTED OCT. 27, 1903 




Increased Leverage, 
Strength and Efficiency. 

No lost motion. In- 
stantly locks and un- 
locks. 

Will not crush the 
lightest pipe. 

Cannot slip. The 
harder the pull the 
stronger the grip. 



Expert mechanics pronounce it 
THE STRONGEST WRENCH ON THE MARKET 

A Monkey, Ratchet, and Pipe Wrench combined. 




I 



Sold by all Jobbers in United States, Canada, and Foreign Countries. 
Manufactured only by 

BULLARD AUTOMATIC WRENCH CO. WRIT A E ND F0 P H RI S KLET 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. 



NO. 60-BULL DOG END OUTTI N G NIPPER 

READY FOR 

IMMEDIATE 

DELIVERY. 

WRITE FOR 

CATALOGUE. 

We make the 

most complete 

line of Nippers 

and Plyersin the 

world. 

Factory : Utica, 
NY. 
UTICA DROP FORGE & TOOL CO., SMITH & HEMENWAY CO., 

Mfrs. Nippers and Plyers Mfra. Cutlery and Hdwe. Specialties 

296 BROADWAY, NBW YORK CITY. 
J Canadian Sample Room: 215 Coristine Bldg., Montreal, Can. ALLEN C. JENKING, Canadian Manager. 





THE FIRE DIES OUT 

in most hot water boilers every little while, 
and it puzzles the attendant to know where 
the trouble lies. It lies in the chilling of the 
fire by the return pipe at the back of the boiler. 

THE ECONOMICAL 
HOT WATER BOILER 

remedies this defect by providing two return 
pipes— one at either side — (see cut.) 

Booklet tells all about It, Agents Wanted. 

P. 6IES. Founder, BERLIN, ONT. 

17 




Hardware and Metal. 



HEATING AND PLUMBING 



January 28, 1905 



linn from a mechanical standpoint, any- 
Jhine I mighl say to medical men re- 
garding the system would be superflu- 
( us. bul for (lie benefll of the laymen 
who mav be in need of information on 
the subject, and in order to emphasize 
the necessity of carrying out every de- 



state, and, finding its way to "the water 
supply, not unirequently results in an 
outbreak of typhoid fever or some in- 
testinal disease. 

RESULT OF WORK OF MICROBES. 

The two classes of microbes referred 
to. have properties somewhat differing 



iTURNED^ 



^^-W" 





^naCnraCi 



Fig. 2 



tation on the surface, and the latter 
passing ap high into the air. as hereafter 
described. 

With this brief reference then, to the 
principles which underlie what is con- 
ceded to be a most efficient system for 
the disposal of sewage, I propose to in- 
dicate how it should be constructed; 
and in order that I may the more read- 
ily make myself plain, I have drawn 
for your inspection a number of dia- 
grams which I trust will accomplish the 
desired result. 

ELEVATION OF SYSTEM. 

In figure 1 is shown an elevation of 
a complete system built on level ground, 
with the tank placed close to the wall 
of the building— where in fact the large 
majority of those now in use are located. 

The tank should be built of brick or 
stone, laid in and lined with cement, or 



tail, in constructing a system as here- 
after described, I deem it wise to briefly 
refer to the fundamental principles 
which govern i 1 . 

A PURIFYING AGENT. 

It is a matter of common knowledge 
that living earth — or top soil — is a 
powerful purifying agent, but compara- 
tively few are aware that the presence 
in it of countless numbers of bacteria, 
or microbes, is alone responsible for the 
chemical changes brought about in waste 
matter placed beneath its surface, and 
that these bacteria, not only through 
their action remove and destroy the 
dangerous properties of such waste mat- 
ter but actually convert them into plant 
food, which, being taken up by the vege- 
tation is again consumed for the susten- 
ance of life. Pasteur divided these mi- 
crobes into two classes, viz: Anerobes, 
or those which lived apart from air, or 
derived their oxygen from decaying 
compounds, and aerobes, or those which 
require, plenty of fresh air for their de- 
velopment, and as both classes are con- 
sidered necessary for the complete re- 
duction of waste matter, it will be seen 



from each other, but the net result of 
their work under proper conditions is 
the breaking down of the solid matter 
in the sewage, the disintegrating of its 



RETURNED 

- * m n wo 6 




Fig. 3 



constituents and the conversion of the 
whole into liquids and gases, in which 
form it leaves the septic tank, the form- 
er to be distributed under the surface 



he i unWcDi 
J AH 




that if sewage is placed too deep in the 
earth, as for instance in a cesspool, 
where, owing to the absence of air, the 
accessary aerobic bacteria cannot ex- 
ist ; it may pass down deeper in a putrid 



of the earth, where, by reason of its con- 
tact" with free oxygen, bacterial life is 
most active, there to be still further re- 
duced and finally converted into nitrates, 
which are readily taken up by the vege- 
18 



of solid concrete, the main object being 
to have it impervious to moisture. 

It will be noticed that the tank is 
divided into two compartments, an oxer- 
flow pipe "F" being built into the di- 
viding- wall, the mouth of the said over- 
How being within seven or eight inches 
of the bottom of the tank, and being- 
covered with a wire screen about the 
size of an ordinary pail, the mesh of 
said screen not exceeding three-quarters 
of an inch. 

The main soil pipe is represented by 
"E" and should be directly connected 
with the closet, bath, sink, etc. It ex- 
tends from the same compartment in 
which the overflow is placed to a point 
two or three feet above the roof, said 
pipe acting not only as a conductor of 
sewage to the tank, but also as a chan- 
nel by which any gases in excess of 
those in solution, may pass out to the 
atmosphere at a height which renders it 
impossible for them to inconvenience 
the occupants of the building. 

"J" in the second compartment ad- 



January 28, 1905 



HEATING AND PLUMBING 



Hardware and Metal. 



Paint Brushes. 



^ A line of paint brushes is a profit paying line. 

*[ We have a neat little catalogue that deals with 
brushes — profit paying brushes. 

^f A post card enquiry will bring you this catalogue 
— not cumbered up with a hundred lines you 
don't want — just a nice selection of paying lines. 

^ This catalogue shows you all that is best of the 
famous RENN0TJ8 KLEINLE & CO. brushes. 

«r The R. K. & Co. brushes are full measure, full 
length, full stock ; many other lines that you see 
— Are Not. 

■r Don't overlook this. It pays to scrutinize. We 
invite it. We submit samples. 

V- Our travellers carry full lines. 

k Write for our catalogue. It will pay you. 



A. RAMSAY & SON COMPANY, 

MONTREAL 



Est. 
1842 



Paint 
Makers 



....,..,..,..,....., 



••••••••••••••••■•••••••••••••••••' 




Like a Patent Medicine 

almost — cures everything. It is a 
fact that the uses of 

Gillett's Lye 

are multitudinous, therefore many 
sales are possible. Every sale means 
a penny or so. 

Pennies make pounds. 



E. W. GILLETT COMPANY, LIMITED 

TORONTO 








THIS IS THE NO. 233. -WILCOX TACKLE BLOCK WIRE STRETCHER 

OLD STAND-BY 

None better on the mar- 
ket unless it is the 
Triumph. 

If your Jobber cannot 
supply, write us for 
prices. # ~ pi 

WILCOX IN/IF - ©. OO. OF" ONTARIO, Limited 




Hardware and MetaL 



HEATING AND PLUMBING 



January 28, 1905 



mi t s fresh air, which passes freely over 
the centre partition — spaces being left 
in the top of the latter for the purpose — 
and up through the soil pipe to the roof. 

In the centre of the second compart- 
ment is placed an automatic valve "C," 
which is caulked into a four-inch cast 
iron bend, as ordinarily used by plumb- 
ers, and which is securely built into the 
bottom of the tank during: its construc- 
tion. The top of the hub of the bend 
is usually left slightlv lower than the 
level of the floor of the tank. 

From the said iron bend is run a line 
of glazed tile pipe, four inches in dia- 
meter, having- a connection with the 
fresh air pipe, for the purpose of ven- 
tilation, and a number of openings 
placed at intervals of two feet or more 
from which are run branches of four- 
inch field tile with loosely butted joints. 

PLAN OF ENTIRE SYSTEM. 

Figure 2 shows a plan of the whole 
system and illustrates one way in which 
the tile may be laid, though, as will be 
manifest, they would do equally well if 
all laid in one side of the main carrier 
in any number of branches, or any 
length, providing a sufficient number in 
the aggregate are laid, and the rows are 
not placed closer together than two feet 
in light soil, and a somewhat greater 
distance in heavy soil. 

The field tile should not be placed 
more than one foot below the surface, 
and must be perfectly level, for the rea- 
son that if given a fall the earth sur- 
rounding the low ends of the system 
would receive more than its share of 
liquid sewage and might in time be- 
eome fouled. While if level, the earth 
surrounding every tile has an equal 
amount of work to do, and will produce 
most satisfactory results. 

Briefly then, the operation of the sys- 
tem is as follows: 

The sewage from the building enters 
through soil pipe "E," filling the first 
compartment in which all solid matter is 
retained until it is reduced by the con- 
tained bacteria which multiply and de- 
velop very rapidly. In a liouid form it 
is allowed to enter the second compart- 
ment through overflow "F" which is 
tinned down because of the presence of 
the bulk of the organic matter in sus- 
pension on or near the surface. 

When the liquid has risen in the sec- 
ond compartment to the height at which 
the unloosing float on the valve has been 
set, the valve automatically opens, and 
discharges the contents of that com- 
partment, be it fifty or a thousand gal- 



lons, into the system of field tiles, 
through which it percolates into the 
surrounding earth, to be taken care of 
by nature as already described. 

As the tank ta^es from twelve to 
twenty-four hours to fill, it will be ob- 
vious that there will be abundance of 
time in which the water in the tiles may 
soak away before it again discharges. 

To prevent the gases of decomposition 
escaping through other than the proper 
channel the tank must be covered first 
with rough plank, and then with five or 
six inches of earth, which in turn, if 
desired, may be sodded over. 

SIZE OK TANK. 

In figuring out the size of tank neces- 
sary, the following may be taken as a 
safe rule, viz. : For everv occupant of a 
private house or hotel, allow three cubic 
feet of space in each compartment, while 
for a school or factory, where, as in 



SPEAKS FOR ITSELF. 

Hardware and Metal, Toronto.— 
One of the main features that have been 
hurtful to the plumbing and heating craft 
throughout Canada has been the lack of 
intercourse between craftsmen, some me- 
dium through which ideas could be inter- 
changed. I believe that Hardware and 
Metal is filling this want and consider it 
a valuable medium for the craft to be 
brought into close touch, one with the 
other. We, in these days, are pleased to 
make much Qf the " Made in Canada " 
sign, don't let us forget that " Published in 
Canada," is also a very good companion 
motto. 

W. H. Meredith, 
Provincial Secretary M.P. A. of Ontario. 



the case of a house, nothing but domes- 
tic sewage is to be treated, one-third 
less space will be sufficient, and for 
every cubic foot in one compartment 
(or one-half the tank lavl thirteen feet 
of four-inch field tile. 

It will be obvious that, as in the case 
of ordinary stable manure, human ex- 
creta, if deposited in its solid state just 
below the surface of the earth, would 
entirely disappear in a very short time, 
and the system just described is merely 
a most convenient and sanitary way 
of automatically accomplishing that 
very desirable result, with the accom- 
panying advantage of not only deposit- 
ing it in the earth partially treated, but 
in a much more favorable condition to 
receive final treatment than could pos- 
sibly obtain if the former method were 
adopted. 

TERRACES. 

Anticipating the difficulty which will 
be encountered where there is a con- 
20 



siderable fall in the ground surrounding 
the building to be drained, I would re- 
fer you to figure 3 which shows a num- 
ber of terraces each receiving a portion 
of the effluent from the tank. 

It will be noticed that the end of the 
(lazed tile is turned up a few inches on 
the brow of each terace, the obvious re- 
sult cf which is that all the field tiles 
at that level must fill before the sew- 
age can rise and overflow to the tiles 
on the next lower level, where the same 
operation takes place, and so on for any 
number of terraces, and as will be ap- 
parent, the sewage passing into the tiles 
on a high level cannot possibly escape 
to those lower down, so that the earth 
surrounding every tile, will have its full 
complement of work to perform. 

RELATIVE POSITIONS. 

Figure 4, the horizontal scale of which 
is somewhat exaggerated, shows the 
proper relative position of the tank to 
the house where the field tiles have to 
be placed on a level considerably below 
that on which the buildine stands. In 
such a case it will be evident that were 
the tank placed on the hie-h level, the 
discharge would come down with suffi- 
cient velocity to wash out both earth 
and tiles, while the discharge from the 
house to the tank as shown will not have 
any injurious effect on the latter. 

In answer to a question which arises 
in the minds of most people who have 
given consideration to the system, I 
may say that it will not freeze in Win- 
ter, even when the frost penetrates the 
ground for several feet everywhere ex- 
cept where the tiles are laid, and, as 
may be expected, splendid results may 
be obtained in vegetables or flowers if 
the tiles are laid under a garden. 

In conclusion I would simply refer to 
a few of the principle points which 
should be kept in mind in constructing 
such a system, viz. : 

Have the tank covered with a few 
inches of earth, to prevent the escape 
of gases, except through the soil pipe 
stack. See that the valve discharges 
at least once before the tank is covered 
in. See that no trap is placed on the 
main soil pipe to prevent the free pass- 
age of air across the tank and up to the 
roof, and that the necessarv space for 
the air is left in the top of the centre 
partition, and, finally, take care that no 
disinfectants or chemicals of any kind 
are allowed to enter the tank, if the 
life of the bacteria, upon which the sys- 
tem depends for its success, is to be 
preserved. 



January 28, 1905 



H BATING AND PLUMBING 



Hardware and Metal. 



Handy Smoke Machine. 

PRACTICAL demonstrations have re- 
cently been made in some of the 
larger cities to establish the effi- 
ciency of the Thomson Smoke Machine 
for testing plumbing, with very satis- 
factory results. It is stated by all who 
have seen these demonstrations that 
the machine can be relied upon to dis- 



Returned 

IAN 30 190/ 





tation and workmanship it would seem 
to be invaluable. It would also seem 
that every owner of residence property 
or office building, would readily com- 
prehend and appreciate the importance 
and pecuniary value to themselves of 
cover the slightest defect in any plumb- 
ing or d iain age system, thus insuring to 
the property owners or tenants the op- 
portunity to protect themselves against 
the deadly effects of sewer and other 
gases. 

The cost at which this machine is sold 
($30) is in no way commensurate witli 
the results secured by its use, and to 
plumbers who are jealous of their repu- 
beine able to satisfy everv one inter- 
ested, that the danger to life and health 
by reason of sewer e-as or defective 
plumbing was not present in their build- 
ings. 

Property owners invariably protect 
themselves against loss by fire, why is 
it not just as reasonable that they should 
insure against deadly sewer gas, by in- 
sisting upon the application of the ac- 
curate and reliable smoke test such as 
is made possible by the use of such a 
machine? The James Morrison Brass 
Mfg. Co., Limited, Toronto, are manu- 
facturing agents for the Dominion. 



inches. Roughing-in measurement from 
wall finish to centre of bend, with back 
connection, as illustrated, is 13£ inches, 
or where flushometer is turned for side 
connection 12 inches. May be used with 
either tank or direct supply. 

Plumbers' Social Evening. 

T^HE regular monthly social evening 
of the Master Plumbers' Associa- 
tion of Toronto came off in the 
rooms of the Association, 21 Richmond 
street west, on Monday, January 23. 
The attendance was excellent, there be- 
ing between eighty and ninety present. 
Shortly after eight o'clock the mem- 
bers adjourned to the main hall to lis- 
ten to an address given by Mr. M. J. 
Quinn, mechanical superintendent at the 
Parliament Buildings, Toronto, on the 
use and helpfulness of the "septic" tank 
in the purification of water. In his ad- 



buikhng of compartments, etc., all of 
which was of unlimited value to those 
present. At the conclusion of the ad- 
dress a number of questions were asked 
which showed that a great interest was 
taken by those who listened to the dis- 
course. 

Two games of carpet ball were then 
started between two teams representing 
the supply men and two teams repre- 
senting the association, which resulted 
in a double win for the association 
teams. 

The game on the west side was fast 
and furious, and judging from the 
amount of cheering, lacrosse and hockey 
are not the only games that Canada can 
boast of. This game resulted in the 
the score of 27 to 14 in favor of the 
association. The line up was as fol- 
lows: — For the supply men — E. A. Rodg- 
ers, of the Jas. Robertson Co.; W. Ful- 
ton, of the Dominion Radiator Co.; F. 

RETURNED 

JAN 30.190 ^oU^^f. 



CuJ^yi^-^ ^f 




^< 



Jet Water Closets. 
The plain syphon jet water closet il- 
lustrated this week is the "Acme," 
with the Kenney flushometer system. It 
has quartered oak seat and cover, cabi- 
net finish, brass floor flange and nickel 
plated bolts. The distance from floor 
to centre of flushometer inlet is 25 



Plain Syphon Jet Water Closet— furnished by 

dress, Mr. Quinn traced the water from 
the time it entered the well until it ar- 
rived in the dwelling ready for use, deal- 
ing with the faults of cess-pools, the 
treating of bacteria, and more particu- 
larly with the plumber's part of the 
work, namely, the laying of pipe, the 
21 



,The Jaines'Robertson Company, Limited. '^1! , 

""I 
McBride, of the Good Mfg. Co., New 
York; M. P. Huffman, of the Canada 
Radiator Co.; Bert Ormaston, of the 
Ontario Lead and Wire Co., and D. 
World, of the Jas. Morrison Brass Mfg. 
Co., who acted as captain. For the as- 
sociation — R. W. Harrison, D. Morgan, 



Hardware and Metal. 



HBATINQ AND PLUMBING 



January 28, 1905 



J. H. Wilson, K. J. Allison, E. A. 
James, and captain W. H. Meredith. M. 
J. Quinn acted as referee. 

The other game on the other side of 
the building was of a quieter nature, al- 
though just as much interest was dis- 
played at the finish when the score stood 
8 to 5 in favor of the association. The 
line up was as follows:— For the supply 
men— L. J. Avery, of the Wolverine 
Brass Works, Grand Rapids, Mich.; W. 
J. Spence, of the Ontario Lead and Wire 
Co.; J. M. Ouston, of the Jas. Robert- 
son Co.; S. T. Hadley, of the Jas. Mor- 
rison Brass Mfg. Co.; W. B. Malcolm, of 
the W. B. Malcolm Co., and C. World, 
of the Jas. Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., 
who acted as captain. For the associa- 
tion— P. Jessman, W. B. Botting, C. 
Wallis, J. E. Knox, J. W. Erwood, and 
W. Walker. (x. H. Cooper acted as 
referee. 




Complete lavatory— furnished by the Ontario 
Lead & Wire Company, Toronto. 

At the conclusion of t he game,, sand- 
withes, cake and 'Coffee were passed 
around. After a short chat over the 
refreshments the party broke up for the 
evening. 

Cement for Closing Leaks. 

The following formula is good for tins 
purpose, hut must be used as soon as 
mixed and rammed tightly into the 
joint or leak: 

Five ll>s. coarsely powdered iron bor- 
ings, 2 oz. powdered sal ammoniac, ] 
o/.. sulphur, and enough water to moist- 
en. This cement hardens rapidly. Mow- 
ever, the sulphur may be left out and 
it will set even more firmly, but require 
a longer time.— Popular Mechanics. 

To Polish Brass. 

A couple of good recipes for polishing 
brass are given herewith, that, will he 
useful to leaders of the plumbing de- 
partment. 



Three parts oxalip acid dissolved in 1^ 
parts hot water; add 100 parts powder- 
ed pumice stone, 2 parts oil of turpen- 
tine, 12 parts soft soap and 12 parts fat 
oil. 

Or; Four oz. rottenstone, 1 oz. oxalic 
acid in fine powder, 1£ oz. sweet oil, 
enough turpentine to make a paste. 



T Fi 3 J 




<e- 



6 - 




Some Pipe Problems Solved. 

THE following hints were given in a 
recent issue of the Engineer: 
Figure 1 represents a difficult job 
of pipe-fitting' recently done on some 
boilers installed in New York. The boil- 
ers were divided into two sections or 
batteries, one section being placed in a 
vault oi- fife-room directly under the 
sidewalk, and contained two boilers, one 
placed on the right of the building. The 
boiler on the left had just been installed 
and the steam cut off from that side of 
the building, the main being kept hot 
from (lie boiler on the right, which made 
it necessary to make connections after 
12 o clock Saturday night. 

The mains were 4 inches in diameter 
and carried cast-inm fittings, the open- 
ings between I he two tees being only 16 
inches apart, as shown. In this instanea 
Ave had to put in a 4-inch valve, the -I- 
iueh flanges and the necessary nipples. 
All kinds of short nipples were tried 
and discarded. The piece containing 







J 






the valve was made up on the floor sev- 
eral times, but without success, because 
both pipes were immovable and could 
22 



not be sprung 1-16 of an inch. The valve 
measured 7 inches, the llamres 2 inches, 
and the three nipples 1 1-2 inches. Fin- 
ally we made up the two halves on the 
- . ., and by means of a crowbar and 
several blocks of wood we managed to 
to ice them into place. 

Figure 2 represents a supporting col- 
umn for carrying a steam main between 
two hot-houses. The distance between 
the two houses was 1~> feet. The col- 
umn or stand is composed of pipe and 
liftings and an ordinary pipe-hanger. 
The main is 5-inch pipe. 

In order to render the column secure. 
a hole 2 feet deep was due and a founda- 
tion built by first imbedding broken 
stone in cement, and laying on this 
brick in cement. After placing the 
flange, the whole was covered with ce- 
ment, which was heaped up cone shaped 
around the 2-iuch pipe as shown. 

An improvised pipe-hanger is shown 
in Figure 3. This is made by heating 
and bending a piece of 3-4-inch wrought 
iron or steel about 3 feet long to fit 




over the I-beam and bending the lower 
end to receive the pipe. This is a simple 
and very good hanger for temporary 
use. 

Building Notes. 

A new Catholic church is to be erect- 
ed at Regina next Spring. 

It is rumored that a new collegiate 
institute building will be erected in Gait 
during the coming season. 

A four-story brick building, costing 
$15,000, is to be erected by the John 
Gibson & Son, of Fredericton. 

Tenders have been invited for the con- 
struction of a new bridge across the 
Madawaska river near Stewartville, 
Ont. 

Plans are being prepared bv the Rod- 
ney Casket Company, of Rodney, Ont., 
for the erection of a large factory in 
that town. 

Tenders are being called for by the 
Western Manufacturing Company, of In- 
dian Head, Assa., for the construction 
of their new factory at Regina. 

During the season of 1905 the Cana- 
dian Westinghouse Company, of Hamil- 
ton, will erect, for the use of its em- 
ployes, in the neighborhood of 1,000 
dwellings. 



January 28, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



* 



* 

* 
* 

* 

* 

* 

* 

* 
* 

* 

* 
* 



Hardware that PAYS 

There is one line of Hardware that returns a bigger profit than most others and it is an 
active line. 



Handlebars 



Bicycle Accessories 

Pedals 



RETURNED ^$^ 
31 190 du&U 





Chains, Spokes and Nipples, Cements, etc 

ALL HIGHEST STANDARD IN QUALITY 

Buy Direct from the Makers 



Get in the Swim ! 

We are going to "talk bicycle" louder and longer than ever 
this year. 1 hey're coming more generally into use on a 
more substantial basis as a vehicle of utility. 

Our new models this season are going to help things along. 

Get in the Swim ! 

Order your new line to-day. There's big money in selling good wheels — ours are the 
world's best, and a little hustling sells them easily. 




"Cleveland" 



"Massey-Harris" 



These bicycles have the new inventions — the new features : Hygienic Cushion Frame and 
Sills Hygienic Handle Bars, Morrow Coaster Brake. 

CANADA CYCLE & MOTOR CO., Limited 

MAKERS OF THE WORLD'S GREATEST BICYCLES 



TORONTO JUNCTION 



RETURNED * 
MM 31 m * 

- * 
4 



4 

* 

4 
4 
4 

4 
* 

4 

4 
4 



23 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 28, 1905 



NO 
NO 
NO 
NO 
NO 



RUST 
POISON 



RUST 
POISON 



RUST 
POISON 



RUST 
POISON 



RUST 
POISON 



NO 



RUST 
POISON 



The advantages of Aluminum for all cooking 
purposes are illustrated in the use of an 

Aluminum 
Saucepan 

Milk cooks quicker in an aluminum pan, and if scorched 
imparts no burnt taste to the remainder of the milk under 
ordinary conditions. This is true of all kitchen utensils made 
of aluminum. They never chip, crack, nor break, and there is 
no danger irom poison or rust. There is nothing so easily 
kept clean. Cheapest in the end. 

Made by the CANADIAN ALUMINUM WORKS. Limited 



Office : 
13 ST. JOHN STREET, MONTREAL. 



Factoky and Foundry : 
CHAMBY CANTON, QUEBEC. 



Catalogues sent to the trade on application. 



WE WANT FOREIGN REPRESENTATIVES 

RUST 
POISON 



NO 



NO 
NO 
NO 
NO 
NO 



RUST 
POISON 



RUST 
POISON 



RUST 
POISON 



RUST 
POISON 



RUST 
POISON 



creamery Ca ns and Trimmings 




RETURNED fOute 
UN 28 190 r 



RETURN E 

J \N 28 190 | 







RETURNED 




SECTION 

FULL ait 



Creamery Cans 



Creamery Taps 



With Locking 
Attachment Cover 



With 
Slip Cover 



Steel Retinned 
Tap 



Loose Key 
Metal Tap 



FAMOUS 
MICA 

GAUGE 



As we carry a complete stock at all times of the above lines, prompt shipment can always be made. 
A heavy stock of Sheet Tin of all sizes, gauges and quality always on hand. 



LONDON, 



McClary Manu 

TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG, 

" Everything -for the 

24 



facturing Oo. 

VANCOUVER, 

Tin9hop." 



AND ST. JOHN, N.B. 



January 28, 1905 



EDITORIAL 



Hardware and Metal. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Fremitni ! 

JOHN BAYNB MAC LEAK. 

Montreal . 

,h * MacLean Publishing Co. 

Limited 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circu- 
late in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. 
Island and Newfoundland. 

OFFICES 

Montreal - - - -232 McGill Street. 

Telephone Main 1255. 

TORONTO - - - 10 Front Street East. 

Telephone Main 2701. 

Winnipeg, Man. - Room 515, Mclntyre Block. 

Telephone 1846. 

F. R. Munro. 

London, Eng. - - 88 Fleet Street, E.C. 

T. Meredith McKim. 

Telephone, Central 12960. 

Manchester. Eng. - 92 Market Street. 

H. S. Ashburner. 

ST. John, N.B. - - No. 3 Market Wharf. 

J. Hunter White. 

NEW YORK - Room 1241 New York Life Bldg. 

W. T. Robson. 

Vancouver, B.C. - Oeo. S. B. Perry. 

Adelaide, Australia, - Steamships Building, 

W. H. Sharland, Jr. 

Subscription, (lanmlt and United States, 52.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere - - 12' 

Published every Saturday. 

„.,»_, I Adscript, London. 

Cabl* Address j Ads cnpt, Canada . 



New Advertisement! : 

Canada Cycle & Motor Co., Toronto Junction. 

Welsh Tinplate and Metal Stamping Co., 
Llanelly, Wales. 

Frothingham & Workman, Montreal. 



Hardware and Metal, Toronto— We look 
forward to each issue of your journal to 
see the latest item of interest to the plumb- 
ing trades, as we think it the best medium 
in Canada on plumbing and .heating infor- 
mation —Purdy, Mansell& Co , Toronto. 



the quiet season in the retail trade, and 
there is always a large influx of business 
men to Winnipeg during the Bonspiel. A 
successful convention seems to be as- 
sured. 

It was the privilege of a Hardware and 
Metal representative to be present at a 
recent meeting of the Winnipeg Retail 
Hardware Association, and it was pleas- 
ant to see the friendly way in whicn 
men, who in spite of their association 
are nevertheless keen business rivals, 
met to discuss their mutual interests. 
At all such meetings there is necessar- 
ily a great deal of give and take— mu- 
tual concessions are the basis upon 
which such an association must exist. 
But Winnipeg hardware men are accus- 
tomed now to work together, and their 
mutual interests are discussed with the 
utmost frankness with results which 
cannot fail to be beneficial. 

There are many towns and villages 
where there are only two or three stores 



A 



THE WESTERN HARDWARE CON- 
VENTION. 

S announced in another column, 
the first annual convention of the 
Western and Manitoba Retail Hardware 
and Stove Dealers' Associations will be 
held in Winnipeg in the Scott Memorial 
Hall on Princess street, on the after- 
noon of Thursday, February 9, and on 
the afternoon and evening of Friday, 
February 10. 

The interest already manifested in 
these conventions by members of the 
hardware trade and the assurances of 
sympathy and support received by the 
executive, point to an enthusiastic and 
well-attended convention. The gathering 
is held at an opportune time, as this is 



As readers of Hardware and Metal 
already know, the Machinery Department, 
which we have heen running for some 
years, has developed into a distinct and 
separate newspaper. The Machinery De- 
partment in Hardware and Metal 
has therefore been discontinued, but sub- 
scribers to Hardware and Metal will 
receive as well a copy of Machinery, the 
new paper, until the end of 1905, or until 
their subscription expires. 



in the same line of business, and it 
should be a much easier matter for 
these stores, few in number, to form a 
working agreement among themselves. 
The example of the Winnipeg hardware 
men is worthy of imitation and it was 
a desire to extend the scope of the move- 
ment which led to the organization of 
the Western and Manitoba Associations. 



ELECTRICAL GOODS IN THE HARD- 
WARE STORE. 

1"* HERE is many an enterprising 
hardware dealer living in a town 
where electricity is used, who has given 
little or no thought to an opening for 
expansion that could be made with small 
effort and no great outlay. The pro- 
gressive merchant should he ever on the 
lookout for new business, and to ex- 
tend his trade by all legitimate means. 
It is no doubt true that as a class there 
25 



are no more wideawake merchants than 
the hardware dealers, and in the face of 
this it is strange that so few have taken 
up the matter of putting in a stock of 
electrical goods and supplies. 

To many the idea of exploiting this 
seemingly unknown field does not appeal 
with any particular force on account of 
the fact that the word electrical con- 
veys an idea of theories, formulae and 
technical matters generally. How er- 
roneous this is as applied to the elec- 
trical supply business will soon be found 
by anyone who takes the trouble to 
look into the question a little. Without 
a knowledge of even first principles 
such a business in connection with the 
hardware store could be carried on suc- 
cessfully and profitably. There is no 
doubt that a superficial knowledge and a 
general idea of wiring, batteries, etc., 
would help very much in selling the 
goods and this could be quickly gained 
from reading some of the electrical 
books as supplied by the Technical Book 
Department of this paper. The sooner the 
hardware merchant in a town where el- 
ectrical goods are in demand gets rid 
of the idea that it requires a tremend- 
ous effort and special knowledge to 
handle this line and makes a move to 
get a stock, however small, the more 
will he be furthering his business inter- 
est. 

The hardware store has often been 
criticized as being uninviting, and some- 
times with good cause. A line of elec- 
troliers and brackets with shades, make 
an attractive display and would add to 
the appearance of any store, however 
tastily arranged before. A start might 
be made with these, supplemented by a 
stock of lamps, care being taken to as- 
certain the style of socket and the volt- 
age in use. Bells and batteries and el- 
ectric novelties would be ready sellers, 
and to these could be added from time 
to time as the merchant sees fit. 

In looking over prospects for the com- 
ing year, this proposition should be tak- 
en into account and acted upon, modest- 
ly, it may be at first, but expanding 
rapidly as it is sure to do. When the 
hardware merchant finds what a profit- 
able business can be done in these goods, 
he will wonder more and more why he 
had not undertaken to handle them 
sooner. 



Hardware and Metal. 



EDITORIAL 



January 28, 1905 



IMPROVEMENTS IN HARDWARE AND METAL. 



LAST week reference was made in 
these columns to the establish- 
ment of Canadian Machinery as an out- 
come of the machinery department which 
has been conducted in this paper for 
some years. 

During the time we were busiest in 
the work of getting out the first issue 
of the new paper, attention was directed 
to some improvements needed in other 
features of the paper. After a close 
study of these needs we are now in a 
position to announce some extensions 
which we believe will be of interest to 
our readers. 

OUR MONTHLY PLUMBING NUMBER. 

It is now about rive months since we 
announced that one issue of Hardware 
and Metal each month should be a spe- 
cial plumbing number, and should be 
distributed to every plumber and steam- 
fitter in Canada. 

In the time since that announcement 
we have succeeded in making our plumb- 
ing department one of the most valuable 
features of the book. We feel, however, 
that the editorial treatment of the de- 
partment can be much improved, and 
have decided to devote more attention 
and to spend more money on plumbing 
and heating matters than we have here- 
tofore done. 

AN OFFEK TO PLUMBERS. 

We want practical articles on plumb- 
ing and heating topics. We are willing 
to pay generously for suitable articles 
drawings or photographs. 

If you have an opinion worth express- 
ing, write to us. 

If you have finished a job worthy of 
attention get a photograph of the job 
made. We will pay for such articles ac- 
cording to their worth. 

If you see a good article on plumbing 
in any paper you read, send it in, and 
if we make use of it we will extend 
your subscription to Hardware and Met- 
al. 

You can help to make this department 
interesting if you will. 

ANOTHER SPECIAL MONTHLY NUMBER. 

The success of the monthly plumbing 
number has determined us on another 
step. In all Canada there are only a 
few hundred hardware merchants who 
are not regular subscribers to Hard- 
ware and Metal. We want to interest 



these retailers in the paper, so once a 
month we will send them a copy of the 
paper that they may see what they are 
missing each, week. 

If any of our readers know of dealers 
in hardware or metals who do not read 
the paper we will add their names to 
this list on request. 

This number, as it is to be sent to 
every retail hardware man in Canada, 
will contain several special features of 
interest to the progressive retailer and 
his clerks. 

Some attention will be given in this 
number to the office and finance work 
in connection with business. Articles 
dealing with advertising, window-dress- 
ing, etc., will also appear regularly. An 
effort will be made to have a description 
of some progressive merchant's store 
and business methods. Another feature 
will be an inspirational article for the 
particular benefit of clerks and young 



The first annual convention i f the 
Western and Manitoba Retail Hard- 
ware and Stove Dealers' Associations 
will be held in Winnipeg in the 
Scott Memorial Hall, Pi incess street, 
on the afternoon of Thursday, Feb- 
ruary 9th, and on the afternoon and 
evening of the 10th. Afternoon 
meetings called at 2.30 p.m. sharp, 
and the evening meeting at 8 p.m. 



business men who are desirous of mak- 
ing themselves more useful and more ef- 
fective in their chosen life work. 

From month to month we hope to ef- 
fect improvements in this number, which 
will be known as our "Magazine Hard- 
ware Store Number." 

A WORD OF APPRECIATION. 

We have several times expressed the 
opinion that few papers could boast a 
stronger spirit of loyalty among its sub- 
scribers than could Hardware and Metal. 

Our subscribers are our friends — this 
we have learned in a hundred ways. 

In proof of our recognition of this 
friendliness we made to our readers an 
exceptionally good offer regarding 
"Canadian Machinery," our new paper. 
The response was a remarkable proof of 
our readers' confidence in our promises. 
We promised that the new paper would 
be a good one. So many replies came 
in from our readers that "Canadian 



Machinery" started its life with several 
hundred subscribers— something almost 
unique in trade paper publication. 

We will not forget this, and when we 
have another good thing to offer our 
readers will get the best of it. In the 
meantime we will strive to make Hard- 
ware and Metal more useful each week. 

If, by the way, any of our readers 
would like to send in one of these cards 
now, we will extend the time to permit 
them to do so. 



CARRIAGE AND SADDLERY HARD- 
WARE. 

VERY few retail hardware men 
throughout Ontario, to-day carry 
a stock of carriage and saddlery hard- 
ware and blacksmiths' supplies. There 
is a good, clean profit in these lines 
which, for various reasons, are often 
turned down by many merchants. Apart 
from the fact that these are staple and 
active lines, the source of 'profit is in 
excess of many other lines, and quite in 
keeping with the general stock carried. 

There are other advantages the retail 
hardware man would derive from trad- 
ing in these lines. Many blacksmiths 
and repair men, also the harnessmaker, 
would prefer trading with the local mer- 
chant rather than buy direct from the 
jobber, as this necessitates his carrying 
an assorted stock, and very often it is 
the case he is to be found crowded for 
want of space or capital. Whereas, if 
he could get his requirements at his 
nearest hardware store, he would buy 
as required, and pay cash, rather than 
expend a large sum in carrying a large 
stock. He is often to be found turning 
his customer with his job for immediate 
attention away, not having the required 
article with which to make repairs on 
hand, and knowing he cannot procure it 
on the moment. 

The stock need not be a large one, 
nor the investment large; this is a mis- 
take often made in new lines. There is 
no class of goods that turns itself often- 
er during the year, as there is a' large 
sale for these lines outside the trade, 
the farmer of to-day is doing his own 
repair work, having tools on his prem- 
ises. > 

Dealers in the smaller cities and 
towns, also those in the country stores 
would, with the opening of a new year, 
do well to enter into this matter with 



28 



January 28, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



a view to carrying a stock of carriage 
and saddlery hardware and blacksmiths' 
supplies, etc., ready for the opening of 
one of the best seasons of the year in 
these lines,— the Spring and Summer 
seasons. To get a share of this business 
which is waiting for you requires only 
a fair stock of the right kind of goods. 



ONTARIO ELECTIONS. 

ONTARIO business men will heave 
a sigh of relief to know that the 
political ascendency in the Province of 
Ontario has been settled ior the next 
four years, and that by a majority so 



day should be a salutary lesson to all 
parties. 

Mr. Whitney comes into office under 
the most auspicious circumstances. He 
is relieved of the incubus which weighted 
down his vanquished opponent, an in- 
adequate majority. With his splendid 
following, Mr. Whitney is in a position 
to think only of the good of the prov- 
ince in choosing his cabinet. It is true 
he owes something to the old guard, 
but his first duty is to Ontario, which 
has placed in him such confidence as has 
never before been placed in any political 
leader. If Mr. Whitney proceeds with a 




Caverhill, Learmont & Co's Baseball Team — Champions 1904 of the Montreal Hardware League. 



significant as not to admit of question. 
The downfall of the Liberal party af- 
ter a regime of 32 years, a regime which 
has boasted of many brilliant names, 
and under which have been effected great 
services for the province of Ontario, 
ican not but be occasion of sympathetic 
regret. George W. Ross is unquestion- 
ably a man of brilliant parts. It was 
his misfortune to become involved in an 
impossible position. His attempt to re- 
tain office in the face of the opposition 
of the country inevitably resulted in the 
corruption which the last few years has 
been the shame of the better elements of 
both parties. The landslide on Wednes- 




single eye to the best men for the vari- 
ous portfolios, irrespective of personal 
claims, he may found a government 
which may rival its predecessor in 
length of service, and which may at 
least have a happier ending. 



In a casual review of the legislature- 
elect, one is struck with the number of 
new faces, and among them many who 
should reflect credit upon their consti- 
tuencies and upon the house. With the 
disappearance of so many old war- 
horses, if that term has not become 
nauseous, there should be more chance 
for the colts. The next legislature un- 
doubtedly will be a young men's parlia- 
ment. The last parliament was not re- 
markable for a plethora Of new material 

t7 



of first-class order. The new house will 
be watched with a great deal of inter- 
est. The olcl lines of battle which, 
blame whom we may, were the reverse 
of edifying, should be, and without 
doubt will be abandoned. Let us have 
the issue joined on new lines that will 
bring out the best talents on each side 
and raise our provincial politics from 
the dead level of partisanship in which 
they have been cast of late. 

The number of business men in the 
new house can not escape notice. Mr. 
Whitney has at his back W. H. Hoyle, 
Thos. Crawford, J. S. Hendrie, who 
would make good cabinet material be- 
sides others who will be useful men on 
the committees where, after all, the 
real work of' the house is done. It is a 
pleasure to notice also that on the 
Liberal side the business men have best- 
stood the shock and Mr. Whitney will 
have the boon of an active and intelli- 
gent, if small, opposition. It is regret- 
able, however, that Mr. Hugh Blain 
should have been defeated in North To- 
ronto. Mr. Blain is a type of man much 
needed in our representative bodies, and 
one whose election would have done 
much to elevate the standard of public 
life. His defeat in suph a fine constitu- 
ency as North Toronto was merely the 
consequence of being caught by the tide 
which was flowing against the govern- 
ment the province over. 
* * * 

The rumor that Mr. Ross will not lead 
the opposition but will retire to the 
Senate at Ottawa seems well authen- 
ticated. If this proves true, it is al- 
most certain that the Hon. Ceo. P. 
Graham, who has proved himself an ef- 
fective leader in Eastern Ontario, will 
be entrusted with the leadership of the 
Liberal opposition. 

CAVERHILL, LEARMONT & CO.'S 
ATHLETES. 

IT speaks well for the athletic genius 
of a firm when their teams are 
equally victorious in Winter and 
Summer sports. To Caverhill, Lear- 
mont & Co. belongs the credit of having 
a baseball team and a hockey team each 
of which won the championship in the 
hardware league in Montreal during the 
past seasons. 

The officers and players of the base- 
ball team are: J. W. Dowling, president; 
Geo. McGowan, vice-president; John 
Davidson, secretary; W. McCutcheon, 
manager; John Cullen, captain and 1st 
base; W. Palmer, 2nd base; B. Hodgson, 
3rd base; L. Arbour, short stop; J. L. 
R. Gibson, catcher; R. F. Cockburn, 
pitcher; W. B. Lawson, B. Spooner, J. 
Papps, F. Rowat, fielders. 

The officers and players of the hockey 
team are Jas. Reid, president; Geo. H 
Cornell, vice-president; Geo. A. Jordan, 
secretary-treasurer; B. Hodgson, goal ; 
H. S. Pillow, point; J. Davidson, cap- 
tain; E. Breigel, A. Reid, H. M. Mas- 
sey, G. Walker, forwards; A. S. Bain. 
H. Odell, spare. 



Hardware and Metal. 



January 28, 1905 




(For detailed prices see Current Market Quotations, page 54.) 




QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 

10 Front •rreet •»«. 

Toronto, Jan. 27, 1905 

Hardware. 
PRING trade is now receiving 
the bulk of attention at the 
hands of the men on the 
road. The latter have been 
particularly successful in 
getting large orders, which goes to in- 
dicate" the faith of the retailer for the 
corning season. There is a fair amount 
of present business passing and country 
trade, with fairly good roads and 
clear weather, has been all that could 
be expected. The principal lines being 
booked for Spring delivery are: Lawn 
mowers, hose, freezers, harvest tools, 
axes, spades and shovels, green wire 
cloth, and poultry netting. 

Prices have been universally maintain- 
ed, so that all former lists and quota- 
tions still hold. Inquiries are numer- 
ous, but collections are hardly up to 
the mark. 

Axes — Axe manufacturers are well 
stocked for the coming season and large 
orders for these are being booked daily 
for Spring delivei-y. Quotations are: 
Chopping axes, unhandled, $6 to 
$9.50 a dozen; double bitt axes, $9.50 
to $12 a dozen; handled axes, $7.50 to 
$9.50; Canadian pattern axes, $7.50 a 
dozen. 

Handles— The trade in these has been 
good for some time past and continues 
without abatement. We quote as follows: 
Axe handles, No. 3, $1.25; No. 2, $1.50 
No. 1, $1.90 a dozen; adze handles, 34 
inch, $1.85 a dozen; pick handles. No. 
2, $1.70; No. 3, $1.50 a dozen. 

Carpet Sweepers— These are finding 
very little sale at the present time. Quo- 
tations are $21 to $31 a dozen. 

Food Choppers— The demand is not 
at all brisk. We quote as follows: 
Smallest size, $1.05 each net; medium 
family size, $1.20 each net; large family 
size, $1.35 each net. 

Sewing Machines— Some falling off 
has heen noticed, but on the whole orders 
are fairly good. We quote as follows: 
hand sewing machines $11.00 each net; 
complete machines with stand, $18.00 
and up, according to quality. 

Lanterns— Judging from the number 
of lanterns already sold, this promises 
to be one of the biggest years in lantern 
sales known. There has been no change 
in price. Quotations are: Cold Blast, 
$6; No. Safety, $4 a dozen-. 

Shovels — Sales of snow shovels have 
almost ceased, but a very active demand 
for steel shovels is being experienced. 
Quotations are as follows: Habitant, 
wood, $2.75 a dozen; Canadian,, wood, 



40 per cent, discount : Victor, wood, 35 
per cent, discount; Steel, straight handle, 
from $2.40 a dozen up; Steel, D handle, 
$7 a dozen up; Childs, steel, 85 cents 
a dozen and up. The new list of Olds 
shovels is as follows: No. 2, $10.50 
per dozen; No. 4, $11.50 per dozen; 
No. 0. $12.50 per dozen. The discount 
is 45 per cent. 

Barb Wire— In barb wire a notice- 
able improvement has been felt, and al- 
though no large volume of trade for fu- 
ture delivery has been done, there is 
considerable movement. Quotations 
are as follows: $2.75 per 100 lbs. 
f.o.b. Montreal, and $2.50 f.o.b. Cleve- 
land. Carlots of 15 tons, $2.40 f.o.b. 
Cleveland. 

Fence Staples— Trade in these is im- 
proving. We quote : $2.65 per 100 lb. keg 
for bright, and $2.85 for galvanized : 
25 to 50 lb. packages 25c. extra. 

ftivets and Burrs— No further change 
has been noted in rivets and burrs with- 
in the past week. The demand is good. 
The following discounts are now 
being quoted : Best iron rivets, 
section, carriage and wagon box, 
black rivets, tinned do., coopers' rivets 
and tinned swede rivets, 60, 10 and 10 
per cent.; swede iron burrs are quoted 
at 60 and 10 and 10 per cent, off, copper 
rivets with the usual proportion of burrs, 
60 and 10 per cent, off, and coppered 
iron rivets and burrs, in 5-lb carton 
boxes are quoted at 60 and 10 per cent, 
off list. 

Screws— There is a brisk trade being 
done in screws. Discounts are : 
Round head, bright, 82 1-2 per 
cent. ; flat head, bright, 87 1-2 per cent. ; 
brass, round head. 75 per cent.: brass, 
flat head, 80 per cent. 

Bolts and Nuts— The market con- 
tinues firm and trade has improved 
somewhat within the past week. 

Wire Nails — Some orders are being 
received for the opening of navigation. 
but as far as present delivery is con-, 
cerned. there is little trade being done. 
We quote: $2.20 a keg. f.o.b. Montreal. 

Cut Nails— Business in these is quiet, 
giving manufacturers a chance to catch 
up for future orders. Prices are : $2.20 
a keg. f.o.b. Montreal. 

Horseshoes — Horseshoes are one of the 
most active lines on the market at 
present and a splendid business has been 
reported in these. Quotations are: 
"P. B. " new pattern, base price 
$3.50 per 100 lbs.: other brands iron 
shoes, light and medium pattern. No. 2 
and larger, $3.65; No. 1 and smaller, 
$3.90; snow pattern, No. 2 and larger, 
$3.90; No. 1 and smaller, $4.15; lierht 
steel shoes. No. 2 and larger, $3.80; No. 
1 and smaller. $4.05; featherweight, all 
sizes, to 4, $5.35; toe weight, all sizes, 

28 



1 to 4, $6.60. Packing— Up to three 
sizes in a keg, 10c per 100 lbs. More 
than three sizes. 25c. 

Horsenaus — In common with the ac- 
tivity in horseshoes, horesnails have ex- 
perienced a marked increase. 

Sporting Goods— Few orders are com- 
ing in for sporting goods at the present 
time and very little more business in 
these lines is to be expected this season. 
We quote : Centre fire cartridges, list net ; 
sporting and military, 10 per cent, ad- 
vance on list; primers, $2.05 per thou- 
sand; American loaded shells, 20 per 
cent, discount : B. B. caps. $2. per thou- 
sand: C. B. caps, $2.60 per thousand. 
Standard shot, $6.50 per hundred lbs; 
chilled, $7 per 100 lbs; buck and seal. 
$7.50 per 100 lbs; ball, $8 per 100 lbs. 
We quote discounts 15 per cent, f.o.b. 
Montreal. Toronto, Hamilton, London. 
St. John and Halifax. 

Building Paper— On all sides are evi- 
dences of a very marked increase in this 
line. Manufacturers are busy in anti- 
cipation of big orders and it is fully ex- 
pected that a large trade is in store for 
the near future. 

Cordage— The establishment of a new 
cordage company in Montreal is one of 
the features in cordage lately. The 
market is firm, but conditions are none 
too settled for the coming season's 
business. 

Cement and Firebrick— Little or no 
chance has been experienced in the 
quietness that has characterized this 
market recently, but orders are being- 
hooked to some extent for .future de- 
livery, and with the large volume of con- 
struction in anticipation for the coming 
season, there should be a very largre 
trade done. We emote: English cement. 
$2 to $2.10; Belgium, $1.70 to $2.10 per 
barrel ex store, and American. $2.15 to 
$2.35 ex cars. 

Coil Chain — The market remains as 
before. Quotations are : 5-16 inch. 
$3.90; 3-8 in., $3.75: 7-16 in., $3.55: 
1-2 in., $3.25: 9-16 in.. $3.30; 5-8 in.. 
$3.20: 3-4 in., $£05: 7-8 in., $3; one 
inch, $2.95. 

METALS. 

Metals have seen little change with- 
in the week, as far as activity is con- 
cerned, but the strength that has char- 
acterized the market for some time has 
increased and several advances are 
noted. Pig iron furnaces are running 
full blast and are turning out a big out- 
put, much of which is going to Western 
Ontario, where there is a heavy demand. 
It was noted last week that black sheets 
and galvanized sheets had advanced, 
but this has not been held to. Sheet 
zinc has advanced one quarter of a 
cent, and ingot tin is one-half cent 



January 28, 1905 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal. 



higher. Ingot copper and ingot zinc 
are also higher, each having- increased 
one-quarter of a cent. 

Pig Iron — Furnaces are turning out 
a large quantity of stock, which is be- 
ing consumed in the west. 

"Disc," No. i $i6-5° deliveied Montreal. 

"Dom.," No. i 1750 

Usual difference in price for lower grades. 

Ferrona No. 1 $18 00 delivered Montreal. 

No. 2 1750 

" No. 3 16 50 " 

" No. 4 16.00 " 

Londonderry. $18.50 to $19.00 delivered Montreal. 

Ulongarnock 20.00 

Gartsherrie 19 25 " 

Carnbroe 18.50 

Carron No. 1 19.50 delivered Montreal. 

(special) 18.50 

Ayresome No. 1 18.00 " 

No. 3 17-5° " 

Summerlec 19-5° " 

Clarence No. 1 18.00 

" No. 3 17-5° " " * 

No. 1 Cleveland 18.00 

Bar Iron — The market continues firm 
and the demand steady. Quotations are 
as follows: Merchants' bar, $1,771-2; 
horseshoe iron, $2.02 1-2 ; forged iron, 
$1,971-2, net cash thirty days. 

Tool Steel— There is every prospect 
of an enormous demand in this shortly 
and the present sales are not small . 
The market continues firm. Our quo- 
tations are as follows: Black Diamond, 8 
cents to 9 cents; Sanderson's, 8 cents 
to 45 cents, according to grade; 
Jessop's, 13c; Jonas & Clover's, 10 to 
20c; "Air Hardening," 65c per lb; 
Conqueror, 7 l-2c ; Conqueror High Speed 
steel, 60c. 

Merchant Steel— Little change has 
been experienced since last week. 
Uur quotations are as follows : 
Sleighshoe, $1,821-2; tire, $1,921-2; 
spring, $2.75; toecalk, $2,421-2; ma- 
chinery (iron finish), $2,021-2; square 
harrow, $1,921-2; reeled machinery 
steel, $2.75; mild, $1,821-2; rivet, 
$] .82 1-2; net cash thirty days. 

Cold Rolled Shafting— While hardly 
as active there is at the same time an 
increasing demand for this. Prices re- 
main as before. Our quotations are 
as follows: Cold rolled shafting, 3-4 
inch, to 1 7-16. $3.85 per 100 lbs: 
inch and a half to 3 inch, $3.50 per 100 
lbs. 

Canada Plates — The advance quota- 
lions noted a week ago still hold. Our 
quotations are as follows: 52s, $2.45; 
60s, $2.50; 75s, $2.55; full polished, 
$3.60; galvanized 52s, $3.90 to $4; 60s, 
$4.15 to $4.25. 

Black Sheets— While the market is 
firm and an early advance is expected,' 
the reported change has not been main- 
tained. We quote as follows: 28 gauge, 
$2.15; 26 gauge, $2.10; 22 to 24 gauge, 
$2.05; 19 to 20 gauge, $2.20; 8 to 10 
gauge, $2.30. 

Galvanized Iron— This market is ac- 
tive, but no advance has taken place, 
although it is strengthening. Our quo- 
tations are as follows: Queen's Head, 28 
gauge, $4.15; 26 gauge, $3.90; 22 to 24 
gauge, $3.65 ; 16 to 20 gauge, $3.55 ; Apol- 
lo, 28 gauge, $4; 26 gauge, $3.75; 22 to 24 
gauge, $3.75; 16 to 20 gauge, $3.40; 
Fleur-de-Lis, 28 gauge, $4; 26 gauge, 
$3.75; 22 to 24 gauge, $3.50; 16 to 20 



gauge, $3.40; Comet, 28 gauge, $3.95; 
26 gauge, $3.70; 22 to 24 gauge, $3.45; 
16 to 20 gauge, $3.40; Bell brand, 28 
gauge, $4; Gorbal's "Best Best," 28 
Lauge, $4.15; ''Windmill Best," 28 
aauge, $3.95; Sword and Torch, 28 
uaugej $4.05; in less than case lots, 25c 
extra. 

Antimony— No startling changes have 
I a ken place in this market. It still con- 
tinues firm and steady. Recent advance 
quotations are: 91-2 to 9 3-4c. 

Sheet Zinc— Although weak not long- 
since, there is a firmness and an ad- 
vance this week is noted. Quotations 
are: Case lots, $7; small quantities, 
$7.25 upwards. 

Tin Plates— While ingot tin has ad- 
vanced, there is no reported change in 
tin plates, but the market is very firm. 
We quote : Cokes, $3.75 ; charcoal, $4. 

Ingot Tin— Ingot tin has advanced 
another half cent and there is a further 
upward tendency. The price is 32 1-2 
to 33c. 

Ingot Copper — A further advance has 
taken place in ingot copper within the 
week, making the price of copper un- 
usuallv high. We quote 161-4 to 
161-2c. 

Ingot Zinc— Ingot zinc has also ad- 
vanced one-quarted of a cent. The mar- 
ket continues firm and steady. We 
quote 6 3-4 to 7e. 

Pig Lead — There is every expectation 
of an early advance in pig lead. The 
demand is good. We quote: $3.50 to 
$3.60, no concessions being obtainable. 

Boiler Tubes— This market continues 
steady, as has been the case for several 
months. Our quotations are as 
follows: Highest grade soft steel, 
British and American tubes, one and a 
half inch, 71-2c; 2 in., 81 -2c; 21-2 in.. 
10c; 3 in., 121-4c; 31-2 in., 16c; 4 in., 
20c: 5 in., 45c. Price per foot net. 

Scrap Metal and Old Material— More 
movement has been experienced than 
before, but even yet the market is not 
as active ,nor the prices as strong, as 
is early looked for. Quotations are : 
Heavy copper and wire, 11 3-4 to 12 l-4c; 
light copper, 10 3-4 to lll-4c; heavy 
red brass, 10 to 10 l-4c ; heavy yellow 
brass, 7 3-4 to 8 3-4c; light brass, 51-2 
to 6c; lead, 21-4c; zinc, 2 3-4c to 3c; 
iron, No. 1 wrought, $12: machinery 
scrap, $12 to $13; stoveplate, $10: mix- 
ed country rags, 65 to 75c per hundred 
pounds; old rubbers, 51-2 to 6c. 

ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
10 Front street ea»t, 

Toronto. Jau. 27, 1905. 

Hardware. 

CONDITIONS are much the same this 
week as last. There is nothing- 
new in quotations to be reported, 
prices remaining unchanged. In the 
hardware trade January and the first 
part of February are the quiet times of 
the year; and now, of course, the usual 
conditions hold, although by no means 
to the usual extent. For this time of 
the year business is good, and prospects 
for the Spring season are unusually 
bright. This is particularly the case in 

29 



heavy hardware. In industrial expan- 
sion the present year in Canada will 
probably be a record year. This will 
mean an increased demand for all lines 
of heavy hardware and also hardware 
specialties . 

The Pedlar People, Oshawa, have 
issued their 1905 price list of plain and 
corrugated expanding conductor pipe 
and eavetroughing, and this list may be 
had by the trade upon application. 

Lawn Mowers — The demand is normal 
for this time of the year. 

Guns and Ammunition— There is no- 
thing much doing. Trade is normal. 

Washing Machines— There is the 
usual demand. 

Chain — The normal trade is being- 
done. Probably Februarv will see an 
impetus given to trade. Our quotations 
are as follows: 1-4 in., $6.50; 5-16 
inch, $4.45; 3-8 inch, $3.85; 7-16 inch, 
$3.70; 1-2 inch, $3.55; 9-16 inch, $3.45; 
5-8 inch, $3.35; 3-4 inch. $3.25. 

Step Ladders— We quote at 10c per 
foot for 3 to 6 feet, and lie per foot for 
7 to 10 feet ladders. 

Extension Ladders— Waggoner, 40 per 
cent, off list. 

Galvanized Wire— The recent advances 
hold firm* trade is ol course quiet but 
perhaps above normal. Quotations are : 
$^.371-2 f.o.b. Cleveland. 

Coiled Spring Wire— Prices have been 
confirmed but are Subject to change 
without notice. Trade is normal. 

Barb Wire — There is more business 
being done now than in December. 
Prices remain unchanged. 

Wire Nails— There is no change in 
the situation, and prices are nominally 
about $2.25 f.o.b. Toronto. 

Cut Nails— The recent advances made 
by Toronto jobbers remain firm. Ham- 
ilton firms are not included in the ad- 
vance. Quotations are: $2.40 per keg, 
f.o.b. Toronto. 

Horseshoes— A very good demand for 
horseshoes is reported for this time of 
the year. We quote as follows: "P.B." 
base, $3.65; other brands are: Iron 
shoes, light and medium pattern, No. 
2 and larger, $3.80 ; No. 1 and smaller, 
$4.05; snow No. 2 and larger, $4.05; 
No. 1 and smaller, $4.30; light steel 
shoes, No. 2 and larger, $3.95; No. 1 and 
smaller, $4.20; featherweight, all sizes, 
to 4, $5.50; toe weight, all sizes, 1 to 
4, $6.75. If shipped from factory 15c 
less. 

Horsenails— There is a very good de- 
mand, and prices remain unaltered. 

Screws— Business is very good in this 
line and prospects are also very bright. 
Prices remain unaltered. 

Rivets and Burrs— A very good trade 
is being done and there is every indica- 
tion of a good demand throughout the 
year. 

Bolts and Nuts — A ver" good volume 
of trade is being done, with bright pros- 
pects for trade during the year. 

Woodenware— Market conditions re- 
main unchanged, and the normal busi- 
ness continues. 

Cordage— Orders are being booked 
well. Prices remain unchanged. 

We quote: Binder twine, Blue Ribbon, 



Hardware and MataL 



THE MARKETS 



January 28, 1905 



121-2c; Red Cap, lll-2c; Ti°-er, 101-2c; 
and Standard, 91-2c; manila, 141-2c; 
British manila, lie; sisal, 10 l-2c; double 
lathyarn, 101-2c; single lathyarn, 10c; 
sashcord "Hercules," 30 to 32c; "Star," 
36 to 38c ; cotton twine, 3-ply, 24c ; 4-ply, 
- ^9c; calking cotton, 161-2 to 17c; cot- 
ton waste, colored, 6 3-4c; white, 11 to 
13c. 

METALS. 

The local metal market has exihibited 
very little change during the week. There 
is no change in quotations. There is a 
good strong market, and buyers are plac- 
ing orders very freely. Prospects are 
very bright indeed for the metal mar- 
ket during the year. 

The London metal market was some- 
what easier last week and the earlier 
part of this week, but local men think 
it only a temporary condition. Pig iron 
in the States has not been selling as 
well during the last couple of weeks as 
formerly. 

Pig Iron— Buying is free, and orders 
for delivery during the latter part of 
the year are being booked. Local quo- 
tations are unchanged. They are as 
followsi 

Middlesboro, f.o.b., Toronto «21 00 

Hamilton, No. 1, at furnace » «« 

No 2, " 17 50 

Midland, No. 1, " "00 

" No. 2, " «•$ 

Radnor, at furnace ■ • • • ■ • • ■ f< »« 

Lon londerry, at furnace 16 SO to liuu 

Bar Iron— There is a very good de- 
mand, and prices remain unchanged. 
Our quotations are as follows: $1.80 
f.o.b. Toronto, with discount of 2 per" 
cent.: for extras as cut to length, while 
lolling, 2 feet and over, 10c per 
100 lbs: 1 foot and under 2 feet, 15c; 
under 1 foot, 20c; over 20 feet, by spe- 
cial agreement according to length and 
size. 

Tin— The market is steady, and buy- 
ing continues somewhat brisker than 
two weeks ago. Quotations are from 32 
to 34c per lb. 

Galvanized Sheets— There is a firm 
market, but the demand is rather quiet. 

Tin Plates— The recent advances hold 
firm, and there is a very good demand. 

Canada Plates— There are more all- 
bright plates now on the market. The 
market is quiet, and prices remain un- 
altered. 

Brass— The market is active and re- 
cent advances hold firm. Discounts are 
10 per cent. 

Lead— The market is firm, and there 
is a very good demand. Quotations are: 
Pig- lead, $3.80 per 100 lbs; and bar 
lead, $4.80 per 100 lbs. 

Zinc Spelter— There is a very good 
demand, and the market is firm. Quo- 
tations are as follows: 7c per lb. for 
foreign and 51-2 to 5 3-4c per lb. for 
domestic. 

Copper— The demand is very good, 
and the market steady. Quotations are 
as follows: Ingot copper, 16 l-4c per lb.; 
and sheet copper, 21c per lb. 

Antimony— The market is quiet, with 
unchanged prices. 

Cement— With the exception of a few 
orders being received for inside repair 
work, trade is quiet. Prices continue 



unchanged.. Quotations are as follows: 
For carload orders f.o.b. Toronto, Can- 
adian Portland, $1.80; American Port- 
land, $1.80. For small orders ex 
warehouse: Canadian Portland, $2 to 
$2.10: American Portland, $2 to $2.10. 

Firebrick — A small amount of repair 
work is being done and trade is quiet. 
Prices are firm owing to a scarcity of 
all lines, but no advance is anticipated 
as the small demand will not warrant 
it. Our quotations are: English 
and Scotch firebrick 30 to 35c: Ameri- 
can, low grade. 25 to 30c; high grade 
32 1-2 to 40c. 

Building Paper— Very few orders have 
been received from the retail hardware 
trade, however, some substantial orders 
have been rceived from the wholesale 
houses. Roofing pitch has declined 
10c per 100 lbs, caused by the arrival of 
a cheaper brand of pitch from Glasgow, 
Scotland. 

Old Material— The demand has lessen- 
ed during the last week and trade is 
quiet. American users of scrap copper 
and brass are short of stock and it is 
expected that they will import from the 
Canadian market. American users of 
scrap iron and steel are expected to 
come on the Canadian market shortly 
with the purpose of purchasing". Taking 
everything into consideration trade has 
a bright outlook. Prices are unchanged. 
We quote the following prices: 
Heavy copper and wire, 13c per 
lb: light copper 12c per lb; heavy 
red brass. 10c per lb; heavy yellow brass, 
8c per lb: light brass. 6s per lb; tea 
lead. $2.35 per 100 lbs: heavy lead, 
$2.50 to $2.60 per 100 lbs; scrap zinc, 
3 3-4c to 4c per lb ; iron. No. 1 wrought, 
$11; No. 2 wrought, $3; machinery cast 
scrap, $13; stoveplate, $8 to $9: malle- 
able and steel, $5 : old rubbers, 5 l-2c per 
lb : country mixed rags, 65c per 100 lbs. 

Coal — Rome dealers report a better 
class of orders arriving this week. Prices 
continue unchanged. Our quotations 
are as follows: Anthracite in cars at 
Briges: Grate, $5.50 per gross ton; egg, 
stove and nut, $5.75 per gross ton ; pea, 
$3.50 per gross ton. 

Standard Hocking, soft coal, in cars, 
f.o.b. at mines: Lump, $1.60; 3-4 inch, 
$1 . 50 : run of mine, $1.40 ; nut, $1 ; N. 
P. and S., 75c; coarse slack, 50c; box 
cars 10 cents per ton additional. 

Youchiogheny soft coal in cars, 
bonded, at the bridges: 11-4 inch, $2.60: 
3-4 inch. $2.50: mine run, $2.40; slack, 
at $1.90 to $2. 



TRADE CONDITIONS IN NEW 
BRUNSWICK. 

Special correspondence of Hardware and Metai. 



M 



St. John, N.B., Jan. 24, 1905. 
ATTERS have been very quiet in 
local hardware circles of late. 
Not that business has been be- 
low the average, but nothing of unusual 
interest has occurred. Stock-taking has, 
of course, consumed a good deal of the 
merchants' time. 

This has been an exceptionally good 
year for the Page Wire Fence Company 
in this section of Canada. The demand 
for its fencing and gates has been un- 

30 



usually heavy, and shows a great in- 
crease over that of last year. During 
the past year this company inaugurated 
a contest among its agents in the 
Maritime Provinces, the result of which 
has just been announced. The company 
offered a prize to the merchant in each 
of the three provinces who, during 1904, 
sold the greatest amount of the Page 
goods. In New Brunswick, Mr. E. L. 
Parker, of Derby, was the winner, and 
received a handsome clock. Mr. J. H. 
Cox and Mr. Andrew Mooney were the 
winners in Nova Scotia and Prince Ed- 
ward, respectively. Mr. Mooney also 
won a silk hat as the champion sales- 
man of all three sections. 

It has been announced that the busi- 
ness conducted by W. A. Fleming & 
Company here is to be discontinued at 
an early date. The reason for this step 
is the prolonged illness of Mr. Walter 
• A. Fleming. This firm has been for 
some years one of the leading supply 
houses for belting and various mill sup- 
plies. The firm also carries on business 
in Montreal. 

Among the new buildings erected by 
hardware people in St. John during the 
past year is one for offices, etc., which 
is the property of Walter Wilson & Son, 
on Union street. This building is of 
brick and is two storeys in height. It 
is being finished throughout in fine style. 
The firm of Wilson & Son is engaged in 
the manufacture of saws and various 
kinds of edge toals, and has been in busi- 
ness here for a number of years. 

The Josiah Fowler Company, Limited, 
manufacturers of axes, springs, edge 
tools, etc., is a St. John concern that 
is pushing its business rapidly. This 
company has been sending its goods 
West for several years, but never fur- 
ther than Winnipeg. Last Fall its mana- 
ger, Mr. Josiah Fowler, took a trip to 
the Pacific coast. He found that his 
company's goods were making an ex- 
cellent impression. Consequently the 
Fowler tools, etc., will hereafter be 
placed widely throughout the West. The 
company expects to do a good business. 

Emerson & Fisher arc now getting 
ready to move into their new building. 



LONDON METAL MARKETS. 

From Metal Market Report, Jan. 24, 1905. 

Pig Iron— Middlesboro No. 3 foundry 
sold at 47s 101-2d, and Scotch warrants 
at 53s 9d, making prices as compared 
with last week, 6d lower for Middles- 
boro and 3d lower for Scotch warants. 

Tin— Spot tin opened firm at £130 5s. 
futures at £129 15s, and after sales of 
120 tons of spot and 330 tons of futures 
closed steady at £130 5s for spot and 
£129 15s for futures/making prices as 
compared with last week £1 lower for 
spot and 5s lower for futures. 

Copper — Spot copper opened easy at 
£67 17s 6d, futures at £67 15s, and after, 
sales of 100 tons of spot and 550 tons 
of futures, closed quiet at £67 17s 6d for 
spot and £67 lis, 6d for futures, making 
prices ns compared with last week 15s 
lower for spot and 18s 9d lower for fu- 
tures. 

Lead— The market closed at £12 13s 
9d, making prices as compared with last 
week 3s 9d lower. 

Spelter— The market, closed at £24 
17s 6d. 



January 28, 1905 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal. 



PORTLAND CEMENT 

CANADIAN, ENGLISH. 

GERMAN and BELGIAN. 

FIRE BRICKS, FIRE CLAY, 

• ENAMELLED BRICKS, all colors. 
BUILDING BRICKS. 

SEWER PIPES, CULVERT PIPES, 
WHEELBARROWS, 

FOUNDERS' and CON- 
TRACTORS' SUPPLIES. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

WELLINGTON ST., MONTREAL 

Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers ot 



Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleab'e 
Castings, Boiler lubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery wh-re great strength 
i- r quired : Strong, High Silicon Iron, f_.r Foundn 
Purposes. 



u 



MIDLAND 



5J 



BRAND. 



Foundry Pig Iron, 

Made from carefully selected Lake- Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as Fuel, "Mid- 
land " will rival in quality and grading the 
▼ery best of the imported brands. 



Writ* for Prlos to Sales Agonts 

Drummond McCall & Co. 

MONTREAL, QUE. 
or to 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 

MIDLAND, ONT. Limited 

Get our prices for 

GALVANIZED 
FLAT SHEETS 

THE "VANDA" BRAND 

For all purposes requiring the best quality. 

It is "deadflat," well galvanized, true to gaure 
and specially soft for working-up. We guarantee 
every sheet bearing our brand. 



C.F.JACKSON & CO , Limited 

Wholesale Merchants 

Ormluale Biock, Vancouver, B.C., and 

Liverpool, England 

Direct Importers of: 

Mftals of every description, Wire Pope, Portland 
Cements, Firebricks, Ore Backs, Giain Bag*, etc.. etc 



PITTSBURG METAL MARKETS. 

From the Iron Trade Review, Jan. 26, 1103. 

Pig Iron -The sale of 40,000 tons of 
Bessemer to the Cambria Steel Co., and 
10,000 tons to the Lackawanna Steel 
Co. removes practically all the specula- 
tive Bessemer from the market. Al- 
though these sales were made on the 
basis of $15.50 at the furnace, the situa- 
tion is strengthened and the price of 
$16 established by the Bessemer asso- 
ciation is probably nearer the market 
than it was a week ago. No. 2 foundry 
iron is now $16.10 to $16.25 at the fur- 
nace and we note the sale of 1,700 tons 
at the latter price. The quotation of 
$15.50 recently made by one furnace 
has been withdrawn and it is doubtful 
if $16.10 can be shaded. We note the 
sale of 5,000 tons of forge at $16.10 and 
$16.25, Pittsburg. Little Southern iron 
is now being sold in this market owing 
to the differential in favor of the North- 
ern grades. We revise quotations as 
follows: 

Bessemer, Valley $15 50 to JU6 00 

Bessemer, Pittsburg 16 35 to 16 85 

No. 1 Foundry 17 ?5 to 1750 

No. 2 Foundry 16 8; to 17 10 

Gray foree Pittsburg 16 10 to 16 25 

Basic, Valley. ig 91 to 16 00 

Basic, Pittsburg 167510 1685 

Steel— Billets and sheet bars for early 
delivery continue to command a prem- 
ium of $2 to $3 a ton, and we note the 
sale of a small tonnage of sheet bars at 
$26, f.o.b. mill. "Official" prices con- 
tinue unchanged as follows: Bessemer 
and open-hearth billets, 4x4 in. and 
slabs, up to and including" 0.25 carbon, 
$21, f.o.b. mill, Pittsburg with actual 
freight to points of delivery; 0.26 and 
including 0.60 carbon, $1 advance; 0.61 
to 1.00 carbon, $2 advance. Billets 
smaller than 4x4 in., $2 advance; sheet 
and tin bars, $23 ; cut bars, $23.50 ; forg- 
ing billets, $23. Bessemer and open- 
hearth steel rods are held at $30.50 to 
$31. 

Rails and Track Material— New rail 
tonnace is not sensational and the total 
accumulates slowly. Demand for spikes 
is heavy and prices are tirm and higher. 

Plates — Outside of the steel car trade 
there is little demand for plates. This 
demand is, however, exceedingly heavy 
and all of the plate mills in this district 
are operating in full. 

Bars— We note the sale of 1,000 tons 
of bar iron at 1.70c, Pittsburg. The 
Pressed Steel Car Co. is also in the 
market for a like tonnage. One of the 
mills is asking 1.75c, Pittsburg, and on 
small orders for prompt delivery this 
price is readily secured. One of the 
leading steel bar producers is asking a 
premium of $2 a ton and it is predicted 
that at the next meeting of the steel 
bar association in February prices will 
be advanced. 

Pipes and Tubes— Boiler tubes have 
been advanced two points amounting to 
about $4 a ton. Demand for merchant 
pipe continues heavy and consumers are 
demanding prompt shipments. 

Wire and Wire Nails— Demand for 
wire products continues very heavy but 
prices remain unchanged. We make the | 

31 



Sheet Zinc 
Sheet Copper 

and other Metals. 
From Stock or for Import. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 

509-512 Merchants Bank But] dins;, 
MONTREAL. 

Anti-Freezing Pumps 

will soon be in demand. 

You ought to lay in a 
stock of our 

Standard 
Anti=Freezing Pumps 

before the cold weather sets 
in. 

They are the best line you 
can handle because yourcus- 
tomerswill be perfectly satis- 
fied when they find their 
pumps will work on a zero 
morning. 

r catalog and prices 




Write fo 



THE R. McDOUGALL CO., LIMITED 
Gait, Ont. 



SPECIFY 




INJ 

Penberthy Injector Co., 



LI/IITED. 



BRASS MFRS. 



Windsor, Ont. 



Nova Scotia Steel 
& Coal Co., Limit* 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 

Manufacturers o f — ■ 

Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIEMENS MARTIN 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



Hardware and Metal. 



THE MARKETS 



January 28, 1905 



following quotations. Wire nails, job- 
bers' carload lots, $1.75; retailers' car- 
loads, $1.80, and less than carloads, $1 ; 
painted barb wire, $1 . 90 to jobbers in 
carloads; retailers' carloads, $1.95, and 
less than carloads $2.05, with 30 cents 
for galvanizing'. Annealed smooth fence 
wire is held at $1.60, with the usual 
differentials to retailers for carloads and 
less than carloads. Quotations are all 
f.o.b. Pittsburg, 60 days, with 2 per 
cent, discount for cash in ten days. Iron 
cut nails are held at $1.85 Pittsburg, 
and steel at $1.75. 







MONTREAL METAL TRADES DINE. 

N Friday evening the annual meet- 
ing of the Metal and Hardware 
Association of the Montreal 
'Board of Trade was held in the Canada 
Club banquet hall. The chairman of 
the evening was Geo. Caverhill, presi- 
dent of the association, while Wm. 
Stark, of the Stark Hardware Co., and 
H. J. Fuller, of the Fairbanks Co., acted 
as vice-chairmen. 

Among those present were: 

Robert and William Starke, of the 
otarke Hardware Co., Limited. 

H.J. Fuller, of the Fairbanks Co. 

Geo. Caverhill, T. H. Newman, and 
J. B. Learmont, of Caverhill, Learmont 
& Co. 

T. L. Paton, T. Esmond Peck, and 
Thos. Peck, of the Peck Rolling Mills. 

F. W. Lamplough, of F. W. Lamp- 
lough & Co. 

A. E. Harina and F. W. Fairman, of 
the Dominion Wire Mfg. Co. 

George Haldimand and R. Haldimand, 
of W. L. Haldimand & Son. 

Geo. A. Childs and C. B. Ritten- 
house, of the U. S. Steel Products Ex- 
port Co. 

A. A. Brown, of the McClary Mfg. 
Co. 

Wm. McMaster, Ross McMaster and 
■- . R . Kinghorn, of the Montreal Roll- 
ing Mills. 

James Crathern, of Crathern & Caver- 
hill. 

Geo. A. Kohl, of B. & S. H. Thomp- 
son & Co . 

C. P. Sclater, of the Bell Telephone 
Co. 

F. Bacon, of Bacon Bros. 
Col. R. Gardner, of R. Gardner & Son. 
Geo. J. Crowdy, of James Hutton & 
Co. 

E. R. Dorken, of Dorken Bros. 

F. C. Wilson, of Williams & Wilson. 
F. G. "Grady, of the Canadian Iron 

Foundry Co. 

F. W. Knowlton, of the United Shoe 
Machinery Co. 

D. Lome McGibbon, of the Canadian 
Rubber Co. 

S. R. Galloway, of the Locomotive 
and Machinery Co. 

H. D. Bayne, of Westinghouse & Co. 

E. F. Sisc, of the Wire and Cable 
Co. 

Thos. Anderson, of Winnipeg. 

T). S. Walker, of the James Walker 
Hard wart' Co., Limited. 

James Davidson and Ed,. Goodwill. 
of the Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co. 



NICHOLSON FILES 

Are known all over the World. 
WARRANTED. 

QUICK CUTTING. LONG WEARING. 

SIX FACTORIES PRODUCING DAILY 120.000. 

Sold by all prominent merchants throughout the Dominion. 

PRICES RIGHT. 

DOMINION WORKS, - Port Hope, Ont. 



GlLBERTSON's Brand Galvanized Sheets 



COMET 

Agent: ALEXANDER GIBB, Montreal. 



are of high quality, but LOW in price — for 
a guaranteed sheet. 

Makers : W. OIL Bf C T SON £. CO., Limited 
Pontardawe, South Wales. 



GALVANIZED FENCE HOOK r F °'cc' """"° '"""'" '""" "* *"" 

.FENCE HOOK 



WIRE NAILS, COILED SPRING, 
BARB and PLAIN FENCE WIRE, 
OILED and ANNEALED, CLOTHES 
LINE WIRE, STAPLES, etc. 



THE WESTERN WIRE & NAIL. OO., Limited, 



-LONDON, ONT. 




THE JOHN MORROW MACHINE 
SCREW COMPANY, Limited 

Manufacturers oi 

Set and Cap Screws, Speoial Milled Work, Engine Studi 
Etc. Cold Punched Nuti of every variety of flniih. 
INGERSOLL. ONT. 




Joker 



nt»n»w» 




Blizzard 



FOR RATS 
AND MICE 

Swift as lightning, sure as death and sure 
death to the animal. Strong, simple, substantial 
construction. "To get the best trap trade, sell 
the best traps made." 

Write for prices to 

J. M. Mast Mfg. Co., Lititz, Penna. 

Canadian Ag'ts, C H. Grenfell &. Co , London, Ont. 




Snap Shot 




Old Nick 




Manilla Paper 

SMOOTH, TOUGH, BNI6HT. CLEAN 
ALL SIZES AND WEIGHTS 



Fibre 



Paper) 



THE TOUGHEST OF THE TOUGH 
ALMOST WATERPROOF 



SAMPLES AND PRICES 
GLADLY SENT. 



Canada Paper Co. 



TORONTO 



MONTREAL. 



R. 
and 
J. 

lu. 

H. 
of II 

N. 
Co. 

P. 
v o., 



J. Merker, of the Canadian Iron 
Furnace Co. 
M. Mackie, of the Laurie Engine 

C. Frost and L. E. A. Shollette, 
ie Canadian Rubber Co. 
S. Reeder, of the Canada Car 

Ross Newman, of the Fairbanks 
Winnipeg. 

32 



J. A. Fuller, of New York. 

Watson Jack, of Watson Jack & Co. 

-John and Chas. Robertson, of the 
•lames Robertson Co. 

J. Stanley Cook, secretary of the 
association. 

The evening was most enjoyably spent 
in social chat and post-prandial ora- 
tions. Altogether it proved one of the 
most interesting meetings the associa- 
tion has held for some years. 



January 28, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




ONTARIO. 

G. T. Fennell, plumber, North Bay, 
has assigned to J. M. McNamara. 

Geo. W. Graham, blacksmith, Law- 
rence Station, has been burnt out. 

The planing mill owned by J. Millard, 
Newmarket, is advertised for sale. 

J. H. White, plumber and tinsmith, 
Welland, lias assigned to D. H. McLeod. 

Ratz & Gingerich, hardware mer- 
chants, Tavistock, have dissolved part- 
nership. 

Weiderhol'd & Honderich, contractors, 
Milverton, have sold to the Milverton 
Planing Mill Co. 

The stock of the estate of Welford 
Bros., manufacturers of ropes and 
brooms, London, was sold by auction 
Jan. 31. 

yUEBEC. 

A. 0. Loiselle, harness maker, Gran- 
by, is offering 25 cents on the dollar. 

A Faucher has been appointed curator 
to O. Plante & Fils, plumbers, Quebec. 

Courville, Nadon & Co, carriage mak- 
ers, Montreal, have dissolved partner- 
ship. 

The assets of A. Desroches & Co.; 
lumber merchants, Quebec, have been 
sold. 

M. Purvis and A. P. Henderson have 
registered under the style of Purvis & 
Henderson, contractors, Montreal. 

John Burns &>• Co., manufacturer of 
ranges, Montreal, has suffered slight 
damage to stock bv smoke and water. 

MANITOBA AND N.W.T. 

T. H., Lines, blacksmith, Carlyle, has 
sold to J. Corbett. 

Rhom & Strohm, lumber merchants, 
Caron, have assigned. 

D. Trump, blacksmith, Fort Saskatche- 
wan,' has sold to Jackson & Jackson. 

D. W. Ferguson, hardware merchant, 
Hartney, has sold to Nichol & Robin- 
sou. 

Thorburn & Sons, hardware mer- 
chants, Broadview, have sold to Paul 
Bros. 

C. E. Crawford, dealer in agricultural 
implements, Strathclair, has sold to 
N. Gran. 

Thompson & Hunt, dealers in agricul- 
tural implements, Indian Head, have 
dissolved partnership. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

W. Hannock, harness maker, Enderby, 
has been succeeded by Jas. Evans. 

NEW BRUNSWICK. 

F. L. Cooper, carriage maker, Fred- 
ericton, has suffered slight damage to 
stock by fire. Fully insured. 



AUGERS AND AUGER BITS. 

WE have just received from Froth- 
ingham & Workman, Limited, of 
Montreal, a catalogue of augers 
and auger bits manufactured bv Garven 
Gilmore, for whom they are the sole 
distributing agents. This catalogue, 
the firm states, is larger than any they 
have previously issued for these goods, 
and shows a line that is a credit to the 
skill of Canadian workmen. 

The catalogue is well illustrated, all 
the different kinds and shapes of augers 
being shown. The line includes- auger 
bits, car bits, ship augers, long and 
short-eyed augers, nut augers, boring- 
machine augers, power-machine bits, 
boom and rafting augers, pump augers 
and Thompson's ship-buijders' augers. 

Two new lines are announced, solid 
centre-stem auger bits and auger bits in 
canvas rolls. The advantage of the 
solid centre-stem auger bit arises from 
the solid centre-stem the same size as 
the shank about which the spiral winds, 
and which gives the bit great strength. 
These auger bits are put up in sets of 
6, 8, 9 and 13 in wooden boxes, and in 
sets of 13 in flexible canvas rolls. 
These rolls will be appreciated by car- 
penters as they are more convenient 
than boxes for carrying in a tool bas- 
ket. 

Readers of Hardware & Metal can ob- 
tain a copy of this catalogue on ad- 
dressing Frothingham & Workman, Lim- 
ited, Montreal. 



A CLOCK FOR THEIR FRIENDS. 

The Frictionless Metal Co., of Rich- 
mond, Va., are sending out to their 
friends in the trade a handsome little 
desk clock. The clock is set in the mod- 
el of a horse-shoe and besides its at- 
tractiveness, is a good timekeeper. The 
metal manufactured by this company is 
given a good reputation for machinery 
bearings and the desk clock will, no 
doubt, add to the firm's reputation. It 
is at any rate an indication that the 
Frictionless Metal Co., are up to date, 
and want their friends kept in close 
touch with time. 



GERMAN SHIPBUILDING. 

In 1903 Germany built 507 ships of 
277,055 registered tons, against 333 of 
208,835 registered tons in 1898. Of 
these 507 vessels, 12 were for the navy; 
294, of 248,562 registered tons, were for 
the commercial fleet; 201, of 28,493 re- 
gistered tons, were for the river and 
canal fleet. 

Of this number of ships Germany 
built 56, of 20,406 registered tons, for 
other countries, while she in turn had 
33 vessels of 37,038 registered tons 
built in foreign docks. 



OUR METALlI&TV 
CEILINGS ^ W&&A\ 

Are both artistic and serv'rffo^r&tf. 
Popularly used by practical peq ' 
everywhere. 



NE 



¥MSm± 



. . ogrw* 



M 



Easily applied — most moderate in 
cost — fire-proof, sanitary and won- 
derfully durable — with countless 
designs to select from. 
Write us for booklet telling all about them. 

METALLIC ROOFING CO., Limited 

Wholesale Mfrs. TORONTO, CANADA. 



HARDWARE CONDITIONS IN 
MANITOBA. 

(Market quotations corrected by , telegraph up till 12 a.m. 
Friday, Jau. 27, 1904.) 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 

Room 515 Mclntyre BIock, 

Winnipeg, Man. 

IT was definitely decided on Monday 
to hold the first annual conventions 
of the Western and Manitoba Retail 
Hardware and Stove Dealers' Associa- 
tions in the Seott Memorial Hall in this 
city on February 9th and 10th. Meet- 
ings will be called at 2.30 p.m. on 
Thursday and Friday, and at 8 p.m. on 
Friday. The executive are sending out 
notices to the western hardware trade 
and a large attendance is looked for. 

At a meeting of the Winnipeg Retail 
Hardware Association held last week 
President Robert Wyatt and Secretary 
W. W. Lindsay were unanimously re- 
elected for 1905. Secretary Lindsay 
was anxious to retire as he will be ab- 
sent from the city during a considerable 
part of the year, but his fellow-members 
would not hear of his resignation and 
insisted on re-electing him. The usual 
routine business -was transacted and the 
members present showed a keen interest 
in the approaching western convention 
which it is felt will do much to advance 
the interests of all hardware . men in 
the west. 



It is announced that the capital stock 
of G. F. Stephens & Co. has been in- 
creased from $150,000 to $500,000. This 
is taken to mean a considerable exten- 
sion in the business of the firm. A 
member of the firm explained to Hard- 
ware and Metal that the steo was ren- 
dered necessary by the increase in their 
business and that they are contemplating 



33 



Hardware and Metal. 



THE MARKETS 



January 28, 1905 



CONDENSED OR "WANT" 
ADVERTISEflENTS. 



Advertisements under this heading, 2c. a word first 
insertion; lc. a word each subsequent insertion. 

Contractions count as one word, but five figures (as 
$1,000) are allowed as one word. 

Cash remittance to cover cost must accompany all 
advertisements. In no casa can this rule be overlook- 
ed. Advertisements received without remittance 
cannot be acknowledged. 

Where replies come to our care to be forwarded, five 
cents must be added to cost to cover postage, etc. 



YEAELY CONTEAOT EATES. 



100 words each insertion 



1 year... |30 00 

6 months 17 00 

3 months 10 00 

1 year 17 00 

6 months 10 00 

1 year 10 00 



MANUFACTURERS' AGENT WANTED. 



AN English firm who make a specialty of brass 
tubing, all kinds ; brass and copper sheets, 
German silver, rolled brass and wire, want an 
agent for Toronto and district. Address Box 209, 
Hardware and Metal, Toronto. . (tf) 



CLERK WANTED. 



HARDWARE Clerk wanted at once. Must be a 
good salesman and stock-keeper. Write, 
stating salary, to Boxall & Matthie, Lindsay, (10) 



SITUATIONS VACANT. 



FIRST-CLASS Machinists and boilermakers 
wanted ; at Pere Marquette new shops at St. 
Thomas, Ont., and Grand Rapids, Mich. W. L. 
Kellogg, master mechanic. 



w 



ANTED— Metal Spinner. Apply Hamilton 
Brass Manufacturing Co., Hamilton, Ont. 



BUSINESS CHANCES 



HARDWARE Business for sale in a live town in 
Western Ontario, doing a turn over of $14, 000. 
Stock and fixtures $8,000. Apply Box 211, Hard- 
ware AND Metal, Toronto. (3) 

THE LOCATORS — W. B. Herbert, general 
manager. The largest and oldest exclusive 
business brokers in the West. Address The 
Locators, 63 Merchants Bank Building, Winnipeg. 

HARDWARE, D. 51— One hundred miles from 
Winnipeg; twenty-five hundred stock; net 
profit one thousand. Good location, excellent buy. 
Seventeen hundred and fifty cash, balance easy. 
The Locators. 



HARDWARE— D. 48— In the Territories, clean 
stock of new goods ; three thousand ; annual 
turnover nine thousand, net profit of twenty per 
cent. This is an exceptional opportunity for bright 
young hardware man. Write at once. The Lo- 
cators. 



HARDWARE— D. 45— Stock about thirty-five 
hundred ; half cash, balance to suit buyer. In 
good town in Territories, four hundred miles from 
Winnipeg. The Locators. 

HARDWARE— D. 17.— About two hundred and 
fifty miles from Winnipeg •_ stock about forty- 
five hundred. Excellent stand in Ai town. Turn- 
over sixteen thousand ; stock is new and very 
desirable. The Locators. 

NEW BOOK— We are just preparing our new 
book of " Business Opportunities." Write 
so that you will get one before they all go. Ad- 
dress The Locators, 63 Merchants' Bank Building, 
Winnipeg. 



a big extension of the manufacturing end 

of their Dusiness. 

• • • 

The Winnipeg plumbers are holding 
their annual ball on the evening of St. 
Valentine's day. The city plumbers 
have been kept very busy by the burst- 
ing of pipes during the cold weather 
and by the demands for their services in 
the Assiniboine avenue district where 
the typhoid epidemic is thought to be 
Jae to defective plumbing. Building 
operations have been only partially sus- 
pended during the Winter and Winnipeg 

plumbers have had little rest. 

• • • 

The Munro Wire Works intend es- 
tablishing a branch factory in Winni- 
peg. 

• * * 

Wholesale business is apparently up 
to expectations. Price changes are not 
numerous, a decline in turpentine and 
an easier petroleum market being the 
principal features. 

Wire — Prices continue steady since 
the recent changes in annealed wire went 
into effect. Orders for future delivery 
are now being booked freely. We quote : 

Barbed wire, 100 lb $285 

Plain galvanized 6 to 8 3 39 

" 9350290 

Plain galvanized ..10- 3 50 

12 3 10 

13 3 20 

U 3 9° 

*5 4 45 

16 4 60 

Plain twist a 85 

Staples 3 35 

Oiled annealed wire , 10 2 96 

11 3 02 

la 3 10 

13 3 2° 

• 14 3 3° 

15 3 45 

Annfq'«i virpc (tirioiledl top. lma. 

Horseshoes — No new feature in horse- 
shoe market. Prices are steady. We 
quote : 

Horseshoes, iron, No. oto No 1 $4 55 

No. a and larger .... 4 30 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 4 80 

No. a and larger 4 55 

Steel, No. o to No. 1 470 

No. 2 and larger 4 45 

Horsenails— Prices are steady and 
trade is fairly active. We quote: 

Horsenails, No. 4— 1% in., list price o 48 

" 5—3 " ° 33 

" 6—254 " osl 

" 7— *X " ° 2 4 

" 8— 2H " OB 

" 9— 2$< " O 20 

" IO — 2fi " ° 2 ° 

" II— 2jf " O 20 

" 12— 1% " • O 20 

" 14— 3H " ° 2° 

Discounts on these prices are for " C " brand 
40, 10 and 7V4 per cent., for other brands 55 and 
60 per cent. Add 15c. per box. 

operations in the city having been car- 
ried on all Winter the demand in Win- 
nipeg has continued active. Indications 
point to an active trade this Spring. 
We quote discounts as follows: 
Screws, flat head, iron, bright 85 and 10 p.c. 

Round " " 80 p.c. 

Flat " brass 75 *«>d 10 p.c. 

Round" " 70 and 10 p.c. 

Coach 70 P-C- 

vvire and Cut Nails— An active mar- 
ket is expected this Spring as the out- 
look for building is very bright. City 
trade is still active as building opera- 

34 



tions have continued all Winter, 
are steady. We quote: 
Cut Nails— * Wire Nails- 
ad 1 in $4 00 1 in. 

3d Fin. i'A in.. 4 00 iH in. 

3d »K >n 3 65 *K 

4d 1 y, in 3 40 

§d iji in 3 40 

6d a in 3 30 

8d 2j< in 3 15 

lod 3 in 3 10 

aod 4 in 3 05 

god 4K in 3 00 

4°d s in 3 00 



Prices 



jod 5K in 3 00 

Sod 6 in ... . 



3 00 



iX 
itf 

a 

2* 

3 

3* 

4 

4* 

5 



4 CO 

4 00 
3«; 
3 4° 
3 40 
3 3° 
3 '5 
3 i° 
3 05 
3 °5 
3 00 
3 co 
3 co 

1 OO 



Screws — For the season of the year 
there is a good sorting trade. Building 

Nuts and Bolts— Trade continues fair- 
ly active. Discounts are still as follows : 

Bolts, carriage, H or smaller 60 and 5 p.o. 

" 7-16 and up 55 P-c. 

Bolts, machine, H and under 55 and 5 p.c. 

" 7-i6and over.. 55P-C. 

Bolts, tire 1 65 p.c. 

Bolt ends 55 p.c. 

Sleigh shoe bolts 65 and 10 p.c. 

Machine screws 70 p.c. 

Plough bolts 55 p.c. 

Square nuts, case lots 3c. discount. 

" " small lots z'Ac 

Hex " case lots 3c. 

" smaller lots 2Kc. 

Rivets — We quote discounts as fol- 
lows: 

Rivets, iron ,.60 and 10 p.c. 

29H 



Copper, No. 8. 

" No. r2 . 

Coil Chain — We quote again 
lows: 

Coil chain, 3-16 inch 

" Jf inch 

. " 5-16 inch 

H inch 

7-16 inch : 

H inch 

Mfinch 

" - y t inch 



'3 
fol- 



»3 15 

1 90 
1 60 

iSo° 



9-25 

7.25 

520 

, 4 60 

• • • • • 4-45 

4 30 

4« 

4-3° 

Shovels — The discount on spades and 
shovels continue 40 and 5 per cent. 
Trade is normal. 

Harvest Tools— The discount on list 
prices is 60 per cent. A few orders 
are already being booked. 

Axe Handles— Trade continues fairly 
active, repeat orders being' numerous at 
this time of year. We quote: 
Axe handles, turned, s. g. hickory, doz. . 

No. i 

No. a 

Octagon extra 

No. i 

Files— We again quote as follows. 

" Arcade " 70 and 10 p.c. 

" Black Diamond " 60 p.c. 

" Nicholson's " 62V4 p.c. 

Building Paper— City trade has been 
active all Winter and prospects point to 
an active country trade in the Spring. 
We quote: 

Anchor, plain 65c. 

" tarrtd 70c. 

Pure fibre, plain 67HC 

" " tarrod 80c. 

Ammunition, Etc.— We again quote: 

Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 

50 and 5 p.c. 

Dominion ,C. F. , pistol 30 p.c. 

" military 15 p.c. 

Ammunition, cartridges, American R.F. 33H p.c. 

C. F. pistol 5 p.c. 

C.F. military 10 p.c. advance. 

Loaded shells : 

Eley's and Kynoch's soft, 12 gauge 

black 15 00 

chilled, 12 gauge 1600 

soft, 10 gauge 1800 

chilled , 10 gauge 19 00 



January 28, 1905 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal. 



Shot , Ordinary, per ioo lb 6 35 

Chilled 6 75 

Powder, F.F., keg, Hamilton 475 

F.F.G., Dupont's 5 00 

Tinware, Etc.— We quote again as 
follows : 

1 inware, pressed, retinned 70 ana 10 p.c. 

" plain 75 and 2% p.c. 

" pieced 30 p.c. 

Japanned ware 37>4 p.c. 
Enamelled ware, white 45 p.c. 

Famous 50 p.c. 

Imperial 50 and 10 p.c. 

Cordage— The cordage market, is firm 
at the advance in sisal noted in last 
issue. We quote: 

K.upc,sisai, 7-10 uud larger, basis II 25 

Manila, 7-16 and larger, basis 1525 

Lathyarn 11 35 

Axes— Quotations are: 

A Acs, ciioj-i-Hig 5 6 75 to 12 00 

" double bitts 12 00 to 18 00 

Solder— Still quoted at 21c. 

Bluestone — As noted before, the price 
has recently been advanced to $5.75, an 
advance of 50 cents over former quo- 
tations. 

Iron and Steel— Prices continue as 
follows: 

bai ii ou ( basis ) s 50 

Swedish iron (basis) 4 75 

Sleigh shoe steel 3 65 

Spring steel £ 00 

Machinery steel 350 

Tool steel , Black Diamond , 100 lb 9 50 

Jessop 13 00 

Black Sheets— Prices are as follows: 

B-H.lv »llrc s, 10 lo 16 gauge, 100 11 ... . 3 50 

18 to 33 gauge 3 75 

24 gauge 3 90 

36 gauge 4 00 

28 gauge 4 10 

Galvanized Iron— We quote: 

Apuilo, id tjnug 4 00 

18 and 20 gauge 4 00 

as and 24 gauge 4 25 

36 gauge 4 50 

98 gauge 4 50 

30 gauge or 10K oz 4 75 

Queen's Head, 24 gauge 4 25 

26 gauge 4 50 

28 " 4 75 

xinplates — We quote as follows: 

TlUplalc, IC CllaIco«n, ^u a^o.uua .... 10 OO 

" IX " 13 00 

IXX " 1400 

Ingot Tin— Quoted at 35 cents. 
Canada Plates— A fairly active trade 
is reported at following prices: 

C i> ada p ia . , i -, > 11,101 ^ 3 25 

Canada plate, 20 x 28 3 5° 

Canada plate, full polished 4 00 

Sheet Zinc— Cask lots are quoted at 
$8.25 per 100 lbs., and broken lots at 
$8.75. 

Pig Lead— Quoted at $4.50 per 100 
lbs. 

Iron Pipe— Trade has been active dur- 
ing the cold weather. Prices continue 
as follows: 

Black iron pipe, V% inch 

H " 245 

H " 265 

H " 3 00 

Ya " 380 

1 " 5 5° 

iH " 7 45 

iK " 89; 

" a " 12 30 

Petroleum— "Silver Star," "Sun- 
light" and "Eocene" are quoted lower 
but no change has been made in the 



other brands mentioned. We quote as 
follows : 

Silver Star, per gal 21c. 

Sunlight " 22c. 

Eocene '" 24c. 

Pennoline " 26c. 

Crystal Spray " 25c- 

Silver Light 23c 

(In barrels f.o.b. Winnipeg.) 

Paints and Oils— Turpentine is quot- 
ed lower at 84c for barrels and 89c for 
less than barrel lots. However, this quo- 
tation is not general, some -houses still 
announcing the old figure, viz. 87c and 
92c. White lead is becoming firmer 
owing to the improved tone of the east- 
ern market. Trade is now rather quiet. 
We quote: 

White icad (pure) $S 00 to $5 50 

Bladder putty, in bbls o 02V4 

" in kegs o 02K 

Turpentine, pure, in barrels $ o 87 

Less than barrel lots o 92 

Linseed oil, raw o 55 

Boiled 058 

Window Glass— We again quote as 

follows : 

16-oz. O.G.. single, in 50-ft. boxes — 

16 to 25 united inches $ 2 25 

26 to 40 3.50 

16-oz. O.G., single, in 100-ft. cases — 

16 to 25 united inches 4.00 

26 to 40 4.25 

4« to 50 4.75 

51 to 60 5.25 

6i to 70 5.75 

21-oz. C.S., double, in 100-ft. cases— 

26 to 40 united inches 6.30 

41 to 50 7-35 

51 to 60 " 8.40 

61 to 70 9.45 

71 to 80 10.50 

8t to 85 11.55 

86 to 90 12.60 

91 to 95 14.70 

96 to 100 " 17-35 



THE TRAILS OF A HARDWARE 
DRUMMER. 

Waiting, waiting, only waiting, 
Till the other traveler goes, 

Till he gets that carload order 
For his hay forks, alxes, hoes. 

Waiting, waiting, now he's going, 
Yes, he surely must be through. 

No, he's going to tell a story, 
Which is anything but new. 

And the buyer smiles so sweetly, 
With a kind and gentle tact, 

Though he's heard that story often, 
Twice that very day, in fact!' 

Waiting, waiting, only waiting— 
Now at last the fellow's flown, 

And we seat ourselves serenely 
In the chair the salesmen own. 

And we quote our bottom prices 

In a most convincing tone, 
When an instant most momentous — 

Buyer's called to telephone. 

With return of busy buyer, 

Also comes another mail, 
Which, of course, he must look over 

And we wait as well as wail. 

And the buyer long peruses 
Over things we think might wait, 

While we sit and twist and think of 
Words and things we dare not state. 

Thus the traveler ever waiteth, s 
Winter, Springtime, Summer, Fall, 

And doth cultivate a patience 
That makes Job's seem very small. 



36 




ON TOP FOR 

40 YEARS 

and looks good for 
another term. 

One Dealer wanted 
for each town in the 

West. A good live pro- 
position for a live man. 
If there is no agency 
in your town, write 

for our Color Cards, 

etc., or if already handl- 
ing Elephant Paints, 
revise your special Col- 
or Card for 1905, and 

mail it to us. We are 
now ready for it. 



OUR 

Stock is complete. 

Quality the best. 

Prices are right. 



MERRICK, 

ANDERSON 

®> CO., 

WINNIPEG, - • MAN. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 28, 1905 



A PROSPEROUS BUSINESS. 

ANNUAL MEETING OF THE E. W. GILLETT 
COMPANY, LIMITED. 

THE fourth annual general meeting 
of E. W. Gillett Company, Limit- 
ed, was held in the company's 
offices, corner King and Duncan streets, 
Toronto, on Thursday, January 19, 
at 11 a.m. A large number of stock- 
holders from various parts of the Do- 
minion were present, and all were thor- 
oughly pleased with the very satisfac- 
tory financial statement presented by 
the management. Charles W. Gillett, 
president of the company, acted as 
chairman, and the utmost harmony pre- 
vailed. 

The minutes of last meeting were read 
by the secretary and adopted. The 
statement presented for the considera- 
tion of the stockholders, showing the 
result of the company's business for 
eight months ending Dec. 31, or the 
period since the fire, was an exception- 
ally good one. As our readers are aware 
this company's entire factory, including 
machinery, stock, etc., was totally con- 
sumed in the appalling conflagration 
which destroyed a large area of the 
wholesale and manufacturing district of 
Toronto oa the -night of April 19, 1904. 
Temporary offices and factory space 
were secured immediately after the fire, 
and on account of the foresight exercis- 
ed by the management of the business 
in having a duplicate set of machinery 
stored in an entirely separate building 
to provide for just such a contingency as 
that which occurred, the company was 
able to resume manufacturing operations 
with practically no interruption, and, 
besides, within a couple of days after 
the fire the icompletion of the purchase 
of their fine factory property, corner 
King and Duncan streets, was consum- 
mated. Notwithstanding the interrup- 
tion that the fire caused, 1904 proved to 
be the banner year for this company, as 
far as sales are concerned. This is true, 
not only in the business done since the 
company was incorporated, but for the 
entire period of 19 years that the goods 
have been manufactured in Canada. The 
fact of the fire not preventing the com- 
pany from paying dividends at regular 
periods is almost unprecedented, and a 
feature that caused a good deal of fav- 
orable comment. The attention of 
stockholders was directed to the fine 
record which the management has been 
able to show year after year in the fact 
of doing such a large business without 
loss in the way of bad debts, and in 
this respect a clean sheet was shown for 
1904. 

The prospects of the company are of 
the brightest, and owing to the thor- 
oughly efficient manner in which the 
business is conducted, stockholders are 



assured of most satisfactory returns, 
and, indeed, at this meeting were told 
that the rate of dividend from the first 
of the year would be increased. 

A motion was unanimously adopted 
expressing deep regret on account of the 
death of the late president of the com- 
pant, E. W. Gillett, which occurred last 
March. 

A pleasant feature of the stockholders' 
meeting was the fact of their showing 
appreciation of the unusuallv successful 
and difficult work bv the management in 
voting a handsome bonus to the general 
manager and treasurer, assistant general 
manager and the secretary, and, besides, 
passed a vote of thanks to all who had 
contributed to the success attained. 

D. Hoskins, chartered accountant, was 
appointed auditor, and the following 
Board of Directors were elected, viz.:— 
Chas. W. Gillett, John Firstbrook, H. 
C. Barker, M. A. Thomas, William 
Dobie. 

After adjournment of- the meeting the 
stockholders were entertained at lunch- 
eon in the building, the catering being 
looked after by the Harry Webb Com- 
pany, Limited. 

After luncheon a meeting of the Board 
of Directors was held, at which the fol- 
lowing officers for 1905 were elected, 
viz.: — 

Charles W. Gillett, president. 

William Dobie, general manager and 
treasurer. 

Geo. H. Macfarlane, assistant general 
manager. 

Geo. Hepburn, secretary. 

(Advt.). 



PERSONAL AND TRADE NOTES. 

Mr. Jos. A. Fuller, representing the 
Standard Tool Co., of Cleveland, is call- 
ing on the Canadian trade. 

Mr. J. A. Lockerby, a plumber of 
Edmonton, was a visitor to the whole- 
sale supply trade of Toronto this week. 

Hon. A. G. Blair, director of the To- 
ronto Roller Bearing Co., is a guest at 
the King Edward hotel, Toronto, this 
week. 

Mr. Lew. J. Avery, representing the 
Wolverine Brass Works, of Grand Rap- 
ids, Mich., is calling on the Canadian 
trade. 

Mr. W. S. Burnett is in Toronto this 
week , where he came from Milwaukee to 
interest parties in a new telegraphic in- 
strument. 

An order winding up the Kramer-Ir- 
win Asphalt & Cement Paving Company, 
Hamilton, has been granted by Judge 
MacMahon. 

E. C. Atkins & Co., saw and tool manu- 
facturers, have moved their Toronto 
office from 30 Front street east to 56 
King street east. 

Mr. R. I. Henderson, manager of the 
Henderson Roller Bearing Manufactur- 
ing Company, Limited, Toronto, left for 
Winnipeg Jan. 24. 

A banquet was held at New Toronto, 
on January 27, by the employes of the 

36 



Purdy, Mansell &i Co., plumbers, steam- 
fitters, of Toronto. 

Mr. Leo Frankel, of Frankel Bros., 
Toronto, has just returned from a tour 
of the brass manufacturers situated in 
the Eastern States. 

McDowell, Stocker & Co., of Chicago, 
have purchased the plant and assets of 
the Dominion Brass Works, Port Col- 
borne. The sum paid was $27,000. 

Mr. W. F. Slomer, of Springfield, Vt., 
has just installed a new Fellows' gear 
shaper in the automobile plant of the 
Packard Electric Co., St. Catharines. 

Mr. W. T. Whittlesey, representing 
John R. Kein, manufacturer of hardware 
and metal specialties, Buffalo, N.Y , is 
visiting the Montreal trade at present. 

Mr. C. D. Watson, of the Roman 
Stone Company, Toronto, has returned 
from Indianapolis, where he attended 
the National Cement Users' Associa- 
tion. 

Mr. Chas. D. Edwards, who founded, 
about forty years ago in Montreal, the 
firm of Kershaw & Edwards, safemak- 
ers, died on January 16, at Stoughton, 
Mass. 

Enlargements to plant and install- 
ments of machinery have at last been 
completed and the Burton Saw Company 
of Vancouver are once more in a posi- 
tion to ship orders. 

Mr. Frank McBride, representing the 
Good Mfg. Co., manufacturers of brass 
and rubber goods, New York, was a vis- 
itor in Toronto this week, calling on 
the local supply houses. 

Arrangements are being made by the 
Rubber Goods Manufacturing Company, 
of New York, to establish a branch 
plant at Windsor to manufacture goods 
for the Canadian market. 

The large, seven-storey new building 
of Emmerson & Fisher, wholesale hard- 
ware merchants, of St. John, N.B., is 
nearing completion and the company are 
making preparations to remove their 

Mr. A. D. MacArthur, of the A. D. 
Mac Arthur & Co., of Toronto, agent for 
the Standard Tdeal Sanitary Co., and 
The McLaren Belting Co., of Toronto 
and Montreal, is in Montreal this week 
on business. 

The Metal and Hardware Association 
of the Board of Trade, Montreal, held 
their annual dinner on Friday evening, 
Jan. 20. There was a large attendance 
of members present, and an enjoyable 
evening was spent. 

A petition has been filed in the Su- 
preme Court for a winding-up order to 
place the Canada Hardware Company of 
Montreal in liquidation. It is under- 
stood that the company has decided to 
go into voluntary liquidation. 

Mr. J. B. Henderson, manager of the 
Penman Company, died at his residence, 
Banfield street, Sunday evening. Mr. 
Henderson has been in poor health for a 
couple of years and last year he and 
Mrs. Henderson took a continental trip 
extending over several months, in the 
hope that he might recover his former 
vigor, but since his return he has not 
been able to resume his work. 



A VALUABLE INVENTION. 

A new machine has been invented by 
J. G. Mills, Toronto, for excavating 
trenches, sewers, drains, etc. The new 
machine will excavate at the rate of 
320 cubifC yards of earth each day. For 
particulars write to Robert Taggart, 
No. 265 Church street, Toronto. 



January 28, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



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37 



Hardware and Metal. 



ELECTRICAL GOODS AND SUPPLIES 



January 28, 1905 



ELECTRICAL 



New Ore Finder. 

ANEW electrical, ore finder has re- 
cently been patented which has 
aroused considerable interest in 
England where it has been successfully 
operated. It is said that by the use of 
this device, the expert listener can judge 
with surprising accuracy how deep the 
lode is, and in which direction it runs. 
The apparatus, which is the joint in- 
vention of aii American and an English- 
man, is extremely ingenious, and in the 
hands of experts, admits of the most 
delicate manipulation. The essential 
principle of its working is that it emits 
not a continuous current, but a series of 
little, short, sharp impulses. These 
will go forward in all directions, and 
when they meet with quartz rock or 
metallic lodes, the waves are so modi- 
fied that the listener can form a judg- 
ment where the ore bodies causing the 
variation of the sound are situated. In 
a recent experiment, the apparatus in- 
dicated the position of the deposits so 
accurately that when the company own- 
ing the land put down a bore, hematite 
was found at about the depth adjudged. 
In a similar way, with variously attun- 
ed apparatus, gold has been located in 
Alaska and Siberia, lead in Wales, cop- 



per in Cornwall, etc. The discovery, 
which calls to mind the divining rod of 
ancient superstition, is likely to prove 
of great importance to mining interests. 

Marconi Speaks of Wireless Telegraphy. 

THE following was recently given 
out as an expression of opinion 
by William Marconi regarding 
prospects for wireless in the near 
future : " We should have our trans- 
atlantic service from Glace Bay, Nova 
Scotia, to Poldhu, England, operating 
on a commercial basis about the first of 
this month. At the present time our 
instruments are installed on 60 ocean- 
going vessels, but of these only two 
have the long-distance instruments that 
operate up to 2,300 and 2,400 miles. 
The other long-distance sets of instru- 
ments will shortly be installed. 

"So far wc have paid little attention 
to the land service, although we are op- 
erating for the English navy depart- 
ment a service from England to Gibral- 
tar, the messages passing over a great- 
er part of Spain. Something may also 
be done with land service in Canada*for 
the Dominion Government. During the 
balance of this year our time will be 
quite fully occupied with improvements 
in our Glace Bay station, and not until 
we are perfectly sure of our ability to 
maintain this service effectively and con- 



tinuously on a commercial scale will it 
be thrown open to the public." 

Electric Treatment of Flour. 
Experiments made in Paris prove that 
electric treatment, while successfully 
turning flour whiter, injures it. Under 
similar conditions, flour subjected to 
electric treatment was much whiter in 
color than flour treated in the ordinary 
way. Its taste and odor, however, were 
far inferior to those of flour treated by 
the ordinary method. The amount of 
phosphorus was the same in both, but 
the quantities of fattv and acid sub- 
stances varied largely. Thus, in flour 
treated by electricity the fatty sub- 
stances proved rancid, glutinous and of 
a less yellowish color, and instead of re- 
taining their usual aromatic, yellow 
state, became oxidized and partly con- 
verted into white sebacic, acid which 
could be dissolved in alcohol. The 
glutinous substances were discolored and 
changed. 

Haines & Company of New York, who 
arc to build the Hamilton, Ancaster 
and Brantford electric railway, have 
opened up offices in Hamilton, and are 
making preparations to commence work 
in the Spring. 




A poor chain is no better than a bad egg. 



URNE! 

7 190 

Edge's Best Best Crane Chain is a good chain. Ct4^ Ji*rt^ * 

We sell it for use in places where severe usage is given chains, where the st &fn^A 
is sudden and the load heavy. 

Suitable for cranes, hoisting blocks, decking chains, anchors, contractors, miners. 




In stock : 



5 


3 


7 


1 


9 


3 


7 


L6 


8 


16 


2 


16 


4 


8 



,i il- 
ly 't ln - 



Frothingham & Workman, Limited 

Wholesale 
Hardware and Iron Merchants, 

Montreal, Canada. 
For 96 years sellers of hardware. 



38 



January 28, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Your Customers 

the farmers are looking for a strong, serviceable and 
durable Fence at a reasonable cost. You can supply 
t to them in the 

IDEAL 




A GOOD SELLER 

The IDEAL is made of No. 9 Hard Steel Galvanized 
Wire throughout, and has many distinctive features which 
make it absolutely the best fence ever produced. 

It pays dealers to handle fencing that gives beat value 
obtainable. Write for our catalogue of Fencing and Gates, 
showing styles for every purpose. 

COILED-SPRING WIRE 

and other Fence Wire unexcelled in quality, shipped 
promptly. 

The McGregor- Banwell Fence Co., Limited, 

WALKERVILLE, ONT. 
Merrick, Andarson & Co., Winnipeg, Man. 

Sole agents for Man. and N.W.T. 




Gas Sullies 




Gas Pillars 

$1.25 pej- gross. 



p&aaaaaaoaaoaEaaasassssDl 
f£K£55SEEB5SSS53SSS5S55S£5S$j 



Gas Brackets 

No. 100, Stiff Bracket - - - 18c. 

No. 104, Single Swing Bracket - 29c. 

No. 105. Double " " - 48c. 




Aluminum 

Gas Tips 

$3.00 per gross. 

Lava Gas Tips 

$1.10 per gross. 



These Prices Net to the Trade Only. 
TOR EVERYTHING ELECTRICAL WRITE TO miuu 



The 



Sayer Electric Co'y, montkeaT 



Rd. JOHNSON, GLAPHAM & MORRIS, LTD , MANCHESTER, ENCLAND 

Before you place your orders for GALVANIZED, CORRUGATED AND DEAD FLAT 
SHEETS, CANADA AND STOVE PLATES, COKE AND CHARCOAL TIN 
PLATES, BAR, HOOP AND SHEET IRON OR WIRE RODS, ask us for quotations. 

Special and prompt attention to Canadian orders. 
Cable Ad.: " Metallicus, Manchester." Codes: Lieberc, A. B.C. 425th, Al and Private Codes. 



PAGE LAWN FENCE 



Indestructible, Handsome, Perfect. Only 20 cents per running foot. 
Supplied by us or local dealer. 



206 



THE PAGE WIRE FENCE CO. LIMITED, Walkerville, Toronto, Montreal Winnipeg, St. John. 



Our 

ELECTRICAL 




ill Pill "•''■• 

^mrmmmm' 




No. 52749,-Table Standard, polished 
brasi, or Italian bronze finish. 



FITTINGS 



Cannot be equalled for 
St>le, Beauty of Design 
and Finish. 

Complete Catalogue of 
Fittings, Glassware, Bells, 
Telephones, etc., mailed 
free to the Trade, with 
terms, on application. 



FALK, 
STADELMANN 

& CO., LIMITED 

83, 85 and 87 

Farringdon Road, 
LONDON, E.C. 



About 



-"7 , GI5 i T ^i :Er ' 

SAJONIC 

T »*DE MAR* 



Brass Goods 




39 



We would like you to know 
more about our lines of 

CURTAIN RINGS 

CURTAIN HOOKS 

MILL BAND 
FASTENERS 

SAIL EYELETS 

ETC., ETC 

Drop a line for list and quota- 
tions to our Canadian Agent, 



f. P. ROGER, Toronto 

J. Nicklin & Co. 

Gt. Charles St. BIRMINGHAM, E1SG. 



Hardware and Metal. 



January 28, 1905 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Tests for White Lead. 

IN answer to an enquiry regarding 
tests for white lead, J. C. Smith 
writes the following letter in the 
Oil and Colorman's Journal: 

"Speaking for myself, and after hav- 
ing had occasion to examine many hun- 
dred samples of white lead of divers 
makes and qualities, I should not care 
to rely solely on the results of this one 
test in forming an opinion on the rela- 
tive merits of rival manufacturers' pro- 
ducts. The 'goodness' or 'badness' of 
white lead for paint-making (and in the 
absence of information to the contrary 
I am justified in assuming that the 
white lead in question was for this pur- 
pose) does not depend on one property 
or quality, but 'on the sum of a number 
of properties, and no single test can be 
relied upon as an infallible guide to in- 
trinsic quality. Briefly, the staining 
test described by your correspondent re- 
solves itself into a comparison of the 
relative size of the particles in the 
various samples, and as it is a well- 
known fact that the smaller the mean 
size of the particles composing a pig- 
ment the better the opacity and paint- 
forming properties of the pigment, the 
test may be regarded as a useful guide 
to quality.- From this poiot of view, 
that is the physical standpoint, the 
staining test is perhaps the simplest, 
most direct and most reliable of the 
tests for white lead. 

PASSES STAINING TEST. 

"It is quite possible, however, to find 
a white lead that ■ passes the staining 
test with flying colors, and yet yields 
an unsatisfactory paint when ground in 
oil, the reason being that the chemical, 
no less than , the physical, properties of 
the sample have to be considered before 
a reliable judgment can be arrived at as 
to the real merits of the material. For 
rough and ready commercial tests elab- 
orate chemical analysis is seldom re- 
quired. A simple buying test practically 
resolves itself into a question of proving 
the absence of deleterious substances. 
We may dismiss the question of bare- 
faced and clumsy adulteration with 
barytes, Paris white, or china clay, 
which is unthinkable in connection with 
samples from a reputable house. What, 



then, is the particular chemical point to 
which special attention should be direct- 
ed? The practical handling of a large 
number of samples over a period of a 
good many years has convinced, me .that 
it is the presence of acetate of lead 
that should in every case be looked for, 
for the reason that even a slight trace 
of this salt renders white lead, which 
in so far as its physical properties are 
concerned may be of superior excellence, 
entirely unfit to grind into paint with 
linseed oil. White lead (containing 
acetate always gives an acid reaction, be- 
cause acetate of lead is easily decom- 
posed into basic acetate and free aceti,c 
acid. 

CARRYING OUT TEST. 

"My own experience, therefore, leads 
me to suggest that alongside the useful 
and easily-applied staining-power test 



(which I prefer to call a test for fine- 
ness of particles) buyers of white lead 
should apply the equally simple and 
(from the paint-makiog point of view) 
equally important test to determine 
freedom from free acid, i.e., aceta,te of 
lead. The test may be carried out 
thus:— Take a perfectly clean porcelain 
basin, and place in it a little distilled 
water. Test with a piece o'f blue litmus 
paper to prove that there is no acid re- 
action. Place in the basin about five 
grammes of the sample of white lead, 
and warm the whole gently over a small 
flame. Again test with blue litmus pa- 
per. The presence of the smallest trace 
of acid will be detected by the reddening 
of the litmus, and in many cases the 
odor of acetic acid can be distinctly per- 
ceived. A thoroughly well-washed and 
highly-finished white lead will always 
emerge successfully from this test." 



WHAT OTHERS SAY 
ABOUT HOLLYWOOD 




A leading hardware firm wrote t»s : 

" It is now four years since we first 
took hold of the brand, and we have 
had in all that time nothing but com- 
mendation of the quality." 



HOLLYWOOD PAINTS, READY-MIXED AND FLOOR, 
WEAR ON THE JOB, NOT OFF IT 



m Imperial Varnish 

and Color Co., Limited 

TORONTO 



40 



January 28, 1905 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware and Metal. 



TO THE VARNISH BUYER 

the most serious considerations are quality, reliability and 
uniformity, and these qualifications are of special importance to 
the dealer who is trying to build up a permanent varnish trade. 

Berry Brothers' label or brand may be safely relied upon as 
ensuring the above conditions. 

Our varnishes are the safest goods to handle and the surest and 
most reliable goods to use. 

BERRY BROTHERS, Limited 

VARNISH MANUFACTURERS 

WALftERVILLE, ONT. 

Write for our 100 page illustrated catalogue. Every dealer should have a copy for reference. 



McArthur. Corneille & Co. 



MONTREAL 



Glue and Gelatine 



An extensive assortment, to suit all requirements. 
WILL BE PLEASED TO SUBMIT SAMPLES ANO PRICES 



MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS OF . 



^ 



White Lead, Oils and Colors, 
Prepared Paints, Window 
Glass, Varnishes, Etc. 



SELLING AGENTS IN CANADA 



For the GENUINE 

Imperial French Green 

of JOHN LUCAS A CO., 

PHILADELPHIA. 



And CELEBRATED 

English Varnishes 

of CHAS. TURNER ft SON, 
LONDON. 



Please mention Hardware and Metal when writing. 




Our whole factory time and energy is given to the 
manufacture of 

REFRIGERATORS 
SCREEN DOORS and 
WINDOW SCREENS 

Therefore we are in a position to supply the best 

goods at the lowest price. 

Our Catalogue explains the details. 

1M Sanderson-Harold Co. 

Limited 
PARIS, ONT. 



41 



Hardware and Metal. 



January 28, 1905 




M 



Quebec. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
232 McGill street, 

Montreal. Jan. 27. 1905. 

XXED paints and manufactured 
goods are meeting' with big sales, 
in unison with the bright pros- 
pects for the coining season. The lin- 
seed oil market in Canada is weak, and 
mills here are out of the competition. 
In England the prospects of a large im- 
portation of seed has likewise unsettled 
matters. Although no change is quoted 
in price, for bulk orders, present prices 
will be discounted one or two cents a 
gallon. Turpentine is easy, but in a 
critical condition though prices remain 
as before. The lead market is firm, 
witli the prospect of an early advance. 

Spring trade has ooened up earlier 
this year than is customary and enough 
business has already been done in the 
paint and oil trade to warrant the belief 
in an exceptional year. 

Canadian Paris Green— Government 
Standard pure Canadian Paris green, 
has advanced 2c. per lb. and is quoted: 
barrels, 15 l-4c; arsenic kegs, 15c; 50 
and 100 lb. drums, 16c; 25 lb. drums, 
16 l-2c; one pound packages 17c; half- 
pound packages, 19c; one pound tins, 
18c. Terms 2 per cent, discount for 
cash in 30 days or 90 days net. 

English Paris Green— Pure English 
Paris green, petroleum barrels, 15 l-4c; 
arsenic kegs, 15 l-2c; 50 and 100 lb. 
drums, 16c; 25-lb. drums, 16 l-2c; one 
pound paper boxes, 17c; one pound tins, 
18c; one-half pound paper boxes, 19c; 
one half-pound tins, 20c. Terms, 2 per 
cent, off thirty days, or ninety days net 
from date of shipment. 



Turpentine— Single barrels, 78c per 
gallon; 2 to 4 barrels, 77c per gallon. 
For smaller quantities than barrels 5c 
extra per gallon is charged. Standard 
gallon is 8.6 lbs. The above prices are 
net thirty days, for longer terms prices 
are higher. 

Linseed Oil— K aw, 1 to 4 barrels, 44c; 
5 to 9 barrels, 43c; boiled, 1 to 4 bar- 
rels, 47c; 5 to 9 barrels 46c; delivered 
in Ontario between Montreal and Osha- 
wa at 2c per gallon in advance. 

Ground White Lead— Best brands Gov- 
ernment standards, $4.60 to $4.75; No. 
1, $4.35 to $4.50; No. 2, $4.30 to $4.25; 
No. 3, $3,771-2 to $3,871-2; No. 4, 
$3.40 to $3.50, all f.o.b. Montreal. 

Dry White Lead— $4.50 in casks, and 
in kegs, $4.75. 

Dry White Zinc— Pure dry in casks, 
7c, in 100 lb kegs, 71-2c: No. 1 zinc, in 
casks, 6c, in 100 lb kegs, 61 -2c. 

White Zinc (ground in oil)— Pure, 
25-lb irons, 71-4c; No. 1, 61-4c; No. 2, 
5 l-4c. 

i'utty— Bulk in barrels, $1.50; in 25- 
lb irons, loose, $1.80; in tins, $1.90; 
bladdered putty in barrels, $1.75. 

Orange Mineral— Casks, 71-4c; 100-1 b 
kees, 71-2c; smaller quantities, 8 l-2c. 

Red Lead — Cenuine red lead in casks, 
$4.50 in 100-lb kees, $4.75; in less 
quantities at the rate of $5.75 per 100 
lbs: No. 1 red lead, casks, $4.25: kegs, 
$4.75, and smaller quantities. $5.50. 

Shellac Varnish— Pure white, $2.80 
to $3; pure orange, $2.75 to $2.85; No. 
1 orange, $2.45 to $2.60. 

Mixed Paints— $1.20 to $1.40 per 
gallon. 

Castor Oil— 8 3-4 to 91-4c in whole- 
sale lots, and l-2c additional for small 
lots. 



Litharge— Ground, in casks, 5c; in 
less quantities, 5 3-4c; flake litharge, 
casks, $5.50; smaller quantities, $6 per 
100 lbs. 

Ontario. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
■ 10 Front Street Eait. 

Toronto. Jan 27. 1 90S 

LINSEED oil has advanced 1 cent 
and the supposition is that old 
stocks arc exhausted and the de- 
mand is beginning to increase. Tur- 
pentine is firmer and it is reported that 
slight advances have occurred at the 
manufacturing points. These condi- 
tions may result in an advance on the 
local market within a lew days. We 
believe that turpentine manufacturers 
and linseed oil dealers are tempted to 
advance the price still more because 
of the fact that paint manufacturers 
and consumers are compelled to order 
larger ouantities. 

The glass situation continues un- 
changed. Local wholesale dealers are 
all refusing to push trade and no sales 
are booked unless the customer makes 
an unsolicited inquiry. Some wholesale 
dealers arc advising their customers not 
to purchase any import orders this 
Spring as (lie delivery and transporta- 
tion will be very unsatisfactory. Pot- 
tery manufacturers are sending in better 
orders for red lead. Trade throughout 
the country has been unsettled during 
the week on account of the elections and 
from the fact that the majority of travel- 
ers returned to their homes in order bo 
be in n condition to use their franchise. 
Travelers report that everywhere mer- 
chants are laying in a stock-in-trade far 
in excess of former years, and every 
hardware merchant believes that this 
year's sale of ready mixed paints will 
excel that of former years. 

White Lead — Ex-Toronto, pure white 
lead. $4.75; No. 1, $4,371-2: No. 2, $4 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their ad- 
vertisement in Hardware and Metal. 

IMPORTERS, ATTEINTIOIN 

Save money by (-onsigning your importations direct to des- 
tination and pay through freight charges only. Have your 
goods cleared and distributed by 

Turnbull & Henderson 

Customs Brokers, Forwarding and Distributing Agents, 
Vancouver, B. O. Satisfactory service guaranteed. 



GENUINE 

PRATTS ASTRAL 
LAMIP OIL 



Sold in all countries and recognized as the 
highest grade oil manufactured. 

WHOLESALE ONLY. 

THE QUEEN CITY OIL COMPANY, Limited 
TORONTO. ONT. 



IT STIMULATES A DEALER 

TO PUSH HI8 BUSINESS, if lie has the satisfaction or feeling that he has bought wisely. 
Whether he has or not is evidenced by what is called for most in any particular line. 
If in the wall-coating line, he would not have to be a very close observer to realize that the demand 
is for CHURCH'S COLD WATER 

ALABASTINE 

a \vall-coating made from a cement base, that will not rub or scale off. 

ALABASTINE is made in Paris, Canada, by Caradian labor, and from rock taken out of 

Canadian mines. It is TIME TBIED, and TIME TESTED. 

ALABASTINE possesses every qualification to help establish and maintain a good trade. The 

fine, up-to-date advertising matter we furnish, and the thousands of dollars expended annually in 

advertising, are potent factors worthy of the consideration of any dealer in business to stay and to 

make money. 

ALABASTINE is in demand all the time, but principally in the spring. Have you ordered 

yet ? " Do it Now." For sale by bbers everywhere, and by 

The Alabastine Co., Limited, Paris, Ont. 



42. 



January 28, 1905 



PAINT. OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware and Metal. 



Struggling wit t h he Paint Problem ? 

Don't decide too soon. Hear what we have to say about 

NEW ERA Prepared Paints 

Let us refer you to some of our agents, and hear from them direct the 
story we want you to know. 

Drop us a line of inquiry and we shall be only too glad to reply. 

STANDARD PAINT & VARNISH CO., Limited, W'" 08 . .?;.,. 




ART GLASS 

UNEXCELLED 
MEMORIAL WINDOWS. 

H. E. St, George, London, Ont. 


McCaskill, DougaJI & Co. 

Manufacturers RAILWAY, CARRIAGE AND BOAT VARNISHES. 

** HIGH-GRADE FURNITURE and HOUSE VARNISHES 

MONTREAL. 






GLUES AGAIN «f™« 

lil UPS are of snrh luph rlass 

and are so suitable for Export that we would like to quote you. Export trade 
in this line is growing rapidly, and we pack in casks or cases as preferred. 
Quality unrivalled. 

GROVE CHEMICAL CO., LTD., Appley Bridge, Lancashire, Eng 


No. 3, $3,621-2; No. 4, $3.35 in pack- 
ages of 25 lbs and upwards; l-2c per lb 
extra will be changed for 121-2 lb 
packages; genuine dry white lead, in 
casks, $4.25. 

Red Lead — Genuine in casks of 560 
lbs, $4.25; ditto, in kegs of 100 lbs, 
$4.50; No. 1, in casks of 500 lbs, $3.75 




to $4: ditto in«kegs of 100 lbs, $4.25. 




White Zinc— Genuine French V.M., 
in casks, $6 to $6.25; Lehigh, in casks, 
$6 to $6.25. 

Shingle Stain In 5 °'allon lots 75 to 


We Have the Glass You Want 


80c. per gallon. 

Paris White— 90c to $1 per 100 lbs. 

"Whiting— 60 to 65c per 100 lbs; Gild 
ers' whiting, 75c. 

Shellac— Pure orange in barrels, 
$2.75 to $3; white, $2~.85 to $3.10 per 
barrel; No. 1 (orange), $2.25. 

Linseed Oil — Our quotation is: Raw, 
1 to 4 barrels, 45c; boiled, 48c; 5 to 
barrels, raw, 44c; boiled, 47c, Toronto. 


— — T HE PRICE IS RIGHT . — — 

Our Distributing Centres keep down your freight charges and give a speedy delivery 


The Consolidated Plate Glass Co., of Canada, Limited 

TORONTO MONTREAL LONDON 
OTTAWA WINNIPEG 








A Few 

Minutes 

If 



will enable 
you to find 
out what you 
need to com- 
plete your 
stock of 
Island City- 
Paints >J» ^» 
Time is 
money in 
this case. 



X . LJ» L/OL/S CQ* CO., Montreal j& Toronto j& Vancouver 



Hardware and Metal. 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



January 28, 1905 




"We are gratified to be 
able to report that your 
COPPER PAINT has been 
giving very excellent satis- 
faction. We trust that you 
will continue to supply the 
same good quality, as this 
item is one where, like the 
pudding, the proof is in the 
eating. Heretofore we have 
been selling it largely for 
small boats, but are now 
getting captains of larger 
vessels persuaded to take it. 
To-day we heard from a cap- 
tain who put it on last year 
and who has just come off 
the slip after repainting. He 
had used American paint for 
fifteen years till last year, 
and reports that the bottom 
of the vessel was never in 
better order and he is great- 
ly pleased with the Canada 
Paint Company's paint." 

FOR 

COPPER PAINT 

address: 

The 

Canada 
Paint 

Limited 
MONTREAL or TORONTO 



Hamilton, London, EJora iind Guelph, 
net 30 days. Advance of 2c for deliv- 
ery to outside points. 

xurpentine— Single bbls 78c; 2 to 4 
obis, 77c; 5 bbls and over 76c, f.o.b. 
point of shipment, net 30 days. For less 
quantities than barrels, 5c per gallon 
extra will be added, and for 5 gallon 
packages, 50c, and 10 gallon packages 
80c will be charged. 

Glues— Broken sheet, in 200 lb. bbls, 
S to 8 l-2c per lb ; cabinet glue, in 
bbls, 111-2 to> 12c; emery glue," in 
bbls, 17c; bookbinders', ground, 101-2c; 
finest American white, 19c: No. 1 Am- 
erican white, 15c per lb. 

Putty— Ordinary, bladders in barrels, 
$1.65 to $1.75; pure linseed oil, $2 to 
$2.10; bulk in barrels, $1.50; pure, 
$1.95 to $2; 100 lb kegs 25c extra. 

Plaster Paris— New Brunswick, $2 
per barrel. 

Liquid Paints— Pure, $1.20 to $1.35 
per gallon; No. 1, $1.10 per gallon. 

Barn Paints— 60 to 70c per gallon. 

Bridge Paints— 75c to $1. 



are still running and some glass is still 
coming to Canada. We quote as follows: 
inrst break, fifty feet, $1.70; second 
break, $1.80; first break, 100 feet, $3.25; 
second break, 100 feet, $3.45; third 
break, 100 feet $4; fourth break, 100 
feet, $4.25; fifth break,^ 100 feet, $4.50; 
sixth break, 100 feet, $5; seventh break, 
100 feet, $5.50; and eighth break, 100 
feet, $6 ; Diamond star, or double thick, 
first break 50 feet, $2.30; second break 
50 feet, $2.50; first break, 100 feet) 
$4.40: second do., $4.S0; third do., $5.75; 
fourth do., $6.50; fifth do., $7.50; sixth 
do., $8, and seventh do., $9. Double 
thick, first break, 50 feet, $3.45; second 
do., $3.75; first break 100 feet, $6.75; 
second do., $7.25: flvird do., $8.75; fourth 
do., $10; fifth do., $11.50; sixth do., 
$12.50; seventh do., $14; eighth do., 
$16.50; ninth do., $18: tenth do., $20; 
eleventh do., $24, and twelfth do., 
$28.50. 

The discount from diamond glass is 
15 per cent, and from double thick is 
er cent. Terms four months, 




RETURR*E*f>er cent, discount 30 days. 

28 190 y — 

p^si/w*^ Petroleum. 

Refined — A better class of business is 
*~" reported this week. Larger orders are 
arriving more frequently. Prices are 
•C easier although no chanse is apparent 
as yet. Quotations are: Water white, 
17c; Canadian prime white, 15 to 15 l-2c: 
American water white, 17 1-2 to 19c ex 
warehouse. • 

Crude— Prices continue unchanged . 
We quote: Pennsylvania, $1.42; Corn- 
ing, $1.09; Newcastle, $1.34; North 
Lima, 95c; Tiona, $1.57; South Lima, 
90c; Somerset, 83c; Indiana, 90c: Can- 
adian, $1.3S. 



Mr. Alex. Ramsay. 

Castor Oil— English, in cases, 8 1-2 to 
9c per lb and 10c for single tins. 

Glass — See current quotations at the 
end of this issue. 



Window Glass. 

MONTREAL. 

No new developments have arisen in 
the past week in connection with the 
glass trade in Canada, and matters have 
apparently settled themselves as far as 
any anticipated change is concerned. 
When the strike in "Belgium was started; 
it was expected that it would end Janu- 
ary 1, but now no settlement is expected 
before May 1. The blowers are willing 
to go back to work, but the cutters are 
not. The coal strike in Germany is 
anticipated to spread to Belgium, and 
this may have some direct bearing on 
the glass industry, as a few factories 



MR. ALEX. RAMSAY. 

AN excellent likeness of Mr. Alex. 
Ramsay, the new representative 
of the oil, paint, soap, chemical 
and allied trades on the Council of the 
Montreal Board of Trade, is presented 
hei-ewith. Mr. Ramsay is senior member 
of the firm of A. Ramsay & Son Com- 
pany, which has been in existence in 
Montreal since 1842. He is a prominent 
figure in Montreal business circles and 
his name is a familiar one to the trade 
throughout Canada. He succeeds Mr. 
J. T. Wilson on the Council of the Board 
of Trade. 



30,000 RIFLES A YEAR. 

The new rifle factory of the Govern- 
ment of India, to be built at Ishpui, 
will be able to turn out close upon 30,- 
000 rifles a year and to manufacture all 
the component parts and do all kinds of 
repairs. One of the first purposes of the 
factory, it is said, will be to realize the 
ambition of the Indian Government to 
have a reserve of 300,000. 



January 28, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



PURE MANILA ROPE, 

Highest Quality Made, 

BRITISH MANILA, 
SISAL ROPE, 

Pure Sisal, 

LATH YARN, 

BINDER TWINE 

New twine in flat packs of every description. 

Lowest Prices and Highest Quality. 



Wire, Write or 'Phone 

Canadian Cordage & Mfg. Co. 



Loner Distance 'Phone 162. 

PETERBDROUGH, ONTARIO, CANADA 



LIMITED 



The latest and finest machinery is operated 
in this factory and although not the largest, it is 
the finest mill of its size in the world. 



^imimi&bimis!rA%sfm<% 




farjmmwjsswzrmw^ 



AS AN INVESTMENT 



BY TENANTS 



MAXimum LIGHT 




demonstrates its economy. It earns 20 to 30 per Cent, by reduction in artificial 
light bill. It furthermore promotes more efficient work from employees. 

MAXimum LIGHT GLASS is a fo ™ of 7 indow * la f l s s ™ n ™ c *"y £" 

ranged so as to gather the light from the 
sky, project and diffuse the natural daylight into all. parts of dark and useless apartments 
and spaces. 

CANADIAN REPRESENTATIVES. 

HOBBS MANUFACTURING CO., Limited, LONDON, ONTARIO 

GLASS IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS. 
SEND FOR BOOKLET. 



45 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 28, 1905 



'*% ;l 






ComeOut 



OF THE 



DARK! 



Bring your "ads'* 
witH you. 

ILLUSTRATE ! ! 

By doing so you illumine 
and release from obscurity 
many a cheerless "type ad" 
that is suffering for the want 
of a little pictorial light. 

We furnish the kind of pic- 
tures that give to your "ads" 
a bright and smiling counte- 
nance. A cheerful face gains 
favor every time. 

Estimates on all and every 
style of design cordially fur- 
nished. 



ART DEPARTMENT 

MacUAN PUBLISHING CO. 



Montreal. 



LIMITED 

Toronto. Winnipeg, 





i^-^SSES 




gLECTRICITY SIMPLIFIED 




5LQANE 




By Prof. T. O'Connor Sloane. 

This work is the simplest ever published on the subject of Electricity, and 
does something not hitherto accomplished. The object of "Electricity Simpli- 
fied " is to make the subject as plain as possible, and to show what the modern 
conception of electricity is ; to show how two plates of different metals immersed 
in acid can send a message around the globe ; to explain how a bundle of copper 
wire rotated by a steam engine can be the agent in lighting our streets ; co tell 
what the volt, ohm. and ampere are, and what high and low tension mean , and 
to answer the questions that perpetually arise in the mind in this age of electricity 

158 Pages. Fully Illustrated. - - Price, $■ 00. 

THE MacLBAK PUB. CO., - TORONTO 








The Sarnla Hub, Spoke and 
Bent Goods Mfg. Co. 

Samia, Ontario. 

We are prepared to fill any orders for 
Heavy Wagon, Sleigh, Buggy, and Cutter Stock 

We make a specialty of heavy stock and can till orders 
promptly. Made from the best of oak and hickory as we carry a 
large stock of lumber and can make any sizes that may be re- 
quired. We make it a point to fill orders promptly. 

If you are in need of anything in our line we will be pleased 
to hear from you and we will give it our prompt attention. 

J. S. LOUGHEAD & SON, - Samia. Ontario 



GLAZIERS' DIAMONDS Sharratt & Newth 

===========^= 43 and 44 Percival Street, • London, England 

Con tractors to H. M. Government and the Principal English Sheet and Plate Glass Works. 
also Established 1816 

Lead Vices, 
Carbon Tools, 
Etc, Etc , 

Agents for Canada: A Ramsay & Son Company, Montreal 
GLAZIER'S DIAMONDS 



Ahead of all others in quality and workmanship. If sparks of fine quality, set 
by experts, are what you require, buy Diamonds of A. Shaw & Son's make. 
Canadian Agent 

OODF-REV S. PELTON 

388 ST. PAUL ST , MONTREAL 



CELEBRATED 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS 




Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers' Shears, 
Tinners' Snips, etc 

ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST. 

R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. SI^rTnT'S^.a 8 Ch " n,be " st - 



SEYMOUR 

SHEAR CO. 



TRADE MARK 



SEYMOUR SHEARS 



HAVE BEEN THE 

Standard for over Half a Century. 

"QUALITY UNQUESTIONED." 
Each pair of our shears bears the above trad* mark. 




GRAJ1T 



Complete Line TRIMMERS , BANKERS', BARBERS' and TAIL 
ORS' SHEARS, Etc., Etc. 

Henry T. Seymour Shear Company. 

WIEBUSCH & HILOER, Limited, NEW YORK, Sole Agents. 



SEYMOUR 

SHEAR CO. 



Latest Cata- 
logue will be 

sent in 

exchange for 

your businem 

card. 



January 28, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




PRESSED, 
STAMPED, and 
MACHINE-MADE. 



HOLLOW-WARE 

ENAMELLED, TINNED, GALVANIZED and JAPANNED 

We manufacture every description of Hollow- ware, and we guarantee that every piece is made wholly 
on our own premises. Our average weekly capacity is over 700,000 pieces, of Tinned, Galvanized and 
Enamelled ware. Our Enamelled ware is of superior durability and finish, and is guaranteed free from 
any poisonous substances. 

Let us have your name for our illustrated lists 

The Welsh Tinplate & Metal Stamping Co., Ltd. 

LLANELLY, WALES 



Cuxfer 

Window and Sidewalk 

Prisms 






Do You Want More Business 




STORE 

FRONTS 
OUR 
SPECIALTY 


for 1905 ? 


SEND FOR 
INFOR- 
MATION 








If so, make your premises Bright, Light 
and Up-to-date. 

A Daylight Store Draws Trade. 



LUXFER PRISM CO., LTD., '<*> king st. w , toro NTO 



FAIRBANKS 



WERE AWARDED THE 



GRAND PRIZE 



AT THE 



LOUISIANA PURCHASE EXPOSITION 

THIS IS THE 

HIGHEST AWARD 

AND THE ONLY GRAND PRIZE GIVEN 
TO SCALES. 



Remember, this was in 
competition with 
the World. 

OUR 

SCALE CATALOGUE 

SENT 

ON REQUEST. 



THE FAIRBANKS CO. 




MONTREAL 



TORONTO 



VANCOUVER 



WINNIPEG 




ONEIDA 

COMMUNITY'S 

WELDLESS 

COW TIES. 



Illustration shows the 



WIRE 



%/■ 



NIAGARA 

OPEN RING TYPE 



Also made in CLOSED RING, THREE CHAIN 
and DOMINION (or "Short") TYPES. 

Oneida Community Cow Ties can be had of all 
the leading jobbers. We invite correspondence 
where any difficulty is experienced in obtaining 
our goods. 



ONEIDA COMMUNITY, Limit*. 

NIAGARA FALLS, ONT. 



47 



Hardware and Metal. 



r 



INDUSTRIAL GOSSIP 



Hardware and Metal would be pleased to receive from any authoritative source industrial news of any sort, th« 
formation or incorporation of companies, establishment or enlargement of mills, factories foundries or other 
works, railway or mining news, etc. All such correspondence will be treated as confidential when desired. 



AT present the works at the Soo 
have a very bright appearance, 
and everything points to a year 
unequalled in the history of the com- 
pany. New capital to the amount of 
$3,500,000 has been invested, making a 
.total of $5,500,000. Confidence has been 
so re-established that creditors with 
claims amounting to $3,550,000 have 
converted their claims into investments 
in the property, with the result that the 
Speyer mortgage amounting to $4,500,- 
000, has been paid off. All the various 
works and operations of the company 
are in full swing. The output of the 
mines have been sold for all of this 
year and part of 1906. The charcoal 
plants are producing 12,000 bushels of 
charcoal per day, 1,000 gallons of wood 
alcohol, and 12,000 pounds of acetate of 
lime. The pulp mill is turning out 100 
tons per day. The output of the blast 
furnaces is entirelv consumed by the rail 
mills which have sufficient orders from 
Canadian railways to keep them in op- 
eration for six months. Large gangs of 
men are busily engaged in the woods 
cutting pine and pulpwood. The number 
of men employed amounts to in the 
neighborhood of three thousand eight 
hundred, with operating expenses for the 
month of December amounting to $550,- 
000. 

Arrangements are under way to endea- 
vor to open a stove foundry at Moose 
Jaw. 

A three-foot coal seam has been open- 
ed up two miles north of Swift Current, 
Assiniboia. 

The C.P.R. has let the contract for 
double tracking the railroad from Fort 
William to Winnipeg. The work will 
cost $7,000,000. 

It is probable that a syndicate of 
Minnesota lumbermen will complete ar- 
rangements within a few weeks for the 
building of a large sawmill plant in 
Vancouver. 

English and Canadian capitalists are 
interested in the project of erecting a 
large sawmill to supply the foreign 
market, and a large iron works at 
Esquimalt, B.C. 

A notification has been received by the 
Backus-Brooks Lumber Company, of 
Minneapolis, from the Dominion Govern- 
ment, granting permission to construct 
an immense dam at Fort Francis. 

It is stated that the Mackenzie & 
Mann Company, and some other inter- 
ests, are considering the question of er- 
ecting in the near future a smelter at 



Port Arthur with a daily capacity of 
from 150 to 200 tons. 

Orders have definitely been placed for 
the two new furnaces to be added to the 
present battery of six furnaces at the 
Granby smelter, Phoenix. Each of these 
furnaces will have 70 square feet, and 
when completed will give the smelter a 
daily reduction capacity of 2,700 tons of 
ore. 

St. John, N.B., and Boston capital- 
ists are seeking incorporation as the 
George E. Barbour Co., witn a capital 
sto,ck of $99,900. The new company 
want to engage in the building and op- 
eration of ships, also the generating of 
electric light, gas, power and heat. 

Last year, out of 1,450,000 tons of 
coal brought into the St. Lawrenpe, 
47,000 tons came from Great Britain. 
The preceding year for a number of rea- 
sons, the imported coal was in far 
greater proportion, namely, 134,000 
tons out of a total of 1,243,000 tons. 

The organization of the New Bruns- 
wick Iron Co., St. John, N.B., has been 
completed. The following directors 
were elected: John S. McLennan, Syd- 
ney; C. W. Young, St. Stephen; A. D. 
Wetmore, Truro; L. B. Knight, St. 
John; C. V. Wetmore, Sydney. The di- 
rectors met subsequently and elected 
the following officers: C. V. Wetmore, 
president; John McLennan, vice-presi- 
dent; Peter Clinch, secretary. 

It is understood that the Dominion 
Iron and Steel Company has decided to 
adopt at its works at Sydney, Nova 
Scotia, a new and inexpensive process 
for the manufacture of pig iron, utiliz- 
ing waste iron ore, which costs from 60 
to 75 cents a ton. The plant which they 
propose to install will cost about $8,- 
000, and will have a daily output of 
75 tons. It will be the first of the kind 
erected on the continent, and the com- 
pany will have the exclusive rights for 
the Dominion of Canada. 

Many of the leading shippers in the 
mining district of British Columbia are 
increasing their plants. New machinery 
to the value of over a half-million dol- 
lars has been ordered and will be in- 
stalled during the next few months in 
a number of mines in the Rossland and 
Slocan districts. The Velvet mine at 
Rossland is putting in new concentrat- 
ors and stamps that will cost $45,000. 
At the Cliffe mine in Rossland about 
$30,000 is to be expended in a thirty- 
stamp mill to increase the output. $12,- 
000 is being expended by the Spitzee 

-IK 



January 28, 1905 

mine at Rossland in compressors and 
machine drills, while a new tramway is 
being put in at the Jumbo mine which 
will greatly facilitate the shipment of 
ore. 

Production of raw iron, which in 1901 
was 39,940,000 tons, increased to 43,- 
480,000 tons in 1902, and reached 45,- 
480,000 tons in 1903. United States 
stands at the head with a production of 
18,010,000 tons, against 17,280,000 tons 
in 1902, and 15,800,000 in 1901. Ger- 
many wrested the second place from 
Great Britain in 1903, its production be- 
ing 10,090,000 tons, against 8,400,000 in 
1902, and 7,790,000 in 1901. Great 
Britain occupies third place with an out- 
put of 8,810,000 tons, against 8,520,000 
tons in 1902, and 7,850,000 in 1901. The 
output in France which in 1903 amount- 
ed to 2,830,000 tons, has increased by 
400,421, as compared with 1902, and by 
427,428 tons as compared with the pro- 
duction of 1901. Belgium produced 1,- 
300,000 tons in 1903, an increase of 
196,301 tons over 1902, and 533,701 
tons over 1901. Spain's production 
amounted to 380,284 tons. The output 
has decreased in the following countries: 
Russia, 2,400,000 tons, or 118,404 tons 
less than in 1902 ; and 382,065 
less than in 1901; Austria-Hungary, 1,- 
320,000 tons, or 108,814 tons, and 82,- 
165 tons less than in 1902 and 1901, re- 
spectively; Sweden, 489,700 tons, a de- 
crease of 34,300 and 23,600 tons from 
the amounts produced in 1902 and 1901, 
respectively. 

COMPANIES INCORPORATED. 

North Bruce Lumber Co., Toronto, 
share capital $50,000; purpose to manu- 
facture and deal in lumber. The direc- 
tors are: F. Rielly, J. B. Bartram, H. 
M. Murton, W. Pinkerton, and A. D. 
Chisholm, all of Toronto. 

Dailey Rotary Engine Co., Gait, share 
capital $100,000; purpose to manufac- 
ture and deal in rotary engines. The 
directors are: C. Hetherington, R. W. 
Roelofson, A. J. Oliver, C. Turnbull, 
and F. E. Brown, all of Gait. 

Standard Construction Co., Ottawa, 
capital stock $1,000,000; purpose to 
carcy on the business of contractors. 
The directors are: E. J. Chamberlin, J. 
W. Smith, C. J. R. Bethune, G. E. 
Fauquier, and H. Chrtstin, all of Ot- 
tawa. 

G. R. Gregg & Co., Toronto, capital 
stock $250,000; purpose to carry on the 
business of retail and wholesale mer- 
chants and manufacturers. The direc- 
tors are: G. R. Gregg, W. E. Hazley, 
W. G. O'Loughlin, W. Lough- and T. 
Gregg, all of Winnipeg. 

British-Canadian Supply Co., Mont- 
real, capital stock $50,000; purpose to 
carry on a general supply and contract- 
ing business in all kinds of materials. 
The directors are: W. Jack, J. W. Har- 



January 28, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their ad- 
vertisement in Hardware and Metal. 




"THE EIKILYN" SAW BENCH 

Made in 6 sizes. Best value obtainable. Specially 
designed for export With or without " Emlyn ' 
Patent Guard. Sole maker — 

CHARLES D. PHILLIPS, 

Cables — Emlyn Engineering Works 

"Machinery," Newport. Newport, Mon., England 



"The Tool Holder People" 

Armstrong Bros. 

Tool Company 

Manufacturers uf Armstrong Patent Lathe and Planer 
Tools and other machine shop specialties. 

617-621 Austin Ave., CHICAGO, ILL, 




STREET PAVING and SI DEWALK S a SPEC IALTY 

SILICA BARYTIG STONE CO. 

OF ONTARIO Limited 

Head Office : 

Ingersoll, Ontario. 

Walter Mills.General Manager 

Ask for quotations for 

Septic Tanks. 



Wat-rProof Floors for 
Malt Houses, Brewer- 
ies, Slaughter Houses, 
Cheese Factories, Cel 
lar. Stable Floors, etc 



"MAPLE LEAF" 
Stitched Cotton Duck Belting 



< 
o 

■< 
z 
•< 



o 



■;&& 





o 
m 



a 

z 
> 



LI 



"Maple Leaf" is made of the best cotton duck, 
woven to our special formula. 

" Maple Leaf" is the truest running belt on the 

market. 
" Maple Leaf" is superior to either Rubber or 

Leather, and in many places will 

do work that no other make of 

belt will. 
"Maple Leaf" is suitable for all kinds of factories. 

mills, etc., for power and carrying 

Main Drive Belts a specialty. 

Ask for " Maple Leaf" and take no other. 

Beware of Imitations 

MANUFACTURED ONLY BY THE 

Dominion Belting Company 

HAniLTON, ONTARIO. 

Uie our " Maplb L»af " Belt Dressing. 



THE ACME LATHE & PRODUCTS CO., LTD. 

TRAPFORD PARK, HANCHESTER. 

We have arranged to carry a large stock of Square and Hex Cap Screws, Square 
Set ScreWSt Bright Bolts. Washers, etc., in Canada, and can deliver from Canadian 
stock after February 1st., 1905. It will pay you, if you are a buyer of these goods, to get 
in touch with us. 

Temporary Offices 

25 Queen City Chambers, Church St., TORONTO. 



Clauss Brand TAILORS' Shears 

Fully Warranteed 

These goods are the BEST and are EQUALLED only by such other goods 
as are manufactured by 




Write for Trade Discounts 



CLAUSS SHEAR CO., 169 Spadi.na Ave., Toronto, Ont. 



H. & fi, SINGLE GUN AUTOMATIC AND NON-EJECTING 



12, 16 and 20 Gauge. 
Steel and Twist Barrels 

Superior in Design, Workmanship 
and Finish, and the most popular 
Gun on the Market. 



Simplest 
"Take Down" 
Gun Made 




BABBIT 




THE 



N9o , A .«f.;^ 

STAR 'iM 
SPECIAL l 
HERCULES 
METALLIC 
IMPERIAL 



(anada Metal (p. 

William St. TORONTO, telephone main 1729. 




Cap Screws, Set Screws, 
rj Machine Screws, 
^ Cold Pressed Nuts, 

Studs, Coupling Bolts, 

SPECIAL MILLED WORK, Etc. 

CANADA FOUNDRY G0..IUM 

Head Office and Works; TORONTO, ONT. 

DISTRICT OFFICES, 

MONTREAL, HALIFAX, OTTAWA, WINNIPEG, 
CALGARY, VANCOUVER, ROSSLANO, 

40 



iJL B 8 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 28, 1905 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their ad- 
vertisement in Hardware and Metal. 

ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
13 St. John Street, Montreal 



Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishing to be represented in Canada. 



SEALED TENDERS addressed to the undersigned, and 
endorsed- "Tender for Postal Pneumatic Tube Systems 
for Montreal and Toronto," will be received at this De- 
partment until Thursday, February 9, 1905, inclusively, for 
laying and joining in the City of Montreal, 4,000 lineal feet 
of double line of smooth bored cast iron piping, to be sup- 
plied by the Government, and for furnishing, installing and 
erecting all the necessary special castings, elbows and fit- 
tings, including the terminal receiving and transmitting 
machinery and carriers. 

Also for laying and joining in the City of Toronto, 18,000 
lineal feet of double line of smooth bored cast iron piping, to 
be supplied by the Government, and for furnishing, install- 
ing and erecting all the necessary special castings, elbows 
and fittings, including the terminal receiving and transmit- 
ting machinery and carriers. 

All as per plans and specification of John Gait, Chief 
Engineer. 

Plans and specifications can be seen and forms of tender 
obtained at this Department, and at the office of John Gait, 
Chief Engineer, Toronto. 

Tenders will not be considered unless made on the printed 
form supplied, and signed with the actual signatures of ten- 
derers. 

An accepted cheque on a chartered bank, payable to the 
order of the Honorable the Minister of Public Works, for 
three thousand dollars ($3,000.00),in the case of Montreal, and 
nine thousand dollars ($9,000.00,) in the ease of Toronto, 
must accompany each tender. The cheque will be forfeited 
if the party tendering decline the contract or fail to com- 
plete the work contracted for, and will be returned in case 
of non-acceptance of tender. 

The Department does not bind itself to accept the lowest 
or any tender. By order, 

FRED. GELINAS, Secretary. 

Department of Public Works, 

Ottawa, January 9, 1905. 
Newspapers inserting this advertisement without authority 
from the Department will not be paid for it. 



"Oh, Yes!" 

THE 

BANNER 

Leads. 

QUALITY 

TALKS. 




Take the Best 

at the 
Same Price. 



LARGEST OIL WELL 

BRIGHTEST LIGHT 

For sale by all prominent dealers. Made by the 

Ontario Lantern & Lamp Co., 

HAMILTON, ONT. 



ris, R. C. Smith, W. B. Powell, and R. 
C. Grant, all of Montreal. 

Canadian Builders', Limited, Toronto, 
capital stock $1,000,000; purpose co car- 
ry on the business of contractors and 
constructors, also to deal in lands 
mortgages, etc. The directors are: G. 
P. Magann, J. MacKay, and W. H. 
Blake, all of Toronto; J. C. Stewart, 
of New York, and C. F. Franson, of 
Pittsburg. 

Brandon Developing, Mfg. and Supply 
Agency, Brandon, capital stock $40,000; 
purpose to manufacture and deal in all 
kinds of cement machines, steam and 
gasoline engines and business of general 
manufacturers. The directors are: H. 
Gutteridge and J. H. McConnell, both of 
Hamiota; R. .1. McKay and A. Lynn, 
both of Killarney; D. A. Stewart, of 
Deloraine, and J. McLaren of Clear- 
water. 



THE CEILING HELD. 

AFIRE occurred on Notre Dame 
street, Montreal, in which the two 
storeys over Aird's restaurant 
were completely gutted. The restaurant 
had a metallic ceiling' and beyond some 
inconvenience from water no damage 
was done ,and business was continued 
as before. On the following day as a 
party of well known business men were 
dining, W. E. Ramsay, Montreal man- 
ager of the Pedlar Metal Roofing Co., 
entered as usual, and remarked, "you 
notice, gentlemen, they have a metallic 
ceiling. Had it been lath and plaster 
you wouldn't have had your lunch here 
to-day, the ceiling would have fallen 
in." By the proprietor and among 
others who were present it was agreed 
that such would have been the case, the 
incident going to show the value of a 
metal ceiling in case of fire. 

RUBBER GOODS TO ADVANCE. 

THE Canadian rubber manufactur- 
ers were in convention last week 
in Montreal. All the leading 
rubber manufacturers in Canada were 
represented. Their object was to ar- 
rive at a common understanding regard- 
ing rubber and rubber goods. 

The matter of prices in Canada was 
not taken up to any extent, chiefly on 
account of the fact of crude rubber 
being very high at present. A meet- 
ing will be held next month when the 
question of prices will come up. In 
any event, rubber men say there will 
be no reductions. 

The decision of the United States 
Rubber Company to maintain last 
year's price list, in face of higher 
prices for raw rubber, has been a 

50 



CONDENSED MACHINERY ADVERTISE- 
MENTS. 

YEARLY CONTEAOT RATES. 

100 words each insertion, 1 year $30 00 

" " 6 months 17 00 

" " 3 months 10 00 

1 year 17 00 

6 months 10 00 

1 year 10 00 



.50 



25 



MACHINERY WANTED. 



Items under this heading inserted free for readers of 
Hardware and Metal 



STRONG Column Drill— To swing about 36-in.; 
must be in good order and cheap ; also a port- 
able engine and boiler, about 10 h-p, Bridge 
Works, Mitchell, Ont. 

Y\t ANTED— One second-hand clam shell digger, 
' » with traveling derrick, complete ; and one 
second-hand locomotive, from 15 t«"> 20 tons ; must 
be in good condition. A. G. Creasor, Owen 
Sound 

WANTED — Sawing Machine — new or second- 
hand; for sawing siove wood. Box 278, 
Port Elgin. 



w 



ANTED — Screw-cutting lathe — in — for motor 
cycle. Horton, London, Ont. 



A MARINE ENGINE— about 12 x 12— tn good 
order ; second-hand. Full particulars Box 
232, Barrie. 

\\/ ANTED— At once— Gasoline engine— 4 to 6 
'* horsepower; new or second-hand, in good 
condition ; state maker, how long in use. and low- 
est cash price. Address Box 78, Elmvale, Ont. 



MACHINERY FOR SALE. 



Rates for first insertion 2c. a word, and for subsequent 
insertions lc. a word. 



BOILER FOR SALE— 60 h.p., second-hand, 
return tubular boiler, good as new ; bargain. 
Address Box 41, Hardware and Metal. 

ENGINE FOR SALE— 16 h.p.; stationary, side 
crank. Price $75. Address Box 37, HARD- 
WARE and Metal, Montreal. 

ONE second-hand gap lathe; swings 40 in. and 
26 in.; 12-ft. 6-in. bed. Address Box 748, 
Montreal. 







NE second-hand shafting lathe, 26-in. swing, 
ao-ft. bed. Address Box 748, Montreal. 



STANDARD SCALES, valve', trucks, steam 
specialties; W. I. pipe and fittings, machine 
tools, mill supplies, scale repairing a specialty: 
prompt delivery from stock; write for prices. The 
Fairbanks Co., Toronto. 

MARINE Engines and Boilers— Large assort- 
ment ; send for stock list. Doty Engine 
Works Co., Limited, Goderich. 

MACHINERY for Sale— Two large die presses; 
one large iron drill ; cheap for immediate 
sale ; in first-class order. United t actories, Lim- 
ited, 164 Adelaide West. 

great surprise to the Canadian trade. 
Giving his reasons for this course, the 
president of the United States Rubber 
Company says it is to prevent the in- 
dependent companies cutting into their 
business. When prices were put so far 
above the basis of raw material prices 
the large margin of profit enabled in- 



January 28, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



dependent companies to offer lower 
prices. They thus gained our business, 
waxed fat, and had to be bought out, 
said the president. Now, the rubber 
company claims to have such excellent 
equipment and organization that the 
lower cost of producing the manufac- 
tured article giyes them a slight ad- 
vantage over their competitors. This 
» they hope to maintain, and by keep- 
ing prices down they hope to increase 
the volume of their business. In this 
way their net profits will be, they an- 
ticipate, quite up to last year, notwith- 
standing the high price of the raw 
material, while at the same time they 
will strengthen their hold on the mar- 
kets. 

Among the representatives present 
were: S. H. C. Miner, president of the 
Granby Rubber Co.; D. Lome McGib- 
bon, general manager of the Canadian 
Rubber Co.; H. D. Warren, president of 
the Gutta Percha Co., of Toronto; James 
Robinson, president of the Maple Leaf 
Rubber Co., of Toronto; Mr. Breithup, 
president of the Berlin Rubber Co., and 
Mr. Reiter, manager of the Merchants' 
Rubber Co., of Berlin. 

REGULATION OF GAS MANTLE 
LAMPS. 

A correspondent, referring to an arti- 
cle under this caption by G. A. McKay 
in last week's Hardware and Metal, 
says, "The method described by Mr. 
McKay to insure proper regulation is 
correct for those burners to which he 
refers, but it might be noted that the 
best burners nowadays are so arranged 
that the regulating of the flow of gas 
can be done while the lamp is lighted, 
and, of course, with these burners the 
regulating is better and more quickly 
done than with the old type referred 
to." 

NEW PRICE LIST. 

The Pedlar People, Oshawa, have issu- 
ed a new and revised trade pripe list 
for 1905 for conductor pipe, eavetrough- 
ing and trimmings. A discount of 10 
per cent, is given on all orders for these 
goods totalling $50.00 or over in one 
shipment. 

NEW METAL BEARING PLANT. 

Within the past week a new plant for 
the manufacture of metal bearings com- 
^ menced operations at 114 Jarvis street, 
Toronto. It is the Canadian branch of 
the Lumen Bearing Co., of Buffalo, N. 
Y. They intend manufacturing ex- 
tensively their high-class bearings for 
the Canadian trade. The manager of 
the company in this country is N. K. 
B. Palet, who formerly held the posi- 
tion as chief sales agent at the head of- 
fice. 



This adds another to the many indus- 
tries recently established in Toronto. 
The plant is newly built and installed 
with modern apparatus for the produc- 
tion of high-grade work. The metals 
made by this company comprise Electric 
and Lumen bronze, Alpha and Buffalo 
bears, Lotus lining metal, Victoria 
metal and of soldeiSj Half and Half, and 
Strictly Commercial. 



INQUIRIES FOR CANADIAN TRADE 

The names and addresses of the firms making the 
following inquiries may be had by application to the 
Department of Trade and Commerce, Ottawa, 
or to the Editor of this paper. Parties answering in- 
quiries will be careful to mention the office under 
which said inquiry appears and the number. 

From Manchester, England: 

No. 75. A British manufacturer of 
pigment colors, dry and pulp, desires to 
correspond with Canadian manufacturers 
who use such goods. 

No. 77. A British manufacturer of a 
lining for wood pulp digesters desires 
correspondence with Canadian manufac- 
turers. 

From Bristol, England: 

No. 19. A Welsh firm desires to secure 
a Canadian agent for the sale of their 
manufactures, consisting of tin plates, 
black plates, etc. 

No. 12. A local firm desires to be 
brought in touch with manufacturers of 
Venetian blind laths and wood cornice 
poles. 

No. 13. A local firm wishes to export 
binder twine to Canada. 

No. 14. A British firm wants quota- 
tions on Canadian oak delivered Cardiff 
or Barry. 



STEEL DIVIDEND LITIGATION. 

THE action taken by Alfred F. 
Stevens against the United States 
Steel Corporation, to compel the 
payment of dividends on the company's 
common stock, has been settled by Vice- 
Chancellor Stevenson in favor of the 
company. This decision practically dis- 
poses of the whole case. Stevens filed 
a bill to enforce the payment of divi- 
dends on the common stock out of al- 
leged accumulation of profits amounting 
in January, 1904, to $66,000,000. Ste- 
vens claimed that the company was 
obliged, under the statutes, to use this 
money for the paying of dividends on 
the common stock. 

Vice-Chancellor Stevenson says there 
is no proof to show that the company 
had this money in actual cash, and 
there is nothing to indicate a policy 
on the part of the corporation to favor 
the interests of its preferred stock- 
holders to the detriment of the common 
stockholders. 

The sustaining of the demurrer is 
equivalent to a dismissal of Mr. Ste- 
rns ' bill. 

5i 



BOOKS FOR 
BUSINESS MEN 



Manufacturing Cost 

By H. L. C. Hall. 

Dealt with along general lines and not from the stand- 
point of any particular industry. 

The whole organization and conduct of a factory from 
the purchasing agent to the salesman are considered ex- 
haustively. An invaluable work. 

Descriptive pamphlet on request 

Cloth bound, tfq flfi 

Price, postpaid, y J - u « 



Business Short Cuts 

In Accounting, Advertising 1 , Book- 
keeping-, Card Indexing, Corres- 
pondence, Management. 

Compiled by a Board of Experts. 

These methods are practical ; in daily use by experts who 
charge $25.00 to §100.00 a day for their services. 

Descriptive pamphlet on request 

Cloth bound, C i f\f\ 

Price, postpaid, v'.UU 



Thome's Twentieth 
Century Book-keeping 
and Business Practice 

A new and model work on Bookkeeping. Not a re-written 
work, but an absolutely new book from cover to cover. Not 
an old or out-of-date method or illustration in it. 

It constitutes an Illustrated Dictionary. It contains 
Three Sets of Accounts— Models— worked out in detail, and 
a host of special forms for special uses. Corporation 
Accounts are treated with special care and thoroughness. 
There is no other book which will so easily teach you to be a 
good bookkeeper. 

Descriptive pamphlet on request 
Bound in half leather, fc o fifi 

Price, postpaid, V 0.\J\J 

Hardware Store 
Business Methods 

Compiled and Edited by R. R. Williams, 
Hardware Editor of the Iron Age. 
The thorough and practical treatment of the important 
subjects discussed, the embodiment in theBe articles of the 
experience of men of ability and enterprise, the suggestive- 
ness of the principles and m ixims thus presented, will, it is 
hoped, render the volume useful to many and tend to elevate 
still further the business methods of the hardware trade. 



Cloth bound, 



Price, postpaid, 



$1.00 



The American 

Hardware Store 

A Manual of Approved Methods 
of Arranging and Displaying 
Hardware. 

By R. R. Williams, 
Hardware Editor of the Iron Age. 

This book is descriptive of the best methods of accom- 
modating and displaying the large variety of goods which 
are carried in stock in representative American and Cana- 
dian hardware stores. Copiously illu*' rated, end worth 
many times its cost to every progressive hardware dealer. 

Cloth bound, 6^ x9K, 
576 pages. Price, postpaid, 



S3.00 



ADDRESS 

TECHNICAL BOOK DEPARTMENT, 

MacLEAN PUBLISHING CO. 

TORONTO 



LIMITED 



Hardware and Metal. 



January 28, 1905 




Will Hold Dp a Shell! 

That's what a shelf bracket is for. 
For this purpose there can be Nothing B et 
ter, Nothing Cheaper than the BRADLEY 
STEEL BRACKET. It is well Japanned, Strong 
and Light. The saving in freight is a good profit, 
aside from the lower price at which the goods are 
sold. Order direot or through your jobber. 

ATLAS MFC. CO., 

New Haven, Conn., U.S. A 

Subscribe to the 

OIL AMD COLQURMU'S JOURNAL 

for news of the Oil, Paint, Soap, Varnish 
Chemical and Drysaltery Trades. 

Subscription, $2.00 per year from date. 
Sample for 10 cents. 

SCOTT, GREENWOOD &. CO. 

19 LUOOATE HILL LONDON, EN6. 



Order a stock of 

"Windmill Best" 
Galvanized Sheets 

Cut Prices Quality Right 

Made by 

John Summers & Sons, Ltd. 

STALYBRIDGE, ENG. 

Weekly output, 2,000 tons of sheets. 
Canadian Agent, 



F. HANKIN, 



Montreal 




YORK 



METAL POLISH PqusH 



Liquid or Paste 

BEST FOR BRASS AND ALL KINDS OF 
METAL SURFACES. 

ORDER FROM YOUR JOBBER. 

ANGLO-CANADIAN SUPPLY GO. 

29 Church-St., TORONTO. 



The original »na only Genuine 
Preparation for Cleaning Cut- 
lery. 6d. and Is. Canisters 



OAKEY'S 

•WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE POLISH 

JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, London, England 

Agent : 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL. 



STOVES AND TINWARE. 



Canadian Trade Conditions. 

STOVE manufacturers and dealers are 
beginning to reap the benefit of the 
good times, with which Canada has 
been blessed of late years. The opening 
up of the country^ the increase in 
wealth and the prosperity of the indus- 
trial population have lead to the build- 
ing of many new homes and the im- 
provement of many old ones. All of 
which has increased the demand for 
stoves. 

The steel range .as a stove for cooking 
purposes has a wide and steady demand. 
Especially is this noticeable in Mani- 
toba and the Territories. Here the pro- 
gressive young farmer, after erecting a 
permanent home, purchases a stove that 
is noted for its durability rather than 
its appearance and is prepared to pay a 
good price for it. 

In British Columbia, outside of the 
towns and cities but few of these stoves 
are used. The large foreign population 
employed at the mines will not buy any- 
thing that is expensive. The class of 
stove that sells most readily among 
this class of people is a cheap box stove, 
which burns wood. 

In the cities and larger towns of the 
West, all the large public buildings are 
heated either with hot water or steam. 
Many of the best houses use furnaces. 
There is at present a strong demand for 
these latter in Winnipeg, Calgary and 
Edmonton, on account of the activity in 
the building trade last season. It is 
estimated that the increase of the fur- 
nace business in Manitoba last year over 
its predecessor exceeded 35 per cent. No 
estimate can be given for British Colum- 
bia owing to the unsettled conditions of 
last year. 

In the district about Edmonton, which 
is inhabited by Europeans, few sales of 
expensive stoves are made. The general 
demand, which is not very heavy, calls 
for a cheap wood stove which can be 
used for both heating and cooking pur- 
poses. 

A cheap line of pooking stoves is al- 
ways carried by the majority of hard- 
ware merchants throughout the North- 
west to meet the demand of the newly- 
arrived settler who does not feel inclin- 
ed to purchase anything expensive until 
after he has built a permanent dwelling. 
After he is finally settled he purchases 
a class of stove which excels the major- 
ity of those bought by our Eastern ag- 
riculturalist. 

In New Ontario a good demand for 
5 2 



coal cooking stoves has been created. 
The supply of wood for burning purposes 
is quickly diminishing, and the inhabit- 
ants have begun to change their class of 
stove. 

The outlook for this year is bright. 
Dealers in Manitoba and the Territories 
are depending on an active building sea- 
son to increase their sales. Merchants 
and agents in British Columbia are look- 
ing forward to an earlv settlement of 
the present difficulties in the lumber in- 
dustry, which will increase their sales 
to those connected with this industry. 
The merchants in New Ontario expect 
the recent mineral discoveries to in- 
crease their population, thereby increas- 
ing the sale, of stoves. The outlook for 
the older provinces is normal. The sup- 
ply of wood which is diminishing rapid- 
ly in Ontario, Quebec and New Bruns- 
wick, may increase the demand for coal 
stoves. Outside of this phase, condi- 
tions are only expected to be normal. 

The First Use of Coal. 

THE first use of coal in the United 
States antedates the revolution 
by some years, according to a 
writer in "Fuel." Jesse Fell who first 
applied the fuel to the purpose of heat- 
ing a house, learned of its value at the 
shop of Obadiah and Daniel Gore, who 
utilized it on a forge in their Wilkes- 
barre blacksmith shop. In the same 
city the old Fell tavern is still stand- 
ing, and visitors are always shown the 
grate in which coal was first burned as 
a heating fuel. This grate was first 
lighted in 1808 by Jesse Fell, the pro- 
prietor of the tavern. In a letter to his 
cousin, Jonathan Fell, which is now in 
the possession of the Historical Society 
of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia, Jesse 
Fell writes that in 1770-71 coal was 
used in the Wilkesbarre blacksmith shop 
of Obadiah and Daniel Gore, and he 
then continues: "Accordingly, in the 
month of February, 1808, I procured a 
grate made of small iron rods ten inches 
in length and ten inches in heighth, set 
it up in my common fireplace, and on 
first lighting it found it to burn exceed- 
ingly well. This was the first successful 
attempt to burn our stone coal in a 
grate, so far as my knowledge extends." 

Records are to be found of the at- 
tempts to burn coal for manufacturing 
purposes. 

It is a historical fact that in 1803 the 
city of Philadelphia bought 100 tons of 
anthracite for use in the pumping works, 



January 28, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



but the engineers, not knowing how to 
burn it, broke it up to gravel the walks 
in the yard. In 1814 two "arks" loads 
were sold at the falls of the Skuylkill 
for $21 a ton. A morning was wasted 
in futile attempts to burn this coal, and 
at noon the employer and workmen, dis- 
couraged at their ill luck, shut up the 
furnace and went to dinner. On their 
return they were astonished to find a 
roaring fire, the furnace itself being in 
danger of melting. From that day dates 
the successful use of anthracite in Am- 
erica. 

Mexico's Stove Trade. 
The increase in the foreign population 
of Mexico has brought with it a good 
demand for both heating and cooking 
stoves. Owing to mistaken ideas con- 
cerning climatic conditions in Mexico, 
many American manufacturers of heat- 
ing stoves have made no attempt to cap- 
tin-e this trade. 



A PERMANENT 

• nd Htndsoma Roof. 




Arrow Brand Asphalt Ready Roofing 

Will bring you profitable trade and satisfied customera. Comes in roll! ready to 
lay, all ready covered witb gravel. Requires no experience to lay, and laste 
for years without further attention. 

A. C. JENKING, Sole Agent, 
Room 2IS Coristine Building, - MONTREAL. 

Sole agents being appointed in each district. Write to-day. 







Ridgely's Model B 
Trimmer 

In conjunction with our famous 
THREE-PIECE STRAIGHTEDGE 

makes an outfit for trimmiDg paper 
that will do the work in one-sixth the 
time it takes to do it with a knife or 
shears, and do it accurately. Guar- 
anteed to give perfect satisfaction. 
For full particulars address 

THE RIDGELY TRIMMER CO., 

Manufacturers. 
Paper Hangers' Supplies, 

SPRINGFIELD, OHIO, U.S.A. 

Send for Catalogue No. 16. 



RETURN! 




Solarine 
Bar Polish 

Best and cheapest preparation for 
polishing:— Brass, Copper, Steel, 
Tin, Zinc, Bar Fixtures, Kitchen 
Utensils. 

A rapid cleaner expressly designed 
for all kitchens. 

For Ontario, Address 

H. F. FALKINER, 

60 George St., TORONTO 



69 

Just now coal bins are getting low. 
Men have to buy coal. 
They have the economical fever. 
Good time to suggest Ash Sifters. 
They'll sell. 



70 

But 

Cutts'ALL METAL is the kind. 
No wood about it— except the handle. 
Can't come apart. 
Retail at a quarter. 
Have we your order ? 

WE SHIP ANYWHERE, ANY QUANTITY 

C. M. CUTTS & CO., m^s Toronto Junction, Ont. 




The chief features of the Imperial Oxford Range 
are not found in any other make. These exclusive 
features are what makes it do better baking and 
roasting with a greater economy of fuel than any 
other range. We are explaining these features to 
your customers in the newspapers of Canada. They 
know that the only range that contains them is the 

Imperial 
Oxford Range 



You will find that a large percentage of the 
stove-buyers who come into your store will have 
already decided that the Imperial Oxford is the 
range they want. You can make a quick sale and 
give them lasting satisfaction if you supply what 
they want, or you can waste a lot of time trying to 
persuade them to take something they don't want. 

Which will you do ? 

The Gray Foidr? Co,, LiiiM 



TORONTO WINNIPEG 



VANCOUVER 



CORRESPONDENTS : 

The Ourney-nassey Co., Limited, Montreal, Que. ; 

The Qurney Standard Metal Co., Limited, Calgary, Alta. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 28, 1905 



Everything counts, and the 

POINTS IN FAVOR OF OUR GOODS 

are many 

Ready Roofing, Sheathing and Black ^^ Diamond Tarred Felts, 
Building Papers, Fibre — Manilla Wrappings, etc. 

Ask for our quotations they will interest you. 

FELT FACTORY PAPER MILLS 

Harbour and Logan Sts., MONTREAL JOLIETTE, QUE. 

ALEX. McARTHUR & CO., LIMITED 



62 McGILL STR 



MONTREAL 



CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS. 



Jan. 28, 1905. 
These prices are for such qualities and 

Suantities as are usually ordered by retail 
ealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. The 
Editor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list, as the deBire 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

TIN. 

Lamb and Flag and StraitB— 

56 and 28-lb. ingots, 100 lb. $32 00 833 00 
TINPLATES. 
Charcoal Plates— Bright. 

M.L.8., equal to Bradley— Per box. 

I 0, usual sizes $6 50 

IX " 800 

IXX " .,„., 950 

Famous, equal to Bradley— 

TO 6 75 

IX »2 5 

IXX 975 

Fnven and Vulture Grades— 

I C, usual sizes * 25 

IX " 50? 

IXX " 5 75 

IXXX " 650 

"Dominion Crown Best"— Double 

Coated, Tissued. p er box. 

IC 5 50 

IX "50 

IXX 7 50 

Allaway's Best"— Standard Quality. 

10 • 450 

TV 550 

iXX 650 

Coke Plates— Bright. 
Bessemer Steel— 

I.O., usual size, 14x20 3 40 

I C, special sizes, base 3 70 

20x28 7 50 

Charcoal Plates— Terne 
Dean or J. G. Grade— 

I.O., 20x28, 112 sheets .... 7 50 

IX., Terne Tin 10 50 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 
Cookley Grade— 

X X, 14x56. 50 sheet bxs. ) 

" 14x60, " V ■■■■ 7 00 

" 14x65, " I 

Tinned SheetB. 

72x30 up to 24 gauge 7 25 7 50 

»" 26 " 7 75 8 00 

IRON AND STEEL. 

Montreal. Toronto. 

Common bar, per 100 lb 1 77J 180 

Refined " " 2 02J 2 05 

Horseshoe Iron " 2 02 J 

Hoop steel, 11 to 3-in. base 

Sleigh shoe Bteel, " ..1821 

Tire steel 1 92i .... 

T. Firth & Son's tool steel- 

Speedicut 60 

Annealed speedicut 65 

Self hardening 35 

Best tool sleel 12 

Warranted 09 

Beet sheet steel 12 

B. K. Morton & Co.— 

" Alpha " high speed 65 

" " annealed 70 

" M " Self -Hardening 50 

" I "Standard 14 

"BO" 09 

onas & Oolver's tool steel 10 20 

"Novo " 65 

" " annealed 70 

Chas. Leonard 08 09 

Crucible Steel Co. 

': Rex high speed steel. . 65 75 

Self Hardening 45 50 



Crucible Special 17 

" Silver steel 13 

Black Diamond In 11 

Sandersons Crucible steel 08 09 

Superior " 12 13 

BABBIT METAL. 

Syracuse Smelting Works : 

Aluminum, genuine 45 

Government, " 44 

Tough, " 40 

Hard, " 40 

Dynamo 30 

Special 25 

Harmony 22 

Car Box 20 

Extra 15 

The Canada Metal Oo. : 

Imperial, genuine 40 

Metallic 30 

Hercules 20 

Star 15 

No. 1 12 

No. 2 10 

No. 3 06 

No. 4 05 

BLACK SHEETS. 

Montreal. Toronto 

10 gauge 2 30 2 30 

12 and 14 gauge 2 30 2 35 

17 " 2 30 2 40 

22 to 24 gauge 2 35 2 50 

26 " 2 40 2 65 

28 2 40 2 70 

COPPER WIRE. 
Discount, 50 per cent. 

CANADA PLATES. 

Ordinary 2 50 

All bright 4 00 

Galvanized Canada Plates- 
Ordinary. Dom. 
Crown. 

18x24x52 4 25 4 35 

" 60 4 50 4 60 

20x28x80 8 50 8 70 

" 94 9 00 9 20 

GALVANIZED SHEETS. Queen s 
Fleur-de-Lis. Got don Crown. Comet Bell. Head 

16 gauge 3 50 

18 to 24 gauge . . 3 50 3 50 3 75 3 50 
26 " .. 3 75 3 75 3 90 3 75 

28 " .. 4 00 4 00 4 05 4 00 

American brands, $4.00 for 10J oz. 
Less than case lots 10 to 15c. extra. 

CHAIN. 
Proof coil, 3-16 in., per 100 lb. 7 00 10 00 

i " 5 60 

5-16 " 4 45 

1 " 3 85 

7-16 " 3 70 

J " 355 

9-16 " 3 45 

t " 3 35 

| " 3 25 

Halter, kennel and post chains, 40 to 40 and 
5 per cent. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Tie out chains 65 p.c. 

Stall fixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain 45 p.c. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, discount 
35 p.c. ["ount 40 p.c. 

Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis- 
COPPER. 

Ingot. Per 100 lb. 

Casting, car lots 15 50 

Bars. 
Cut lengths, round, J to J in. . 21 00 23 00 
round and square, 

1 to 2 inches 21 23 00 

Sheet. 
Plain, 16 oz., 14x48 and 14x60 .... 20 00 

Plain, 14 oz 21 00 

Tinned copper sheet 24 00 

Planished 32 00 

54 



Braziers' (in sheets). 

4x6 ft., 25 to 30 lb. each, per lb 22 

" 35 to 45 " " .... 21 

" 50-lb. and above " • .... 20 

BOILER AND T.K. PITTS. 

Stun" 11116 ' 1 ' } 40 per cent, off list. 

BRASS. 
Rod and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge, 15 per cent. 

Sheets, hard-rolled, 2x4 23 

Tubing, base, per lb 231 

ZINC SPELTER. 

Foreign, per 100 lb 6 25 6 50 

Domestic " " 5 50 5 75 

ZINC 8HEE1. 

5-cwt. casks 7 00 

Part casks 7 50 

LEAD. 

Imported Pig, per 100 lb 3 60 

Bar, per lb 05 

Sheets, 21 lb. sq. ft., by roll 06 J 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lb. " 06 

Note.— Cut sheets lc. per lb., extra. Pipe, 
by the roll, usual weights per yard, lists at 7c. 
per lb. and 35 p.c lis. fob. Toronto. 

Note.— Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 
8-f , lengths, lists at 8c. 

ANTIMONY. 

Cookson's per lb. 10J 11 

SHOT. 

Common, $6.50 per 100 lb.; chilled, $7.00 
per 100 lb.; buck, seal and ball, $7.50. Dis- 
count, 15 p.c. Prices are f.o.b. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
TermB, 2 p.c. for cash in thirty days. 

PLUMBING GOODS. 

BATH tubs. 

Zinc 6 00 

Copper, discount 20 per cent, off revised list. 

BATHS. 
Standard Ideal Enameled. 
54-ft. 21 in. rolled rim, 1st quality 



2nd 

1st 
2nd 
1st 
2nd 
1st 
2nd 



Plate 116 D, lavatories 1st quality 

" 116 D, " 2nd " .... 

" 118 D, " 1st " .... 

" 118'D, " 2nd " .... 

" 120 D, " 1st " .... 

" 120 D, " 2nd " .... 

" 122 D, " 1st " .... 

" 122 D. " 2nd " .... 

Sinks 18 x 30 in flat rim 

CLOSETS. 

Fittings 

Plain Simplex Syphon Jet 

Erab. " 

Fittings 

Low Down Elgin or Teutonic, plain . 
Low " " emb. 

Connection . . , 

Plain Richelieu' 

Emb. " 

Connections 

Basins, P.O., 14-in 

Basins, oval, 17 x 14-in 

Basins, " 19 x 15-in 



21 25 

17 25 
23 6) 

19 00 

18 40 
17 25 

20 75 
17 25 

8 90 
7 50 
5 70 

4 80 

5 60 

4 70 

5 40 
4 50 
2 50 
Net. 
1 00 

9 00 
9 50 
1 25 

6 00 
6 50 
1 25 
4 25 
4 50 
1 25 

63 

1 50 

2 0., 



IRON PIPE. 



Black 

I 



pipe— 
inch 



Per 100 feet. 



2 03 
2 14 

2 29 
2 87 

4 12 

5 62 

6 75 
9 00 



Galvanized pipe— 

Jinch 2 86 

" 296 

, " 3 14 

J " 4 02 

1 " 5 77 

U " 7 87 

lj " 9 45 

2 " 12 60 

Malleabl* Flttirjgs— Canadian discount 20 per 
cent.; American discount 35 percent. 

Cast Iron Fittings— Standard bushings 65 
per cent.; headers, 60; flanged unions, 
lipped, 60; malleable bushings, 571; nip- 
ples, up to 6 in., 70 and 5. 

PLUMBERS BRASS GOODS. 

Standard Compression Work, dis. 60 & 10 p.c. 

Cushion work, discount 50 per cent. 

Fuller work, discount 70 per cent. 

6 dozen lots and over of the above, extra dis- 
count 10 per cent. 

Lever handle Stops and Waste, discount M 
per cent. With in lots of 2 dozen and over . 
an extra discount of 10 per cent. 

J. M.T. Globe, Angle and Check Valves, dis- 
count 55 per cent. 

Standard Globe, Angle and Cheok Valves, 
discount 65 per cent. 

Kerr's special standard globes and angles 
discount 55 percent. 

Kerr's Jenkin disc, copper-alloy disc and 
heavy standard valves, discount 55 percent. 

Kerr's standard brass checks, discount 55 p.c. 

Kerr's standard brass disc steam radiator 
valves, discount 65 per cent. 

Kerr's Jenkin disc, copper-alloy disc radia- 
tor valves, discount 65 per cent. 

Kerr's quick - opening not - water radiator 
valves, discount 65 per cent. 

Weber's (Kerr) patent straightway gat* 
valveB, brass, discount 50 per cent. 

Weber's (Kerr) patent straightway gat* 
valves, I. B. B. M. , discount 60 and 10 per cent. 

J. M. T. Radiator Valves discount 55 per cent. 

Standard Radiator Valves, discount 65 per 
cent. 

Patent Quick - Opening Valves, discount 70 
per cent. 

No. 1 compression bath cock net 1 75 

No. 4 " " " 1 90 

No .7 Fullers " 2 10 

No. 4J, " " 2 25 

Patent Compression Cushion, basin 
cock, hot and cold, per doz., $31 ; 5 and 10 
per cent discount. 

Patent Compression Cushion, bath 
cock, No. 2208 2 25 

Square head brass cocks, discount 55 peroeut 
" " iron " " 50 to 60 " 

Thompson Smoke-test Machine $25.00 

RANGE BOILERS. 

Copper, 30 gallon " 22 00 

K 35 ' " 24 00 

" 40 " 28 00 

Discount off copper boilers 15 per cent. 

GALVANIZED IRON RANGE BOILERS. 

Capacity. Standard. Extra heavy 
Gals. 

12 4.50 6.50 

18 4.75 6.75 

24 4.75 6.75 

30 5.00 7.50 

35 6.00 8.50 

40 7.00 9.50 

52 11.00 14.00 

66 18.00 20.00 

82 21.00 24.00 

100 29.00 34.00 

120 34.00 4000 

144 47 00 55 00 



January 28, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



American Steel & Wire Co. 



New York 

Empire Building 



Montreal 

N.Y. Life Building 



Chicago 

The Rookery 



BARBED WIRE GALVANIZED PLAIN WIRE 

PLAIN TWIST CABLE FENCING 

Telegraph and Telephone Wire; Mattress, Broom, Weaving Wires of 
every description; Rail Bonds, Bale Ties, Special Wires for all 
purposes, Springs, Horse Shoes, Wire Rope, Cold-drawn Steel 
Shafting. 



SOIL PIPE AND FITTINGS. 
Med. and Extra heavy pipe and fittings, die 60 

per cent. 
7 and 8-in. pipe, disoount 40 and 5 per cent. 

solder. Per lb 

Bar, half-and-half, guaranteed 17} 

Wiping 15* 

Refined 16f 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

COLORS IN OIL. 
1-lb. tins^pure. 

Venetian red, per lb 8 08 

Chrome yellow 6 15 

Oolden ochre , 68 

French " 06 

Marine black 04 

Chrome green 10 

Prenoh permanent green 13 

Sign writers' black 15 

WHITE LEAD. Per 100 lb. 

Pure 4 75 

No. 1 4 50 

No. J 4 25 

No. S 3 874 

No. 4 3 50 

Munro's Select Flake White 4 75 

Elephant and Decorators'Pure 4 75 

Monarch 5 00 

Deoorator's Pure 4 75 

Sluex Genuine 4 25 

terllng Pure 5 00 

Island City Pure 5 00 

Ramsay's Pure Lead 4 75 5 00 

Ramsay's Exterior 4 50 4 75 

RED LEAD. 

Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per c wt $4 25 $4 50 

Genuine, 100 lb. kegs, " .... 4 75 

No. 1, 560 lb. casks, per cwt 4 00 

No. 1, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 4 25 

WHITE ZINC. 

Extra Red Seal Oti 08 

French V. M 06 06} 

Lehigh 06 06} 

DRY WHITE LEAD. 

Pure, casks 4 25 

Pure, kegs 4 50 

No. 1, casks 4 00 

No. 1, kegs 4 25 

PREPARED PAINTS. 
In I, } and 1-gallon tins. 

Pure, per gallon 120 

Seeond qualities, per gallon 1 00 

Barnjinbbls.)^ 60 90 

The Sherwin-Williams paints 1 35 

Canada Paint Co.'s pure 1 25 

Toronto Lead & Color Co's pure 1 25 

Sanderson Pearcy's pure 1 20 

Standard Co.'s "New Era." 130 

"Globe" barn 60 70 

Francis-Frost Co.'s "Ark" B'd .... I 25 

" British Navy deck 1 50 

Henderson & Potts's "Anchor" 135 

Ramsay's paints, Pure, per gal 1 20 

Thistle, " .... 1 00 

Outside, bbls 55 65 

Island City House Paint 1 25 

Floor " 1 25 

Sterling House Paint 120 

" Floor " 1 10 

National 1 05 

PARIS GREEN. 

BERGERS' ENOLI8H. 

Petroleum, barrels, per lb 15} 

Arsenic, kegs 15} 

50 and 100-lb. drums 16 

25-lb. drums 161 

1-lb. paper boxes 17 

1-lb. tins 18 

J-lb. paper boxes 19 

1-lb. tins 20 

Terms— 2 per cent off 30 days, or 90 days 
net. 



PUTTY. 

Bulk in bbls 1 45 

Bulk in less quantity 1 70 

Bladders in bbls 1 V0 

Bladders in kegs, boxes or loose 1 85 

25-lb. tins 1 80 

12} lb. tins 2 05 

Bladders in bulk or tins less than 100 lb. 1 85 

VARNISHES. 

In 5-gal. lots. Per gal. Net. 

Carriage, No. 1 150 160 

Pale durable body 4 10 4 25 

" rubbing 2 85 3 20 

Gold size, japan 1 50 1 60 

No. 1 brown japan 85 90 

Elastic oak 1 50 

Furniture, extra . 1 10 1 25 

No. 1 90 100 

Hard oil finish 135 150 

Light oil finish 160 170 

Damar 175 2 00 

Shellac, white 2 40 2 50 

" orange 230 240 

Turpentine, brown japan .... 1 10 1 20 

black japan 1 10 1 20 

11 No. 1. 85 90 

EJastilite rarnish, 1 gal. can, each.. 2 00 

Granitine floor finish, per gal 2 75 

Maple Leaf coach enamels ; size 1, $1.20 ; 

size 2, 70c. ; size 3, 40c. eaoh. 
Sherwin-Williams' kopal varnish, assorted 
case, from to 1 gal., $2.50. 

GLUE. 

Common 08 081 

French medal 10 14 

White, extra 18 22 

Gelatine 

Strip 18 20 

Coopers 19 20 

Huttner 

Ground 12 16 

Cologne, genuine 



ADZES. 
Disoount 20 per cent. 

ANVILS. 

Wright's, 80-lb. and over II 

Hay Budden, 80-lb. and over " 

Brook's, 80-lb. and over 11; 



APPLE FARIRS. 

Woodyatt Hudson, per doz., net 4 50 

AUGERS. 

Gilmour's, discount 65 and 5 per cent, off list. 

AXES. 

Chopping Axes 

Single bit, per doz 7 00 10 00 

Double bit, " 10 00 18 00 

Bench Axes, 40 per cent. 
Broad Axes, 25 per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boys' Axes 6 25 7 00 

Splitting Axes 7 00 12 00 

Handled Axes 10 00 

AMERICAN AXE AND TOOL CO. 

Red Ridge, boys', handled 5 75 

hunters 5 25 

TJnderhill American Bench Axes, 40 pi. 
• AXLE GREASE. 

Ordinary, per gross 600 700 

Best quality 10 00 12 00 



BELLS. 

Hand. 



HARDWARE. 

AMMUNITION. 

Cartridges. 

B. B. Caps Dominion, 50 and 5 and 25 per cent. 

American $2.00 per 1000. 

C. B. Caps American, $2.60 per 1000. 

Rim Fire Pistol, discount 30 p.c, American. 

Rim Fire Cartridges, Dominion, 50 and 5 p.c. 

Central Fire, Military and Sporting, Amer- 
ican, idd 20 per cent, to list. B.B. Caps, 
discount 40 per cent., American. 

Central Fire Pistol and Rifle, list net Amer. 

Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes, Domin- 
ion, 30 per cent. 

Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary, Dominion, 15 per cent. Amerioan 

10 per cent, advance on list. 

Loaded and empty Shells, "Trap" and 

" Dominion " grades. 25 per cent, discount. 

American 20 per cent, discount. Rival 

and Nitro, 10 per cent, advance on list. 
Brass Shot Shells, 55 per cent. 
Primers, Dom., 30 per cent.; American, $1.75 
Wads. per lb. 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

}-lb. bags $0 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 
Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 35 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 each, 

12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in .boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge P 25 

Chemioally prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M. 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9 and 10 gauges 70 

7 and 8 " 90 

5 and 6 " 1 10 

Superior chemioally prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 ' T 1 (5 

5 and 6 " 1 90 

55 



Brass, 60 per cent. 
NickeL 55 per cent. 

Cow. 
Amerioan make, discount 63J per cent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 
Door. 

Gongs, Sargant's f iO 8 00 

" Peterboro', discount 50 tnd 10 
per cent, off new list. 

Farm. 

American, each 1 .'5 3 00 

House. 

American, per lb 35 40 

BELTING. 
Extra, 60 per cent. 
Standard, 60 and 10 per cent. 
No. 1, not wider than 6 in., 60, 10 and 10 per 

oent. 
Agricultural, not wider than 4 in., 75 per cent. 

BITS. 

Auger. 
Gilmour's, discourt 60 per cent. 
Rookford. discount 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings Gen., net list. 

Car. 
Gilmour's, 471 per cent. 

Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent. 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 065 090 

Diamond, Shell, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Nail and Spike, per gross 2 25 5 20 

BLIND AND BED STAPLES. 

All sizes, per lb 07J 12 

BOLTS AND NUTS 

Carriage Bolts, common ($1 list) Per cent. 

" " 3-16 and 1 60 and 10 

" 5-16 and | 55 and 5 

" " 7-16 and up 55 and 5 

" full sq. ($2.40 list) 60 
" " Norway Iron ($3 

list) 60 

Machine Bolts, all sizes, | and 

less 60 

Machine Bolts, 7-16 and up 60 

Plough Bolts 55 and 5 

Blank Bolts 55 and 5 

BoltEnds 55 and 5 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 70 

Coach Screws, cone point 70 

Nuts, square, ail sizes, 4c. per lb. off. 
Nuts, hexagon, all sizes, 4fc. per lb. off. 
Stove Rods per lb., 51 to 6c. 
BOOT CALKS. 

Small and medium, ball per M. 4 25 

Small heel " 4 50 

BRIGHT WIRE SOODS. 

Discount 621 per cent. 

BUTCHERS' CLEAVERS. 

German per doz. 6 00 9 00 

American " 12 00 18|00 

BUTCHER KNIVES. 

Bailey's per doz. 60 130 



BUILDING PAPER, ETC 

Tarred Felt, per 100 JJ) 1 86 

Ready roofing, 2-plyrnot under 45 lb. 

per roll 8 90 

Ready roofing, 3-ply, not under 65 lb., 

per roll 1 15 

Carpet Felt per ton 45 00 

Heavy Straw Sheathing per ton 35 00 

Dry Sheathing per roll, 400 sq. ft. 40 

Tar " " 400 " 56 

Dry Fibre " 400 " 55 

Tarred Fibre " 400 " 65 

O. K. & I. X. L . . . . " 400 " 70 

Resin-sized ' 400 •' 45 

Oiled Sheathing.... " 600 " 1 00 

Oiled " .... " 400 " 8 78 

Root Coating, in barrels per gal. 8 17 

Roof " small packages " 25 

Refined Tar per barrel 5 00 

Coal Tar " 4 09 

Coal Tar, less than barrels per gal. 15 

Roofing Pitoh per 100 lb. 1 00 

. Slater's felt per roll 60 



BULL RINGS. 
Copper, $2.00 for 21-inch, and $1.1 or 2-inoh. 

BUTTS. 
Wrought Brass, net revised list. 

Oast Iron. 
Loose Pin, disoount 60 per cent 

Wrought Steel. 

Fast Joint, discount 70 to 70 and 5 per oent. 
Loose Pin, discount 70 to 70 and 5 per cent. 

CARPET STRETCHERS. 

American per doz. 100 150 

Bullard's " .... 6 50 



Bed, new list, discount 55 to 57} per cent. 
Plate, discount 52} to 571 Per cent. 

CATTLE LEADERS. 

Nos. 32 and 33 per gross 7 50 I 50 

CHALK. 

Carpenters' Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump per cwt. 8 60 8 85 

Red 6 05 8 06 

Crayon per gross 14 6 18 



Socket, Framing and Firmer. 

Broad's, discount 60 and 10 per cent. 

Warnock's, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 

P. 8. & W. Extra, discount 60 and 10 per cent. 

EOODS— STOCK. 

Colonial Stock Foods, 50c. packages, 

per doz $4 00 

" " " I5c. pkgs., " 2 08 

10c. ,r " 7* 

" " " 25-lb. pall, each 1 80 

P6ultry Foods, 25c. packages 1 25 

Congh Powders, per doz 125 

Worm " " 1 26 

Intemation 1 Stock Foods, $1 packages, 

perdoz — I 00 

International Stook Foods, per pail , , . . ill 

perbbl.,.. 10 58 

" Poultry " $lpkg».,perdz. 8 08 

" Worm Powders, 50c. pkgs. 4 68 

" Pine Healing Oil, per doz ... 8 00 

Pheno-Chloro,$lpkgs.,perdoz 8 0J 

Hoof Ointment 8 0* 

" Compound Absorbent 16 08 

Also 25c. pkgs. at $2 per doz. 50c pkgi. at 
4 per doz 

CLOTHES HEELS. 

Davis Clothes Reels, dis. 40 per cent 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 28, 1905 



An Every Day Occurrence With Us 

is the receipt of letters from customers who have used our Wire Edged Ready 
Roofing and who are so well pleased with the material that they want more. 



The Paterson Mfg. Co., Limited 



Toronto 



i-id Montr* 



CONDUCTOR PIPE. 

Plain or Corrugated. 

f -inch per 100 feet 3 00 

1 •• " " 4 00 

J •• " " 5 25 

5 " " " 675 

( " " " 900 

CRADLES, GRAIN. 
Canadian, discount 20 to 25 per oent. 

CROSSCUT SAW HANDLES. 

8. & D., No. S per pair « 174 

8.4D., " 5 n 022J 

S. tD., " 6 " 15 

Boynton pattern " 20 

DOOR SPRINGS. 

rorrep e Rod per doz. .... 1 85 

Ooll.ttollin " 95 165 

English " 2 00 4 00 

DRAW KNIVES. 

Ooaoh and Wagon, disoount 50 per oent. 
Carpenters' disoount 60 and 10 per tent. 

DRILLS. 
Hand and Breast. 
Millar's Palls, per doz., net list. 

DRILL BITS. 
Morse, disoount 574 to 40 per cent. 
Standard, discount 50 and 5 to 55 per cent. 

FAUCETS. 
Common, cork-lined, discount 35 per cent. 
EAVETROUOHS. 

10-incb per 100 ft. 10 00 

elbows (stoTepipe.) 

6 and (-inoh, common per doz. 1 20 

7-inoh " 1 35 

Polished, 15c. per dozen extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 
Disoount 50 and 10 per cent., new list 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 
Iron, discount 40 per cent. 

FACTORY MILK CANS. 
Disoount off revised list, 40 per cent. 
FILES AND RASPS. 

Great Western 70 and 10 per cent. 

Aroade 70 " 10 

Kearney & Foot 70 " 10 

Disston's 70 " 10 

American 70 " 10 " 

jTBarton Smith 70 " 10 " 

MoOlellan 70 " 10 

facie 70 " 10 

loholson, 60 and 10 to 60, 10 and 5 

loyal 80 

Jlobe 70 to 75 

Black Diamond. &<i and 10 to 60, 10 and 5 per 

cent. 
Jowitt's, English list, 25 to 27J. per cent. 
Nicholson File Co.'s " Simplicity " file handle, 

per gross 85c. to $1.50 

CLASS. 
Window. Box Price. 

Star D. Diamond 

Size United Per Per Per Per 

Inches. 50 ft. 100 ft. 50 ft. 100 ft. 

Under 26 380 .... 506 

26 to 40 4 00 .... 5 44 

41 to 50 4 50 .... 6 56 

51 to 60 4 75 .... 7 50 

«1 to 70 5 00 .... 8 62 

71 to 80 5 30 .... 9 38 

81 to 15 10 75 

tttoW 12 30 

91 toW 15 00 

96tol00 18 (W 

96to 100 18 00 



GAUGES. 

Marking, Mortise, Etc. 
Stanley s. discount 50 to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 
Winn's, Nos. 26 to S3 . . . .each 1 65 2 40 

GILLETTS POWDERED LYE. 

1-case, $3.70; 3-case, $3.60; 5-case and over, 
$3.50. 

HALTERS. 

Rope, 1 -inch per gross i 00 

Rope, J " " .... 12 00 

Rope, I to J-inch .... " .... 14 00 

Leather, 1-inch per doz 4 00 

Leather, 11" " .... 5 20 

Web " .... 2 45 

HAMMERS. 

Nail. 
Maydole's, discount 5 to 10 per cent. Canadian 
discount 25 to 274 per cent. 
Tack. 

Magnetic per doz. 1 10 1 20 

Sledge. 

Canadian per lb. 8 074 084 

Ball Pean. 
English and Canadian, per lb. 22 (25 

HANDLES. 
Axe, 2nd growth, per doz. net 3 00 4 00 

Store door ...per doz. 100 150 

Fork. 
C. & B., discount 40 per cent., revised list. 

Hoe. 
CAB., discount 40 per cent., revised list. 
Saw. 

American per do» I 00 1 25 

Plane. 

American per gross 3 15 3 75 

Hammer and Hatchet. 
Canadian, discount 40 per cent. 

HANGERS. doz. pairs. 

Steel barn door 8 00 10 00 

Stearns, 4-inch 4 50 

" 5-inch 6 00 

Zenith 9" 00 

Lane's covered — 

No. 11. 5-foot run 8 40 

No. 111. 10-foot run 10 80 

No. 12, 10-foot run 12 60 

No. 14, 15-foot run 2100 

Steel, covered 4 00 1100 

" track, 1 x 3-16 in(100 ft) ... . 3 75 
" Hx3-16in(100ft) .... 4 75 

HARVEST TOOLS. 

Discount 60 per cent. 

HATCHETS. 
Canadian, discount 40 to 424 per cent. 

Shingle, Red Ridge 1, per doz 4 40 

2, " 4 85 

Barrel, Underhill 5 00 

HAT ENAMEL. 
Henderson & Potts' ' Anchor Brand " 

HINGES. 

Blind, Parker's, discount 60 per cent. 

Heavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb 064 

5-in., " 06} 

" " 6-in., ' 06 

" " *in., " 053 

10-in., " 05J 

Light T and strap, discount 65 and 5 per oent 
Screw hook and hinge— 

6 to 10 in per 100 lb 4 50 

12 in. up " .... 3 25 

Spring, No. 20, per gro. pairs — 10 50 

Spring, Woodyatt pattern, per gro., No. 5, 

$17.50; No. 10, $18; No. 20, $10.80; No. 

120, $20 ; No. 51, $10 ; No. 50, $27.50. 



Clothes line, No. 61. . " 00 70 

Harness " 60 12 00 

Hat and coat per gro. 1 10 10 00 

Chandelier per doz. 50 100 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought hooks and staples Canadian dis- 
count 60 per cent. 

Wire. 
Hat and coat, discount 60 per cent. 

Belt per 1,000 .... 60 

Screw, bright, discount 60 per cent. 

HORSE NAILS. 

"P.B." Brand, 55 to 60 per cent. 

"C brand, 40, 10 and 74 per cent, off list f Oval 

"M" brand. 55, per cent. ( head 

"Monarch, ' 50 and 74 per cent. 

' ' Peerless " 50 per cent. dis. 

HORSESHOES. 

F.O.B. Montrea 1 

"P.B.'' brand, new pattern, base $3 50 

"M." brand, base 3 65 

Add 15c. Toronto, Hamilton, Guelph. 



JAPANNED WARE. 

50 per cent. 
PICKS, 
per doz. 3 00 



KETTLES. 

Brass spun 74 per cent, discount off new list. 

Copper per lb. 30 50 

American, 60 and 10 to 65 and 5 per cent. 



HOES. 

Garden, Mortar, etc., discount 60 per cent. 

Planter per doz. 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE. 
Tinned ca.it, 35 per cent. 

HOOKS. 

Out Iron. 
Bird sage ....per doz. 160 110 



Lock, Canadian dis. 40 to 40 and 10 per cent. 
Cabinet, trunk and padlock, 
American per gross 60 

KNOBS. 
Door, japanned and N.P., per 

doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin per doz. 2 75 3 25 

Bronze, Genuine " 6 00 9 00 

Shutter, porcelain, F. & L. 

screw per gross 1 30 2 00 

White door knobs per doz 2 00 

HAY KNIVES. 

Net prices. 

LAMP wicks. 
Discount, 60 per cent. 

LADDERS, EXTENSION. 

Waggoner Extension Ladders, dis. 40 per cent. 

lanterns. 

Cold Blast per doz. 7 00 

No. 3, "Wright's" " 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner . ... " 4 00 

Dashboard, cold blast " 9 00 

No. - 5 75 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

Porcelain lined per doz. 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized " 187 3 85 

King, wood " 2 75 2 90 

King, glass " 4 00 4 50 

All glass " 50 90 

LAWN MOWERS FOR 1905. 

Woodyatt, 104-in., 14-in. cut $ 8 50 to $11 00 
Star, 9 -in. " 6 00 to 6 50 

Daisy, 8 -in. " 5 25 to 5 75 

Philadelphia,74-in. " 6 00 to 7 50 

Woodvatt, 104-in., ballbearing 13 25 to 18 00 

Grass Boxes 1 75 to 2 00 

King Edw'd, 12-in., 14-m. cut 9 00 to 10 00 
Horse Lawn Mowers, "Special." 
Discount, 50 per cent., with freight conces- 
sions in quantity shipments. 

Maxwell & Sons : 

10%-in. high wheel 7 50 10 00 

9-in 5 50 6 25 

8-in 4 90 5 50 

Discount 50 per cent. 

LOCKS. 
Canadian, 50 to 50 and 10 per oent. 
H until A Erwin per dot 



Cabinet. 
Eagle, discount 30 per cent. 

Padlocks. 

English and Am per doz. 50 t 00 

Eagle, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

MACHINE SCREWS. 
Iron and Brass. 
Flat head, discount 25 per cent. 
Round head, discount 20 per cent. 

MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths' perdoz. 1 26 1 60 

Carpenters', hiokory, " 1 25 S 75 

Lignum Vitae :. " 3 15 6 00 

Caulking, each 0(0 200 

MATTOCKS. 

Canadian perdoz. 5 50 ( 0C 

MEAT CUTTERS. 
American, discoun 34 per cent. 
German, 15 per oen 

Gem eaoh .... 1 15 

MILK CAN TRIMMING*. 
Discount 25 per oent. 

nails. Cut. Wire. 

2d } JO S 15 

3d 3(6 2 90 

4and5d J 70 1(5 

( and 7d 1 (0 1 55 

" and 9d J 45 2 40 

10 and 12d 2 40 1 35 

16and20d 2 35 130 

SO, 40, 50 and 60d (base) 2 30 2 25 

F.o.b. Toronto. 
Cut nails in carlots 5c. less. 
Wire nails in carlots are $2.20 (base). 
Steel cut nails 10c. extra. 
Miscellaneous wire nails, disoount '5 per cent. 
Coopers' nails, discount 30 per cent. 
NAIL PULLERS. 

German and American 1 75 2 50 

NAIL SETS. 
Square, round and octagon, 

per gross 3 31 

Diamond 1 00 

POULTRY NETTING. 
,2-in. Mesh, 19 w.g., dis. 60 percent. 
2-in. Mesh 16 w.g. and heavier, 50 p.e. 
1 OAKUM. 

U.S. Navy per 100 lb (76 

Plumbers " S 09 

OILERS. 
McOlary e Model galvanized 
oil can, with pump, 5 gallon, 

per dozen 10 00 

Davidson oilers, disoount 40 per cent. 

Zinc and tin, discount 50, 50 and 10 per cent. 

Copper per doz. 1 25 S 60 

Brass " 150 150 

Malleable, discount 25 per cent 

GALVANIZED PAILS. 
Duff erin pattern pails, discount 474 per cent 
Flaring pattern, discount 474 per cent. 
Galvanized washtubs, discount 474 P*r cent 

PIECED WARE. 

Discount 40 per cent off list, June, 1899. 
10-qt. flaring sap buckets, discount 40 per cent 
6. 10 and 14-qt. flaring pails dis. 40 per eent. 
Creamer cans, discount 40 per cent. 

PICKS. 
Per dozen (00 101 

PICTURE NAILS. 

Porcelain head per gross 1 35 1 50 

Brass head " 40 1 0B 

PICTURE WIRE. 
Tin and gilt, discount 75 per eent. 

PINE TAR. 

4 pint in tins per gross ... 7 (0 

1 " " " ... (M 

PLANES. 
Wood bench, Canadian discount 40 per cent., 

Amerioan disoount 50 per oent. 
Wood, fanoy Canadian er Am«ric» 37 
40 per seat 



56 



January 28, 1905 

TU RNED * C"& ^ 



& 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



yj^r^ot-^ 



N 21 1 1903; 




The 

Champion 

Filing 

Device 



Vertical System of Filing. 

The illustration shows the style used by order departments and considered 
by business men the "Acme of Filing Devices." All correspondence 
filed vertically (on edge) in a Manilla Folder, so that the correspondence of any 
one concern is always together and can be referred to instantly. A card 
will bring a circular. Now's the time to write. 

Full Line of Office Furniture and Labor-saving Devices in Stock 

The Office Specialty Mfg. Co. 

LIMITED 
Factory : Newmarket. 9^ J Q5 WeMllgCOn St. W., TOrOlltO. 

COME AND SEE OUR NEW PREMISES 




PLANK IRONS. 

English perdoz. 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 

Button's genuine, per doz. pairs, discount 
371 to 40 per cent. 

Button's imitation perdoz. 5 00 9 00 

German " 60 80 

PRESSED SPIKES. 

Discount 20 per cent. 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse per doz. 55 1 00 

Ail, " 22 33 

gorew " 27 1 00 

Awninr " 35 2 50 

PUMPS. 

Canadian cistern 1 80 3 60 

Canadian pitcher spout 1 40 2 10 

PUNCHES. 

Saddler's perdoz. 100 185 

Conductor's " 3 00 15 00 

Tinners', solid perset — 72 

" hollow per inch — 100 

RAKES. 

Wood per doz. net 1 20 up. 

razors. per doz. 

Elliot's 4 00 18 00 

Geo. Butler's & Co. s 4 00 18 00 

Boker'« 7 50 11 00 

King Cutter 13 50 18 50 

Wade & Butcher's 3 60 10 00 

Oarbo Magnetio 15 00 

Griffon Barber's Favorite 10 75 

Griffon No. 65 13 00 

Griffon Safety Razors 13 50 

Griffon Stropping Machines 13 50 

Lewis Bros '" Klean Kutter" 8 50 10 50 

Hindoo 10 50 14 00 

Orgsteom's Swedish 3 50 10 00 

Henckel's 7 50 20 00 

Clauss, 50 and 10 percent. 
Clauss Strops, 50 and 10 per cent. 

REGISTERS. 

Discount 40 per cent. 

RIYETS AND BURRS. 

Iron Rivets, black and tinned, 60 and 10 p c. 
Iron Burrs, discount 60 and 10 per cent. 
Copper Rivets, with usual proportion burrs, 45 

per cent. 
Copper Burrs only, discount 30 and 10 per cent. 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivets, 1-lb. 

packages lc. per lb.; }-lb. packages 2c. lb. 

RIVET SETS. 

Canadian, discount 35 to 371 per cent. 
rope, ETC. 

Sisal 011 

Pure Manilla 14} 

"British" Manilla 11 

Cotton, 3-16 inch and larger 21 23 

" 5-32inch 25 27 

iinch 25 28 

Russia Deep Sea 16 

Jute 09 

Lath Yarn, single 10 

double 10} 

Sisal bed cord, 48 feet per doz. 65 

" " 80 feet " 80 

" 72 feet " 95 



Boxwood, discount 70 per cent, 
tvory, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

SAD IRONS. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished. ...per set 80 

" No. 50, nickle-plated, " 90 

Common, plain 4 50 

plated i 50 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 

B.(A. sand, discount, 40 and 5 per cent 
faaeiT, discount 40 per eent. 
■kraat (Burton s| 5 to 10 per oent. advance 
•nUtt 



SAP SPOUTS. 

Bronzed iron with hooks per 1,000 7 50 

" Eureka " tinned steel, hooks " 8 00 

SAWS. 

Hand, Disston's, discount 12} per cent 
S. & D., discount 40 per cent. 

Crosscut, Disston's per foot 35 55 

S. & D., discount 35 per cent, on Nos. 2 and 3. 

Hack, complete each 75 2 75 

" frame only each 50 125 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional per 100 lb. 2 00 2 25 

Solid " 1 50 1 75 

SASH CORD. 

Per lb 28 30 

saw sets. per doz. 

Lincoln and Whiting 4 75 

Hand Sets, Perfect 4 00 

X-Cut Sets, " 7 50 



Gurney Standard, 40 per cent. 
Gurney Champion, 50 per cent. 
Burrow, Stewart & Milne— 

Imperial Standard, discount 40 percent. 

Weigh Beams, discount 35 per cent. 

Champion Scales, discount 50 per cent. 
Fairbanks standard, discount 35 per cent. 

" Dominion, discount 55 per cent. 

" Richelieu, discount 55 per cent. 

Warren's new Standard, discount 40 per cent. 
11 Champion, discount 50 per cent. 

" Weighbeams, discount 35 per cent. 



1 00 



SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's per doz. 65 

SCREEN DOORS. 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, walnut 

stained, 4-in. style per doz. 6 50 

Common doors,2 or 3 panel, yellow and 

green stained, 4-in. style... .per doz. 6 75 
Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, in natural 

colors, oil finish per doz. 8 75 

3-in. style 20c. per dozen less. 

SCREWS. 
Wood, F. H., bright and steel, discount 874 

per cent. 
Wood, R. H., bright, dis. 82} pei cent. 
" F. H., brass, dis. 80 percent. 
" R. H., " dis. 75 per cent. 
' F. H., bronze, dis. 75 per cent. 
' R. H., " dis. 70 per cent. 
Drive Screws, dis. 87} per cent. 

Bench, wood perdoz. 3 25 4 00 

" iron " 4 25 5 00 

Set, case hardened, dis. 60 per cent. 
Square Cap, dis. 50 and 5 per cent. 
Hexagon Cap, dis. 45 per cent. 
SCYTHES. 

Per doz. net 6 00 9 00 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 
Canadian, discount 40 per cent. 

SHEARS. 

Clauss, nickel, discount 80 per cent. 
Clauss, Japan, discount 67} percent. 
Clauss, tailors, discount 40 per cent. 
Seymour's, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 

Canadian, discount 45 per cent . 

Cast iron, 16x24 85 

" 18 x 30 1 00 

18 x 36 1 40 

SNAPS. 
Harness, German, discount 25 per cent. 

Lock, Andrews' 4 50 11 50 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

1, l}-lb per lb 37 

2-lb. or over " 34 

squares. 
Iron, No. 492 ••••... .per doz. 1 90 2 25 

" No. 493 " 2 40 2 55 

" No. 494 " 3 25 3 40 

Steel, discount 60 and 5 to 65 per cent. 
Try and Bevel, discount 50 to 52} per cent. 

STAMPED WARE. 

Plain, discount 75 and 12} per oent. off re- 
viled list. 
Retinned, discount 75 per cent, off revised list 



STAPLES. 

Galvanized 3 00 

Plain 2 80 

Coopers', discount 45 per cent. 

Poultry netting staples, discount 40 per cent. 

STOCKS AND DIES. 

American discount 25 per cent. 

STONE. 

Washita per lb. 28 60 

Hindostan " 06 07 

slip " 09 09 

Labrador " .... 13 

" Axe " .... V. 

Turkey " .... 50 

Arkansas " .... 150 

Water-of-Ayr " .... 10 

Scythe per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind, 40to2001b.,perton 25 00 

" under 40 lb., " 28 00 

" 200 lb. and over 3100 

STOVEPIPES. 

5 and 6 inch, per 100 lengths ■ ■ ■ • 7 00 
7 inch " > f .... 7 50 

TACKS, BRADS, ETC. 

Carpet tacks, blued 80 and ±5 

tinned 80 and 20 

" " (in kegs) 40 

Cut tacks, blued, in dozens only 80 

} weights 60 

Swedes cut tacks, blued and tinned— 

In bulk 80 and 10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk 85, 12} and 12} 

" brush, blued and tinned 

bulk 70 

Swedes, gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 and 12} 

Zinc tacks 35 

Leather carpet t acts 55 

Copper tacks 50 

Copper nails 52} 

Trunk nails, black 65 and 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Clout nails, blued 65 and 5 

Chair nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finishing 40 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 

" in bulk 15 

" " solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle naile, in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in doz- 
ens only 60 

Zinc glaziers' points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers. . 90 and 10 

bulk.... 40 

Clinch and duok riveta 45 

TAPE LINES. 

English, ass skin per doz. 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather 5 50 9 75 

Ohesterman'a each 90 2 85 

" steel each 80 100 

TINNERS' SNIPS. 

Perdoz 3 00 15 00 

Clauss, discount 35 per cent. 

THERMOMETERS. 

Tin case and dairy, 75 to 75 and 10 per cent 

TRAPS (steel.) 
Game, Newhouse, discount 25 per cent. 
Game, H. & N. P. S. & W., 65 per cent. 
Game, steel, 72}, 75 per cent. 

TROWELS. 
Disston's, discount 10 per cent. 

German perdoz. 4 75 6 00 

S. & D., discount 35 per cent. 

TWINES. 

Bag, Russian per lb 27 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply 24 

,r " 4-ply 27 

Mattress per lb. 33 45 

Staging " 27 35 



VISES. 

13} 
121 
350 

5 50 

SawVise 4 50 » 00 

Columbia Hardware Co. 
Blacksmiths' (discount) 60 per cent. 

" parallel (diaoeunt) 46 per cent. 



Wright's. 

Brook's 

Pipe Vise, Hinge, No. 1 . . 
K " " No. 2.. 



ENAMELLED WARE. 
White, Princess, Turquoise, Blue and White 

discount 50 per cent 

Diamond, Famous, Premier, discount 50 and 

10 per cent 

Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent, discount 

50, 10 and 10 per cent. 
Premier steel ware, 40 per cent. 
" Star " decorated steel and decorated whit 

25 per cent. 

WIRE, 

Smooth Steel Wire. 
No. 0-9 gauge $2 25 

10 " 60. extra. 

11 " iX>. " 

12 " 20c. 

13 " 30o. " 

14 " 40o. " 

15 " 55o. " 

16 " 70o. " 

Add 60c. for coppering and $2 for tinning. 

Extra net per 100 lb. — Oiled wire 10c., 

spring wire 9125, special hay baling wire 30c.. 

best steel wire 75o, bright soft drawn 18o., 

charcoal (extra quality) $1.25, packed in casks 

or cases 15c;., bagging and papering 10c. 50 

and 10O-lb. bundles 10c, in 25-lb. bundles 

15c., in 5 and 10-lb. bundles 35o., in 1-lb. 

hanks, 50c, in }-lb. hanks 75o., in J-lb. 

hanks $1. 

Fine Steel Wire, discount 27} per cent. 
List of extras: In 100-lb. lots: No. 17, 
$5-No. 18, 85.50— No. 19, 86-N0. 20, 86.65- 
No.21, 87-No. 22, 87.30-No. 23.$7,65-No. 
24, $8-No. 25, $9-No. 26, 89.60-No. 27, 
810— No. 28, 811— No. 29, $12— No. 30, $13— 
No.31 jl4-No. 32, $15-No. 33, 816-No. !" 
£17. Extras net— tinned wire, Nos. 17-1. 
$2— Nob. 26-31, 84— Nos. 32-34, 86. Copper* 
5c.— oiling, 10c.— in J5-lb. bundles, .lao.—lnl 
and 10-lb. bundles, 25c. —in 1-lb. hanks, 25o. 
—in }-lb. hanks, 38c.— in J-lb. hanks, 6O0.— 
packed in casks or cases, 15o.— bagging or 
papering, 10c. 

Brass wire, discount 60 per oent. off the list. 

Copper wire, discount 80 per cent, net oas> 
30 days, f.o.b factory. 

Galvanized wire, per 100 lb.— Nos. 4 and 5, 
13.70 to 83.70-Nos. 6, 7. 8, 83.15 to 83.16 
-No. 9, 12.55 - No. 10, 83.20 to It 20 
-No. 11, 83.25 to 83 25 -No. 12, J5.«« 
-No. 13. 82.75-No. 14. $3.75 to $3.?5-No 
15, 84.30-No. 16 84.30. Base sizes, Nos. 
6 to 9, $2.37} f.o.b. Cleveland. In oarloU 
12}o. leu. 

Clothes Lin* Wire, regular 7 strand, No. 17. 
84.65; No. 18. 82.90; No. 19, 82.60. Hollow 
* strand, No. 17, $4.30 ; No. 1$. $2.70 : No. 
19, $2.35; No. 20, $2.30, fob. Hamilton, 
Toronto, Montreal 

WIRE FENCING 

Galvanized barb 2 50 175 

Galvanized, plain twist 2 50 8 75 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, $2 30 fo 
small lots and $2 20 for oarloU. 

COILED SPRING WIRE. 

HighCarbon, No. 9 $2 70 

No.U 336 

No.12 IH 

WIRE CLOTH. 
Painted Screen, per 100 so. ft., net. . 1 61 
Terms, 2 per cent, off 30 days. 

WASHING MACHINES. 

Round, re-acting per doz 56 00 

Square " " 6» 00 

Eclipse, per doz 48 00 

Dowswell " 36 08 

New Century, per doz 73 08 

Connor Improved 33 00 

Daisy « 00 

WRINGERS. 

Leader per doz. 30 00 33 00 

Royal Canadian " .... 24 00 

Royal American — 34 88 

Sa*mpson — 34 80 

Lightning .... 37 00 

Terms, 4 months, or 3 per cent. 30 day* 

WROUGHT IRON TilBlIS, 

Canadian Bake, diaoeunt 40 pet oent 



57 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 28, 1905 




INDEX TO ADVERTISERS. 



A 

Acme Lathe 4 Products Co 49 

Adams Co 60 

Alabaatine Co 42 

American Shearer Mfg. Co 60 

American Steel and Wire Co 54 

Anglo-Canadian Supply Co 52 

Armstrong Bros 49 

Atlas Mfg. Co 52 

Auer Light Co 19 

Australasian Hardware, .inside back cover 



Harnett, G. 4 H, Co outside back cover 

Batty Stove and Hardware Co 17 

Berry Bros 41 

Bird, J. A. 4 W., 4 Co 19 

Birkett, Thos., 4 Son Co 1 

Booth Copper Co 60 

Bradst reet'a 60 

Bullard Automatio Wrench Co 17 

Butler, Geo., & Co 45 



Canada Cycle and MotorCo 23 

Canada Foundry Co 49 

Canada lion Furnace Co 31 

Canada Metal Co 40 

Canada Paint Co 54 

Canada Paper Co 32 

Canadian Aluminum Works 24 

Canadian Cordage and Mfg. Co 45 

Canadian Rubber Co 8 

Canadian Sewer Pipe Co 16 

Clams Shear Co 49 

Consolidated Plate; Glass Co 43 

Consumers' Cordage Co 7 

Contract Record 60 

Covert Mfg. Co 60 

Oullen, Orlan Clyde 6 

Outta, O. M. 4 Co 53 



Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co 2 

Deseron'o Iron Co 31 

§od«, P. D., & Co 43 

omloion Belting Co 49 

Dominion Wire Mfg Co 4 

Dor ken Bros. * Co outside front oover 

DowswellMfg. Co 4 



E 

Enterprise Mfg. Co 58 

Erie Specialty Co 60 

F 

Falkiner, H. F 53 

Falk, Stadelmann & Co 39 

Fairbanks Co 47 

Frothingham & Workman 36 

G 

Gibb, Alexander 23, 50 

Gies, Philip 17 

Gilbertson, W., & Co 32 

Gillett, E. W., Co., Ltd 19 

Glauber Brass Co 16 

Greening, B., Wire Co 4 

Grose, Walter 32 

Grove Chemical Co 43 

Gurney Foundry Co 31 

Gutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. Co 

outside back cover 

H 

Harrington 4 Richardson Arms Co ... . 49 

Heinisch, R. , Sons Co 46 

Henderson, J. A 6 

Hobbs Mfg. Co 45 

Howland, H. S., Sons & Co 13 

Hyde, F. 4 Co 31 

I 

Imperial Vamish and Color Co 40 

International Stock Food Co 

inside back cover 

Iver Johnson Arms and Cycle Works . . 12 

J 

Jackson, C. F.. * Co 31 

Jardine, A. B, 4 Co 16 

Jenking, A 53 

Johnston, Rd. , Clapham 4 Morris 39 

K 

Kemp Mfg. Co 8 

Kerr Engine Co 17 



Leslie, A. C, & Co 31 

Lewis Bros. 4 Co 3 

Lewis, Rice, 4 Son inside front cover 

London Rolling Mill Co. inside back cover 

Loughead, J. S. Co 46 

Luf kin Rule Co inside back oover 

Luxfer Prism Co 47 

Lysaght, John outside front cover 

M 

Maple Leaf Harvest Tool Co 5 

Mast, J. M., Mfg. Co 32 

Maxwell, D., & Sons 6 

Merrick, Anderson & Co 35 

Metallic Roofing Co 33 

Morrison, James, Brass Mfg. Co 14 

Morrow, John, Machine Screw Co 32 

Mo 

McArthur, Alex., 4 Co 54 

McArthur, Corneille & Co 41 

McCaskill, Dougall 4 Co 43 

McClary Mfg. Co 24 

McDougall, R., Co 31 

McGregor-Banwell Fence Co 37 

N 

Newman, W., 4 Sons 6 

Nicklin, John, 4 Co 39 

North Bros. Mfg. Co 1 

Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Co 31 



Oakey, John, 4 Sons 52 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co 57 

Oneida Community 47 

Ontario Lantern and Lamp Co 50 

Ontario Silver Co 6 

Ontario Tack Co 49 

Ontario Wind Engine and Pump Oo 43 



Fage-Hersey Iron and Tube Co 17 

Page Wire Fence Co 39 

Paterson Mfg. Co 58 

Penberthy Injector Co 31 

Phillips, Ohas. D 49 



Queen City Oil Co 42 



Ramsay, A., 4 Son Co 19, 46 

Ridgely TrimmerOo 53 



s - 

Sadler 4 Haworth outside baok cover 

Samuel, M. 4 L., Benjamin, 4 Oo 2 

Sanderson-Harold Co 41 

Sayer Electric Co 39 

Scott, Greenwood 4 Co 52 

Sells Commercial 6 

Seymour, Henry T. , Shear Co 46 

Sharratt 4 Newth 4 

Shaw, A., 4 Son 46 

Sherwin-Williams Co 11 

Silberstein, A. L., 4 Co 1 

Silica Barytic Stone Co 49 

Smith 4 Hemenway Co 17 

Solarine Metal Polish 53 

Standard Ideal Sanitary Co 14 

Standard Paint and Varnish Works. .. 41 

St. George, H. E 43 

Summers, John, 4 Sons 52 

T 

Taylor-Forbes Co outside front cover 

Thompson, B 4 S. H., Co outside back oover 

Thorne. R. E 15 

Turnbull 4 Henderson 42 

u 

United Factories 37 

w 

Wallace Barnes Co 6 

Walter, E. F., 4 Co 4 

Welsh Tinplate 4 Metal Stamping Co.. 47 

Western Wire Nail Co 32 

Wilcox Mf«. Co 19 , 

Wright, E. T., 4 Co 6Jj 

Wynn. T. H 6« 



fi8 



January 28, 1905 



Hardware and MetaL 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Accountants and Auditors. 

Hoskins. David, Toronto. 
Jenkins A Hardy, Toronto. 

Aluminum Castings. 

Canadian Aluminum Works Montreal. 

Anvils 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Art Glass 

St. George, HE., London, Ont. 

Ash Sifter. 

Cutts, C. M., 4 Co., Toronto Junction. 

Axes. Hatchets, Scythes, etc, 

American Axe & Tool Co. Montreal. 

Babbitt Metal. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 
Fairbanks Co. . Montreal and Toronto. 

Barristers, Solicitors, etc. 

Atwater, Duclos 4 Ohauvin, Montreal. 
Tupper, Phippen to. Tupper, Winnipeg. 

Belting, Hose, etc. 

Canadian Rubber Co. of Montreal. 
Dominion Belting Co.. Hamilton. 
Gutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. Co., 

Toronto. 
Sadler to. Haworth Montreal 4 Toronto. 

Bicycles and Accessories. 

Canada Cycle and Motor Co., Toronto 

Junction. 
Millen, John, & Son, Montreal and To- 
ronto. 

Bird Cages. 

Wright, E. T., to, Co., Hamilton. 

Box Straps. 

Warminton, J. J*., Montreal. 

Brass Goods. 

Jones to. Barclay, Birmingham. 
Lewis, Rice, & Son., Toronto. 
Morrison, Jas, Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Nicklin, J., 4 Co., Birmingham, Eng. 
Penberthy Injector Co.. Windsor, Ont. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Brushes and Brooms. 

Ramsay, A., & Son Co.. Montreal. 
United Factories, Toronto. 

Business Brokers. 

The Locators, Winnipeg. 

Carpenters' and Builders' Tools 
and Supplies. 

Covert Mfg. Co., West Troy, N.Y. 
Fairbanks Co., Montreal and Toronto. 
1 Hdwland, H. S. Sons to, Co., Toronto. 
Hyde, F., to. Co., Montreal. 
Lamplough, F. W. A Co., Montreal. 
Lewis Bros, 4 Co., Montreal. 
Lewis, Rice, to, Son, Toronto. 
Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, Mich. 
Merrick, Anderson to, Co., Winnipeg. 
Metallic Rooting Co., Toronto. 
Newman A Sous, Birmingham. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Ontario Tack Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Phillips, Chas. D., Newport, Eng. 
Smith to. Hemenway Co., New York. 
Silica Barytic Stone Co., Iugersoll, Out. 
Stanley Rule to. Level Co., New Britain. 

Conn. 
Taylor- Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 
Waggoner Ladder Co., London, Ont. 
Wilcox Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 

Carriage and Waggon Ac- 
cessories. 

Covert Mfg. Co., West Troy, N.Y. 
Lougheed, J. S., 4 Co., Sarnia, Ont. 

Cattle and Trace Chains. 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 
Oneida Community Co., Niagara Falls. 

Chains— Hea vy. 

Frothingham A Workman, Montreal. 

Churns. 

Maxwell, David, to. Sons, St. Marys. 

Clippers — All Kinds. 

American Shearer Mfg. Co., Nashua, N.H. 
Burman A Sons, Birmingham, Eng. 

Clothes Reels. 

Waggoner Ladder Co., London, Ont. 

Concrete Block Machines. 

Conorete Block Machine Co., Toronto. 

Cordage. 

Canadian Cordage and Mfg. Co., Peter- 
borough, Ont. 
Consumers' Cordage Co., Montreal. 
Hamilton Cotton Co., Hamilton. 

Cork Screws. 

Erie Specialty Co., Erie, Pa. 

Customs Brokers. 

Turnbull4 Henderson, Vancouver, B.C. 

Cutlery— Razors, Scisson,, etc. 

Birkett, Thos., 4 Son Co., Ottawa. 
Butler, Geo., 4 Co., Sheffield, Eng. 
Clause Shear Co., Toronto. 
Dorken Bros. & Co., Montreal. 
Heinisoh's, R., Sons Co., Newark, N.J. 
Lamplough, F. W, 4 Co., Montreal. 
Silberetein, A. L., New York. 
Smith & Hemenway Co., New York. 
Waiter, E. F. , k Co. . Montreal. 
Wiebuieh A HUger, New York. 



Educational. 

Belleville Business College, Belleville. 
Metropolitan Business College, Ottawa. 
St. Margaret's College, Toronto. 

Electric Fixtures. 

Canadian Aluminum Works, Montreal. 
Falk, Stadelniann & Co., London, E.C. 
Morrison James, Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Munderloh & Co., Montreal. 
Sayer Electric Co., Montreal. 

Engravers. 

Legg Bros.. Toronto. 

Files and Rasps. 

Barnett Co., G. & H., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Disston, Henry & Sons, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Grose, Walter, Montreal. 

Financial Institutions. 

Bradstreet Co. 

British America Assurance Co., Toronto. 
Canadian Bank of Commerce, Toronto. 
Confederation Life Ass., Toronto. 
London Guarantee and Accident Ins. 

Co., Toronto. 
Metropolitan Bank, Toronto. 
Reed, Jos. B, & Sons. Toronto. 
Western Assurance Co., Toronto. 

Firearms and Ammunition. 

Hamilton Rifle Co., Plymouth, Mich. 
Harrington A Richardson Arms Co., 

Worcester, Mas6. 
Iver Johnson s Arms and Cycle Works, 

Fitchburg, Mass. 
Walter, E. F., & Co., Montreal. 

Food Choppers. 

Enterprise Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lamplough, F. W., to. Co., Montreal. 
Smith A Hemenway Co., New York. 

Gas Lamps and Sundries. 

Auer Light Co., Montreal. 

Falk, StadelmanniSt Co., London E.C. 

Glaziers' Diamonds. 

Sharratt 4 Newth, London, Eng. 
Shaw, A., 4 Son, London, Eng. 

Glue. 

Grove Chemical Co., Lancashire, Eng. 

Hardware Specialties. 

Erie Specialty Co., Erie, Pa. 
Harvest Tools. 

Maple Leaf Harvest Tool Co., Tillson- 
burg, Ont. 

Hollow Ware. 

Welsh Tinplate and Metal Stamping 
Co., Llanelly, Wales. 

Horseshoe Pads. 

Canadian Rubber Co. of Montreal. 

Horseshoes and Nails. 

Canada Horse Nail Co., Montreal. 

Hot Water Boilers. 

Gies, Philip, Berlin, Ont. 
Gurney Foundry Co., Toronto. 

Ice Cream Freezers. 

Dana Mfg. Co., Cincinnati, Ohio. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia. Pa. 

Ice Cutting Tools. 

Erie Specialty Co., Erie, Pa. 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa 

Injectors — Automatic. 

Penberthy Injector Co., Windsor, Ont. 

Iron Pipe. 

Page-Hersey Iron and Tube Co., Guelph. 
Iron Pumps. 

McDougall, R., Co., Gait, Ont. 

Keys. 

Millen, John 4 Son, Montreal. 

Ladders — Extension. 

Waggoner LadderCo., London, Ont. 

Lamps. 

Falk, Stadelmann & Co., London, E.C. 

Lanterns. 

Kemp Mfg. Co. , Toronto. 

Ontario Lantern Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Wright, E. T., 4 Co., Hamilton. 

Lawn Mowers. 

Maxwell, David, 4 Sons, St. Marys Ont. 
Taylor-Forbes Co.. Guelph, Ont. 

Ledgers and Office Stationery. 

Weese.G. A. 4 Son, Toronto. 

Lumbermen' s Supplies. 

Birkett, Thos., 4 Son Co., Ottawa. 

Lve. 

Gillett, E. W., Co., Limited, Toronto. 

Machinery. 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Co.. Chicago, 111. 
Canada Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Fairbanks Co., Montreal and Toronto. 
Jardine, A. B, A Co., Hespeler, Ont. 
Kerr Engine Co., WelkervilU, Ont. 
Morrow MachineScrew Co.,Ingereoll,Ont. 
Ontario Wind Engine and Pump Co., 

Toronto. 
Penberthy Injector Co., Windsor. 

Mantels. 

Batty Stove and Hardware Co., Toronto. 

Manufacturers' Agents. 

Qibb, Alexander, Montreal. 



Metals. 

Booth Copper Co., Toronto. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co., Midland, Ont. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 

Deseronto Iron Co., Deseronto, Ont. 

Gibb) Alexander, Montreal. 

Gilbertson, W., Pontardawe, Wales. 

Hankin, F. , Montreal. 

Ironside, Sen 4 Co., London, Eng. 

Jackson, C. F., 4 Co., Vancouver, B.C. 

Johnston, Rd., Clapham & Morris, Man- 
chester, Eng. 

Kemp Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Leslie, A. C. 4 Co., Montreal. 

London Rolling Mills Co., London,. Ont. 

Lysaght, John, Bristol, Eng. 

Morton, B. K., 4 Co., Sheffield, Eng. 

Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Co., New 
Glasgow, N.S. 

Samuel, Benjamin 4 Co., Toronto. 

Thompson, B. 4 S. H. 4 Co., Montreal. 

Metal Lath. 

Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto. 

Metal Polish, Emery Cloth, etc. 

Anglo-Canadian Supply Co., Toronto. 
Solarine Company, Chicago. 
Oakey, John, 4 Sons, London, Eng. 

Metallic Window Screens. 

Cutts, C. M., 4 Co., Toronto Junction. 

Milk Cans and Trimmings. 

Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Kemp Mfg. Co.. Toronto. 
McClaryMfg. Co., London, Ont. 
Wright, E. T., & Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Mops. 

Tarbox Bros. , Toronto. 
Office Furniture. 
Office Specialty Mfg. Co.. Toronto. 

Paints, Oils and Glass, 

Alabastine Co.". Paris, Ont. 
American Window Glass Co., Montreal. 
Berry Bros., Detroit and Walkervillf. 
Canada Paint Co. , Montreal. 
Consolidated Plate Glass Co. , Toronto. 
Dods, P. D., 4 Co., Montreal. 
Dominion Linseed Oil Co., Montreal. 
Imperial Varnish and Color Co., Toronto. 
Jamieson, R. O, 4 Co., Montreal. 
Lucas, John, 4 Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Luxfer Prism Co., Toronto. 
McArthur, Corneille 4 Co., Montreal. 
McCaskill, Dougan 4 Co., Montreal. 
Merrick, Anderson 4 Co., Winnipeg. 
Nobles 4 Hoare, London, Eng. 
Queen City Oil Co., Toronto. 
Ramsay 4 Son, Montreal. 
Sherwin-Williams Co., Montreal. 
Standard Paint and Varnish Works, 

Windsor, Ont. 
Thome. R. E., Montreal. 

Painters Tools and Supplies. 
United Factories, Toronto. 
Waggoner Ladder Co., London, Ont. 

Patent Solicitor. 

Cullen, Orlan Clyde, Washington, D.C. 

Perforated Sheet Metals. 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 

Plumbers' Tools and Supplies. 

Bullard Automatic Wrench Co., Provi- 
dence, R.I. 
Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 
Gauber Brass Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Gies, Philip, Berlin, Ont. 
Jardine, A. B., & Co , Hespeler, Ont. 
Millen, John, to. Sons, Montreal. 
Morrison, J as., Brass nfg. Co., Toronto. 
Page-Hersey Iron 4 Tube Co., Guelph. 
Standard Ideal Sanitary Co., Port Hop*, 

Portland Cement. 

Hyde, F., 4 Co., Montreal. 
Thompson, B. 4 S. H. 4 Co., Montreal. 

Poultry Netting. 

Page Wire Fence Co., Walkerrille, Ont. 
Greening, B., "Wire Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Refrigerators. 
Davidson, Thoa., Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Sanderson-Harold Co., Paris, Ont. 

RooSng Supplies. 
Bird, J. A. <fe W., <fe Co., Boston. 
Jenking, A. C, Montreal. 
McArthur, Alex., <fc Co., Montreal 
Metal Shingle 4 Siding Co., Preston, Ont. 
Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto. 
Paterson Mfg. Co., Toronto 4 Montreal. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Saws. 

Disston, Henrv, 4 Sons, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Shurly 4 Dietrich, Gait, Ont. 
Sap Buckets and Spouts. 
Kemp Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Scales. 

Fairbanks Co., Montreal and Toronto. 
Gurney Scale Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Merrick, Anderson 4 Co. . Winnipeg. 
New- Warren Scale Co., Montreal. 

Screen Doors and Windows. 

Sanderson-Harold Co., Paris, Ont. 
United Factories, Toronto. 

Screws, Nuts, Bolts. 

Acme Lathe ProductsfCo. , Manchester 
Bayliss, Jones 4 Bayliss, Wolverham- 

ton, Eng. 
Canada Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Morrow, John, Machine Screw Co., 

Ingereoll, Ont. 

Sewer Pipes. 

Canadian Sewer Pipe Co., Hamilton 
Hyde, F., 4 Co., Montreal. 

ShelfBozes. 

Bennett Mfg. Co., Piokering, Ont. 



Shelf Brackets. 

Atlas Mfg. Co., New Haven, Conn 

Ship Chandlery. 

Lewis, Rice, 4 Son, Toronto. 

Silver-Plated Ware. 

Ontario Silver Co., Niagara Falls. 
Toronto Silver Plate Co., Toronto. 
Standard Silver Co., Toronto. 
Weeton, G., Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Sporting Goods. 

Fisher, A. D., Toronto. 
Lewis, Rice, 4 Son, Toronto. 

Stable Fixtures. 

Greening, B. Wire Co., Hamilton. Ont. 
Oneida Community Co., Niagara Falls, 

Ont. 
Metal Shingle to. Siding Co., Preston, Ont 

Stamps, Stencils, etc. 
Superior Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Steel Castings. 

Montreal Steel Works. Montreal. 

Steel Rails. 

Algoma Steel Co — Drummond, McCall 

& Co., Agents, Montreal. 
Jackson, C. F., 4 Co., Vancouver, B.C. 
Morton, B. K., 4 Co., Sheffield, Eng. 
Nova Scotia Steel & Coal Co., New Glas- 
gow, N.S. 

Stock Food. 

Colonial Stock Food Co., Toronto. 
International Stock Food Co., Toronto. 
Naisbitt Co., Toronto. 

Store Lighting. 

Auer Light Co., Montreal. 
Grose, Walter, Montreal. 

Stoves and Tinware, Radia- 
tors, Furnaces, etc. 

Adams Co., Dubuque, Iowa. 

Batty Stove 4 Hardware Co., Toronto. 

Canadian Heating 4 Ventilating Co., 

Owen Sound. 
Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Gies, P., Berlin, Ont. 
Guelph Foundry Co., Guelph. 
Gurney Foundry Co. , Toronto. 
Kemp Mnfg. Co., Toronto. 
McOlary Mfg. Co., London. 
Merrick, Anderson <fc Co., Winnipeg. 
Stewart James Mfg. Co., Woodstock. 
Telephone City Stoves, Brautford. 
Western Foundry Co., Wingham. 
Wright, E. T.,4 Co., Hamilton. 

Stove Polish. 

St. Arnaud Freres, Montreal. 

Tacks. 

Ontario Tack Co., Hamilton. 
Wynn, T. H., Hamilton. 

Traps. 

Mast, J. M., Mfg. Co., Lititz, Pa. 

Vises. 

Lamplough, F. W., 4 Co., Montreal. 

Wall boating. 

Alabastine Co., Paris, Ont. 

Wall Paper. 

Staunton's Limited, Toronto. 

Wall Paper Trimmer. 

Ridgeley Trimmer Co., Springfield, 

Warehouse Trucks. 

Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 

Washing Machines, etc 

Connor, J. If . 4 Son, Ottawa. 
Dowswell Mfg. Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Taylor Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Wholesale Hardware. 

Birkett, Thos., 4 Sons Co., Ottawa. 
Canada Hardware Co. , Montreal. 
Howland, H. S., Sons 4 Co., Toronto. 
Kennedy Hardware Co., Toronto. 
Lewis Bros. 4 Co., Montreal. 
Lewis, Rice. 4 Son, Toronto. 
Merrick, Anderson & Co. , Winnipeg. 

Window and Sidewalk Prisms. 

Hobbs Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 
Luxfer Prism Co., Toronto. 

Window Cards and Signs. 

Martell-Stewart Co., Montreal. 

Wire Springs. 

Henderson, J. A., Montreal. 
Wallace, Barnes Co. , Bristol, Conn. 

Wire, Wire Rope, Cow Ties, 
Fencing Tools, etc. 

Bayliss, Jones 4 Bayliss, Wolverham- 

ton, Eng. 
Amerioan Steel and Wire Co., New 

York, Montreal, Chicago. 
Dennis Wire and Iron Co., London, Ont. 
Dominion Wire Mnfg. Co., Montreal and 

Toronto. 
Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 
Ironside, Son 4 Co., London, Eng. 
McGregor - Ban well Fence Co., Windeor, 

Ont. 
Merrick, Anderson 4 Co. , Winnipeg. 
Oneida Community, Niagara Falls 
Owen Sound Wire Fence Co., Owen Sound 
Page Wire Fence Co., Walkerville, Ont. 
Walter. E. F. 4 Co., Montreal. 
Western Wire 4 Nail Co., London, On 

Woodenware. 

Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 
United Factories, Toronto. 
Waggoner Ladder Co., London, Ont. 

Wrapping Papers. 

Canada Paper Co., Toronto. 
McArthur, Alex., it Co , Moatreat. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 28, 1905 




COVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy, N.Y 

Steel Carriage and Wagon Jacks 

Harness Snaps, Chain, Rope and Web 
Goods, etc. 

SOLD BY ALL LEADING JOBBERS. 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 

Jra^^s u ^~^3f Largest VarietY, 

,B ^-" , "/>f Toilet, Hand, Electric Power 

ARE THE BEST. 

High cut Quality Grooming and 
Sheep-Shearing Machines. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

SEND FOB CATALOGUE TO 
intriean Shearer Mfg. Co., Nashua. N.H..USA 

Wiebusch & Hilger, Limited, special New York 
representatives, 9-15 Murray Street. 





+ + + ******>* + *+********>* + * 

3 a most useful firm I 

4 1 We cut to your order any size ou short notice £ 

| BRASS- COPPER; 

— Sheets 
— Tubes 
—Rods 



The waste is ours — not much waste, though. 



The Booth Copper Co., 

LIMITED, 
4 119-123 Queen St. East, JT 

TORONTO. 



$2 



FOR THIS SMALL SUM THE 



$2 



MANUFACTURER—SUPPLY MERCHANT 

may keep posted on new openings 
«. for trade. 

™£ CANADIAN CONTRACT RECORD 

reports weekly all projected building and other 
construction works throughout Canada as well 
as new business enterprises. 



Send your name and address with $2 for 
a year's Subscription to 

Canadian Contract Record 

$2 Toronto, Montreal and Winnipeg $2 



TO MANUFACTURERS' 
AGEISTS : 

Hardware and Metal has enquiries 
from time to time from manufacturers and 
others wanting representatives in the leading 
business centres here and abroad. 

Firms or individua's open for agencies in Canada 
or aHn>ad may have their names and addresses 
placed on a special list kept for the information of 
enquirers in ot various offices throughout Canada 
and in Great Britain without charge. 



Address 



Business Manager 



HARDWARE A1SD METAL 

Montreal and Toronto. 



t 



Want Ads. 



In this paper cost 2 cents per word first 
insertion, 1 cent per word subsequent in- 
sertions. Contractions count as one word, 
but five figures (such as $1,000) may pass 
as one word. Cash remittance to cover 
cost must in all cases accompany orders, 
otherwise we cannot insert the advertise- 
ment. When replies come in our care 5 
cents additional must be included for for- 
warding same. Many large business deals 
have been brought about through adver- 
tisements of 20 or 30 words. Clerks can be 
secured, articles sold and exchanged, at 
small expenditure. 

MacLEAN PUBLISHING CO., Limited 
Montreal and Toronto. 



DIAMOND STOVE PIPE DAMPER. 



17. S. Patent June 25th, 1895 



Canadian Patent December Uth, 13) 




^OCLUE, \< 



Made by 
THE ADAMS COMPANY, Dubuque, Iowa, U.S.A.>TA.YL0R-?0RBB3 CO., Limited. Guelph, On 



...ESTABLISHED 1849... 



Capital and Surplus, SI, 500,000. Offices Throughout the CivUiced World. 

Exeoutive Offioes : Nos. 346 and 348 Broadway, Hew York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers information that reflects the financial condition and 
the controlling circumstances of every seeaer o mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the 
merchants, by the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information nc 
effort is spared, and no reasonable exp> nse considered too great, that the results may justify its claim as an 
authority on all matters affecting commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have 
bee'i steadily extended, and it furnishes information concerning mercantile persons throughout tnt 
civilized world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, jobbing 
and manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and business corporation!. 
Specific terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of it* offices. Correspondence Invited. 

OFFICES IN CANADA 



HALIFAX. N 8. 
OTTAWA, ONT. 
VANCOUVKB. B.O. 



HAMILTON. ONT. 
QUEBEC, QUE. 



LONDON, ONT. 
8T. JOHN, N.B, 
WINNIPEG, MAN. 



MONTREAL, QUI. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



TH0S. C. IRVING, Gen. Ma*. Western Canada. Toronto. 



Walker Cork Screws 

Over seventy varieties to select from. Every one 
tested and guaranteed. Write for Cork Screw- 
Catalogue with new and original illustrated poem, 
"Sir Cork Screw's Soliloquy." 

ERIE SPECIALTY COMPANY, Erie, Pa., U.S.A. 



January 28, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



IRON 



Bars ia Flats, Rounds, Squares, 
Ovals, Half-Ovals, Half-Rounasand 
Bands. Also Wrought Washers. 
OOOD QUALITY. PROflPT SHIPMBNT. 



London Rolling Mill Co. 

Limited, 
LONDON, CANADA. 



STEELI 




LUFKIN 



MEASURING TAPES 

Steel, Metallic, Linen, Pocket, Iss Skin, 

Pat. Leather, Bend Leather, Etc. 



ARE THE BEST AND MOST POPULAR TAPES IN THE WORLD. 
YOUR STOCK IS NOT OOMPLETE WITHOUT THEM. 

LUFKIN RULE CO., Saginaw, Mich, U.S.A. 

London Office and Warehouse— *8 Lime St. New York City Branch 28» Broadway. 

For sale by ALL PROMINENT CANADIAN HARDWARE JOBBERS. 



f 



I 



\ 



\ 



Canada is Big 



We have need of many agents. This 
is why we are advertising so constantly. 
There are several thousand hardware 
dealers in the country, all of whom 
ought and can be agents for 

INTERNATIONAL 
STOCK FOOD 

You have the best of opportunities to 
sell our food, because you are continu- 
ally in touch with farmers and stock- 
breeders. 

So write for an agency. 

DO IT TO-DAY. 

INTERNATIONAL STOCK POOD CO. 

TORONTO 




<& Australasian «£ 
Hardware and Machinery, 

The Organ of the Hardware, Machinery 
and Kindred trades of the Antipodes. 

SUBSCRIPTION $1.25 PER ANNUM, 

post free to any part of the world. 
PUBLISHING OFFICES: 

Fink's Buildings. 



Melbournj 
Sydney, 
BRITISH OFFICES : 
London, 



Post Office Chamber*. 



•42 Cannon St.,E.C. 



CANADIAN AND AMERICAN ENQUIRIES will receive prompt 
attention if addressed to the LONDON OFFICE, 42 CANNON 



STREET, E.C. 



Specimen Copies Free on Application. 



# 1st. 1868. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 28, 1905 



'*'^'%'*fc / %^'%'%>'«V'%/%/%^%/%'%'%^/%/%/%^1 




Inc. 1896. 



I Black Diamond File Works 



G. & H. Barnett Company 



!! 
!! 

(I 
(' 


t 



PHILADELPHIA 



Twelve 



Medals 




i 
| 

!! 



Awarded 
By JURORS * 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 



yy 







WALTER GROSE, s«iu«e agent for 

THE DOMINION. 



"Redstone 
Sheet Packing 

For use in highest pressures for 
Steam, Hot or Cold Water and 
Air. Packs equally well for al 
No trouble with leaky joints 
when they are packed with 
" REDSTONE. " The most 
satisfactory packing on the 
market. Try a sample lot and 
be convinced of its merits. 

Manufactured solely by 

THE GUTTA PERCHA & RUBBER MFG. CO. 

OF TORONTO, LIMITED. 

Temporary Offices: 

15 East Wellington Street, Toronto. 

Branches— MONTREAL, WINNIPEG. 



The Newmarket Power 
Horse Clipper 

Made by 

Burman & Sons Ltd., Birmingham, Eng. 

This machine is strongly and soundly built, 
guaranteed perfect and has been adopted by His 
Majesty's War Office. The Driving Wheel is 
28 inches, giving a speed of 2800 cuts per minute. 

The Flexible Shaft is 6 feet long, covered 
with waterproof canvas hose and long enough for 
operator to get at all parts of the horse. 

Write for Prices and Other Particulars 

B.&S.H.THOMPSON&C0. 



LIMITED 



S3 St. Sulpice Street, MONTREAL 



SADLER*HAWORTH 



C 



3 



E&ttXfr 



Standard 




WAREHOUSES S: FACTORIES 

AT 

MONTREAL^ TORONTO. 






CIRCULATES EVERYWHERE IN CANADA 

Alio in Great Britain United States, West Indies, South Africa and Australia. 

HARDWARE-METAL 

A WeeKly Newspaper devoted to the Hardware, Metal, Machinery, 
Heating and Plumbing Trades in Canada. 



VOL. XVII 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, FEBRUARY 4, 1905 



NO. 5 




CARVERS 
CASED GOODS 
TABLE CUTLERY 



BUTCHERS' 
HUNTING S. 
POCKET KNIVES 




FOR SALE BY LEADING WHOLESALE HOUSES. 



FUUR Aof US. 




"FLEUR DE LIS" 
GALVANIZED IRON 



Equal to any but "Queen's Head." 
Every sheet guaranteed. 



JOHN LYSA6HT, Limited, Maker., A. C. LESLIE A CO., MOHTEXAi 
BRISTOL. EVe. Managers Canadian IraJM*. 



HIGH-GRADE 

"Empress" 

Lawn Mower. 



The "Empress" is distinguished in being 
Bali-Bearing. The only ball-bearing Mower 
made in Canada. 




The "EMPRESS" Ball-bearing. 



KNIVES made of the very best STEEL ; CUPS for cage balls, and CONES are case hardened. Every 
part is BRITISH MADE— No United States goods used. Patented in Canada, United States and Great Britain. 
Made in 12, 14, 16, 18, 20 inch. A High-Grade Mower for best trade. Send for Catalogue C— tells all about it. 



-ORDER EARLY FROM YOUR JOBBER 



V 



Taylor-Forbes Company 

Montreal Branch ' ThC L * r ? est Manufacturers of Hardware in Canada. LIMITED. 

9 De Bresoles St. ' GUELPH, CANADA 



CLASSIFIED UST OF ADVERTISEMENTS ON PACE 55. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



February 4, 1905 



BUTCHERS' TOOLS 




TOTilfNiP 



JOSEPH RODGERS & SONS 5 
ENGLISH 






NICHOLS Butcher 



Tools- 



TUR^ D 



BUTCHER 
KNIVES 



Write for trade prices. 

RICE LEWIS 



BUTCHER SAWS 




SON 



LIMITED 



TORONTO. 



February 4, 1905 HARDWARE AND METAL 

QAYLISS, JONES & BAYLISS, Lo 



MANUFACTURERS OF 
PATENT SELF-ADJUSTING, ROUND-BAR, UNCUMBABLE 



RAILING. 

No. F2SIB, with BLUNT POINTS. 




PLAIN AND 
ORNAMENTAL 

CATES, 

Etc. 



List free. 



Suits level also 

undulating: ground. 

Price from 4s. 9d. 

per lineal yard, 

f o.b London or 

Liverpool, 

in bundles. 




Also Manufacturers of IRON AND WIRE FENCING, 
BOLTS, PATENT NUTS, TIE-BARS, Etc. Catalogue Free. 

r,°."s"- WOLVERHAMPTON, ^ MID 

LONDON OFFICES AND SHOWROOMS: 139 and 141 CANNON ST., E C. 



Don't forget to get oar 
prices for,. 



SPRING GOODS 



o 



BEFORE BUYING 

Lawn Mowers, Lawn Rakes, 



Rubber 


Hose, 


Harvest Tools, 


Shovels 


and 


Spades, 


Paris 


Green, 


Green Wire 


Cloth, 


Churns, 


Whee 


Ibarrows. 


■ ■ ■ 



Builders' and Lumbermen's Supplies Always 
on Hand 



THOS. BIRKETT & SON CO., 

OTTAWA, ONT. 



LIMITED 




"LIGHTNING 1 



GEM" 



"BLIZZARD' 








mRCQT IPC PDCAIUI CDEC7CDG in practical use, because convenient, 
DCOI IUl UncMIVI rnr.C/_CnO compact in size, use smallest amount of 
Ice and salt, run easily, freeze quickly, produce smoothly frozen creams or desserts 
with little bother and less work. 

THE ONLY FREBZERS riADE having Cedar Pails with Electric Welded Wire Hoops 
Cans of Heavy Tin with Drawn Steel Bottoms, Automatic Tin Scrapers. 



AMERICAN" 

TWIN FREEZERS 



(2 in I) 



Freezes two flavors of Ice Cream or an Ice or Sherbet 
and Ice Cream at one and same time, in one Freezer. 
Something' entirely new. Never done before. 

ASK YOUR JOBBER FOR THEM. 
SEND FOR NEW FREEZER BOOK. 

NORTH BROS. MFG. CO. 

PHILADELPHIA, P.A. 




LIGHTNING" "CROWN 

ICE CHIPPERS 



"GEM" 
ICE SHAVE 



HARDWARE AND MBTAL 



February 4, 1905 



SAP SPOUTS 



Patented IS96 



STEEL 




Supplied with or without hooks 



™" EUREKA %,.„ 

Sap Spouts are ever popular, be- 
cause they are economical and 
durable, safe and secure, no leak- 
age, easiU inserted, do not injure 
the tree, secure full flow of sap. 
All packed in cardboard boxes, 
100 each 




SAP BUCKETS 




Cuts show 
Full Size 
of Spouts. 



IMPERIAL" 

TAPERED 



SUBSTANTIALLY MADE 



Long Pattern 

SLIGHTLY FLARING, FITS CLOSELY TO THE TREE 
AND WILL NOT OVERFLOW UNTIL NEARLY FULL. 




Western Pattern 



Made from heavy tinned shee 
especially adapted 

FOR COVERED 
SAP 
BUCKETS 



The THOS. DAVIDSON MF6. CO., Limited, . . . MONTREAL 



PIG IRON 



Enquire for our prices before buying. 



M. & L. Samuel, Benjamin & Co. 



503 Temple Building 

English House— 16 Philpot Lane, LONDON, ENGLAND. 

2 



TORONTO. 



February 4, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



PadlocK Logic 

To carry a stock of tobacco in a Hardware store is eccentricity. 
To refuse to handle silverware may be prudence. 
But to try to do business without an up-to-date line of Padlocks 
is double-barreled folly. 




U. '5-A.f~~~~ 

FEBrtlWO 




fiNEI 



No. 823. Solid cast bronze case and 
shackle, 2 nickel-plated flat steel 



No. 2. Dark rustless steel case and shackle 
2 corrugated steel keys. 



RETURNED 

^b 4.. my 

JO LU4rt~*^ 



No. 7425. Bronze plated case, 
brass spring shackle, 2 levers, 
2 nickel-plated keys. 




No. 412 Bower barfT steel 
case, brass locking mech- 
anism, steel keys. 




No. 4II7 1 4 . Brassed steel case, spring shackle, 
2 levers and 2 keys. 



No. 2916V Bright steel case, heavy spring shackle, eight 
secure levers, 2 double bited keys. 



Always 
address tHe 
Montreal 
Office 



Lewis Bros. CSL Co. 

Importers and Distributers 

Montreal 



Toronto 
Ottawa 



V 



ancouver 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



February 4, 1905 



Oar Representative* 

are showing an extensive range of new lines that will be of interest to you. 

WAIT AND SEE THEM 

E. F. WALTER & CO., "Si £ Montreal 




BELIEVE US 



We know something about Washing Machine construction, for we make many styles 
and have for years. But there is one that we know to be king of all. It is 

TI1E "NEW CENTURY" WASHING MACHINE 

It combines advanced scientific features with the maximum economy of Time, 
Fabric and Strength. 

We invite all dealers to send for our descriptive catalogue. 



THE DOWSWELL MANUFACTURING CO., Limited, 



HAMILTON. 




Improved 

Steel 
Wire 
Trace 
Chain* 



Every chain guaranteed. 
Gives universal satisfaction 



The 

B. Greening Wire Co. 

Limited 

Hamilton, Ont., Montreal, Que. 



NOW 

IS THE TIME TO PLACE YOUR ORDER FOR 

BARB WIRE 



PLAIN- 



Galvanized Wire 

Galvanized Coiled Spring 

Staples 

Wire Nails, Screws 

ALL CANADIAN-MADE GOODS. 



DOMINION WIRE MFG. CO. 



LIMITED 



MONTREAL and TORONTO. 



February 4, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Have You Seen Them ? 

For Beauty, FinisH and Quality, tHe 
"Maple Leaf" Harvest Tools are unexcelled. 




No. 122. Manure ForK. 




No. 136. Spading ForK. 




No. 2*3. Beet ForK. 




No. 108. Hay ForK. 




,. „ — -■. ■ i_. [- l li m i 



No. 155. SocKet Field Hoe. 



TO THE HARDWARE TRADE- 




No. 43. Patent V Blade H 



When placing your order for harvest tools with your jobber it will be to your advantage 
to specify for the "Maple Leaf" Harvest Tools. Should your jobber be unable to supply 
them, send your order to us and it will receive prompt and careful attention. 

The Maple Leaf Harvest Tool Co., Limited, Tillsonburg, Ont. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



February 4, 1905 



ONTARIO SILVER CO., 



Limited, 
NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA. 

, , , FLATWARE, CUTLERY a 

Manufacturers of ELECTRO PLATE. . 

Ask for our Catalogue and Quotations. 



The Best Door Closer is . . . 

NEWMAN'S INVINCIBLE FLOOR SPRING | 

Will close a door silently against any pressure of wind. 
Has many working advantages over the ordinary 
spring, atid has twice the wear. In use through- 
out Great Britain and the Colonies. Gives perfect 

satisfaction. Made oily by 

W. NEWMAN & SONS, 

Hospital St., - - BIRMINGHAM 





il 


A Popular. Profit- 
able and Seasonable 
Line to Handle. 


iJPm 


Dennis' 


ffil^n 


Flexible Steel Wire 




Door Mats 


DENNIS WIRE AND IRON CO. 


Send for Catalogue 


LONDON, ONT. 



Oilan Clyde Cullen, G.E.L.L.M. 

Counseller at Law U.S. Supreme Court. 
Registered Attorney U.S. Patent Office, 

U.S. and Foreign Patents, Caveats, Copy- 
rights and Trade Marks. Military and 
Naval Inventions a specialty. Address, 

Box 264, Station G, Washington, D.C. 

CUN SHOP and MODEL SHOP 

Warren White Sulphur Springs, 

Totten P.O., Virginia. 



Buy the Best. 




HERCULES 

Sash Cord. 

Star Brand Cotton Rope 

Star Brand Cotton Clothes Lines 

Star Brand Cotton Twine 

Por Sale by all Wholesale Dealers. 




DAVID MAXWELL & SONS 

ST. MARYS, ONT., CANADA. 

"Maxwell Favorite Churn." RHH8. 

^^^^^^^_^_ _ ^_^^^^^^^^^^^^^_ Improved Steel 

Stand, Roller 
Bearings, and Foot and Hand Lever Drive, and Detachable Driving 
Link. Improved for season of 1904. Steel or Wood Frame as desired. 



Steel Frame Support. 



I stnrn Mnnrarc Hi S n and Low Wheels, from 12 in. to 
LdVVIl I'lOWClS. 20 in - widths - Cold Rolled Steel 
Shafting, Crucible Steel Knives and 

^~^^^~ ^— """^^ Cutting Plate. 

If your Wholesale House does not offer you these articles 

SEND DIRECT TO US. 





MAXWELL MOWER 



8-in. Low Wheel. 



Wheelbarrows 



In Four 
Different 
Sizes. 



SPRINGS 

For Clocks, Phonographs, Typewriters and Steam 
Drills — in any quantity. 

CATALOG MAILED UPON APPLICATION. 

SEND SAMPLES OR SPECIFICATIONS FOR PRICES 



THE WALLACE BARNES CO., 



BRISTOL, CONN 



TACKS 


Factory equipped with the Make inquiries 
latest Improved machinery. Get our prices 


AGENTS WANTED 


THOS. H. WYNN, - - HAMILTON 



Do NOT accept "Just as good." 
INSIST upon getting 



SWORD an5 TORCH 

when buying galvanized sheets. 
Lowest Price for F"irie Quality. 

Agent for 

J. A. HENDERSON, T. W. & J. WALKER, 

Board of Trade Bid£., MONTREAL, WOLVERHAMPTON 



February 4, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Bf- 



T 



Good steel, correct design, skilled workmen 

make Gawen Gilmore's Augers and Auger Bits the best 

offered to the Canadian Hardware Trade. 

NED RET 

«qq You can talk quality all the time when selling them. 

They bore fast. ~ /d 

In a test, a Gilmore Y2 in. auger bit went through a 1 in. board in 12 revolutions, 
two American of the same size in 17 and 23 revolutions. 

Sold by almost the entire jobbing trade of the Dominion. 



Frothingham & Workman, Limited 

Wholesale 
Hardware and Iron Merchants, 

Montreal, Canada. 
For 96 years sellers of hardware. 





1 



A warm wave 

of prosperity strikes the dealer handling 

Peerless Iceland Freezers 

Peerless Iceland advertisements cover the country ; are in every publication that 
influences the purchases of women. They put Peerless Iceland, 
merit so persistently and convincingly before your customers 
who can't help believing that the Peerless is the best, and the 
freezer that they want. They will buy of your competitor or 
order direct if you can't supply them. 

AsK your jobber. 

THE. DANA MFG. CO. 
Cincinnati. 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



February 4, 1905 



BURMAN'S 



CELEBRATED 



CLIPPERS 



-Contractors to the War and India Offices- 



PATENTEES AND MANUFACTURERS OF" 



Horse Clippers, Barbers' Clippers, Dog Clippers, Leg Clippers, 
Fetlock Clippers, Body Clippers, Mane Clippers . 

and Clippers of all descriptions. 



310 



274, A 




The Improved 

B. PATTERN 

"NEWMARKET" 

Detachable Plates. 

Improved Cap with Long 
Bearing. 

Rigidity and Easy Running. 

Accurately Machined and 
Perfectly Fitted. 



ALL PARTS INTERCHANGEABLE. 




The "Handicap" Clipper. 

The cheapest centre-adjustment clipper made. 



Bown's "Newmarket" Clipper. 

Our goods are stocked by all the leading Jobbers throughout the Dominion 



For Beauty of 

Design 

and 

Superiority 

of 
Workmanship 




The "NEWMARKET" 

POWER CUPPER 

stands 

Supreme 

and 

Unassailable. 



The "Newmarket" Power Clipper. 

Strong and Reliable. Speedy and Durable. Simple and Effective. 

BURMAN & SONS, Limited, "«■ BIRMINGHAM 

ENGLAND 



February 4, 1905 HARDWARE AND METAL 

tm*m*m n* m*m***H*t * * mum finmm\*mmm*H*mm+u- i i m ************** ****** t \ 



' 






Binder Twine 

BLUE RIBBON, 650 ft. to the lb. 
REDCAP, - 600 ft. to the lb. 
TIGER, - - 550 ft. to the lb. 

STANDARD, 500 ft. to the lb. 
GOLDEN CROWN, 500 ft. to the lb. 



Still the Favorites of both FARMERS and DEALERS. 



If SHEAF BRAND is preferred to any of the above, we are prepared to supply 
it, .as we are the Proprietors of this Trade Mark. 

Nothing but Select Fibre Used. 
Skilled Canadian Labor. 

Our Twine is not only evenly spun, but is WELL BALLED. 
This is very inroortant, prevents tangling in Twine Box 

Write for prices. 

CONSUMERS CORDAGE CO., Limited 

MONTREAL. 

Mills-MONTREAL and HALIFAX. 



* * *** * *i\****+m*****iim%*m m t\ m *m* 

9 









1 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



February 4, 1905 



The 

IS SUPERIOR 



Kemb Cold Blast Lantern 






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FOLLOWING REASONS: 










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/*."* 



^¥ 



*£* 






R.nufactured by KEMP MANUFACTURING CO., TORONTO, C.nad. 



February 4, 1905 



Hardware and M»tal. 




MAKING ONE'S 
CATALOGUE PROFITABLE 




H 



ELLO, is that Mr. Black? Hello, Tom; Fred 

Jackson is speaking Say Tom, I'm 

thinking of getting out a catalogue for our 
business and I want to talk the matter over 
with you, to get 'pointers.' When can you 

see me? ; 4 o'clock? All right, I'll be over 

at 4 Good-by." 

Accordingly, 4 o'clock found me in Tom Black's office. 
Tom was in the wholesale cloak and suit business, and 
had issued catalogues for a great many years, and I knew 
he could give me good counsel. I was in the electrical 
supplies trade, had worked up a good connection and was 
anxious to reach out after new trade. I had been thinking 
for a long time about issuing a catalogue of the lines I 
handled and had made some inquiries. The cost of a 
catalogue I was told would amount to at least $1,600, which 
would give me an edition of 2,000 copies., Then there 
would be envelopes in which to send them out, addressing 
and postage, another $125, I reckoned. 

These were pretty stiff figures, and I hesitated about 
investing this amount of money in a form of advertis- 
ing I had no experience in. So I was very glad to talk 
it over with a man whose experience was both long and 
successful. 

We lit our cigars, and proceeded to business. 

"Going to get out a catalogue, eh! Fred.?" 

"Thinking of it." 

"Counted up the cost." 

"Yes, partly." 

"How much?" 

"Between $1,700 and $2,000, for 2,000." 

"That's about 10 -cents a piece— how are you going 
to send it out— by mail?" 

"Yes, that is my idea." 

"To whom— everybody?" 

"Well, to all those with whom I hope to do business 
—customers and others." 

"I suppose you are aware that there is a pretty 
big waste in sending out catalogues." 

"Yes, I suppose there is, but I really don't know 
much about it. That's what I want to talk over with 
you. You've been getting out a catalogue for a good 
many years, and I take from that that it is a good 
thing for you. Then Why not for me?" 

"Well, it should be a good thing for you, but you'll 
have to go about it right, or you'll lose a pile of money. 
I know to my sorrow that it has cost me a pretty penny 
to make my catalogue pay." 

"What was your experience, then?" 

"Oh, it is a common enough experience I guess, but 
I'll tell it to you for what it's worth, and perhaps it 
will help you. 

"I published my first catalogue away back in 1885. 
It was a good deal smaller than the one I issued last 
year and a pretty homely one, I can tell you. Fortunately, 
it didn't cost me a great deal— about $200. I sent it 
out among my customers, and it did me good. I got 
many orders, and the catalogue paid for itself easily. 
And so it was for the next four or five years. 

"Then I planned bigger things. I 'blew' myself in 
1897, and I got out a pretty expensive catalogue— fine 
paper, plenty of engravings, embossed cover, and all that 
—cost me $3,000, to say nothing of the mailing. I sent 
it to every cloak dealer in Ontario, Quebec, and the Mari- 
time provinces. In those days I didn't bother with the 
Northwest trade. Well, to say that I expected a big 



business is to put it mildly. I put on more travelers, 
bought heavily, and made up a big pile of stuff. I guess 
I must have spent that year $15,000 more than I had) 
been in the habit of spending— and perhaps you may 
remember my 'squeeze' the next year— how that I had 
to have a settlement." 

"How do you account for it?" 

"In several ways. I found that I got scarcely any 
business whatever from many firms to whom I sent my 
catalogue— firms that were new to us, and to whom we 
were new. From our regular customers the returns were 
all right, but we added very, very few new accounts. In 
the territory covered bv the new men I put on, I didn't 
get enough business to pay their expenses, let alone their 
salaries. Thev were good men, but the people they called 
on were conservative, and since they didn't know us, 
didn't want to do business with us." 

"Didn't your catalogue do you any good among these 
new people?" 

"Very little, I assure you. I asked the men to in- 
quire particularly about the catalogue sent, and their 
report was to the effect that very few catalogues had 
been saved; that the dealers remembered getting a copy, 
but that they had thrown it in the waste paper basket. 
Others had it put away among a mass of other catalogues, 
away out of sight, and had never looked at it a second 
time. They all agreed it was a beautiful catalogue. Of 
course there was a firm here and there who did place 
an order with me direct or through salesmen, but their 
number was very, very small. 'We don't know your house^' 
was the burden of our salesmen's story when they came 
in. I had sold only a fraction of what I had expected 
to sell, had an immense quantity of stock, a good portion 
made up, on hand, had used up all my samples in meet- 
ing the increased expenses, and as you know, I came 
near making an assignment. 

"Fortunately, my creditors perceived that my trouble 
was the result of misguided ambition, and my past 
record stood me in good stead, so that I had no difficulty 
in securing an extension of credit, to enable me to make 
a fresh start. 

"For the next year or two, I didn't issue a catalogue. 
My old customers were loyal without it, and as for new 
customers, I found that they had to be brought in by other 
means. I had learned one lesson, and that was that if I 
were ever to do business outside my old list of customers 
I had to make my business better known. 

"There were two methods open, one to send circulars 
to all the cloak dealers of Eastern Canada, and an ad- 
vertisement in the Dry Goods Review, the newspaper of 
the drv goods trade. I counted up the cost of the circu- 
lar plan, and finally rejected it— it promised to be too 
expensive, and was too much like the catalogue method — 
too likely to be ineffective. 

"Then I took up the matter with a Dry Goods Re- 
view man, and agreed to take a half page space for a 
year. The cost of which was something about $300. I 
wasn't concerned about direct results— what I was after 
was what they call publicity— I wanted to get known, 
and keep known. I prepared pretty good advertisements, 
if T do say it myself, and was content to let them do 
their silent work for the firm direct and for my travel- 
ers." 

"Did you send men out over the ground that had been 
unproductive before?" 

"No, not at first; I was not able to— I didn't have 
the money. However, I began to do business down east 



11 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



February 4, 1905 



without a representative. One day, about three or four 
months after I had been advertising, I got an inquiry 
for samples of a certain line of coats. I looked up the 
man in Bradstreet, and found him to be one of the best 
rated men in St. John. You may depend upon it I didn't 
waste much time in getting a parcel ready to express 
that night, and the letter I sent contained some pretty 
tempting quotations. I knew my goods were dead right 
at the figures, and confidently expected an order. It 
came all right enough, and a good one at that. I may 
just say here, that I've been doing business with that 
firm ever since, and both of us seem to be satisfied. 

"In the same way came occasional inquiries for sam- 
ples from other places in the East, with results some- 
times good, sometimes disappointing. I really didn't 
try to follow up inquiries at this time in any energetic 
way, I was concerned with getting on my feet again, 
and was satisfied with the success I was having. I felt 
pretty sure that when I did send a man East the story 
would be different from what it was in a former day. 

"But I got a surprise when letters began coming 
from the West, I hadn't been thinking about this field very 
much, and wasn't looking for business from that direc- 
tion. You can understand then, that I was tickled to find 
my advertising opening up for me a bran new field. Since 
that time, my Manitoba and Northwest business has 
become a very heavy item, and I am represented there 
all the time. 

"You'll be getting impatient, old man, to know what 
all this has to do with your catalogue, but I am coming 
to that— I'll first light another cigar if you don't mind. 

"When these inquiries began to increase, I found out 
the necessity of being able to send illustrations of new 
models in addition to those I used in my space in The 
Review where I was now using two pages. Many people 
didn't care to send for samples— particularly if they 
lived at far away points. 

' ' Then I had attractive folders prepared to enclose 
with correspondence, and I invited readers of The Re- 
view to send for these. By-and-by, these folders grew 
into a catalogue, and so for the past four years, I have 
issued twice a year, a catalogue of coats, suits, and 
jackets. " 

"Do you send these out to everybody?" 

"No, I have become wiser than to do that." 

"What do you do, then?" 

"I send my catalogues to a select mailing list, made 
up of those who are my regular customers, and those 
who are only occasional buyers; also to all those who 
have requested them. I make a feature of every adver- 
tisement that my catalogue is sent cheerfully to all who 
will send for it. I go on the assumption that those who 
don't ask for it don't want it, and if they had it, and 
didn't want it, would only throw it away. 'My catalogues 
cost me too much money to make fuel and scrap.' " 

"Do you ever get business from these people who 
write in for your catalogue?" 

"Oh, yes indeed. We make many new custo- 
mers in this way. When a man writes in for a cat- 
alogue, I have a letter sent him saying that a copy of 
the catalogue goes forward under separate cover, and 
inviting him to give it a careful perusal, and expressing 
the hope that he will be pleased to give us an order." 

"Does he reply to this letter as a rule?" 

"Not very often, I am sorry to say, but then I scarcely 
look for a direct reply. I expect to be able to get closer 
to him later on through one of our travelers. However, 
I don't let him forget us, if lie has not replied within 
six weeks, my card-index files will recall his name, and 
letter No. 2 is sent him, and similarly 2 months later letter 
No. 3. These letters aim to be as courteous and personal 
as possible, and do us good. In a majority of cases we 
get a reply to our third letter, and in many instances to 
our second letter." 

"What is the nature of these replies?" 

"Oh, it would amuse you to see some of them, they 
are so apologetic for their inattention to our correspon- 
dence. But most of these people express a willingness 
to look at our samples when our traveler calls, and if 



once a man looks at our samples, we are pretty sure of 
doing business together." 

' ' Every now and then a man comes into our place, 
and says he has never done any business with us though 
our travelers were callin ' on him frequently, but he 
had been noticing our advertisements in The Review for 
a long time and felt he was out of it unless he was doing 
business with us. He had sent for a catalogue, and hail 
decided after studying it that he should give us part 
of his business." 

"Well, old man, how do you apply all of this to my 
business. I think I catch your meaning, but would like 
you to condense it for me." 

"Well, Fred, it means in a nutshell— Advertise your 
catalogue. If your business warrants the issue of a cat- 
alogue, and from what you say, you should have a cat- 
alogue, go ahead and get one out. But don't imagine 
that the mere sending out of a catalogue is going to sell 
your goods. It helps, but without other help you'll find 
it was a bad investment. I could tell you of a good many 
firms who get out catalogues, some of them being expen- 
sive affairs, and who send them out to everybody whom 
they would like as customers, and I know that they are 
not getting anything like sufficient returns. Houses with 
experience have learned that it pays to put one's cat- 
alogues into the hands of those who request them, and 
that to induce requests, the business and the catalogue 
must be advertised in the one paper that is read by their 
customers. ' ' 

"What's- the newspaper for your business that reaches 
the trade you are after?" 

' There are two or three perhaps, that might answer, 
but I am more particularly concerned with developing 
my business among the wholesale and retail hardware 
trade, and the medium for this class is Hardware and 
Metal." 

"Then 1 would certainly advise you to arrange for 
adequate space in Hardware and Metal, and advertise 
your firm. In this way you will get to be known pretty 
generally, and from my experience, I assure you it is 
almost fatal for an unknown firm to hope to do busi- 
ness with any success. Make it a point to include in 
every advertisement a reference to your catalogue and 
offer to give it free to any one asking for it." 

"What about a follow-up system of letters such as 
you send out?" 

"By all means. Here, take with you copies of these 
I send out; you may find them suggestive." 

The hour or so I snent with Tom Black was time well 
employed, as I afterwards found out. I took his advice, 
and engaged space in Hardware and Metal. I explained 
to its advertising manager how it was that he was getting 
an order with so little trouble, and told him of my friend 
Black's experience. He told me that one of the greatest ob- 
stacles in the way of getting some firms to advertise was 
the fact that they issued catalogues, and seemed to think 
that this circumstance did away with the necessity of 
newspaper advertising. 

"We believe in catalogues," he said to me, "but we 
believe too, that, advertising in the proper medium 
doubles up their usefulness and productiveness." 

I have had a year or two's experience myself since 
that time and I have learned to believe every word of 
what he and Black said. 



WIRE NAILS, 



TACKS, WIRE 



Prompt Shipment 



The Ontario Tack Co., Limited 



Hamilton, Ont. 



February 4, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CATALOGUES AND BOOKLETS. 

For the convenience of its readers Hardware and 
Metal has opened its columns for the review of catalogues 
booklets or other such publications issued by manufacturers 
or wholesale dealers selling to the hardware, plumbing, 
machinery or metal trades. Retailers desiring such publica- 
tions may also hare inserted a note to that effect. It is re- 
quested that when any of the trade write for any booklet 
mentioned in these columns that they credit Hardware 
and Metal as the source of their information. 



c 



Chain Belting. 

'ATALOGUE No. 15C, of the Water- 

ous Engine Works Co., Limited, 

Brantford, Ont., deals with chain 

belting'. It is a handsome, standard 

size, 6x9 inches, catalogue, and contains 

100 pages. 

The catalogue is profusely illustrated, 
although only the general types of ap- 
pliances used are illustrated. However, 
the company have a very extensive 
variety of patterns and solicit inquiries 
from prospective buyers not finding in 
the catalogue what they require. In the 
front of the catalogue is given some use- 
ful information required in order to fur- 
nish estimates, which should prove of 
value to the reader. 

The first 22 pages are devoted to 
Ewart's detachable chain belting. This 
is followed by a sprocket list for the 
belting. Eight pages are devoted to the 
discussion of the application of this 
belting, and also eight pages to the 
Ewart chain conveyors. Some special 
detachable chains and their applications 
are touched on. Sixteen pages are de- 
voted to forged chains and their appli- 
cation. Conveyors, other than chain, are 
considered in the last part of the cata- 
logue. 

Hollow Ware. 

The 1905 price list of seamless steel 
enamelled hollow ware, manufactured 
by the Welsh Tinplate and Metal Stamp- 
ing Co., Limited, Llanelly, South Wales, 
is to hand. The list is in booklet form, 
8x5 inches and contains 59 pages. The 
left hand pages are reserved for illus- 
trations while the price lists are on the 
right hand pages. The index is a valu- 
able adjunct to the booklet. Readers 
of Hardware and Metal may secure one 
of these price lists upon application to 
the Welsh Tinplate and Metal Stamping- 
Co. 

New General Catalogue. 

In the notice of the B. Greening Wire 
Co. 's catalogues last week it should have 
been mentioned that this company are 
issuing a new general hardware cata- 
logue which will be mailed to all the 
hardware merchants next month— it is 
not ready yet — and the small books that 
were reviewed were simply sections of 



£ W. It. 

BRIGHTENS 
THE EARTH 




& £ W. It. 



BRIGHTENS 
THE EARTH 



Sherwin-Williams Varnishes have the same quality in 

them and the same push behind them as the SHERWIN-WlLLIAMS 

Paint. 

Our new "Brightens the Earth" varnish trade marK is 
destined to be to the varnish business, what our "Cover the 
Earth" paint trade mark is to the paint business. 

Both signify best quality and most push. 

If you are an S.W. P. Agent and do not now handle the 

full line of Sherwin-Williams Varnishes, you are getting 

only a fraction of the S- W. full line profits. 

If you are not an S.W. P. Agent, now is the time to get 
in line and take advantage of the opportunity we offer in our 
\ 905 agency proposition. Write us today. 

WThe Sherwin-Williams Co. paint and varnish makers 

Canadian Headquarters and Plant: 639 Centre St., Montreal, Que. 

Warehouses : 86 York St , Toronto; 147 Kannatyne St., K., Winnipeg, Man. 136 



this general catalogue. The Greening 
Co. find that a merchant will often have 
a customer that wants to refer to the 
tables in wire cloth, metals, wire, etc., 
and to save the merchant loaning his 
general book have issued these supple- 
mentary books which may be had upon 
application. 

Pretty Desk Calendar. 

A charming little desk calendar has 
come to the office of Hardware and 
Metal. The central feature is a colored 
picture of a beautiful girl. The calen- 
dar is the gift of the Standard Tool Co., 
of Cleveland and New York. 

Yankee Tools. 
A neatly arranged catalogue has 
reached us from the North Bros. Mfg. 
Co., Philadelphia, Pa., describing the 
popular "Yankee" tools put on the mar- 
ket, by them in 1898. The catalogue is 
1:5 



of convenient pocket size and the 24 
pages and cover contain numerous illus- 
tration of various sizes of ratchet 
screwdrivers, spiral ratchet screwdriv- 
ers, chuck and drills, countersink, auto- 
matic drills, reciprocating drills, pocket 
magazine screwdrivers, and tool sets. 
An additional feature of value is a table 
of weights of each class of tools put up 
in dozen lots ready for shipment. Read- 
ers who write for a copy of the catalogue 
should mention Hardware and Metal 
when doing so. 

Pneumatic Tools and Appliances. 
"Something Pneumatic," the monthly 
magazine issued by the Chicago Pneu- 
matic Tool Co., announces that the 
Chicago Storage Battery Co. has been 
merged into the first named concern. 
The January number gives several illus- 
trations of sand sifters, sand rammers, 
sand blasts, mechanical coal feeding de- 
vices, automatic oilers, etc. Excellent 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



February 4, 1905 



articles dealing with these machines and 
kindred subjects are also published, mak- 
ing the number very interesting to any 
users of machinery or pneumatic tools. 
The companies new departure allows 
them to make a specialty of igniting bat- 
tei-ies for automobile, gas and gasoline 
engines, an exhibit of these being made 
at the recent New York Automobile 
Show. The Toronto office of the com- 
pany is in the Temple Building and in- 
terested persons should mention Hard- 
ware and Metal when writing for copies 
of the magazine or information regard- 
ing pneumatic tools. 

Electrical Generators and Transformers 

Circulars Nos. 1093 and 1060 issued 
by the Canadian Westinghouse Co., 
Limited, Hamilton, Ont. (Toronto office, 
Lawlor Building), have been received. 
The first mentioned contains a series of 
illustrations of cuts describing self-con- 
tained direct current multipolar gen- 
erators, the accompanying reading mat- 
ter comprising a historical sketch of 
this class of electrical machinery as 
well as a full description of the general 
design, construction and working of the 
generators. The latter is devoted to an 
exposition of the advantage of the West- 
inghouse type N transformers, a superior 
but moderately priced device. Illustra- 
tions of fuse blocks, coils, transformers, 
terminal bPocks, cut-outs, etc., together 
with diagrams and dimensions of the 
transformers are given, together with a 
graphic printed description. The book- 
lets are valuable, to any interested in the 
development of ^electrical machinery. 
Mention Hardware and Metal if you' 
write for information. 



Get Ready for Cycling. 
A handsome catalogue embracing some 
unusually good lines in bicycle acces- 
sories has just been issued by the Can- 
ada Cycle and Motor Co., Bay and Tem- 
perance streets, Toronto. The book is 
very complete and will be indispensible 
to hardware merchants as a work of 
standard reference, particularly as this 
line is now almost wholly confined to 
the hardware trade. The Canada Cycle 
and Motor Co. is the only manufacturer 
of bicycle accessories in Canada. The 
trade will, therefore, readily see the ad- 
vantage of buying direct from the mak- 
ers. Any merchants who have not al- 
ready received one of these books can 
secure one promptly by dropping a card 
to the Canada Cycle and Motor Co. and 
mentioning Hardware and Metal. 




HAS A "GRIP" 
ON THE TRADE. 

IVER 
JOHNSON 

Revolver Grip. 

Progressive dealers instantly recognized its value — the demand was spontaneous 
As the result of extensive advertising there is already a large demand for this 
revolver. 

Have you placed your order ? 

"DON'T CARRY IT" — "WILL SEND AND GET IT"— 



INTEND TO HAVE IT" 



Hammer 

the 

Hammet 



Accidental} 
Discharge 
Impossible! 



are signs that 



-t> point to the door of your competi- 



New York Office: 
No. 99 Chambers St. 



tor, who. being alert and keen, realizes that "New Things" 
impart life and activity to his business and who instantly 
recognizes; the practicability and selling virtues of the 

IVER JOHNSON Revolver Grip 

Send for new catalogue just issued — a work of art — 
mailed free upon application. 

IVER JOHNSONS ARMS & CYCLE WORKS, 

FITCHBURG, MASS.. U.S.A. 



THE LATE MR. H. O. EDY. 

After carrying on a successful busi- 
ness in Montreal as manufacturers' 
agtnt for the past twenty-four years, Mr. 
H. 0. Edy died at his home last week 
of aneurism of the heart. He repre- 
sented the interests of the Kemp Mfg. 
Co. in Montreal, being a cousin of Mr. 
A. E. Kemp. For the past two years 
Mr. Edy had not been well and for two 
months and a half previous to his death 
was confined to his home in Westmount. 
He was forty-nine years of age and spent 
most of his life in Montreal. He is 
survived by a wife and one son. 



of any trace of acid. Finally they are 
rinsed, dried over steam pipes and then 
treated by a process of enameling. 



PROTECTING STEEL. 

A method of pickling steel common 
in Europe but new to this country has 
recently oeen applied in New York on 
a steel bridge. The pieces are boiled in 
a 10" per cent, solution of caustic snail 
to remove grease, and then rinsed in 
boiling water. Afterward they are dip- 
ped into a boiling 10 per cent, solution 
of sulphuric acid, until all the oxide is 
removed. They are again rinsled in 
boiling water, and dipped into a solu- 
tion of carbonate of soda, to free them 
14 



A PROFITABLE LINE FOR 
DEALERS. 

The hardware dealer generally does 
not realize just what a proltable line 
the bicycle accessories is. Although the 
bicycle has passed the craze days never- 
theless there is now, and probably al- 
ways will be, a steady and growing class 
of bicyclists. Old wheels are constant- 
ly needing new parts and repairs- 
riders new and old are looking for lit- 
tle improvements and odds and ends in 
accessories. If the dealer does not handle 
these he is probably losing a customer 
for other goods by driving him to an 
opposition merchant. Another point Eor 
consideration is the important fact that 
there is actually a larger percentage of 
profit on bicycle accessories than on the 
general line of hardware. 

The different manufacturers state that 
they will continue to aggressively adver- 
tise bicycles and this will no doubt add 
considerable stimulant to the demand. 
It, therefore, appears necessary for the 
up-to-date hardware merchant to see 
that his shelves contain a full line of 
these accessories. 



February 4, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO, 



Wholesale 
only 



HARDWARE MERCHANTS 
138-140 WEST FRONT STREET, TORONTO 



The Gonuino 
IVIic-IVIac " 1905 MocRoy Sticks. 



LIMITED 



Only 
Wholesale 




RETURNED 




The wood from which the 
"MIC-MAC" Hockey Stick is 
made is found in young hard- 
wood trees, which have grown 
to the correct shape in the 
woods, and trimmed carefully 
to the shape and finish which 
make it so desirable an article 
to use. 



Look for the trade mark 
"MIC-MAC" when you buy 
Hockey Sticks, and if you find 
it you can feel secure in the 
sticks you get. 



HOCKEY PUCKS. 




Trade Mark 
Registered. 

THE GENUINE "MIC-MAC" STICKS 

give the best satisfaction. 
Telegraph or Mail Orders Shipped Day Received. 



BOKER'S SKATES. 







H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., ...mixed. Toronto. 



QRAHAM NAILS ARE THE BEST 

Factory. Dufferln Street, Toronto, Oni, 

IS 



We Ship Prenptlj 



Hardware and Metal. 



HBAtiNQ AND PLUMBING 



February 4, 1905 







MANUFACTURERS Of 



MADE IN CANADA." 



Porcelain Enamel Bath Tubs, 



Porcelain Enamel Sinks, 



Porcelain Enamel Lavatories, 



Porcelain Enamel Lipped and Plain Urinals, 
Porcelain Enamel Slop Hoppers, 



Porcelain Enamel Eactory Wash Sinks. 



THE ONLY MANUFACTURERS OF ENAMELLED WARE IN CANADA 



Head Office and Factory : 

Port Hope, Out. 



Sales Office: 

So Colborne St., Toronto. 



lbl« 



V. : - A 



: ^ 



Seasonable Goods 



The "J. M. T.' 

Renewable-Disc Valve. 



Prepare for Spring Trade — You will require 
such lines as 

Valves, Injectors, 
Steam Guages, 
r Lubricators, Oil Cups, 
Pipe Fittings, &c. 

Our goods have a reputation and sell * 
readily, offering inducing profits to the (I 
dealer handling them. 






J. M. T. Valves and Injectors 

Are Good Lines to Stock 



The "J.M.T. ' Injector. 



The James Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., »»■*« Toronto 



i 



STEAM AND PLUMBING GOODS 



16 



February 4, 1905 



Hardware and Metal. 




THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF 
MASTER PLUMBERS AND STEAM 
AND HOT -WATER FITTERS OF 
CANADA. 



President — Robt. Ross, Toronto. 
Vice-President — A. J Hammond, Winnipeg. 
Secretary — J. A. Gordon, Montreal. 
Treasurer — F. G. Johnson, Ottawa. 

PROVINCIAL VICE-PRESIDENTS. 

Ontario — H. Mahoney, Guelph. 
Quebec — W. R. J. Hughes, Montreal. 
Nova Scotia — James Farquhar, Halifax. 
New Brunswick — W. Watson, Moncton. 
Manitoba — James Mold, Winnipeg. 
British Columbia— James Coughlan, Victoria. 

ONTARIO PROVINCIAL ASSOCIA- 
TION. 

OFFICERS. 

President — Win. Mansell, Toronto. 

Vice-President— W. J Walsh, Hamilton. 

Financial Secretary — Lewis LeGrow, Toronto. 

Treasurer — J. K. Wilson, Toronto. 

Secretary -W. H. Meredith, Toronto. 

Executive Committee— The officers and H. 
Mahoney, Guelph ; S. Mellon, Hamilton, and E. 
H. Russell, London. 

MONTREAL. 

President — Thos. O'Connel. 
Secretary — J. Gordon. 

TORONTO. 

President — Robert Ross. 
Vice-President — Geo. H. Cooper. 
Secretary-Treasurer — W. H. Meredith. 

HAMILTON. 

President — S. Mellon. 
Secretary — T. H . Davies. 

OTTAWA. 

President — Gil. Julien. 
Secretary — T. Thorpe Blyth. 

LONDON. 

President— B. Noble. 
Vice-President— Wm. Smith. 
Secretary-Treasurer — E. H. Russell. 



THE PLUMBING SUPPLY 
MARKET. 

Quebec. 

office of Hardware and Metal, 
232 McGill street, 

Montreal. Feb. 3, 1905. 

DEALERS in heating goods have 
been surprised at the manner in 
which orders are coming in tor 
heating goods at this late season. The 
market lias been active much longer 



than is usual and this activity is an 
index to t he increased business in gen- 
eral throughout the continent. In 
plumbing supplies there is a briskness 
and activity throughout, except perhaps 
in the Maritime Provinces where snow- 
storms have been severe. Prices con- 
tinue unchanged. 

Range Boilers— This season has seen 
a continuation in the demand for these 
much later than is customai'y. The de- 
mand still continues good. Pi-ices re- 
main unchanged. We quote : Iron clad, 
30 gallon, $6, and 40 gallon, $7.50 net: 
copper. 30 gallon, $22; 35 gallon, $24; 
40 gallon, $28. The discount on copper 
boilers is 15 per cent. 

Lead Pipe— The lead market continues 
firm but no advance has been made in 
the price of lead pipe. The demand for 
this is exceptionally good. We quote : 
Discount 30 per cent, f.o.b. Montreal, To- 
ronto, St. John, N.B., and Halifax; f.o.b. 
London, 15c per 100 lbs extra; f.o.b. 
Hamilton, 10c per 100 lbs extra. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings— In common 
with the demand for other plumbing 
supplies, orders for soil pipe and fittings 
have been coming in freely. Prices re- 
main unchanged as follows: Soil pipe, 
standard, 50 per cent, and 10 per cent, 
off list: standard fittings, 50 per cent, 
and 10 and 10 per cent, off list; medium 
and extra heavy soil pipe, 60 per cent. 
< ff : fittines, 60 and 10 per cent. off. 

Iron Pipe Fittings— For both heating 
and plumbing work there has been a big 
demand for these goods. We quote as 
follows : Discounts on all sizes of nip- 
ples up to 6 inch, 671-2 to 70 per cent. 

Iron Pipe — It was intimated recently 
that iron pipe would advance shortly 
and while indications will point in that 
direction there has as yet been no change 
in former quotations. The market is very 
active. We quote: Standard pipe, per 
100 feet in length under 19 feet, 
Black, 1-8 inch, $2.30: 1-4 inch. 
$2.30: 3-8 inch, $2.55; 1-2 inch, $2.85: 
3-4 in., $3.65; 1 in., $5.20; 11-4 in., 
$7.35; 11-2 in., $8.95; 2 in., $12.55. 
Galvanized— 1-4 in., $3.30; 3-8 in., 
*3.45: 1-2 in., $3.90: 3-4 in.. $5; 1 in., 
$7.20; 11-4 in., $10.05; 11-2 in., $12.20; 
2 in.. $16.85. In the above the discount 
on 1-8, 1-4 and 3-8 in black and 1-4 and 
3-8 in galvanized is 12 1-2 per cent. ; and 
on 1-2 to 2, inclusive, in black and gal- 
vanized is 15 per cent. Extra heavy 
pipe, plain ends are quoted per 100 feet 
as follows: Black, 1-2 in., $4.20; 3-4 in., 
$5.25: 1 in., $7.55; 11-4 in., $10.55; 
11-2 in., $12.75; 2 in., $17.60. Gal- 
vanized— 1-2 in., $5.25; 3-4 in., $6.65; 
1 in., $9.55; 11-4 in.. $13.25; 11-2 in., 
$16; 2 in., $21.90. The discount on all 
sizes of extra heavy pipe is 12 1-2 per 
eent. Coupling, 1-2 in. to 2 in., 55 per 
cent, discount; nipples, 1-4 and 3-8 

17 



in., 65 per cent., discount, and 1-2 to 
6 in., 70 per cent, discount. 

Ontario. 

Offioe of Hardware and Metal, 

10 Front itreet *ut. 

Toronto, Feb. 3, 19<i5. 

ORDERS are beginning to arrive 
more freely and jobbers and sup- 
ply mercnants seem convinced 
that trade has definitely began to im- 
prove. The market in fittings is very 
unsettled. The steady advance in the 
raw material and manufactured goods 
in United States has affected the local 
supply men who have no stock on hand. 
A few wholesale dealers have their stock 
for the coming season already purchased 
and they can supply retail merchants at 
a lower figure than those dealers who 
have yet to order from the manufactur- 
ers. Owing to the advanced price of 
iron, prices on baths are expected to 
advance. A better demand is current 
for iron pipe. Retail merchants have 
almost concluded stock taking and the 
local jobbers are expecting a large in- 
crease in orders next week, for stock- 
ing-up purposes and for future ship- 
ments. 

Lead Pipe — Trade conditions continue 
unchanged. Demand is fair, and prices 
continue unchanged. We quote : Lead, 
7c; lead waste pipe, 8c: discount 30 per 
cent. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings— Quotations 
remain unchanged as follows: Medium 
and extra heavy pipe and fittings, 60 
per cent.; 7 and 8 inch pipe, 40 and 5 
per cent. 

Iron Pipe Fittings— A better demand 
is current. Prices are unsteady, 
we quote nominally as follows: 
Malleable fittings 20 per cent, for Ameri- 
can and .35 per cent, for Canadian; cast 
iron (standard), bushings, 60 per cent.; 
headers, 60 per cent. ; flanged and lip- 
ned unions, 60 per cent.; malleable bush- 
ings, 60 per cent. ; nipples up to 
6 inch inclusive, 70 and 5 per cent. 

Copper Range Boilers— Trade is quiet. 
The discount continues unchanged at 15 
per cent. 

Galvanized Iron Range Boilers— Trade 
is quiet. Prices continue unchang- 
ed. Our quotations are : 12 gal- 
lon capacity, standard, $4.50; extra 
heavy, $6.50: IS «allon, standard. $4.75; 
extra heavy. $6.75 ; 24 gallons, stand- 
ard, $4.75: extra heavy, $6.75; 30 sral- 
long, standard, $5 ; extra heavy, $7.50 : 
35 gallons, standard, $6; extra heavy, 
$8.50; 40 gallons, standard, $7: extra 
heavy, $9.50; 52 eallons, standard, $11: 
extra heavy, $14; (^6 gallons, standard, 
$18; extra heavy. $?0- fw "•nllon", stand- 
ard. * >J 1 • extra heavy, $24; 100 gallon*, 
standard, $29; extra heavy, $34; 120 



Hardware and Metal. 



HEATING AND PLUMBING 



February 4, 1905 



gallons, standard, $34; extra heavy, $40; 
144 gallons, standard, $47; extra heavy, 
$55. 

Iron Pipe— A stronger demand is 
noted on this week's market. The 
market is steady. Prices are firm and an 
advance is anticipated. We quote: Black, 
1-4 inch, $2.04; 3-8 inch, $2.06; 1-2 
inch, $2.30; 3-4 inch, $2.88; 1 inch, 
$4.13; 11-4 inch, $5.63; 11-2 inch, 
$6.75; 2 inch, $9. Galvanized, 1-4 inch, 
$2.86: 3-8 inch, $2.89: 1-2 inch, $3.15; 
3-4 inch, $4.03; 1 inch, $5.78; 11-4 inch, 
$7.88; 11-2 inch, $9.45; 2 inch, $12.60. 

Solder— Trade is brightening up. 
Prices have advanced 1 cent. We quote : 
riar solder, half and half, guaranteed, 
is quoted at 18 3-4c; wiping solder at 
161-2c, and refined 17 l-4c. 

Enamelled Ware— The following quo- 
tations on Standard Ideal enamelled 
ware are given : Baths, rolled rim 5 1-2 
feet, 21-2 in. rim, A quality, $21.25; B 
quality, $17.25; 3 in. rim, A quality, 
$23.60; B quality, $19; 5 feet, 21-2 in. 
rim, A quality, $18.40; B quality, 
$17.25; 3 in. rim, A quality, $20.75; B 
quality, $17.25. Lavatories, plate 116D, 
A qualitv. $8.90: B qualitv $7.50; 118D, 
A quality, $5.70; B, $4.80; 120D, A 
quality, $5.60; B qualitv. $4.70; 122D, 
A quality, $5.20; B quality, $4.50. 
Sinks, 18x30 in., flat rim. $2.50. 

Miniature Tools. 

Smith & H'emenway Co., of New 
York, have recently taken over the en- 
tire output of the Davidson Mfg. Co., 
Brooklyn, who manufacture a line of 
miniature tools, which is one of the big- 
gest selling specialties that has appeared 




RNED 
1905^ 




Pre 4 

for some time. Each cut represents a 
perfect-working model of a larger tool, 
and is shown full size. Prices, and cir- 
culars regarding these may be had by 
enquiries to the Canadian office of the 
firm, Cbristine Bldg., Montreal. 



How to Purify Water. 

It is claimed that sulphate of iron will 
convert the filthiest of sewage into pure, 
wholesome drinking water, free of germ 
life of any kind. St. Louis, Mo., and 
many other cities and towns in the 
United States have adopted the process, 



and claim that the sulphate destroys 
typhoid germs and the germs that cause 
all intestinal diseases. The carbonates 
are decomposed into an insoluble hyd- 
rate, which combines with the sulphate 
and iron and the solids that may be in 
the water. Decayed matter is taken up 
and a coagulum is formed. T his is 
heavier than the water, and precipitates 
to the bottom of a tank" that is neces- 
sary. The coagulum catches the bacteria 
in the water, and as it catches in the 
filters it holds baick all germ life. 



I 



Radiators in the Top Storey of a 
Building.* 

By A B. Reck, Copenhagen, Denmark. 

N discussing methods of computing 
radiator surfaces in proportion to 
heat absorbing surfaces (windows, 
walls, ceilings, etc.), with American en- 
gineers, I have in some instances found 
that they employ rules which I think 
will give them too small radiators in 
the top story of a building, the rules 
not taking sufficiently into account the 
loss through the ceilings for that story. 
For this reason I have thought it might 
be useful to mention that I have had to 
do with a case this Winter where it has 
been necessary to increase the radiators 
in all the rooms of the top story in a 
buildivg, although same allowance for 
the ceilings realh- had been made in the 
size of the radiators, only the allowance 
not being large enough, because I had 
understood there was an attic (unheat- 
ed) over the story, whereas in reality 
there was not, the protection against 
loss of heat being only a ceiling of lath 
and plastering, an air space and the 
ordinary sheathing, roofing felt and gra- 
vel on the roof timbers. The building 
of which I speak« is one of the buildings 
in Chicago in which has been installed 
the Reck hot water circulator system, 
described in the paper I read before this 
society at its meeting in January, 1904. 
In the building in question the radiators 
are distributed in 80 rooms on three 
floors, and have a heat emitting capacity 
of about 5,000 nominal square feet of 
hot water heating surface. (Those of 
you who recollect my paper from last 
year will perhaps remember that what 
I call a "nominal" square foot is a 
square foot emitting 160 British ther- 
mal units an hour.) 

The calculation of the radiators was 
based on 80 degrees difference between 
outside and inside, and for rooms with 
equal areas of walls and windows the 
radiators in the top story were given 1 
"nominal" square foot more than the 
radiators on the floor below for every 
18 square feet of exposed ceiling. This 
augmentation of the radiators on the 
top floor was based on a rule employed 
by me for rooms with unheated attics 
over, and the rule gave radiators on the 
top floor in many instances 33 per cent- 
larger than the radiators on the second 
floor in rooms with same areas of win- 
dows and walls. 

Notwithstanding this the radiators on 
the top floor verv soon proved to be in- 
sufficient to produce the same tempera- 
ture as the radiators on the second 
floor, and the right temperature on the 
top floor was only attained by giving 
the radiators here 1 "nominal" square 
foot of area more than the radiators on 
the second floor for every 9 square feet 



Paper reufl at the elerenth annual meeting of the 
American Society of Heatine and Ventilating Engineers, 
New York, January 1719, 1905. 

18 



BRONZE POWDER AND LIQUID 

is used by every steam-fitter. Ask your supply house 
for our goods for best results. Or, if they have not 
got them, write direct to 

R. E. THORNE 



768 Craig 8treet 
MONTREAL 



29 Melinda Street 
TORONTO 



. . FULL STOCK . . 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWERP1PE 



Double Strength Culvert Mpe 
a Specialty. 

•he CANADIAN SEWER PIPE GO. 

HAMILTON. ONT. TORONTO. ONT. 

ST. JOHNS. QUE. 



A lot of time is wasted every day in 
blacksmith shops where there are no 
proper tools for punching and shearing 
iron. Our 

COMBINED 
PUNCH "d SHEAR 

will fill the bill. The very best material 
is put in the knives and punches, and the 
machine is well made throughout. 



A. B. JARDINE & CO. 

Mfrs. TAPS and DIES. 

HESPELER ONTARIO 



GUARANTEED 




l 

0) 


i 


X 

PI 

0) 
(A 
K 



BEST IN THE WORLD 



February 4, 1905 

THIS IS OUR BRAND 

P-H 



HEATINQ AND PLUMBING 
TPIIPIE TH-A.T IS ZPITPIE 




You Want It. 
See that You Get It. 

PAGE-HERSEY IRON 




Hardware and Metal. 



THIS IS OUR TAG 



TAKE NO OTHER. 
AND TUBE CO., LIMITED, GUELPH, Canada 



Have you 
tried it? 

Tried what ? 




This is in your line of business, and it will 
pay you. 

The Batty Stove ft Hardware Co 

76 YORK ST., TORONTO. 




Kerr's Standard and 
Jenkin Disc Radiator Valves 

are perfectly constructed, and of beauti- 
ful design. Like all " Kerr " Specialties, 
strictly high-grade. 



The KERR ENGINE COMPANY 



MANUFACTURERS 



WALKERV1LLE, ONT., CANADA 



THE bullard automatic wrench 



Instantaneous ad- 
justment to any size 
within its range. 

No cramping or . 
wedging. ft 



PATENTED OCT. 27, 1903 




Increased Leverage, 
Strength and Efficiency. 

No lost motion. In- 
stantly locks and un- 
locks. ♦ 

Will not crush the 
lightest pipe. 

Cannot slip. The 
harder the pull the 
stronger the grip. 



Expert mechanics pronounce it 
THE STRONGEST WRENCH ON THE MARKET 

A Monkey, Ratchet, and Pipe Wrench combined. 




Sold by all Jobbers in United States, Canada, and Foreign Countries. 
Manufactured only by 

BULLARD AUTOMATIC WRENCH CO. WRIT A E ND F0 P R RI S KLET 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. 



SEAVEY MITRE BOXES 

ANY CROSS CUT OR HAND SAW CAN 
BE USED. ANY WIDTH OR DEPTH 
OF MOULDING CAN BE CUT. 

ASK YOUR JOBBERS FOR THEM 
SEND FOR THE "GREEN BOOK" OF HARDWARE 
SniTM & HEMENWAY CO., 

J04 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY, 

Mfrs Cutlery and Hardware Specialties. 
Canadian Sample Room : 215 Coriatine Bldg., MONTREAL. ALLEN C. JENKINO, Canadian Manager 




THE MAN WHO WORKS 

for 16 years installing furnaces and boilers 
gets to know something about their good 
points and weak points. 

THE ECONOMICAL 
HOT WATER BOILER 

has been designed with a full knowledge of 
hot water boiler needs. 

Send for Booklet, Agents Wanted. 

P. GIES, Founder, BERLIN, ONT. 

19 





Hardware and Metal. 
\A/o mal<© 



HEATING AND PLUMBING February 4, 1905 

Electric Fixtures, Sockets and Cut-Outs 




lectrical Supplies of all kinds. 



MONTREAL. 






of exposed ceiling, this being my rule 
for ceilings with no attics over, such as 
described in the beginning of my paper. 
In the building referred to the radia- 
tors in many rooms on the top floor 
have now 66 per cent, more heating ca- 
pacity than the radiators in rooms on 
the second floor, with equal window and 
wall areas, without being larger than 
necessary. Seeing this 1 have thought 
it useful to direct your attention to 
this point that no rule for proportion- 
ing radiating surfaces will hold good for 
top floor unless some increase is given 
to the radiators here taking the areas 
and the construction of the exposed 
ceilings in consideration. 



Building Notes. 

L). Kelly, builder, intends erecting a 
number of brick" dwellings this Spring 
in East Hamilton. 

Philip White, Vancouver, intends to 
erect a three-storey business block on 
Granville street in that city. 

Small & Buekland, New Westminster, 
B.C., are looking for a site for a new 
saw mill they intend erecting. 

Dufferin avenue Presbyterian Church 
congregation has decided to build a 
larger edifice this Spring. The site is 
not yet chosen. 

A new bridge over the Red River at 
Winnipeg is proposed to connect that 
city with Elmwood and Springfield, 
rapidly growing settlements. 

Raymond & Dougherty intend erect- 
ing a new building on Germain street, 
St. John, N.B. The building' will be 130 
x33 feet and two storeys high. 

The Vancouver Lumber Co. are pre- 
paring plans for the extension of their 
buildings and plant to allow of doubl- 
ing their present output of 100,000 feet 
of lumber daily. 

The Electrical Development Co., Lim- 
ited, Niagara Ealls, Ont., are calling for 
tenders for the election of a large power 
house building df cut stone or granite. 
Tenders close on February 17. 

McWhinney & Lewerke, Vancouver 
intend erecting a three-storey brick block 
on Hastings street, adjoining the Rubin- 
owitz departmental stores recently pur- 
chased by them. 

The Hendrie Co. are building a stable 
for .'500 horses at Peter and Front 
streets, Toronto. The plans include a 
smithy and shoeing forge and the total 
cosl will be about $100,000. 

George A. Proctor, contractor, who 
was awarded the contract for the drill 
hall at Chatham, is seeking- to be re- 



lieved of the contract. The amount for 
which he agreed to do the work was 
$60,000. 

The Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion in Vancouver have decided to let 
the contract for a new building which 
will include an up-to-date gymnasium, 
having large locker and dressing rooms 
•iid batbing facilities. 

Two new hotels are to be built in 
Vancouver this year. The site of one 
has been selected onposite the Hotel 
Vancouver on Granville street, the total 
cost to be about $80,000, The other will 
probably be at the corner of Hastings 
and Abbott streets. 

Stephen Jones, hotelkeeper, of Vic- 
toria. B.C., intends erectine a large office 
building in Vancouver. He has purchas- 
ed a lot on the corner of Hastings and 
Homer streets and is bavin"? nlans pre- 
pared for a substantial building six or 
seven storeys in height. 

Mettam. Tendon & Co.. hardware 
merchants, Leamington, have taken Mr. 
CharVs Tendon into the partnership and 
have nurchased a site on which they pro- 
pose building a fine two-storev building 
of cement blocks, with Hate glass front. 
The frontage will he 48 feet and the 
depth 90 feet. 

The plans of Backus & Co. for build- 
ing tbe dam and developing- water power 
< n the Rainy River at Fort Frances have 
been approved by the Commissioner of 
Public Works. They provide for tbe de- 
velopment of 20,000 horse power, half 
' F which is to be used on the Canadian 
side of the river. 

A companv is being' formed in Balti- 
more. Md.j for the purpose of -manufac- 
turing fire-proof building and other ma- 
terials from asbestos. James M. Cnthell. 
representing the North American Fralite 
Co., is negotiating' the local comii-inv. 
which is to be the parent company of 
mother company now in existence and 
v . rk'i"' in Canada. Mr. Cnthell owns 
.•'out 3.0011 acres of asbestos land near 
Bedford City. Va., and controls about 
3,300 acres of asbestos land in the Pro- 
vince of Quebec. 

The new arts building 1 in connection 
with the Ottawa University is beine con- 
structed of armored concrete. A library 
and medical hall, as well as a large con- 
vocation hall will also be erected of the 
same material. Two large wings on 
either side of the arts building will be 
commenced next season, the corner 
stones to be laid on May 24. The 

20 



work is being done by the Ferro Con- 
crete Construction Co., of Baltimore, 
M. J. S. Irvin, manager of the Inter- 
national Portland Cement Co., of Ot- 
tawa, being one of the principal pro- 
moters of tbe reinforced concrete plan 
of construction. 

J. Gunn & Sons, Winnipeg;, have been 
awarded the contract for the new Can- 
adian Northern Railway bridge over the 
south branch of the Saskatchewan River 
near Prince Albert. The structure con- 
sists of nine spans of 150 feet each, the 
track being 100 feet above low water. 
The niers are to be built of concrete and 
the trusses of steel. The structure is to 
be completed by September 1, but the 
contractors will erect false wfork fto 
carry over trains to Prince Albert as 
soon as the ice goes out and will have 
the foundations for the piers in before 
the ice moves. 



Building Permits. 

• TORONTO. 

S. J. Gravdon, dwelling, 128 Spadina 
road, $4,500. 

William Apps, dwellings, 901 and 903 
Bathurst street, $4,000. 

R. C. Vaughan, dwellings, Bathurst 
street, near College, $8,000. 

Dr. John Hoskin, addition to resi- 
dence, 21 Dale avenue, $1,500. 

Mrs. L. S. Johnston, dwellings, Lang- 
lev avenue, near Broadview, $3,800. 

R. Saunders, dwellings, Concord ave- 
nue, near Northumberland, $6,500. 

McCaulay & Bishop, dwellings, Mark- 
ham street, near Harbord, $8,000. 

Christie, Brown & Companv, Limited, 
stables and barn, Duke street, $15,000. 

Canada Launch Works, office and work- 
shop, Carlaw avenue, near Eastern, $2,- 
000. 

Mr. Cawthra, interior alterations to 
store, Yonge and Temperance streets, 
$18,000. 

Gutta Percha Rubber Company, Lim- 
ited, office and warehouse, O'Hara avenue. 
$75,000. 

K. McKenzie and W. McKain, dwell- 
ings, Hallam street, near Preston ave- 
nue, $2,500. 

W. J. Gage & Co., Limited, factory, 
Spadina avenue, near Adelaide, $50,000. 

Cosgrave Brewing Company, Limited, 
rebuilding damages from* fire, Queen 
street west, near Niagara, $4,000. 

MONTREAL. 

Eusebe Roy, dwellings, Pontiac street, 
$7,500. 

A. V. Gadbois, dwelling, Comte 
street, $600. 



February 4, 1905 



HBATlNO AND PLUMB1NO 



Hardware and Metal 



.................... 



.............. ■••■■•■.•-.< 



Paint Brushes. 



^[ A line of paint brushes is a profit paying line. 

<ft We have a neat little catalogue that deals with 
brushes — profit paying brushes. 

*K A post card enquiry will bring you this catalogue 
— not cumbered up with a hundred lines you 
don't want— just a nice selection of paying lines. 

<fi This catalogue shows you all that is best of the 
famous RENNOUS KLEINLE & CO. brushes. 

«r The R. K. & Co. brushes are full measure, full 
length, full stock ; many other lines that you see 
—Are Not. 

w Don't overlook this. It pays to scrutinize. We 
invite it. We submit samples. 

*[ Our travellers carry full lines. 

■r Write for our catalogue. It will pay you. 



CIFY GENUIN 




"THE BEST" 



A. RAMSAY & SON COMPANY, 

MONTREAL 



Est. 
1842 



:.»..»..»^ 9 ..»..»..»..t..t..»..t..0..»..»..»..f.»..f.t—:»- 



Paint 
Makers 



........ ......»»•. ....... 



Automatic Injector 



MADE IN CANADA 



ASK YOUR DEALER 



To Manufacturers' 
Agents : 

Hardware and Metal has enquiries from time to 
time from manufacturers and others wanting repre- 
sentatives in the leading business centres here and 
abroad 
Firms or individuals open for agencies in Canada or abroad may 
have their names and addresses placed on a special list kept for 
the information of enquirers in our various offices throughout 
Canada and in Great Britain without charge. 
Address 

Business Manager 

HARDWARE AISD METAL 

Montreal and Toronto 




THIS IS THE 

OLD STAND-BY 

None better on the mar- 
ket unless it is the 
Triumph. 

If your Jobber cannot 
supply, write us for 
prices. 

WILCOX M 



NO. 233— WILCOX TACKLE-BLOCK WIRE STRETCHER 




CO. OR ONTARIO, Limited 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



February 4, 1905 



Your Customers 

the farmers are looking for a strong, serviceable and 
durable Fence at a reasonable cost. You can supply 
it to them in the 

IDEAL. 




A GOOD SELLER 

The IDEAL is made of No. 9 Hard Steel Galvanized 
Wire throughout, and has many distinctive features which 
make it absolutely the best fence ever produced. 

It pays dealers to handle fencing that gives best value 
obtainable. Write for our catalogue of Fencing and Gates, 
showing styles for every .purpose. 

COILED-SPRING WIRE 

and other Fence Wire unexcelled in quality, shipped 
promptly. 

The McGregor- Banwell Fence Co., Limited, 

WALKERVILLE, ONT. 
Merrick, Anderson & Co., Winnipeg, Man. 

Sole agents for Man. and N.W.T. 




Gas *ni[)|)lk> 





Gas Pillars 

$1.25 per gross. 



Gas Brackets 

No. 100, Stiff Bracket - - - 18c. 

No. 104, Single Swing Bracket - 29c. 

No. 105, Double " " - 48c. 



Aluminum 

Gas Tips 

$3.00 per gross. 

Lava Gas Tips 

$1.10 per gross. 



These Prices Net to the Trade Only. 



TOR EVERYTHING ELECTRICAL MRITE TO 



The 



Saycr Electric Co'y, 



10-14 Beaver Hall Mill 

MONTREAL 



Bo. JOHNSON, GLAPHAM & MORRIS, LTD, MANCHESTER, ENGLAND 

Before you place your orders for GALVANIZED, CORRUGATED AND DEAD FLAT 
SHEETS, C«NADA AND STOVE PLATES, COKE AND CHARCOAL TIN 
PLATES, BAR, HOOP AND SHEET IRON OR WIRE RODS, ask us for quotations. 

Special and prompt attention to Canadian orders. 
C ble Ad.: " Metallicus, Manchester." Codes: Lirbers, A. B.C. 425th, Al and Private Codes. 



PAGE METAL GATES 



3 feet -wide, 4 feet high including hinges and latch 82.25 

10 feet -wide, 4 feet high, including hinges and latch 5.25 

Other sizes in proportion. 



Supplied 
by as or 
local dealer. 207 



THE PAGE WIRE FENCE CO. LIMITED, Walkerville, Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg, St. John 




YOUR SALESMEN 

can add to your daily profits a good 
many pennies if you insist upon 
their pushing 

Gillett's Lye 

No home uses too much of this 
sanitary doctor. 



E. W. GILLETT COMPANY, LIMITED 

TORONTO 




»*»*-»«*««* 



2nd 



Efficiency 



j& 



*«ttrt»*f*« 



Efficiency may be said to be ability to do the work 
required to be done and to do it quickly and thoroughly. 

The Empire Queen Range 

is an efficient stove according to this definition. Our 
catalogue tells about it at length. Send for it. 

We want Agents in every section of Canada. 

Write us about it. 



The Canadian Heating & Ventilating Co. 

OWEN SOUND, ONTARIO. Limited 



22 



February 4, 1905 



ELECTRICAL GOODS AND SUPPLIES 



Hardware and Metal. 



ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 



Swedish Traction Experiments. 

THE Swedish Government some 
months ago made a grant of 500,- 
000 ctowns, or $134,000, for the purpose 
of enabling the railway board to carry 
out experiments in electric railway trac- 
tion. In the Spring of 1904 the board 
petitioned the government for permis- 
sion to erect electric transmitting ap- 
paratus on land belonging to the state 
between Tomteboda and Vartan. No- 
thing has as yet been done, but at 
Tomteboda station double wires will be 
used, and at Vartan the contact system 
will be employed for transmitting the 
current from the power station to the 
electric locomotive, the rails serving for 
the return current. For these experi- 
ments a high-tension, one-phase, alter- 
nating current will be used, the tension 
and frequency of which will vary accord- 
ing to requirements. 

Electro-Chemistry and Metallurgy. 

In the field of electro-chemistry and 
electro-metallurgy there was no start- 
ling development during 1904. Electrical 
methods of manufacturing chemicals and 
refining and producing metals are thor- 
oughly established, and every little 
while announcement is made of some 
new product manufactured in the elec- 
tric furnace. Steel is now being made 
commercially in Sweden and France in 
electric furnaces, and Canadian electric- 
ians are investigating this branch of 
electro-metallurgy, hoping to find in it 
a solution of the problem of utilizing 
our valuable ore deposits and many wa- 
ter powers. The report made is favor- 
able to the manufacture of steel elec- 
trically, but as regards iron there is as 
vet insufficient evidence to show that its 
manufacture can be carried out commer- 
cially in the electric furnace in competi- 
tion with the blast furnace. 

An Electric Clock. 
A clock which will run for two thou- 
sand years has been invented by Richard 
Stiutt, son of Lord Rayleigh. The mo- 
tive power is a small piece of gold-leaf 
which is electrified by means of a very 
small quantity of radium salt. It b '"'s 
away from the metal substance and 
keeps moving under this influence until 
it touches the side of the containing ves- 
sel. At the moment of contact it loses 
its electrical charge and then springs 
back and is again electrified, and the 
process repeated. 

Machinery and Electrical Notes. 

The gross earnings of the Havana, 
Cuba, electric tramway in 1904 were 
$2 111,000 in excess of 1903. 



The annual meeting of the Sherbrooke, 
Que., Power, Light and Heat Company 
was held on Jan. 23, and Mr. Justice 
White was re-elected president, the old 
board of directors being also re-elected. 
A dividend of 2 per cent, was declared 
for the current six months. 

The Redding Mining Company is in- 
stalling machinery for a stamp mill at 
the company's mine in the Atikokan his- 
trict near Fort William. Mr. Dalphin, 
Montreal, has charge of the work and 
the stamp mill will be in working order 
before next Fall. 

W. F. Forrest, Atwood, who is erect- 
ing a new grist mill near his planing 
mill in that town, will equip the new 
mill with sufficient boilers and machin- 
ery to do a general milling business and 
supply electri,c light for the town. The 
building and plant will cost about $11,- 
000. 

The Battle Creek Health Food Com- 
pany, whose factory at London was de- 
stroyed by fire three months ago, has 
rebuilt the factory and installed a new 
lot of machinery, including (Cleaning, and 
dusting machines, large five-ton rollers, 
scouring machines, traveling ovens, soak- 
ing tanks, etc. 

N. Thompson & Co., Vancouver, have 
purchased a portion of the Albion Iron 
Works Company's plant at Victoria, 
consisting of large steam rolls, a steel 
hammer and a number of smaller tools. 
Mr. Thompson states that the floating 
dock being constructed in Great Britain 
is nearing completion and the first sec- 
tion will reach Vancouver during 1905. 

The annual meeting of the Winnipeg 
Electric Street Railwav Company took 
place on Jan. 25. The annual report 
was considered very satisfactory. The 
directors for the ensuing year elected 
were as follows: William Mackenzie, 
president; William Whyte, vice-president; 
F. Morton Morse, secretary-treasurer ; 
Sir William Van Home, D. D. Mann, A. 
M. Nanton and D. B. Hanna, directors. 

The Molsons Bank, creditor for $23,- 
830, is asking for the winding up of the 
Eager & Sanderson Company of Win- 
chester, flour and feed dealers and own- 
ers of an electric light plant. The lia- 
bilities total $25,830, with the assets 
climated at $15,000. An arrangement 
may he made whereby Winchester will 
still be lighted, undisturbed by the liti- 
gation. 

The British Columbia Electric Rail- 
way Company, which has been operating 
electric systems of street railways in 
Victoria, Vancouver and New Westmin- 
ster, and between the two last-named 
cities, has taken over the branch line 
of the C.P.R. between Vancouver and 
Steveston, and will operate it as an 
23 



CONDENSED MACHINERY ADVERTISE- 
MENTS. 

YEARLY CONTRACT RATES. 

100 words each insertion, 1 year $30 00 

( months 17 60 

" " 3 months 10 00 

1 year 17 00 

" " ( months 10 00 

1 year 10 00 



.00 



25 



MACHINERY WANTED. 



Items under this heading Inserted free for readers of 
Hardware and Metal 



STRONG Column Drill— To swing about 36-in.; 
must be in good order and cheap ; also a port- 
able engine and boiler, about 10 h-p, Bridge 
Works, Mitchell, Ont. 

VWANTKD —One second-hand clam shell digger, 
* » with traveling derrick, complete ; and one 
second-hand locomotive, from 15 t" 20 tons ; must 
be in good condition. A. G. Creasor, Owen 
Sound 

WANTED — Sawing Machine — new or second- 
hand ; for sawing stove wood. Box 278, 
Port Elgin. 



w 



ANTED — Screw-cutting lathe — in — for motor 
cycle. Horton, London, Ont. 



A MARINE ENGINE— about 12 x i.—m good 
order ; second-hand. Full particulars Box 
232, Barrie. 



w 



/ANTED — At once — Gasoline engine — 4 to 



horsepower; new or second-hand, in good 
condition ; state maker, how long in use, and low- 
est cash price. Address Box 78, Elmvale, Ont. 



MACHINERY FOR SALE. 



Rates for first insertion 2c. a word, and for subsequent 
insertions lc. a word. 



BOILER FOR SALE— 60 h.p., second-hand, 
return tubular boiler, good as new ; bargain. 
Address Box 41, Hardware and Metal. 



ENGINE FOR SALE— 16 h.p.; stationary, side 
crank. Price $75. Address Box 37, Hard- 
ware and Metal, Montreal. 

ONE second-hand gap lathe; swings 40 in. and 
26 in.; 12-ft. 6-in. bed. Address Box 748, 
Montreal. 



o 



NE second-hand shafting lathe, 26-in. swing, 
20-ft. bed. Address Box 748, Montreal. 



STANDARD SCALES, valve-, trucks, steam 
specialties; W. I. pipe and fittings, machine 
tools, mill supplies, scale repairing a specialty; 
prompt delivery from stock; write for prices. The 
Fairbanks Co., Toronto. 

MARINE Engines and Boilers — Large assort- 
ment ; send for stock list Doty Engine 
Works Co., Limited, Goderich. 

MACHINERY for Sale — Two large die presses; 
one 'ar~c iron drill ; cheap for immediate 
sale ; in first-class order. United r actories.^Lim- 
ited, 164 Adelaide West. 



electric railway, establishing an electric 
sub-station at Eburne for the new line. 
Electrical energy will also be supplied 
to cannerymen and other manufacturers 
who will establish additional enterprises 
at Steveston and other points near the 
mouth of the Fraser River. The electric 
system will be installed about July 1. 



SIR H. MONTAGU ALLAN 



HAHDWAkB AND MBTAL 
Established Over Fifty Years. 



February 4, 1905 



D. LORNE McGIBBON. 

General Manager. 




ALWAYS UNIFORM 

ALWAYS RELIABLE 

ALWAYS IN DEMAND 



£ M* v 



"Red Star" 

Sheet 

Packing 



HIGH QUALITY 

HONEST SERVICE 

COMPLETE SATISFACTION 



n 



KGQ Otdr is the original High 
Grade Sheet Packing, a winner all the time. 

Some of the other Packings are good 
Packings, but — 

"Red Star" is without a Rival. 



Write for a Free Sample 



Sales Branches and IWarehouses 



172 Granville St., 
Halifax, N.S. 



Imperial Bank Building, 
Montreal, Que. 



Front and Yonge Sis., 
Toronto, Ont . 



Princess St., 
Winnipeg, Man. 



Cordova St., 
Vancouver, B.C. 



The Canadian Rubber of Montreal. 



SAP PAILS and SPILES 




These goods will be needed before long, and your 
customers may ask for them any time now. 

If you require either spiles or pails, we can ship i 
you any quantity the same day the order reaches us. 



Sap Pails 



~48& 




STRAIGHT PATTERN. 




Made in six sizes, in both straight and flaring patterns. 

"Eureka" Cast Iron and Steel Spiles 

The superiority of these spiles over all others is well known to the trade. 
Tinned and Galvanized Iron in the following sizes and gauges, for sap pans always 



FLARING PATTERN 



Tinned Iron 

48x96x20 
48x96x22 
48x96x24 
36x84x22 
36x84x24 



in stock. 

Galvanized Iron 

48x96x22 
36x96x22 
36x96x24 



Prompt 

Shipment 

Guaranteed. 



LONDON, 



M 

TORONTO 



oOlary Manufact 



MONTREAL, WINNIPEG 

;vQry-tr-iir»g for the Tii 

24 



unrig 

VANCOUVER, 

hop." 



ST. JOHN, N.B 



February 4, 1905 



EDITORIAL 



Hardware and Metal. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



President : 

SOHJV BAYNB MACLBAfli. 

Montreal . 

"" MacLean Publishing Co. 

Limited 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circu- 
late in the Piovinces of British Columbia, 
North-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nov.i Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. 
Island and Newfoundland. 



those who are in closest touch with 
Canadian trade and commerce. 



CANADA- 
montreal - 

Toronto 

Winnipeg, Man. 

St. John, N.B. 
Vancouver. B.C. 



OFFICES. 

- 232 McGill Street. 

Telephone Main 1255. 

10 Front Street East. 

Telephone Main 2701. 

- Room 515, Mclntyre Block. 

Telephone 1846. 

F. R, Munro. 

No. 3 Market Wharf. 

J. Hunter White. 

Geo. S. B. Perry- 



UNHID STATES- 
NEW York - Room 1241 New York Life Bldg. 

W. T. Robson. 

GREAT BRITAIN- 
LONDON, Eng. 



Manchester. Eng. 

AUSTRALIA- 
ADELAIDE, AUSTRALIA, 



88 Fleet Street, E.C. 

T. Meredith McKim. 

Telephone, Central 12960. 

02 Market Street. 

H. S. Ashburner. 



Steamships Building, 
W. H. Sharland, Jr. 



Subscription, Canada and United States, 82.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere - - 12s 



Published every Saturday 
Cable Address 



Adscript, London, 
Adscript. Canada. 



New Advertisement! : 

White Mountain Freezer Co., Nashau. N.H. 
Concrete Block Machine Co., Toronto. 

WHO WILL BE THE ELECT? 

WITH the air full of gossip as to 
the material Mr. Whitney will 
select within the next few days for his 
Cabinet, and several professional gentle- 
men already singled out as among those 
likely to have ministerial honors con- 
ferred upon them, the business commun- 
ity are naturally anxious that the few 
of their number who can "qualify" 
should not be passed over. 

The new premier has been given an 
unusual opportunity to serve the Prov- 
ince of Ontario and serve it well. He 
will be justified, moreover, in introduc- 
ing a strong professional element into 
his Cabinet. At the same time, he 
ought to bear in mind that the biggest 
factor in the industrial and commercial 
expansion of Ontario and Canada for 
many years to come will be its business 
men. If he would legislate wisely he 
should see to it that a fair share of the 
machinery of government is intrusted to 



A VIEW OF THE FAILURE RECORD. 

ACCORDING to Bradstreet's the 
commercial failures in Canada 
during the years from 1896 to 1904 were 

as follows: 

Assets. Liabilities. 

i9"4 1 177 84136,618 ^10,018,99 

1903 956 3,8^2197 8328,262 

1902 i,cg2 3, 97,220 8,328,658 

1901 1,370 5. .96.9;! 11,656,937 

I9=° 1.333 4. 2 44.93 2 I ,7%t,27(> 

1899 1.285 11,077,891 

1898 1,427 9644,100 

1897 1,907 13,147,929 

1896 2,179 16,208,460 

The increase in 1904 over 1903 was 
221 in number, $284,421 in assets and 
$1,690,037 in liabilities. Over 1902 the 
increase was 85 in number, $539,398 in 
assets and $1,689,641 in liabilities. The 
failures of 1903 were much below the 
average. In fact, thev were the small- 
est in the Bradstreet's record since 



As readers of Hardware and Metal 
already know, the Machinery Department, 
which we have been running for some 
years, has developed into a distinct and 
separate newspaper. The Machinery De- 
partment in Hardware and Metal 
has therefore been discontinued, but sub- 
scribers to Hardware and Metal wiU 
receive as well a copy of Machinery, the 
new paper, until the end of 1905. or until 
their subscription expires. 



1882, though during the intervening- 
period there has been a large increase 
in population, and a considerable in- 
crease in the number of traders. 

Dun's Review in a table of the Can- 
adian failures by branches of business 
shows the largest adverses in 1904 ap- 
peared in general, dry goods, liquor and 
grocery stores. The following are the 
figures : 



cf merchants not only in the cities and 
larger towns where it is established, but 
in the surrounding towns and villages. 
There is no reason, however, in the re- 
cord noted above or anything presently 
developed in the general situation to 
think that the growth of commercial 
mortality is on the increase. The report 
for the I?tst year is hardly of a character 
to cause general uneasiness. At present 
we are 'in a waiting stage. A moderate 
check was felt in 1904. Until we learn 
what 1905 will bring forth it is impos- 
sible to tell much about the future. If 
the great staple crons are abundant, the 
foundation will exist for "'ood times. 
The important industries in the various 
sections of the country have complaints, 
but are generally in a nourishing con- 
dition. Banks are loaning freely to 
legitimate borrowers, which is a healthy 
indication. 



WHAT THE TRADE PAPER DOES. 

A FEATURE of the trade paper 
which is peculiar to it, but not 
often discussed, is its co-operative side, 
i.e., its making one family of the mem- 
bers engaged and interested in an in- 
dustry. Take a man in the grocery 
business for instance. He has his local 
newspaper every day from which he gets a 
modicum of what is going on in the 
world of politics and finance. But what 
has it to put him in touch with 
his own particular interests? Absolute- 
ly nothing. The latest process of manu- 
facture or brand of goods on the mar- 
ket may mean dollars and cents to him 
and yet nothing about them is to be 
found in such a paper. 
On the other hand his trade journal 



No. 

General Stores 261 

Dry Goods 83 

Clothing 68 

Groceries 175 

Stoves 30 

Books 6 

Liquors 34 



1904. 




1903. 




1902. 


Liabilities. 


No. 


Liabilities. 


No. 


Liabilities 


$1,893 250 


217 


$1,281,194 


251 


$1,776,190 


1,208,032 


61 


461.484 


68 


1,018,159 


374,624 


53 


282,093 


67 


369,190 


903.120 


165 


723,475 


162 


541,570 


325,974 


22 


210,103 


27 


412,210 


41.650 


10 


56.200 


9 


133,350 


296 552 


24 


77,840 


30 


485 096 



Even during the past three years the 
development of the departmental store 
in city and town can be seen to have 
swelled the failure list of especially the 
general stores. It has also tended to 
reduce the number of the smaller class 
25 



keeps him in touch with all the people 
who make or job or retail the goods in 
which he is most interested. Through it 
he is made acquainted with developments 
in the grocery trade — in the manufacture 
of food stuffs, etc., and put in real 



Hardware and Metal. 



EDITORIAL 



February 4, 1905 



touch with the industrial family of 
which he is a member. 

Another valuable feature of the trade 
paper is that while it does not alto- 
gether take the place of the salesman, 
it does take his place in many places 
where it is not profitable for a manufac- 
turer or jobber to send a salesman. It 
brings the little man in the small town 
in touch with the big man in •the large 
town. It is a distributer of ideas, a 
drummer for business, and is often more 
effective than any individual traveling 
man can ever hope to be. 

CARELESS IGNORANCE. 

PERFECTION in system is usually 
looked upon as being one of the at- 
tributes of railway corporations. It is 
only ordinary business concerns whose 
systems are not always good. That 
railway companies have not good sys- 
tems strictly perfect is evident from an 
instance which came under our observa- 
tion a few days ago. 

A large manufacturing concern in Can- 
ada had secured an order through one of 
its travelers from a merchant in New 
Glasgow, Quebec. It was the first order 
received, and the firm was particularly 
desirous of pleasing him. The goods 
were shipped promptly, but 42 days 
after shipment was made the shipper 
was notified by the railway officials that 
two cases of goods addressed to the 
New Glasgow merchant were lying at 
their office at Point Levis. The bill of 
lading instructed that the goods be 
shipped by the railway in question, via 
the G.T.K., via the G.N.R. 

The address on the packages cor- 
responded with that on the bill of lad- 
ing, but in notifying the shipper that 
packages were lying at Point Levis the 
representative of the railway company 
wanted to know if the goods were not 
intended for New Glasgow, N. S. In 
fact they said they had no such station 
on their line as New Glasgow, Quebec. 
It appears that the goods had been 
shipped to New Glasgow, N.S., and find- 
ing that no merchant of the name on 
the cases did business in that town, 
they were brought back to Point Levis 
and then the shipper communicated 
with. 

It would have been a simple matter 
indeed for the officials of the railway 
company to have discovered where New 



Glasgow, Quebec, was situated. Had 
they the inclination, they could have 
discovered in five minutes, and when 
this was drawn to their attention the 
only answer they could give was to the 
effect that they thought the shipper had 
made a mistake. 

It is evident that in the employ of the 
G.T.R. are men, who, like employes in 
some other business enterprises, have 
not enough initiative about them to 
turn to any directory and find the ad- 
dress of a town or of an individual. It 
is evident that the G.T.R. Company 
needs to stir up some of its careless em- 
ployes, as business men stand to lose a 
great deal of money through the lack of 
prompt attention to duty on the part of 
the servants of transportation compan- 
ies. 



A BIG BUIijiniNir YEAR. 

IF building operations keep up to the 
high standard that has been set dur- 
ing January, as indicated by the 
number of permits issued in Toronto and 



CONVENTIONS POSTPONED. 

The conventions of the Western 
and Manitoba Retail Hardware and 
Stove Dealers' Associations, which 
were to have been held in Winnipeg 
next week, have been postponed 
until Feb. 14th, when afternoon and 
evening sessions will be held in 
Scott Memorial Hall. 



by the reports of new buildings to be 
erected in other Canadian cities, Canada 
will be a hive of industry during 1905. 

During January, in Toronto alone, the 
aggregate value for which permits were 
issued was $307,448, as compared with 
$61,450 for the same month last year, 
showing an increase in favor of 1905 of 
$245,998. The increase is partly owing 
to the Gutta Percha Rubber Company's 
new factory to be erected on O'Hara 
avenue at a cost of $75,000, and the 
Christie, Brown Company's stables, 
which will cost $15,000. February has 
also started off well with a permit issu- 
ed to W. J. Gage & Co., Limited, for 
a new factory on which $50,000 will be 
expended. 

Toronto is not alone by any means, 
as Vancouver, Winnipeg, Brandon, and 
other Western cities also report a large 
number of new buildings to be erected, 
aria" everything points to another record 
year. 



Whatever tends to benefit the building 
industry is of advantage to the hard- 
ware and plumbing trades, and the con- 
tinued development of the building in- 
dustry means much to all our readers. 
One branch of the building industry 
which should show marvelous develop- 
ment during 1905 is the concrete block 
system and Hardware and Metal will 
make a special effort to keep its readers 
informed as to the merits and demerits 
of this comparatively new phase of the 
industry. 



CONVENTION POSTPONED. 

AS announced in another column, it 
has been deemed advisable to 
postpone for one week the convention of 
the Western and Manitoba Retail Hard- 
ware and Stove Dealers' Associations. 
After the announcement of the dates in 
the first week of the Winnipeg Bonspiel 
it was found that the reduced railway 
rates would not be given to non-curlers 
until the second week. The conventions 
will, accordingly, be held in Scott Mem- 
orial Hall on the afternoon and evening 
of February 14. 

Every indication points to a large ga- 
thering, as hardware men from distant 
points have already intimated their in- 
tention to be present and it is likely 
that the Manitoba hardware men will 
take advantage of cheap railway rates 
to attend. Some very important busi- 
ness will be laid before the /conventions 
and as many hardware men of the West 
as can possiblv arrange to do so should 
manage to be present. 

A scheme for the mutual fire insurance 
of members of the Association is being 
mooted by some members, and it will, 
no doubt, come up for discussion. The 
departmental store is invading the West 
and every hardware man is interested in 
plans for meeting this competition. No 
progressive hardware merchant in Mani- 
toba or the Territories should miss 
these meetings if it is at all possible for 
him to attend. 

CHANGE YOUR ADS. 

When you meet a friend on the street 
nearly every day, ami stop and talk 
with lii 111 - you don't recite a set speech 
to him every time you meet him. Then 
why do you use the same old ad. day in 
and day out? Your readers are as tired 
of it as you are. You must tell them 
something new every time they meet 
you in the columns of the paner, or they 
won't stop and read your ad. Attract 
their attention and make them listen to 
what you have to tell them. Let it he 
new, bright, interesting. Tell them what 
you would tell them if they had come 
into your store to ask about the partieu- 



26 



February 4, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



BOARD OF TRADE ELECTIONS 



NO CONTESTS IN OTTAWA. 

ELECTIONS by acclamation were 
the order in Ottawa this year the 
new officers of the board being : 
President, Denis Murphy; first vice- 
president, James W. Woods ; second 
_ vice-president, Peter Whelan; secretary, 
Cecil Bethune; Council, W. H. Dwyer, A. 
W. Fleck, Jas. Ballantyne, G. S. May, 
W. P. Hinton, Stuart McClenaghan, D. 
M. Finnic, A. W. Ault, Jackson Booth, 
J. R. Reid, P. D. Ross, John McKin- 
ley. The board adopted a resolution en- 
dorsing the Empire Cable scheme and 
authorized the printing of a circular for 
distribution throughout the empire. 

A "TRADER'S WEEK" PROPOSED. 

A joint committee of the Toronto 
Board of Trade and the Toronto branch 
of the Canadian Manufacturers' Associa- 
tion have been endeavoring to make ar- 
rangements with the railway companies 
for special rates to Toronto for a 
"Traders' Week" each Spring and Fall. 




W. I. Gear, elected President of the Montreal 
Board of Trade for 1905. . 

The idea has worked out satisfactorily 
in New York, the special rates inducing 
retail merchants from all parts of the 
country to visit the metropolis and 
make their purchases from the whole - - 
sale houses. The carrying out of the 
plan in Toronto, however, is blocked by 
t lit- refusal of the railways to grant any 
reduction in rates, fearing that other 
cities would make similar requests. 

Quebec's new officers. 

The 190-5 officers of the Quebec Board 
of Trade are as follows: President, Win. 
Power, M.P.; first vice-president, Geo. 
E. Amyot; second vice-president, T. 
lletherington; treasurer, E. F. B. Rat- 
tray, and secretary, T. Levasseur. 

PORTAGE LA PRAIRIE IS PROGRESSIVE. 

The Portage la Prairie, Alan., Board 
of Trade has chosen the following offic- 
ers for the coming year: President, A. 
L. Hamilton; vice-president, Ed. Brown; 
secretary, H. V. Hudson; council, A. 11.' 



Dickens, J. V. Cadham, Geo. Munro, J. 
J. Garland, F. Babb, C. S. B. Burley, 
F. L. Newman and C. Heath. Steps 
were taken towards establishing fish 
hatcheries in Lake Winnipeg and D. A. 
McDonald was appointed as delegate to 
Ottawa to secure the assistance of the 
government re the prevention of floods. 

NEW ORGANIZATION FOR VANCOUVER. 

A Chamber of Commerce is proposed 
in Vancouver, the chief mover in the 
new organization being Mr. Frank Bur- 
nett, senior. The annual membership 
fee of $20 pharged by the Board of 
Trade is, it is contended, too high for 
retailers. The Chamber will maintain a 
permanent salaried secretary if the ef- 
fort to organize is successful. 

A NEW BOARD OF TRADE. 

Elm Creek, Man., is one of the latest 

Western towns to organize a Board of 

Trade. Mr. J. T. Cook is the presi- 
dent. 

PREFERENCE TO CANADIAN PORTS. 

At a meeting of the St. John, N.B., 
Board of Trade on January 17, the fol- 
lowing resolution was passed: Resolved 
that this board is of the opinion that all 
preferential rebates off customs duties 
which are allowed in connection with 
Canadian imports, should only apply to 
goods that are imported through Cana- 
dian seaports and in British registered 
vessels. 

PRESCOTT BOARD OF TRADE. 

The following officers of the Prescott 
Board of Trade have been re-elected by 
acclamation: President, F. S. Evenson; 
first vice-president, W. F. MacCarthy; 
second vice-president, W. F. MacPher- 
son; secretary, J. D. Mills; treasurer, 
F. Bennett. 

PRESENTATION AT HALIFAX. 

The annual meeting of the Halifax 
Board of Trade was held Jan. 24, the 
meeting being one of the largest and 
most representative gatherings of busi- 
ness men ever held in that city. James 
Hall was elected president, and A. M. 
Bell and George Faulkner, vice-presi- 
dents. The retiring secretary. Chas. M. 
Creed, was presented bv the board with 
a check for $460, as a recognition of 
his past valuable services," and as a 
token of the esteem in which he was 
held by the members. 

ELECTIONS AT KENTVILLE. 

The King's County Board of Trade 
met at Kentville, N.S., on Jan. 24, 
there being a large attendance of farm- 
ers and fruit growers. The officers el- 
ected for 19115 are: President, C. O. Al- 
len; vice-president, Joseph Kinsman ; 
secretary-treasurer, J. H. Cox, Cam- 
bridge. 

MONTREAL BOARD OF TRADE. 

The Board of Trade elections in Mont- 
real on Feb. 1 resulted as follows: 
President, W. I. Gear; first vice-presi- 
dent, R. M. Ballantyne; treasurer, Jas. 
Thorn; members of council, Andrew A. 
Allan, shipping; F. W. Thompson, flour 
milling; Andrew Herbert, groceries; 
Geo. Caverhill, hardware; E. C. Pratt, 
banking; Leslie H. Gault, dry goods ; 
Alex. Ramsay, paints; C. B. Esdaile, 
grain; G. F. C. Smith, insurance, Harry 

27 



A. Hodgson, dairy produce; Donald Mun- 
ro, live stock; J. J. McGill, manufac- 
turing. 

BRANDON BOARD GETS BUSY. 

The annual meeting of the Brandon 
Board of Trade took place on Jan. 24, 
the officers chosen for 1905 heing as fol- 
lows: President, John Inglis, re-elected 
by acclamation; vice-president, Frank 
Smith; secretary - treasurer, Kenneth 
Campbell, re-elected by acclamation ; 
executive council, A. F. Campbell, Fred. 
Nation, A. D. Rankin, Messrs. Ingram, 
Alexander, McDiarmid, Coldwell, Lind- 
say, Warner, Hanbury, Bowker and Dr. 
Harcourt. 1 1. was reported that the 
population had increased from 7,000 to 
8,000 during 1904; that another bank 
would soon locate in Brandon, making 
seven in all; that the assessment had in- 
creased from $2,700,000 to $3,300,000; 
that 250 buildings, worth $600,000, were 
built during 1904; and that the hotel 
accommodation, school accommodation, 
customs collections, etc., had all shown 
great increases, all showing Brandon to 
be holding its own as the second city of 
the Northwest. 




George Caverhill. elected a member of the Coun- 
cil of the Montreal Board of Trade, 1905. 

A RAZOR SHARPENER. 

A most ingenious machine for the 
handy sharpening of razors is the "Kar- 
ny," manufactured for the Farny Com- 
pany by F. Alfred Reichardt & Go., 
New York. The machine holds a razor 
in the vise of a steel cradle fastened to 
a movable stage and kept in the centre 
by two wire springs under ihe platform 
of the razor holder. A crank movemenl 
turns two wings with sharpening sur- 
faces set at an angle of ten degrees, as 
they revolve against the edge of the 
blade. Each revolution causes both 
wings to come once in contact with the 
razor and glide along its edge, one on 
one side, the other on the other. This 
gives a beautiful edge to the blade. 



Mr. Charles Eakins lias resigned from 
his position as bookkeeper for Ihe !■ mith 
Plumbing Company, London, and will be 
located in Toledo, Ohio, in future. His 
fellow-employes presented him with a 
purse of gold as a token of their esteem. 



Hardware and Metal. 



February 4, 1905 




(For detailed prices see Current Market Quotations, page 50.) 



QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
232 McGill Street, 

Montreal, Feb. 3, 1905. 

Hardware. 

PREDICTIONS made earlier re- 
garding the bright future in 
the hardware and metal mar- 
ket for t he coining year show 
every evidence of being real- 
ized in their fulfilment. At this time 
a year ago trade had fallen flat, the rail- 
roads were blocked, there was little 
freight moving, and consequent upon 
dull times retailers were holding back. 
To-day orders are coming in at a greater 
rate than is usual even at this, one of 
the busy seasons of the year, and travel- 
ers and wholesale houses are corre- 
spondingly busy. Prices are being well 
maintained and some lines are even 
firmer than before. Wire nails are 
quoted 5c in advance of last week's 
prices. Copper rivet quotations are 
changed, the discount being' 45 per cent. 
Some changes are noted in merchant 
steel, being an advance of 5c a hundred 
on certain lines. Lanterns are quoted 
at considerable reduction from former 
prices . 

Axes— Travelers report unusually 
large orders of these for future deliv- 
ery. Our quotations are as follows: 
Chopping axes, unhandled, $6 to 
$9.50 a dozen; double bitt axes, $9.50 
to $12 a dozen; handled axes, $7.50 to 
$9.50: Canadian pattern axes, $7.50 a 
dozen. 

Handles— The market is quite brisk 
with no change in prices. We quote: 
Axe handles, No. 3, $1.25; No. 2, $1.50 
No. 1, $1.90 a dozen; adze handles, 34 
inch, $1.85 a dozen; pick handles. No. 
2, $1.70: No. 3, $1.50 a dozen. 

Sewing Machines— The demand for 
these continues fair but with no marked 
activity. Quotations are as follows: 
hand sewing- machines $1L00 each net; 
complete machines with stand, $18.00 
and up, according to quality. 

Lanterns— Prices are somewhat un- 
settled and are quoted at considerable 
reduction this week. The demand con- 
tinues good with large sales. Quotations 
arc Cold Blast. $4.75; No. Safety, 
$3.50. 

Barb Wire— The market has picked 
up considerably lately and has once more 
resinned a fair basis of activity. Prices 
remain unchanged . Our quotations 
are as follows: $2.75 per 100 lbs. 
f.o.b. Montreal, and $2.50 f.o.b. Cleve- 
land. Carlots of 15 tons, $2.40 f.o.b. 
Cleveland. 

Fence Staples— Demand is better. We 
quote as follows: $2.05 per LOO Lb. keg 



for bright, and $2.85 for galvanized; 
25 to 50 lb. packages 25c. extra. 

Rivets and Burrs— There is consider- 
able movement in rivets and burrs at 
present. The following discounts are now 
being quoted : Best iron rivets, 
section, carriage and wagon box, 
black rivets, tinned do., coopers' rivets 
and tinned swede rivets, 60, 10 and 10 
per cent.; swede iron burrs are quoted 
at 60 and 10 and 10 per cent, off, copper 
rivets with the usual proportion of burrs, 
45 per cent off; and coppered iron rivets 
and burrs in 5-11) carton boxes at 60 and 
10 and 10 off; copper burrs alone 30 and 
10, subject to usual charge for half 
lb. boxes. 

Screws — In common with other lines 
in the hardware trade, all sizes of screws 
have seen marked activity within the 
past week. Discounts are as follows: 
Round head, bright, 82 1-2 per 
cent.; flat head, bright, 871-2 per cent.; 
brass, round head. 75 per cent.; brass, 
flat head, 80 per cent. 

Bolts and Nuts— There is a much big- 
ger demand for these and wholesale 
houses report large sales. 

Wire Nails — An advance of 5c a keg 
in wire nails is noted over the price 
quoted last week. There is a good de- 
mand. We quote : $2.25 a keg f.o.b. 
Montreal. 

Cut Nails — Cut nails are not in great 
demand at present. The price continues 
as before, $2.20 a keg f.o.b. Montreal. 

Horseshoes— This is one of the most 
brisk markets at present. Shipments 
being freely made. Our quotations are: 
"P. B. " new pattern, base price 
$3.50 per 100 lbs.; other brands iron 
shoes, light and medium pattern. No. 2 
and larger, $3.65; No. 1 and smaller. 
$3.90; snow pattern, No. 2 and larger, 
$3.90; No. 1 and smaller, $4.15; light 
steel shoes. No. 2 and larger, $3.80; No. 
1 and smaller. $4.05; featherweight, all 
sizes, to 4. $5.35; toe weigbt, all sizes, 
1 to 4, $6.60. Packing— Up to three 
sizes in a keg, 10c per 100 lbs. More 
than three sizes. 25c. 

Horsenails — There is considerable ac- 
tivity in horsenails, as well as horse- 
shoes, with no change whatever in prices. 

Sporting Goods — Orders for sporting 
goods are fewer than before, although 
some are being placed for next season. 
We quote : Centre fire cartridges, list net ; 
sporting and military, 10 per cent, ad- 
vance on list; primers, $2.05 per thou- 
sand ; American loaded shells, 20 per 
cent, discount; B. B. caps. $2. per thou- 
sand: C. B. caps, $2.60 per thousand. 
Standard shot, $6.50 per hundred lbs: 
chilled, $7 per 100 lbs; buck and seal. 
$7.50 per 100 lbs; ball, $8 per 100 lbs. 
We quote discounts 15 per cent, f.o.b. 

28 



Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton, London, 
St. John and Halifax. 

Building Paper— This market has been 
quiet recently, but has experienced a 
lively change. The manufacturers are 
preparing for a large season's trade. 

Cordage— There is little change in the 
cordage market from a week ago. Prices 
continue firm, but the market is com- 
paratively quiet. 

Cement and Firebrick— It is expected 
that within the next three weeks trade 
in cement and fire brick will once more 
resume activity, but at present there 
is very little doing in these lines. We 
quote as follows: English cement. 
$2 to $2.10; Belgium, $1.70 to $2.10 per 
barrel ex store, and American, $2.15 to 
$2.35 ex cars. 

Coil Chain— The market is quiet and 
no change in prices. We quote: 5-16 inch, 
$3.90; 3-8 in., $3.75; 7-16 in., $3.55; 
1-2 in., $3.25; 9-16 in.. $3.30; 5-8 in., 
$3.20; 3-4 in., $3.05; 7-8 in., $3; one 
inch, $2.95. 

Green Wire Cloth— Orders for Spring 
delivery are being freely booked. Quo- 
tations are $1.50 per hundred square 
feet. 

Poultry Netting— Travelers report 
that there is to be an unusually large 
demand for poultry netting this season. 
Discounts for 2 inch 19 gauge standard 
extras are 60 and 5; for 2 inch 16 gauge 
the discounts are 55 and 5 per cent. 

Spring Hinges— The market is lively. 
We quote as follows: No. 5, $17.25 per 
gross; No. 19, $18 per gross; No. 20, 
$10.50; No. 120, $20; No. 51, $9.25; 
No. 50, $27.50. 

METALS. 

Prices on all metals have been main- 
tained during the past week, and while 
only one advance is noted several others 
are very firm. On galvanized and black 
sheet no concessions are obtainable as 
intimated a week ago. Ingot tin has ad- 
vanced l-2e the price now being 33 to 
33 l-2c. No great activity prevails in 
any line but there is a steadiness to the 
market. In scrap metal and old ma- 
terial there is little doing and stocks 
ai - e being held in anticipation of higher 
prices. 

Pig Iron— While the blast furnaces 
are very active there is no great quantity 
of pig iron moving at present. 

"Disc," No. i $16.50 delivered Montreal. 

"Dom.," No. 1 1750 " 

Usual difference in price for lower grades. 

Ferrona No. i $iS oo delivered Montreal. 

No. a 1750 " 

No. 3 16 50 

" No. 4 16.00 " 

Londonderry. $18.50 to f tg.oo delivered Montreal. 

Glengarnock 20.00 ". 

Gartsherrie 19 .25 " 

Carnbroe 18.50 " 



February 4, 1905 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal. 



Carron No. I 19-5° delivered Montreal. 

(special) it*-5° 

Ayresome No. i 18.00 

No. 3 17. so " 

summerlet- 19-5° 

Clarence No. 1 18.00 

" No. 3 17-1° 

No. 1 Cleveland. .. . 18.00 

Bar Iron — Rolling mills are turning- 
out a large quantity of bar iron and 
orders for future delivery are being 
freely booked. Quotations are as fol- 
lows: Merchants' bar, $1,771-2; horse- 
shoe iron, $2.02 1-2 ; forged iron 
$1,971-2; best refined iron, $2,171-2 
base, net cash thirty days. 

Tool Steel— Larger orders than usual 
have been taken for tool steel this sea- 
son and a big output is expected. The 
market is firm. Our quotations are 
as follows: Black Diamond, 8 
cents to 9 cents; Sanderson's, 8 cents 
to 45 cents, according to grade; 
Jessop's, 13c; Jonas & Clover's, 10 to 
20c; "Air Hardening," 65c per lb; 
Conqueror, 7 l-2c; Conqueror High Speed 
steel, 60c. 

Merchant Steel— Merchant steel has 
advanced within the past week. The 
new prices being given below : Sleigh- 
shoe, $1,871-2; tire, $1,971-2; spring, 
$2.75; toecalk, $2.50; machinery, iron 
finish, $2; square harrow, $1,971-2; 
reeled machinery steel, $2.75; mild, 
$1.82 1-2; rivet, $1.82 1-2; net cash thirty 
days. 

Cold Rolled Shafting— The demand 
continues good with a firm market. We 
quote: Cold rolled shafting, 3-4 
inch, to 1 7-16. $3.85 per 100 lbs; 
inch and a half to 3 inch, $3.50 per 100 
lbs. 

Canada Plates— This week sees little 
change in Canada Plates. The advance 
of a fortnight ago still holds. Our 
quotations are as follows: 52s, $2.45; 
60s, $2.50; 75s, $2.55; full polished, 
$3.60; galvanized 52s, $3.90 to $4; 60s, 
$4.15 to $4.25. ■ 

Black Sheets— In black sheets the 
market continues firm, ■ no concessions 
whatever being obtainable on prices 
quoted. We quote as follows: 28 gauge, 
$2.15; 26 gauge, $2.10; 22 to 24 gauge, 
$2.05; 19 to 20 gauge, $2.20; 8 to 10 
gauge, $2.30. 

Galvanized Iron— Recent advances in 
galvanized iron are being maintained 
with no shading whatever on quota- 
tions given. We quote: Queen's Head, 28 
gauge, $4.15; 26 gauge, $3.90; 22 to 24 
. gauge, $3.65 ; 16 to 20 gauge, $3.55 ; Apol- 
lo, 28 gauge, $4 ; 26 gauge, $3.75 ; 22 to 24 
gauge, $3.75; 16 to 20 gauge, $3.40; 
Fleur-de-Lis, 28 gauge, $4; 26 gauge, 
$3.75; 22 to 24 gauge, $3.50; 16 to 20 
gauge, $3.40; Comet, 28 gauge, $3.95; 
26 gauge, $3.70; 22 to 24 gauge, $3.45: 
16 to 20 gauge, $3.40; Bell brand, 28 
gauge, $4; Gorbal's "Best Best," 28 
gauge, $4.15; "Windmill Best," 28 
gauge, $3.95; Sword and Torch, 28 
gauge, $4.05; in less than case lots, 25c 
extra. 

Antimony— There is little activity in 
this market, which continues firm. Quo- 
tations are 9 1-2 to 9 3-4c. 

Sheet Zinc— Although the zinc mar- 
ket is firmer than a week ago there is 



no quoted advance in sheet zinc. Quo- 
tations are: Case lots, $7; small quanti- 
ties, $7.25 upwards. 

Tin Plates— Tin plates are somewhat 
firmer and continue active. We quote: 
Cokes, $3.75; charcoal, $4. 

Ingot Tin— There has been an advance 
in ingot tin during the past week of 
l-2c a pound, the price now being 33 to 
331-2c. 

Ingot Copper— The advance in copper 
noted last week still holds, with no fur- 
ther changes. The market continues 
steady and is fairly active. We quote : 
161-4 to 16 l-2c, no concessions what- 
ever being obtainable on these prices. 

Ingot Zinc— There is little movement 
in ingot zinc at present and the strength 
that has characterized this market re- 
cently is still maintained. We quote: 
6 3-4 to 7c. 

Pig Lead — Evidences pointed towards 
an advance in pig lead recently but so 
far such has not materialized. There 
is considerable activity. We quote, 
$3.50 to $3.60, no concessions being ob- 
tainable. 

Boiler Tubes— Boiler tubes are in good 
demand and an active season is being 
looked forward to. Quotations are as 
follows: Highest grade soft steel, 
British and American tubes, one and a 
half inch, 71-2c; 2 in., 81-2c; 21-2 in.. 
10c: 3 in., 121-4c; 31-2 in., 16c; 4 in., 
20c; 5 in., 45c. Price per foot net. 

Scrap Metal and Old Material— There 
is no considerable movement in scrap 
metal and old material at present. Prices 
for the most part are firm with the in- 
dication of advances so that stocks are 
being held with this in view. We quote : 
Heavy copper and wire, 11 3-4 to 12 l-4c; 
light copper, 10 3-4 to 11 l-4c ; heavy 
red brass, 10 to 101-4c; heavy yellow 
brass, 7 3-4 to 8 3-4c; light brass, 51-2 
to 6c; lead, 21-4c; zinc, 2 3-4c to 3c; 
iron, No. 1 wrought, $12; machinery 
scrap, $12 to $13; stoveplate, $10; mix- 
ed country rags, 65 to 75c per hundred 
pounds; old rubbers, 51-2 to 6c. 

ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
10 Front street east, 

Toronto, Feb. 3, 1905. 

Hardware. 

FOR this time of the year business in 
general hardware lines is quite 
brisk. However*the usual quiet- 
ness is felt, although not quite to the 
usual extent. Business this year is 
opening up much better than it did last, 
and there are exceptional prospects for 
trade during the year. At, piesent, for 
the most part, retailers are buying for 
immediate requirements, although a few 
orders for future delivery are reported. 
The feature of February business will 
probably be much the same as those of 
January. 

Price lists show no change this week. 

Lawn Mowers — The demand is normal 
for this time of the year. 

Guns and Ammunition— There is no- 
thing much doing. Trade is normal. 

Washing Machines— There is the 
usual demand. 

29 



Chain— The normal trade is being 
done. Probably Februarv will see an 
impetus given to trade. Our quotations 
are as follows: 1-4 in., $6.50; 5-16 
inch, $4.45; 3-8 inch, $3.85; 7-16 inch, 
$3.70; 1-2 inch, $3.55; 9-16 inch, $3.45; 
5-8 inch, $3.35; 3-4 inch. $3.25. 

Step Ladders— We quote at 10c per 
foot for 3 to 6 feet, and lie per foot for 
7 to 10 feet ladders. 

Extension Ladders— Waggoner, 40 per 
cent, off list. 

Galvanized Wire— The recent advances 
hold firm • trade is of course quiet but 
perhaps above normal. Quotations are : 
$z.371-2 f.o.b. Cleveland. 

Coiled Spring Wire— Prices have been 
confirmed but are subject to change 
without notice. Trade is normal. 

Barb Wire — Nothing much is doing 
in barb wire as yet. 

Wire Nails— Situation shows little 
change. Nominal quotations are $2.25 
f.o.b. Toronto. 

Cut Nails — There is a fair trade be- 
ing done. Prices remain firm. Quota- 
tions are $2.40 per keg f.o.b. Toronto. 

Horseshoes — A very good demand for 
horseshoes is reported for this time of 
the year. We quote as follows: "P.B. " 
base, $3.65; other brands are: Iron 
shoes, light and medium pattern, No. 
2 and larger, $3.80; No. 1 and smaller, 
$4.05; snow No. 2 and larger, $4.05; 
No. 1 and smaller, $4.30; light steel 
shoes, No. 2 and larger, $3.95; No. 1 and 
smaller, $4.20; featherweight, all sizes, 
to 4, $5.50; toe weight, all sizes, 1 to 
4, $6.75. If shipped from factory 15c 
less. 

Horsenails— There is a very good de- 
mand, and prices remain unaltered. 

Screws — Business is very good in this 
line and prospects are also very bright. 
Prices remain unaltered. 

Rivets and Burrs— A very good trade 
is being done and there is every indica- 
tion of a good demand throughout the 
year. 

Bolts and Nuts — A very good volume 
of trade is being done, with bright pros- 
pects for trade during the year. 

Woodenware— Market conditions re- 
main unchanged, and the normal busi- 
ness continues. 

Cordage — Oi'ders are being booked. 
Prices remain unchanged. We quote as 
follows: Binder twine, Blue p_j*J__- 
12 l-2c: Red Cap. 11 l-2c; Ti~er, I 
and Standard, 91-2c; manila, 14^1 
British manila, lie; sisal, 10 l-2c; dor" 
lathyarn, 101-2c; single lathyarn, 10 
sash'cord "Hercules," 30 to 32c; "Star,' 
36 to 38c : cotton twine, 3-ply, 24c ; 4-ply, 
29c; calking cotton, 161-2 to 17c; cot- 
ton waste, colored, 6 3-4c; white, 11 to 
13c. 

METALS. 

The local metal market continues ac- 
tive and firm. Orders are being placed 
very freely both for present use and for 
future delivery. The feature of the 
week has been the good demand for 
ingot metals. 

The slight lowering of prices on the 
British market has proven, as was ex- 
pected, only a temporary condition. Tin, 



Hardware and Metal. 



THE MARKETS 



February 4, 1905 



eopper -and lead are all lip again, but 
pig iron and spelter still keeps low. 

Pig Iron — Sales continue to be good 
on the local market, and many orders 
tor delivery late in the year are being 
booked. Several large sales of pig iron 
were made on the Pittsburg market dur- 
ing the last week of January. 

Bar Iron — There is a very good de- 
mand, and prices remain unchanged. 
Our quotations are as follows: $1.80 
f.o.b. Toronto, with discount of 2 per 
cent. : for extras as cut to length, while 
rolling, 2 feet and over, 10c per 
100 lbs; l.foot and under 2 feet, 15c; 
under 1 foot, 20c; over 20 feet, by spe- 
cial agreement according to length and 
size. 

Tin — There is a strong and active 
market. Quotations on the London mar- 
ket are again up. Quotations are from 
32 to 34c per lb. 

Galvanized Sheets— The market shows 
a more active aspect this week. Prices 
are firm. 

Tin Plates— This market is more ac- 
tive than last week, and recent advances 
hold firm. 

Canada Plates— The market is rather 
quiet this week; prices remain unalter- 
ed. 

Brass — There is a rather quiet mar- 
ket. Advances of recent date hold firm. 
Discounts are 10 per cent. 

Lead — The market is firm, and more 
active than last week. Prices on Lon- 
don market have advanced. We quote : 
Pig lead, $3.80 per 100 lbs; and bar 
lead, $4.80 per 100 lbs. 

Zinc Spelter— There is a very good 
demand, and the market is firm. Quo- 
tations are as follows : 7c per lb. for 
foreign and 5 1-2 to 5 3-4c per lb. for 
domestic. 

Copper — For ingot copper the demand 
has been very brisk this week. Copper 
has advanced or London market. Quo- 
tations are as follows: Ingot copper, 
lb' l-4e per. lb and sheet copper, 21c per 
pound. 

Antimony— The market is quiet, and 
juices remain unaltered. 

Cement — Few orders are being receiv- 
ed, outside dealers believing that prices 
will take another drop before trade 
opens next Spring. Prices have de- 
clined a trifle during the week, but, as 
to the prices current before trade 
closed, no do'.-;,iite impression can be 
hair ^° further decline is expected; 
„ 0> , a movement is expected shortly 
Aig the manufacturers to make a 
ided advance. Our quotations are: 

ir carload orders f.o.b. Toronto, Can- 
adian Portland, $1.70; American Port- 
land, $1.70. For small orders ex 
warehouse: Canadian Portland $2 ; Am- 
erican Portland, $2. 

Firebrick — The discontinuation of re- 
pair work has diminished the demand. 
This quietness is expected to reign until 
the usual repair work begins in the 
Spring. Prices remain the same. We 
quote the following prices: English 
and Scotch firebrick 30 to 35c: Ameri- 
can, low grade. 25 to 30c; high prade 
32 1-2 to 40c. 

Building Paper— Some good orders 
have been received by the manufacturers 



from the wholesale hardware houses. 
Preparatory to filling orders from their 
travelers who are now on the road. The 
majority of country hardware merch- 
ants have concluded taiun 0, stock, and 
those who order their building paper 
direct from the nianulacturers are ex- 
pected to send in their orders during the 
next week or ten days. 

Old Material— A good general demand 
from the Canadian utilizers has develop- 
ed on the market during the last week. 
Lead, eopper, brass and iron have the 
principal inquiry, although the demand 
for old rubbers has brightened up won- 
derfully, and the general impression 
conveyed is that American manufactur- 
ers are minus stock and are anxious to 
purchase. Quotations are as follows : 
Heavy copper and wire, 13c per 
lb ; light copper 12c per lb ; heavy 
red brass. 10c per lb; heavy yellow brass, 
8c per lb; light brass, 6s per lb; tea 
lead. $2.35 per 100 lbs; heavy lead, 
$2.50 to $2.60 per 100 lbs; scrap zinc, 
3 3-4c to 4c per lb ; iron, No. 1 wrought, 
$11 ; No. 2 wrought, $3 ; machinery cast 
scrap, $13; stoveplate, $8 to $9; malle- 
able and steel, $5; old rubbers, 5 l-2c per 
lb: country mixed rags, 65c ner 100 lbs. 

Coal — A marked decline is noted in 
Hocking and Youghioaheny coals. This 
decline is due more probablv to the fact 
that a number of new mines have been 
opened in Ohio and sister states which 
has resulted in a production far in ex- 
cess of the demand. Our quotations 
are as follows: Anthracite in cars at 
Hriges: Grate, $5.50 per gross ton; egg, 
stove and nut, $5.75 per gross ton ; pea, 
$3.50 per gross ton. 

Standard Hocking, soft coal, in cars, 
f.o.b. at mines: Lump, $1.35; 3-4 inch, 
$1.25; run of mine, $1.05; nut, 90c; N. 
P. and S., 60c; coarse slack, 40c; box 
cars 10 cents per ton additional. 

Youghiogheny soft coal in cars. 
bonded, at the bridges: 11-4 inch, $2.55; 
3-4 inch, $2.45; mine run, $2.35; slack 
at $1.95 to $2. 

LONDON METAL MARKETS. 

From Metal Market Report, Jan. 31, 1905. 

Pig Iron— Middlesboro No. 3 foundry 
boro and the same for Scotch warrants. 
at 53s 9d, making prices as compared 
with last week, 3d lower for Middles- 
boro and the same for Scotch warants. 

Tin — Spot tin opened quiet at £132, 
futures ;;t €130 15s, and after sales of 
150 tons of spot and 100 tons of futures 
closed linn at £132 7s 6d for spot and 
£131 for futures, making prices as com- 
pared with last week £2 2s (id higher 
for spot and ."s higher for futures. 

Copper — Spot copper opened firm at 
£68, futures at £68 2s 6d, and after 
sales of 200 tons of spot and 600 tons 
of futures, closed firm at £68 Is 3d for 
spot and £68 5s for futures, making 
mice as compared with last week ,">s !M 
higher for spot and 7s fid hiffher for fu- 
tures. 

Lead— The market closed at £12 15s, 
making prices as compared with last 
week Is 3d higher. 

Spelter— The market closed at £24 
l?s fid, making prices as compared with 
last week, 5s lower. 
30 



UNITED STATES METAL MARKET. 

Artvancs proofs furnished Hardware and Metal by 
Th- Iron A;e. Feb. 2, 1905. 

SO far as fresh buying is involved the 
pig iron markets, generally 
speaking, have been rather quiet 
during the past week. In the Pitts- 
burg district steel makers have not 
taken additional quantities, nor is 
it certain that the leading interest 
will purchase any notable quantities 
at once. The market has been 
pretty thoroughly cleaned up of specula- 
tive lots, only one small parcel of less 
than 3,000 tons, offered at a shade under 
prevailing prices, having been marketed. 

Eastern steel makers have shown in- 
creased interest in supplying future 
wants, and sales aggregating about 25,- 
000 tons have been consummated for de- 
livery to the end of the year. Negotia- 
tions for further lots are pending. 

The steel market is narrow and strong 
in all the principal selling (Centres. 
Some of the rolling mills within moder- 
ate reach of tidewater have been testing 
the market for imported steel, but find 
conditions adverse and prices high even 
for drawback tonnage. The German coal 
strike is an uncertain factor in the in- 
ternational markets. Advices indicate 
that the German steel works had some 
stock of fuel to draw upon, and appear 
thus far to have made their shipments 
regularly. The English makers are in a 
position to take care of requirements 
for the immediate future and show a 
disposition to do so at no marked rise 
in the price. However, it is believed by 
importers that had it not been for this 
danger of a curtailment of the supplv it 
might have been possible to put through 
some business for this side. 

Reports from the steel rail makers are 
better than 1hev were. In the West 
some further large orders have been 
placed, Chicago reporting about 50,000 
tons additional, which include 30,000 
tons for a Northern transcontinental 
line. It is reported that the South 
Chicago mill has now booked an aggre- 
gate of 400,000 tons out of a total ca- 
pacity of 750,000 tons. It is estimated 
that the mills in the pool now have 
about 1,000,000 tons on the books. Last 
year these mills shipped a little under 
1,450,000 tons, which include Canadian 
and Mexican shipments, the official re- 
cord of such exports having been 240,- 
000 tons. This leaves a little over 1,- 
200,000 tons as the record of last year 
of this particular group of mills. Be- 
sides this, of course, thev contributed 
the balance of the exports, which aggie- 
gated 414,800 tons. 

There is no hope whatever of selling 
to Canada this year under the anti- 
dumping clauses of the Canadian tariff, 
so that the Canadian Pacific order now 
up for consideration does not interest 
our makers. Last year under the stim- 
-ulus of the rush to get in in time the 
exports to Canada were 216,800 tons. 
Rut even taking into account that this 
business is lost, the position of the rail 
mills is verv much belter than last year, 
which will go down into the history of 
the rail trade as the worst for a long 
period of years. 

The activity in the merchant pipe 
trade lias justified a further advance of 
•SI per ton and has brought about the 
placing of heavy orders for skelp. 

The structural and plate markets are 
quiet, no notable transactions having 
taken place. 



February 4, 1905 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal. 



PORTLAND CEMENT 

CANADIAN, ENGLISH, 

GERMAN and BELGIAN. 

FIRE BRICKS, FIRE CLAY, 

ENAMELLED BRICKS, all colors. 
BUILDING BRICKS. 

SEWER PIPES, CULVERT PIPES, 
WHEELBARROWS, 

FOUNDERS' and CON- 
TRACTORS' SUPPLIES. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

WELLINGTON ST., MONTREAL 

Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers ot 



Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
drauli. and other Machinery where great strength 
is r qui-ed : Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 



u 



MIDLAND 



JJ 



BRAND. 



Foundry Pig Iron, 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as Fuel, "Mid- 
land ' ' will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Writ* for Prlo* to Sales Agent* 

Drummond McCall & Co. 

MONTREAL, QUE 



or to 



Canada Iron Furnace Co. 

MIDLAND, ONT Limited 

Get our prices for 

GALVANIZED 
FLAT SHEETS 

THE "VANDA" BRAND 

For all purposes requiring the best quality. 

It is "dead flat," well galvanized, true to gauge 
and specially soft for working-up. We guarantee 
every sheet bearing our brand. 



C.F. JACKSON & CO, Limited 

Wholesale Merchants 

Ormitiale B ock, Vancouver, B.C., and 

Liverpool, England 

Direct Importers of: 

Metals of every description, Wire Rope, Portland 
Cements, Firebricks, Ore Sacks, Grain Bags, etc., etc 



PITTSBURG METAL MARKETS. 

Iron Trade Review, Feb. 2, 1905. 

Pig Iron — The iron market is quiet 
and owing to the small number of trans- 
actions it is difficult to locale the mar- 
ket. We note the sale of 2,500 tons of 
Xii. 2 foundry at $16.25 furnace, located 
east of Pittsburg, and owing to the lo- 
cation of the consumer the price is con- 
sidered a good one for the furnace. Val- 
ley iron is offered at $16, furnace. Sev- 
eral foundry furnaces are heavily over- 
sold, while others are eager for business 
and until the latter are filled up, low 
juices will continue to prevail. Specu- 
lative Bessemer continues to be offered 
in this market at $15.50, furnace, de- 
spite the recent heavy sales, and oper- 
ators are beginning lo wonder how much 
non was really sold to speculators on 
the late low market. The Bessemer Piti 
Iron Association refuses to shade $16, 
and there is little doubt that this price 
can be secured when all the speculative 
iron is cleaned up. Purchases by the 
United States Steel Corporation are ex- 
pected within a few days, but the ton- 
nage has not been fixed. Forge iron is 
heid at $16 to $16.25, Pittsburg. We 
revise quotations as follows: 

Bessemer, Valley $15 50 to $16 00 

Bessemer, Pittsburg 16 35 to 16 85 

No. 1 Foundry 17 25 to 17 50 

No. 2 Foundry 16 85 to 17 35 

Gray forge, Pittsburg 16 10 to 16 25 

Basic, Valley 15 gi to 16 < o 

Basic, Pittsburg 16 75 to 16 85 

Steel— Independent finishing mills arc 
having considerable trouble in securing 
steel to operate their plants, and Besse- 
mer and open-hearth billets for prompt 
shipment are held at $24.50 to $25, Pitts- 
burg, while sheet bars are quoted at 
$26.50 to $27. Large steel producers in 
this district are not making sufficient 
steel to meet the requirements of their 
finishing departments and the outside 
mills are not receiving shipments- on 
their contracts. 

Plates— Pes] >ite the fact that there is 
little demand for plates from the boiler, 
tank and shipbuilding trades, the mills 
are gradually falling behind on their 
orders on account of the heavy demands 
of the steel car builders. Little new 
business is being placed, but the speci- 
fications on contracts are growing heav- 
ier daily. 

Bars— The market is firm at 1.70c, 
Pittsburg. On.steel bars one of the lead- 
ing interests is asking a premium of $2. 
We quote as follows: Bar iron, 1.65c 
to 1.69 1-4 Pittsbur-- hoops, 1.55c, and 
bands, 1.40c, both takins' bar extras. 
Bessemer steel bars, 1.40c; open-hearth 
steel bars, 1.40c; plow and cultivator 
beams, 1.40c net; channels, angles, zees 
and tees under 3 in, 1.05c. The follow- 
ing differentials are maintained on steel: 
Less than 2,000 lbs of a size and not less 
than 1,000 lbs, 10 cents advance; less 
than 1.000 lbs of a size, 30 cents ad- 
vance. 

Structural Material— Most of the 
structural shops in this district have 
large orders on hand, and the structural 
mills are well filled for this season of 
the year. Quotations are unchanged : 

31 



Tinned Sheets 
Tinplates 
Canada Plates 
Polished Sheets 

ETC., ETC. 

PROM STOCK OB FOR IMPORT. 

A. C. LESLIE & CO 

S09-512 Merobants Bank Building, 
MONTREAL. 



Ask your customers 

if they don't need new pumps. 

If they do, sell them our 

Standard Anti- Freezing Pumps 

They'll appreciate getting a 
pump that doesn't have to be 
thawn out every zero morning. 



McDougall Pumps 
—Made in Canada. 



Write for Catalogue and Prices 
The 

R. McDougall Co. 
Limited 

Gait, Ont. 




RAINES £> PECKOVER 

TORONTO. 

Ontario Agents for 

B. K. MORTON & CO.'S 

"ALPHA" 

I1IGI1 SPEED STEEL 

AND 

Crucible Cast Steel 

Large stock on hand. Send for Stock 
List 



Nova Scotia Steel 
& Coal Co., u mK .d 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 

Manufacturers of ™ ■ 

Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIEMENS MARTIN 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



Hardware and Metal. 



THE MARKETS 



February 4, 1905 



Beams and channels up to 15 in, 1 .."»().- ; 
over 15 in, 1.60c; angles. 3x2 up to 6x6. 
l..")(ic; zees, 1.40c; tees, 1.55c; angles 
from 11 to t(i in, 1.50c; universal ana 
sheared plates. 6 1-4 to 14 in, inclusive, 
1.40c: over 14 in, J .50c base. 

Sheets — Demand for sheets for prompt 
delivery continues heavy, while all milh 
are operating at a greater capacity than 
any lime in the past year and a half 
Jobbers are laying in heavy stocks an- 
ticipating another advance, which is 
looked for shortly. 

Wire and Wire Nails— Heavy stocks 
are being accumulated in all the ware- 
houses of the wire and nail manufac- 
turers in anticipation of a heavy Spring 
trade. An advance in price is expected 
this week, but as yet no announcement 
has been made. Quotations are unchang- 
ed as follows: Wire nails, jobbers' car- 
load lots, $1.75; retailers' carload lots, 
$1.80, and less than carloads, $1; paint- 
ed barb wire, $1.90 to jobbers in car- 
loads: retailers' carloads, $1.95, and 
less than carloads, $2.05, with 30 cents 
for galvanizing. Annealed smooth fence 
wire is held at $1.60, with the usual 
differentials to retailers for carloads 
and less than carloads. Quotations are 
all f.o.b. Pittsburg, 60 davs, with 2 per 
cent, discount for cash in ten days. Iron 
cut nails are held at $1.85 Pittsburg, 
and steel at $1.75. 

Merchant ' Steel— Demand continues 
strong, although prices continue practi- 
cally unchanged. 

Coke — The coke market is somewhat 
easier, strictly Connellsville furnace 
coke being held at $2.50 to $2.60 for 
prompt shipment, and foundry is held 
at $2.85 to $3. The coke shipments to 
the west are heavy, but a lack of suit- 
able cars has hindered eastern ship- 
ments. Coke production continues heavy 
and at the rate of about 17,000,000 ton's 
annually. 

TRADE CONDITIONS IN NEW 
BRUNSWICK. 

Special correspondence of Hardware and Metal. 

St. John, Jan. 30, 1905. 

THE hie; event in local hardware cir- 
cles lately was the annual dinner 
of the St. John Iron and Hard- 
ware Association, which was held at the 
Union Club on the evening of Jan. 25. 
The attendance was large and thoroughlv 
representative of the trade. The chair 
was occupied by Mr. John Keeffe, the 
association president. The committee in; 
charge of the affair were Messrs. A. M. 
Rowan, J. J. Barry, J. A. McAvity, 
and J. P. Mclntyre. After the dinner 
had been done justice to, the !■ asts 
were honored as follows: The King, pro- 
posed by the chairman; Our Association, 
proposed bv W. S. Fisher and responded 
to by W. H. Thorne; The City of St. 
John, proposed bv Chairman Keeffe and 
responded to bv Mayor White, H. B. 
Schoficld, Aid. T. B. Robinson; The Iron 
and Hardware Manufacturers, proposed 
bv J. J. Footc and responded to by W. 
S. Fisher, G. McAvity, C. McDonald 
and J. A. McAvity; Our Guests, propos- 
ed bv M. E. Agar and responded to by 
C. J. Coster and .1. D. Hazen, M.P.P.; 
The Ladies, proposed by Col. Markham 
and replied to by H. J. O'Neill and 
James Harrison. 



NICHOLSON FILES 

Are known all over the World. 
WARRANTED. 

QUICK CUTTING. LONG WEARING. 

SIX FACTORIES PRODUCING DAILY 120.000. 

Sold by all prominent merchants throughout the Dominion. 

PRICES RIGHT. 

DOMINION WORKS. - Port Hope, Ont. 



GlL^ERTSOiv^ BrandJ Galvanized Sheets 

- s ^^b=^iH^^E--f^ r ^^r^_£2^ cost less jhan 'some other brands, but will do your 

g~f ^-v m mm fry rfl~~ ' WOrk e 1 uallv well— every sheet guaranteed. 

ty %J Wi. 12* 1 Makers : W. OILBERTSON & CO., Limited 
Agent: ALEXANDER GIBB, Montreal. Pontardawe, South Wales. 



GALVANIZED FENCE HOOK ™S C F £ SJEH,H0 v™ *" picket ow w '" e 

FENCE HOOK 



WIRE NAILS, COILED SPRING. 
BARB and PLAIN FENCE WIRE, 
OILED and ANNEALED, CLOTHES 
LINE WIRE, STAPLES, etc. 



THE WESTERN WIRE & NAIL CO.. Limited, 



-LONDON, ONT 




THE JOHN MORROW MACHINE 
SCREW COMPANY, Limited 

Manufacturer* ol 
Set and Cap Screws, Special Milled Work, Engine Stndi. 
Etc. Cold Punched Nuti of every variety of finiih. 
INGERSOLL,*ONT. 




Blizzard 



FOR HATS 
AND MICK 

Swift as lightning, sure as death and sure 
death to the animal. Strong, simple, substantial 
construction. "To get the best trap trade, sell 
the best traps made." 

Write for prices to 

J. M. Mast Mfg. Co., Lititz, Penna. 

Canadian Ag'ts, C- H. Grenfell & Co , London, Ont. 




Snap Shot 




Old Nick 




WATERPROOF WRAPPING PAPER 

For Express and Long Distance Packages Put up In rolls 36 In. wide, 
250 and 300 yards In a roll. Clean paper on both sides— waterproof sub- 
stance in the centra— therefore It will not soil or stain delicate goods as 
ordinary waterproof paper will. Practically odorless. May be used 

p i a t c h k %Ve°s r . c ' se,,ningorwrapp ' ng Canada Paper Co. 

gAMPLES AND PRICES WITH PLEASURE. TORONTO LIMITED MONTREAL 



1 

I 



The dinner was undoubtedly one of the 
most successful that the Association has 
yet held. 

It is not improbable that shelf hard- 
ware will soon be bringing' higher prices 
than at the present. The travelers for 
American manufacturers who have been 
ffoing the rounds of late are quoting 
somewhat higher figures than formerly 
and the effect must soon be evident. Al- 
ready a stiffening in price is making it- 

32 



self felt in regard to, at least, some 
articles . 

Although perhaps not strictly a hard- 
ware subject it may not be amiss to men- 
tion the formation of a new iron com- 
pany in New Brunswick. This company 
is known as the New Brunswick Iron 
Company, Limited, and has possession 
of a large tract near Lepreaux, Charlotte 
county, where a variety of iron ore is 
said to be plentiful. This ore is coin- 



February 4, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Hardware and Metal. 



monly supposed to be magnetic. The 
president of the company is Mr. C. V. 
Wetmore, Sydney, who was also the 
chief promoter. The vice-president is 
Mr. J. S. McLennan, of Sydney, and 
the secretary Mr. Peter Clinch, of this 
city. The company expects to send iron 
to Sydney, the United States, Germany 
and England. 
t The January sales have not, of course, 

been very heavy. The general opinion, 
however, is that the sales compare fav- 
orably with those of the same month 
in other years. The very stonny weather 
has probably interfered with the sales 
to some extent. The outlook for the 
next few months is regarded as very 
good. 

Prices all round are firm at present. 
There is no sign of any instability that 
would cause anxiety although there is 
a slight drop in the price of one or two 
articles. 



Halifax, England; Roberts Pilling Ma- 
chine Co., patent filling machines, Bol- 
ton. England. 



NEW SAW COMPANY. 

A new organization known as the 
Canada Saw Co., with headquarters at 
Ottawa, have concluded negotiations for 
the purchase of the Ottawa Saw Co. and 
the saw manufacturing plant formerly 
owned and operated by the James Rob- 
ertson Co., Toronto. Negotiations are 
- said to be under way for the purchase 
of every independent saw manufactur- 
ing plant in Canada with the exception 
of Shurly & Dietrich, of Gait. 



A NEW CONCERN. 

The St. Armand Co. is the firm name 
adopted by A. M. St. Armand, hard- 
ware importers and manufacturers' sell- 
ing agents, with headquarters in Mont- 
real. Mr. St. Armand was formerly 
manager of the Canada Hardware and is 
widely known all over the trade. His 
&eencies will include many of the lead- 
ing manufacturers of this continent as 
well as of the Old Country.. 

A STRONG LIST OF FIRMS. 
Wayland Williams & Dadson is a 
firm which though young in this name 
are old in experience as hardware and 
machinery sales agents. Wayland Will- 
iams was for years secretary of the 
Laurie Engine Co. They will represent 
in Montreal and the Province of Quebec 
the following firms: John Birch & Co., 
limited, engineers and merchants, metals 
and machinery, London, England; Henry 
Russell & Co., tool steel, files, Sheffield, 
England: T. Harding Churton & Co., 
A. C. Motors, Leeds, Ens-land; Acme 
Lathe and Products Co., cap and set 
screws, special screws, etc., Manchester, 
England; Campbell Gas Engine Co., 
.umited, gas engines, suction gas plants, 



CHINESE STEEL RAILS. 

In 1903, the iron works at Han Yang, 
China, turned out over 28,000 tons of 
steel rails, which were sold at an aver- 
age price of $31.37 a ton. The output 
of pig iron was increased from 75 to 
120 tons a day. The iron works em- 
ployed five foreigners as managers and 
overseers and over 3,000 native work- 
men. 



PERSONAL AND TRADE NOTES. 

Mr. Adam Taylor, of the Baylor & 
Forbes Company, Guelph, made a busi- 
ness trip to Toronto this week. 

C. R. Boultbee's implement and gen- 
eral milling business at Broadview, 
Assa., was destroyed by fire on Jan. 29. 

Mr. W. M. Pringle, a popular young 
hardwareman of Whitby, was married 
last week to Miss Ross of the same 
town. 

Mr. D. R. Pottinger, representing Geo. 
Carter & Co., of Victoria, B.C., was a 
visitor to the Toronto hardware trade 
this week. 

Mr. James McGuire, who for 45 years 
carried .on business as a master plumber 
in Quebec, died on January 30, after a 
brief illness. 

Mr. Eugene Coste, president of the 
Canadian Mining Institute, has returned 
to Toronto after a visit to the Califor- 
nia oil fields. 

Watts cv. Company are a new firm who 
are opening up a hardware business in 
Brantford. They will be ready for busi- 
ness about March 1, with a full line of 
goods. 

Mr. G. N. Griffin is now representing 
the Vokes' Hardware Company in their 
city business, taking the place of Mr. 
Morgan Smith, now with the Brooks- 
Smith Hardware Company. 

Fire did several thousand dollars' 
worth of damage at the Woodstock Gas 
Company's works on Jan. 29, the bri- 
gade of the Bain Wagon Company ren- 
dering valuable assistance. 

Mr. E. W. Rathbun, the new M.P.P. 
for East Hastings, is well known to 
Canadian dealers in lumber, cement, 
etc., through his connection with the 
Rathbun Lumber Company, Limited, of 
Deseronto. 

Fire did $80,000 dollars' worth of 
damage to the National Rubber Com- 
pany's warehouse and to the Kilgour &) 
Co.'s furniture factory in Montreal on 
Jan. 28. Most of the loss was covered 
by insurance. 

The store of R. Goods, Pembroke, 
dealer in paints, oils, wall paper, etc , 
was destroyed by fire on Jan. 27. The 
office of the Pembroke Electric Light 

33 




RNE 

1« 



Metallic Skylights 



" ^ 



«y 



The acme of Skylight perfection ! 

We make them from hollow 
bars of Copper or Galvanized 
Steel — in styles and sizes to suit 
all kinds of roofs. 

They are very strong, and 
unaffected by cold or heat, as 
there is neither contraction nor 
expansion — and, if glazed with 
our fire-proof wired glass, they 
are absolutely fire-proof. 

METALLIC ROOFING CO., 

Limited, 

Wholesale Manufacturers, 

TORONTO, CANADA. 



Company was in the same building and 
was also destroyed. 

Mr. E. P. Heaton, of Montreal, has 
been appointed manager of the new fire 
insurance department of the Canadian 
Manufacturers' Association. Mr. Hea- 
ton has had 27 years' experience in fire 
insurance and was chosen for the new 
position out of 40 applicants. 

Mr. George L. Rice, who for a couple 
of years past has been superintendent of 
the Deering Harvester works, Hamilton, 
has left for Chicago to assume the man- 
agement of the large twine factory of 
the International Harvester Company. 
Before leaving Hamilton he was present- 
ed with a handsome diamond scarf pin. 

The business heretofore carried on by 
Mr. A. C. Jenking, of Montreal, will in 
future be known as A. C. Jenking & 
Co., as Mr. Jenking has entered into- 
partnership with Mr. J. L. Woods, re- 
cently from England. The firm will be 
represented on the road by Mr. J. Ar- 
nold, who is well known amongst the 
trade. 

The Facer Solid Steel Car Wheel Com- 
pany, of Perth, Ont., is asking for an 
extension of one year, within which to 
import steel wheels and machinery used 
in the manufacture thereof, without in- 
validing the patents. The ground for 
the request is that the company has not 
yet been enabled to manufacture the 
patented articles in the Dominion. 

Mr. John N. Hunter, who has held 
the position of advertising manager for 
Lewis Bros., Montreal, for some time 
past, has severed his connection with 
that firm and accepted a position as 
traveling salesman for Decatur, Ball & 
Co. Mr. Hunter has made many friends 
while in Montreal who regret that the 
change means his departure from the 
city. He left this week for a Western 
trip. 



^ 



Hardware and Metal. 



THE MARKETS 



February 4, 1905 



CONDENSED OR "WANT" 
ADVERTISEHENTS. 



Advertisements under this heading, 2c. a word first 
Insertion; lc. a word each subsequent insertion. 

Contractions count as one word, but five figures (as 
$1,000) are allowed as one word. 

Cash remittance to cover cost must accompany all 
advertisements. In no case can thisrule be overlook- 
ed. Advertisements received without remittance 
cannot be acknowledged. 

Where replies come to our care to be forwarded, five 
cents must be added to cost to cover postage, etc. 



Y£AELY CONTRACT RATES. 

100 wordi each insertion, 1 year $30 00 

6 months 17 00 

3 months 10 00 

50 " " 1 year 17 00 

6 months 10 00 

25 " " 1 year 10 00 



MANUFACTURERS' AGENT WANTED. 

AN English firm who make a specialty of brass 
tubing, all kinds ; brass and copper sheets, 
German silver, rolled brass and wire, want an 
agent for Toronto and district. Address Box 209, 
Hardware and Metal, Toronto. (tf) 



CLERK WANTED. 



HARDWARE Clerk wanted at once. Must be a 
good salesman and stock-keeper. Write, 
staling salary, to Boxall & Matthie, Lindsay, (10) 

SITUATIONS VACANT. 

WANTED for wholesale hardware house young 
man about twenty-five years old, who has 
had some experience in hardware catalo ue and 
advertising work. Apply in own handwriting. 
Address P.O. Box 2345, Montreal. (5) 



FOR SALE. 



STOVES, Tinware, Tinsmithing Business for 
sale. Clean stock. Doing good business. 
Going West. Box 217, Hardware and Metal, 
Toronto. (5) 



BUSINESS CHANCES 



-THE LOCATORS — W. B. Herbert, general 

I manager. The largest and oldest exclusive 

business brokers in the West. Address The 

Locators, 63 Merchants Bank Building, Winnipeg. 

HARDWARE— Good clean s'ock of forty-three 
hundred doing fifteen thousand turnover ; 
population over two thousand. Thirty-five hun- 
dred cash, balance to suit. The Locators. 

HARDWARE — In good old settled town in 
Manitoba, stock fifty-five hundred, bui dings 
thirty-five hundred ; twenty-five hundred cash 
handles. Populat on six hundred. Annual turn- 
over twelve thousand The Locators. 

HARDWARE—Stock three thousand, annual 
turnover twelve thousand. Thirty per cent, 
clear profit. Terms half cash, balance easy. The 
Locators. 

HARDWARE AND IMPLEMENTS— A small 
stock doing good business. Turnover nine 
thousand; one thousand cash, balance easy; in 
Manitoba. The Locators. 

HARDWARE, Lumber and Coa' — Ten thou- 
sand handles this. Excellent business ; about 
two hundred miles from Winnipeg. Good hard- 
ware business, and good lumber and coal business. 
If a man has ten thousand he can handle this. 
The Locators. 

WE are just getting out our new list of Business 
Opportunities and you should write for one. 
Address The Locators, 63 Merchants' Bank Build- 
ing, Winnipeg. 



HARDWARE CONDITIONS IN MANITOBA. 



(Market quotations corrected by tele; 



OWING to the fact that the railways 
are allowing excursion rates to 
non-curlers during- the second 
week of the Winnipeg Bonspiel only it 
lias been found necessary to postpone 
the conventions of the Western and 
Manitoba Retail Hardware and Stove 
Dealers' Associations until the second 
week. It is expected that many hard- 
ware men from the west will take ad- 
vantage of the cheap excursion rates to 
at I end the conventions. They will be 
held in Scott Memorial Hall on the af- 
ternoon and evening of February 14. 

Some enthusiastic hardware men are 
discussing the feasibility of a plan 
whereby the Hardware Association 
might undertake the fire insurance of 
its members. It is argued that the vari- 
ous risks a,re far apart and that it would 
be quite possible to give ample fire in- 
surance at rates much less than those 
charge*} by the regular fire insurance 
companies. Some of the American as- 
sociations have such a system in vogut 
and it is said to work satisfactorily. 
This is one of many topics to be dis- 
cussed at the approaching conventions. 

Wholesale business is still rather 
quiet but an impetus is expected during 
the Bonspiel weeks when many hardware 
men will be in town. Collections are re- 
ported to be improving and indications 
point to an unprecedented^ large Spring 
trade. Prices are steady throughout. 

Wire— Orders for Spring delivery are 
now quite numerous as travelers are out 
for Spring business from all the local 
houses. The demand for wire is very 
large, showing that the western farmer 
is now undertaking to fence in his farms. 
Prices are steady. We quote: 

Barbci wire, 100 lb : -i %S 

Plain galvanized 6 to 8 3 39 

92 50 2 90 

Plain galvanized 10 " 3 50 

12 3 10 

" 13 3 20 

14 3 9° 

x 5 4 45 

16 4 60 

Plain twist a gc 

Staples , c 

("Wed annealed wire 10 2 96 

\\ 11 3 02 

12 3 10 

13 3 2° 

14 3 3° 

IS 3 45 

Annealed wires (unoiled) 10c. less. 

Horseshoes— Trade is quiet and prices 
are steady. We quote: 

Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No 1 $4 55 

No. 2 and larger .... 4 30 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 4 8o 

No. 2 and larger 4 SS 

Steel , No . o to No. 1 4 70 

No. 2 and larger 4 45 

Horsenails— List price and discounts 
are as follows: 

Horoen»ils, No. 4— 1% in., list price o 48 

" S— 2 " '' o 32 

' 6— 254 " o 28 

' 7— atf " o 24 

\\ 8— 2H " " o «2 

9—2 % " o 20 

" IO— 2}{ " " o SO 

" 11— aK " " o 20 

" is— 2H " o 20 

" M— 3tf " o 20 

34 



raph up till 12 a.m. Friday, Feb. 3, 1905.) 
Office of Hardware and Metal 

Room 515 Mclntyre Block, 

Winnipeg, Man. 

Discounts on these prices are for "C" brand 
40, 10 and 7tf per cent., for other brands 55 and 
60 per cent. Add 15c. per box. 

Wire and Cut Nails -The western nail 
market is fairly steady and the outlook 
for a large business this year is of the 
best. We quote: 



Cut Nails — 

2d 1 in $4 00 

3d Fin. iH in.. ^00 

3d 1 X in 3 65 

4d 1 % in 3 40 

5 d iM in 3 40 

6d 2 in 3 30 

8d ■*% in 3 15 

iod 3 in 3 10 

2od 4 in 3 05 

3od 4K in 3 00 

4°d 5 in 3 00 

Sod sH in 3 00 

ood 6 in 3 00 



Wire Nails— 

1 in 

iH in 

at •■ ... 

1% " ... 

1% " ... 

2 " . . . 
a% " ... 

3 " ••■ • 
3% " ... 

4 " ... 
4* " ... 

5 " •.. 
5* " ... 

6 " ... 



4 CO 
4 00 
3 6-, 
3 4° 
3 4° 
3 30 
3 '5 
10 
05 



3 

3 

30-, 

3 00 

3 ro 

3 co 

3 00 

Screws— Orders for delivery in a few 
months are heavy. Some sizes are in 
only fair supply. We quote: 

Screws, flat head, Iron, bright 85 and 10 p c. 

Round " " 80 p. c. 

Flat "brass 75 and 10 p. c. 

Round " " 



Coach 



.70 and lop.c. 
70 p.c. 



Nuts and Bolts— We quote: 

BdIis., carnage, H or smaller 60 and 5 p.c. 

7-16 and up 55 p.c. 

Bolts, machine, H and under 55 and 5 p.c. 

7-i6andover 55 p.c. 

Bolts, tire 65 p-C . 



Bolt ends . 



SS P.c 



Sleigh shoe bolts 65 and 10 p.c. 

Machine screws 70 p.c. 

Plough bolts SS p.c. 

Square nuts, case lots 3c. discount. 

small lots aj<c 

Hex " case lots 3c. " 

smaller lots 2X0. " 

Rivets— We quote again as follows: 

Rivets, iron 60 and 10 p.c. 

Copper, No. 8 29K 

No. 12 33 

Coil Chain— Prices continue unchang- 
ed. We quote: 

Coil chain , 3-16 inch 

U inch 

5-16 inch 

H inch 

7-16 inch 

% inch 

Yt inch 

" Ji inch 



9.25 
725 
5.20 
4.60 
4-45 
430 
4.10 
430 



Shovels— The discounts on shovels and 
spades are 40 and 5 per cent. 

Harvest Tools— Discount 60 per cent. 

Axe Handles— We quote: 

Axe handles, lurned, s.g. hickory, doz. 

No. I 

No. 2 

Octagon extra 



No.l 

Files— We quote: 



*3 i? 
1 90 
1 60 



" Arcade " 70 and 10 p.c. 

" Bla k Diamond " 60 p.c. 

" Nicholson's " 62V4 p.c. 

Building Paper— Trade is active for 
the season and orders for future delivery 
are heavy in volume. Prices are steady. 
We quote: 

Anchor, plain 65c. 

tarred 70c. 

Pure fibre, plain 67 He. 

" " tarred loc. 



February 4, 1905 



RETURNED 
FEB 4., 1905" 

A*l #^~**^ 

OIL 



77//; MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal. 



Trade Mark. 



of all 





Trade Mark. 



STOVES 



descriptions. 



F. W. LAMPLOUGH & CO., MONTREAL 



CONCRETE BLOCKS 

?eturne £|k^ 

EB 4...190>! ^ r 



Concrete Block Machine Co. 



32 Church St., - - Toronto. 

Correspondence Invited. 





CONNOR'S O. K. ROTARY WASHER. 




No experiment, but a trade winner. Dealers who ndle 
this washer say they sell easier than any other. Write for 
oar catalogue and price list. 

J. H. CONNOR Sl SON, LTD.. Manufacturers OTTAWA 



IF YOU INTEND MAKING ALTERATIONS WRITE 

US FOR PRICES AND PARTICULARS 

OF OUR 




We can make boxes to fit your present shelving 
...THE... 

Bennett Manufacturing Co. 

PICKERING, ONT. 



Ammunition, Etc.— We quote as be- 
fore : 

Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 

SO and 5 p.c. 

Dominion, C.F., pistol 30p.c. 

military t'< p.c 

Ammunition, cartridges, American R.F. 3H p.c. 

C.F. pistol 5 P <"• 

C.F. military 10 p.c. arlvam r. 

Loaded shells : 

Eley's and Kynoch's soft, 12 gauge 

black 15 00 

chilled, 12 gauge 10 00 

soft, 10 gauge 18 00 

chilled, jo gauge 19 00 

Shot , Ordinary , per 100 ■ h 6 25 

Chilled • 75 

Powder, F.F., keg, Hamilton 47.' 

F.F.G., Dupont's coo 

Tinware— Discounts unchanged. We 
quote : 

Tinware, pressed, retinned 70 ana 10 p.c. 

•' plain 75 and 2 K p.c. 

" pieced 30 p.c. 

Japanned ware 37 % p.c. 

Enamelled ware, white 45 p.c. 

Famous 50 p.c. 

" Imperial 50 and 10 p.c. 

Cordage— Wo quote: 

Hope, sis,a.i, 7-10 iinu larger, basis II 25 

Manila, 7-16 and larger, basis 15 25 

Lath yarn 11 as 

Axes— We quote: 

Axes, chopping $ 6 75 to 12 00 

" double bitts 13 00 to 18 00 

Bluestone— Quoted at $5.75, a recent 
advance. 

Iron and Steel— We quote following 
unchanged prices: 

Bar iron (basis) 2 50 

Swedish iron (basis) 4 75 




U fl n |( C Cup and Square Hooks, in Bright 
i\J\JT\*J, i TOn> Brassed Iron, and Solid 

"■~^~ ^^—"' Brass. 

SCREW RINGS and GENERAL BRASS FOUNDRY. 
JONES & BARCLAY 

Bath Row, BIRMINQHAM. E N G. 



DILLON-HINGE-STAY 

Why handle Barb and Coiled Wire at no profit when 
you can have a fair margin on our 



Dillon 




ncing 



Got up specially 
for the h a 
trade. 



rd wa r e 



Easily put up and 
at the most moderate 

" **,$»* 

Write for prices Incerorimill lots 



prices. 



CAVERfllLi, IEARM0NT & CO., 

_ Montreal and Winnipeg 

Eastern ani Wet-tern Ageuis 



OWEN SOUND WIRE FENCE CO., limited 

Owen Sound, Ont. 



35 



Hardware and Metal. 



THE MARKETS 



February 4, 1905 




ON TOP FOR 

40 YEARS 

and looks good for 
another term. 

One Dealer wanted 
for each town in the 

West. A good live pro- 
position for a live man. 
If there is no agency 
in your town, write 

for our Color Cards, 

etc., or if already handl- 
ing Elephant Paints, 

revise your special Col- 
or Card for 1905, and 

mail it to us. We are 
now ready for it. 



OUR 
Stock is complete. 

Quality the best. 

Prices are right. 



MERRICK, 

ANDERSON 

®> CO., 

WINNIPEG, - - MAN. 



Sleigh shoe steel 

Spring steel 

Machinery steel 

Tool steel, Black Diamond, ioolb. 
Jessop 



2 65 
i 00 

3 50 
9 5° 

13 00 



Black (Sheets— Forward delivery or- 
ders are being booked quite freely. 
Prices continue as before. We quote: 



Black ->li»-.r s, lulu 16 gdugi., n/o i 

18 to 22 gauge 

24 gauge 

26 gauge 

28 gauge 



3 75 

3 90 

4 00 
4 10 



Galvanized Sheets— We again quote: 



Apollu, 10 <<»i-gc 

t8 and 20 gauge 

32 and 24 gauge 

26 gauge 

iS gauge 

30 gauge or 10K oz 

Queen's Head, 24 gauge. 

26 gauge 

28 " 



4 co 
4 00 
4 25 
4 5° 
4 50 
4 75 
4 25 
4 5° 
4 75 



-We quote prices as be- 



Tin Plates 

fore : 

' li.piate, IC charcoal, 20 x 28, box 
IX 
IXX 



10 00 

12 00 

14 00 

Ingot Tin— Quoted still at 35 cents. 
The local market seldom follows minor 
fluctuations in the east. 

Canada Plates— We again quote as 
follows : 

3 25 

3 5'J 

4 00 



C 1 adct plate, 18 < 21, 18 x 24 

Canada plate, 20 x 28 

Canada piate, full polished. . . 



Sheet Zinc — The price of cask lots is 
$8.25 per 100 lbs. and of broken lots 

$8.75. 

Pig Lead— Still quoted at $4.50 per 
100 lbs. 

Iron Pipe— We again quote as fol- 
lows: 



Black iron pipe, % inch 

y* " 

x •• 

a " 

x " 
1 

iH " 

2 " 



2 4S 

2 65 

3 00 
3 80 
5 5° 

7 45 

8 95 
12 30 



Petroleum— Prices are steady at 
figures quoted last week. We quote: 



2ic. 
22c. 
24c. 
26c. 
25c. 
23c. 



61 to 70 5.75 

21-oz. C.S., double, in 100-ft. cases — 

26 to 40 united inches 6.30 

4i to 50 7.35 

51 to 60 8.40 

61 to 70 9.45 

71 to 80 10.50 

81 t.. 85 11. ss 

86 to go 12.60 

9t to 95 14.70 

96 to 100 " 17.35 



Silver Star, per gal 

Sunlight " 

Eocene '' 

Pennoline " 

Crystal Spray •' 

Silver Light 

(In barrels f.o.b. Winnipeg. ) 

Paints and Oils— Trade beginning to 
show some signs of Spring activity. 
Prepared paints for forward delivery 
are selling well. Turpentine is steady 
at the decline noted last week. We quote: 

White lead (pure J $5 00 to #5 50 

Bladder putty, in bbls o 02 Vi 

" in kegs o 02K 

Turpentine, pure in barrels $ o 87 

Less than barrel lots 092 

Linseed oil, raw o 55 

Boiled o 58 

Window Glass— We again quote : 

16-oz. O.G.. single, la 50-fi, boxes — 

16 to 25 united inches $2 25 

26 to 40 2.50 

16-oz. O.G., single, in 100-ft. cases — 

16 to 25 united inches 4.00 

26 to 40 4.25 

41 to 50 4.75 

51 to 60 5.25 

36 



NEW OFFICE IN LONDON. 

A BRANCH office of the Commercial 
Department of the Canadian 
High Commissioner has recently 
been established at 73 Basinghall street, 
E. C, London, England. The need of a 
city office has been felt for many years, 
and the action of the Government in 
establishing an office of this sort in the 
heart of the city will be greatly appre- 
ciated by business men throughout Lon- 
don. The office is situated in the heart 
of the city, in what are known as the 
Board of Trade Buildings, and is in 
charge of Mr. Harrison Watson, who for 
some years has been curator of the 
Canadian section of the Imperial Insti- 
tute. " The rooms are on the ground 
floor with several large windows looking 
into Basinghall street.. On each of these 
windows is a neat gilt sign likely to at- 
tract the attention of passers by, so 
that Canada will be permanentlv adver- 
tised in that section of the city. 

Although the offices have only been 
opened up quite recently, Mr. Watson re- 
ports a large number of calls from busi- 
ness men and the amount of correspond- 
ence is growing in a very satisfactory 
manner. It might be mentioned that 
Mr. Watson attends only to commercial 
enquiries, and correspondence relating 
to all other matters should be addressed 
to Lord Strathcona's offices in 17 Vic- 
toria street, S. W., as before. 



GERMAN CEMENT OVER-PRODUC- 
TION. 

A recent Consular report issued in 
Germany states that no other branch 
of industry in Germany has ever exper- 
ienced such a rapid expansion, and 
shown during recent years such an ex- 
traordinary over-production as the ce- 
ment industry. The beginning of the 
industry only dates beak to the year 
1852, yet the annual output at the pres- 
ent time is estimated at 30,000,000 casks; 
of this quantity, some 700,000 tons, 
valued at nearly a million sterling, were 
exported during the year 1903. The 
over-production has had a ruinous effect 
upon prices, and the continuance is 
likely to have still more disastrous ef- 
fects during the year 1905. 



February 4, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CANADIAN CORDAGE 1 MFG. CO., Limited 

CORDAGE 



OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



MANILA ROPE, 

SISAL ROPE, 

LATHYARN- 



BINDER TWINE: 



SISAL, 



STANDARD, 

MANILA. 



All qualities and lengths, 500 ft., 550 ft., 600 ft., 650 ft. to the pound. 



We guarantee our goods to be absolutely Pure and free from all sub- 
stances calculated tn inorease weight. Consumers will find on careful 
test that our goods are the Mo't Tconomic«l, Highest quality, T ow pr-cp? 

Wire, Write or 'Phone 

Canadian Cordage & Mfg. Co. 

Long Distance 'Phone 162 LIMITED 

PETERBOROUGH, ONTARIO, CANADA 



Ask 



1" 

f 
f 

i 



and 
Receive. 

Advertise 

and 
Acquire. 



If you want to sell 
a business or a de- 
livery wagon, if you 
want a partner or a 
clerk — advertise. 
If you have what 
you don't want, or 
haven't whatyoudo 
want — advertise. 
Our condensed 
advertisements 
cost little, but are 
worth a good deal. 



You can reach most of the general 
merchants in Canada at the expense of 
a few cents. Our rate is 2c. per word 
first insertion, and lc. per word each 
subsequent insertion, and remittance 
must accompany order in every case. 

HARDWARE and METAL 

MONTREAL ond TORONTO 



i 



The "White Mountain 



ff 




THE ONLY 

TRIPLE MOTION 

ICE CREAM FREEZER 



No Experiment Thoroughly Known 

Many Year* Tested 



SALES INCREASING ALL THE TIME 

New Illustrated and Descriptive Catalogue, together with prices, upon application 

The IVioOIsry Manufacturing Oo. 

LONDON TORONTO MONTREAL WINNIPEG VANCOUVER AND ST. JOHN, N.B. 

37 



Hardware and Metal. 



February 4, 1905 




Improvement in Glass Making. 
r | > HE invention of the "Lang" pot 

I by Messrs. Jules Lang & Son, not 
only increased the output of glass 
but saved a few of the small manufac- 
turers of England— of which there are 
so many— from being wiped out. 

The conditions of the trade before 
the invention were going from bad to 
worse and the majority of small manu- 
facturers have been practically wiped 
out, owing to their inability to stand the 
strain of paying workmen for the long 
hours in which no work was done. 

Under the old conditions it has been 
known where workmen have had to wait 
forty-eight hours before they could draw 
a composition from the melting pot fit for 
practical purposes. Now, however, the 
new "Lang" pot is so invented that an 
uninterrupted flow of glass is continu- 
ally permitted, thereby saving loss of 
time. • 

The "Lang" pot holds a ton of glass. 
and it is placed in the furnace in cuch 
a manner that- only two necessary open- 
ings—the mouth and the arch opening 
can appear. With this pot the small 
manufacturer will be able to hold his 
own against foreign competition, _ and 
the coming years should witness a great 
revival in the English glass industry. 

Turpentine. 

A large plant for refining wood spirits 
of turpentine is to be erected at Savan- 
nah, Ga., by two capitalists from New 
York. The following is a table which 
shows the crop of 1903-04, 1002-03 and 
1901-02 by districts: 

Districts. 1903-04. 1902-03. 1901-02 

Bbls. Bbls. Bbls. 

Wilmington 14,523 17,199 15,878 

Charleston 2,273 2,761 2,683 

Savannah 167,734 258,596 295,647 

Brunswick 5t,49 2 65,596 7'979 

Mobile 11,405 18,088 10,870 

New Orleans 32,265 29,^91 18,082 

Carrabelle closed 3,304 7,347 

Georgetown 6,504 9,355 7,726 

Pensacola 39, 002 34,°47 36783 

Jacksonville and 

Fernandina. . . 166,559 77.894 28,119 

Tampa closed 13,565 H 5°9 

Total 491.757 529.996 509,623 

A Paint Brush Attachment. 

A new novelty is being placed on the 
market by the Chicago Specialties Mfg. 
Co., 103-109 East Randolph street, Chi- 
cago. It is called the Perfection Brush 



Guide and protects glass, sash, mould- 
ings and walls from paint or kalsomine 
when tracing adjoining surfaces. This 
automatic retracting shield exposes the 
brush fibre when dipped and is manufac- 
tured in several sizes, retailing at 25 
cents. It is claimed that it will double 
the capacity of the painter by saving 
half his time. Readers who send for 
samples should mention Hardware and 
Metal when writing. 

Petroleum in Austria. 

The output of crude oil in Austria, 
says an exchange, has enormously in- 
creased of late years, having risen from 
1.30,000 tons in 1894 and 320,000 in 1899 
to over 800,000 tons. The increase is 
due chiefly to the Boryslaw district, 
where 400 tons were stored in one 
month, September, 1904. The supply 
shows no signs at present of diminish- 



ing, as it had been feared it would do, 
and new shafts are constantly being 
sunk from which the oil overflows. The 
trust of the Austrian crude oil produc- 
ers, Petrolea, is again about to increase 
its storage room, this time from 400,000 
to 600,000 tons. To provide for the in- 
creased exportation the Actien Gesell- 
schaft fur Oesterreichische u. Ungar- 
ische Mineralol Produkts lias been 
founded. As the Boryslaw oil is rich 
in paraffin the manufacture of that pro- 
duct has made great strides in Austria. 
As a result the imports of paraffin fell 
from 1,600 tons in the first nine months 
of 1903 to 1,100 in the corresponding 
part of 1904, and at the same time the 
exports rose from 300 to 3,600 tons. 
There appears to be great wealth of pe- 
troleum in Galicia at depths hardly yet 
reached by anv of the wells. 



WHAT OTHERS SAY 
ABOUT HOLLYWOOD 




A leading hardware firm wrote us : 

" It is now four years since we first 
took hold of the brand, and we have 
had in all that time nothing but com- 
mendation of the quality." 



HOLLYWOOD PAINTS. READY-MIXED AND FLOOR, 
WEAR ON THE JOB, NOT OFF IT 



m Imperial Varnish 

and Color Co., Limited 

TORONTO 



38 



February 4, 1905 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware and Metal. 



MAXimum LIGHT 




gathers all the daylight, and fully utilizes it. 
There is a complete absence of glare, an elimi- 
nation of shadow and all streakiness of effect is 
avoided. 

Property owners, Architects and Builders are especially 
interested in MAXimum LIGHT GLASS. They will buy it 
if you show it. 

Sample on request. Booklet about it free. 

HOBBS MANUFACTURING CO., Limited, LONDON, ONTARIO 

Glass Importers and Manufacturers 



If You Buy 



Varnishes 
Japans 
Lacquers 
Stains 
Fillers 



Paints 
Colors 
Glues 
Bronzes 
Chamois 
Sponges 



WRITE TO 



LIMITED 



R. C. JAHIESON & CO. 
MONTREAL 

AOENTS FOR ASPINALL'8 ENAMEL. 




Our whole factory time and energy is given to the 
manufacture of 

REFRIGERATORS 
SCREEN DOORS and 
WINDOW SCREENS 

Therefore we are in a position to supply the best 

goods at the lowest price. 

Our Catalogue explains the details. 

JM Sanderson-Harold Co. 

Limited 
PARIS, ONT. 



39 



Hardware and Metal. 



February 4, 1905 




Quebec. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
232 McGill Street. 

Montreal, Feb. 3, 1905. 

SEVERAL important changes have 
taken place in the paint and oil 
market within the past week. Tur- 
pentine has advanced 2c a gallon, but 
this is what might be expected at this 
time of the year, as the Spring stock 
does not commence to arrive until after 
the end of March, so that prices will be 
very firm until that date, after which 
they generally ease off. Linseed oil is 
quoted 2c a gallon lower. On account 
of the very strong position of zinc pro- 
ducts, pure zinc, white, in oil has ad- 
vanced l-2c a pound. In response to 
the drop on the part of gum shellac, 
pure white and orange shellac have been, 
reduced 20c a gallon and No. 1 orange 
15c a 2'allon. Other lines continue un- 
changed. The paint and oil business in 
general is very satisfactory. 

Canadian Paris Green— Government 
standard pure Canadian Paris green, 
has advanced 2c. per lb. and is quoted : 
barrels, 15 l-4c; arsenic kegs, 15c; 50 
and 100 lb. drums, 16c; 25 lb. drums, 
16 l-2c; one pound packages 17c; half- 
pound packages, 19c; one pound tins, 
18c. Terms 2 per cent, discount for 
cash in 30 days or 90 days net. 

English Paris Green— Pure English 
Paris green, petroleum barrels, 15 l-4c; 
arsenic kegs, 15 l-2c; 50 and 100 lb. 
drums, 16c; 25-lb. drums, 16 l-2c; one 
pound paper boxes, 17c; one pound tins, 
18c; one-half pound paper boxes, 19c; 
one half-pound tins, 20c. Terms, 2 per 



cent, off thirty days, or ninety days net 
from date of shipment. 

Turpentine— Single barrels 80c per 
gallon; 2 to 4 barrels 79c per gallon, 
for smaller quantities than barrels 5c 
extra per gallon is charged. Standard 
gallon is 8.6 lbs. The above prices are 
net thirty days, for longer terms prices 
are higher. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, one to four barrels, 
42c ; five to nine barrels, 41c. Boiled, one 
to four barrels, 45c; five to nine barrels, 
44c. Delivered in Ontario between 
Montreal and Ottawa at 2c per gallon in 
advance. 

Ground White Lead— Best brands Gov- 
ernment standards, $4.60 to $4.75; No. 
1, $4.35 to $4.50; No. 2, $4.10 to $4.25; 
No. 3, $3,771-2 to $3,871-2: No. 4, 
$3.40 to $3.50, all f.o.b. Montreal. 

Dry White Lead— $4.50 in casks, and 
in kegs, $4.75. 

Dry White Zinc— Pure dry in casks, 
7c, in 100 lb kegs, 71-2c: No. 1 zinc, in. 
casks, 6c, in 100 lb kegs, 6 1 -2c. 

White Zinc (ground in oil)— Pure, 
25-lb irons, 7 3-4c; No. 1, 61-4c; No. 2, 
5 l-4c 

x'utty— Bulk in barrels, $1.50; in 25- 
lb irons, loose, $1.80; in tins, $1.90; 
bladdered putty in barrels, $1.75. 

Orange Mineral— Casks, 71-4c; 100-lb 
kegs, 71-2c; smaller quantities, 81-2c. 

Red Lead — Genuine red lead in casks, 
$4.50 in 100-lb kee-s, $4.75; in less 
quantities at the rate of $5.75 per 100 
lbs: No. 1 red lead, casks, $4.25: kegs, 
$4.75, and smaller quantities, $5.50. 

Shellac Varnish— Pure white, $2.60 to 
$2.80; pure orange, $2.55 to $2.65; No. 
1 orange, $2.30 to $2.45. 



Mixed Paints— $1.20 to $1.40 per 
gallon. 

Castor Oil— 8 3-4 to 9 l-4c in whole- 
sale lots, and l-2c additional for small 
lots. 

Litharge— Ground, in casks, 5c; in 
less quantities, 5 3-4c; flake litharge, 
casks, $5.50; smaller quantities, $6 per 
100 lbs. 

Ontario. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
10 Front Street East, 

Toronto, Feb 3, 1905. 

WHILE some large sales are being 
.made the general condition of 
the paint and oil market is 
rather dull. Merchants are beginning to 
stock up for the Spring trade but are 
selling little more than small orders for 
inside work at present. White lead is 
firm and it is probable that an advance 
in prices will soon be made. Plumbers 
are buying considerable red lead. Lit- 
tle linseed oil is selling on account of 
cold weather which prevents its use. 
Prices of turpentine continiie very firm. 

No change has taken place in the glass 
situation, all the dealers carrying small 
stocks owing to the high prices existing 
and only fine or two Canadian houses 
have made any purchases recently. The 
last six months have seen a steady rise 
in prices, the increase amounting to 
about fifty per cent. This will continue 
if the strike of German coal miners 
spreads into Belgium and forces the 
closing down of the few glass factories 
which are still running. . 

There has been a drop in the prices of 
American crude oil during the week, 
the better grade falling three cents and 
the poorer grades two cents. 

White Lead — Ex-Toronto, pure white 
lead, $4.75; No. 1, $4,371-2; No. 2, $4 
No. 3, $3,621-2; No. 4, $3.35 in pack- 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their ad- 
vertisement in Hardware and Metal. 



ART GLASS 

UNEXCELLED 
MEMORIAL WINDOWS. 

H. E. St. George, London, Ont. 
IMPORTERS, ATTENTION 

Save money by consigning your importations direct to des- 
tination and pay through freight charges only. Have your 
goods cleared and distributed by 

Turnbull & Henderson 

Customs Brokers, Forwarding and Distributing Agents, 
Vancouver, B. C. Satisfactory service guaranteed. 

ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
13 St. John Street, Montreal 



Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishing to be represented in Canada. 



The Distinguishing Feature of Man 

is not found in his social rank, his occupation, his dress or his fortune, but 
solely in himself; and so with material things. The only true distinction is 

superior worth. Churoh's Cold Water 

ALABASTINE 

as a material for wall tinting and decorating has the elements of superiority, in 
that it is a permanent coating and hardens with age. In covering properties 
and ease of working it is perfection itself. Is equally as well adapted for 
decorating in relief as for plain tinting ; and because of these advantages, and 
the fact that Alabastine is thoroughly and systematically advertised, it sells 
readily and the margin of profit satisfies the dealer. 
Order from jobber or direct from 

The Alabastine Co., Limited, Paris, Ont. 



40 



February 4, 1905 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware and Metal. 




THE ARGUMENT 

we offer for your favor in the matter of paints is the downright 
worth of 

NEW ERA Prepared Paints 

We could fill a book with words about their worth, but 
words are not half so trustworthy as a trial of the goods 
themselves. Let us send you names of dealers who are our 
agents. They'll tell you about them — and we're not afraid of 
the verdict. 

WRITE US TO-DAY. IT IS IMPORTANT. 

The Standard Paint & Varnish Co., Limited 

Windsor, Ont. 




aees of 25 lbs and upwards; l-2c per lb 
extra will be changed for 121-2 lb 
packages; genuine dry white lead, in 
casks, $4.25. 

Red Lead — Genuine in casks of 560 
lbs, $4.25; ditto, in kegs of 100 lbs, 
$4.50; No. 1, in casks of 500 lbs, $3.75 
to $4; ditto in kegs of 100 lbs, $4.25. 

White Zinc— Genuine French V.M., 
in casks, $6 to $6.25; Lehigh, in casks, 
$6 to $6.25. 

Shingle Stain — In 5 gallon lots 75 to 
80c. per gallon. 

Paris "White— 90c to $1 per 100 lbs. 

Whiting— 60 to 65c per 100 lbs; Gild- 
ers' whiting, 75c. 

Shellac — Pure orange in barrels, 
$2.75 to $3; white, $2.85 to $3.10 per 
barrel; No. .1 (orange), $2.25. 

Linseed Oil— Our quotation is: Raw, 
1 to 4 barrels, 45c: boiled, 48c; 5 to 9 
barrels, raw. 44c; boiled, 47c, Toronto, 
Hamilton, London, Elora and Guelph, 
net 30 days. Advance of 2c for deliv- 
ery to outside points. 

I'urpentine— Single bbls 78c; 2 to 4 
ubls, 77c; 5 bbls and over 76c, f.o.b. 
point of shipment, net 30 days. For less 
quantities than barrels, 5c per gallon 
extra will be added, and for 5 gallon 
packages, 50c, and 10 gallon packages 
80c will be charged. 



McCaskill, Dougall & Co. 



Manufacturers 

99 



RAILWAY, CARRIAGE AND BOAT VARNISHES. 
HIGH GRADE FURNITURE and HOUSE VARNISHES. 

MONTREAL. 



Get your GLUES from 

The GROVE CHEMICAL CO., Limited 

Appley Bridge. Lane, England. 

Our ordinary giades are better than ordinary, and we can supply special makes 
fur special purposes. SCOTCH GLUES, BOX GLUES, COLOGNE GLUES 
for Paper Makers. Size of all kinds. Send your name for our printed matter 



MohZes Sf Hoare. 

CORNWALL ROAD STAMFORD STREET. 

LONDON, ENG. 

Manufacturers ot 




MARK 



HIGH-CLASS VARNISHES ONLY 

Which can be obtained direct from the works 
or from the principal Color Dealers in Canada 




A Few 

Minutes 

If 



will enable 
you to find 
out what you 
need to com- 
plete your 
stock of 
Island City 
Paints >*» ^ 
Time is 
money in 
this case. 



P. D. DODS (EL CO., Montreal & Toronto ^ Vancouver 



Hardware and Metal. 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



February 4, 1905 




For full par- 
ticulars RE- 
GARDING Paints 

for Marine 
Work see page 

25 of The 
Canada Paint 

Co.'s 1905 

Catalogue. 



"We are gratified to be 
able to report that your 
COPPER PAINT has been 
giving very excellnt satis- 
faction. We trust that you 
will continue to supply the 
same good quality, as this 
item is one where, like the 
pudding, the proof is in the 
eating. Heretofore we have 
been selling it largely for 
small boats, but are now 
getting captains 
of larger vessels 
persuaded to 
take it. To-day 
we heard from 
a captain who 
put it on last 
year and who 
has just come off the s)ip 
after repainting. He had 
used American paint for 
fifteen years till last year, 
and reports that the bottom 
of the vessel was never in 
better order and he is great- 
ly pleased with the Canada 
Paint Company's paint." 

FOR 

COPPER PAINT 

ADDRESS : 

The 

Canada 
Paint 
Company 

Limited 
MONTREAL or TORONTO 



Glues— Broken sheet, in 200 lb. bbls, 
8 to 8 l-2c per lb ; cabinet glue, in 
bbls, 111-2 to 12c; emery glue, in 
bbls, 17c; bookbinders', ground, 10 l-2c; 
finest American white, 19c; No. 1 Am- 
erican white, 15c per lb. 

Putty— Ordinary, bladders in barrels, 
$1.65 to $1.75: pure linseed oil, $2 to 
$2.10; bulk in barrels, $1.50; pure, 
$1.95 to $2; 100 lb kegs 25c extra. 

Plaster Paris— New Brunswick, $2 
per barrel. 

Liquid Paints— Pure, $1.20 to $1.35 
per gallon; No. 1, $1.10 per gallon. 

Barn Paints— 60 to 70c per gallon. 

Bridge Paints— 75c to $1. 

Castor Oil— English, in cases, 81-2 to 
9c per lb and 10c for single tins. 

Glass — See current quotations at the 
end of this issue. 



Window Glass. 

MONTREAL. 

As far as present indications go therer 
will be no more glass imported to Can- 
ada before Spring. Matters at head- 
quarters are pretty much as before with, 
as intimated last week, little prospect 
of a settlement. It is now assured that 
there will be no glass famine in this 
country. Our quotations are as follows: 
Jnrst break, fifty feet, $1.70; second 
break, $1.80; first break, 100 feet, $3.25; 
second break, 100 feet, $3.45; third 
break, 100 feet $4; fourth break, 100 
feet, $4.25; fifth break, 100 feet, $4.50; 
sixth break, 100 feet, $5; seventh break, 
100 feet, $5.50; and eighth break, 100 
feet, $6; Diamond star, or double thick, 
first break 50 feet, $2.30; second break 
50 feet, $2.50; first break, 100 feet, 
$4.40 ; second do., $4.80 ; third do., $5.75 ; 
fourth do., $6.50; fifth do., $7.50; sixth 
do., $8, and seventh do., $9. Double 
thick, first break, 50 feet, $3.45; second 
do., $3.75; first break 100 feet, $6.75; 
second do., $7.25; tlird do., $8.75; fourth 
do., $10; fifth do., $11.50; sixth do., 
$12.50; seventh do., $14; eighth do., 
$16.50; ninth do., $18; tenth do., $20; 
eleventh do., $24, and twelfth do., 
$28.50. 

The discount from diamond glass is 
15 per cent, and from double thick is 
331-3 per cent. Terms four months, 
and 3 per cent, discount 30 days. 



Petroleum. 

Refined — Trade is reported to be very 
good and a large business is predicted 
for the coming season. The demand for 
oil from all the manufacturers is in- 
creasing. Quotations are: Water white, 
17c ; Canadian prime white, 15 to 15 l-2c ; 
American water white, 17 1-2 to 19c ex 
warehouse. 

\ Crude— Prices have fallen ^lightly. 
We quote: Pennsylvania, $1.39, Com- 
ma', $1.06; Newcastle, $1.31; North 
Lima, 92c; Tiona, $1.54; South Lima, 
90c ; Somerset, 81c ; Indiana, 88c ; Can- 
adian, $1.35. 

42 



BRASS MANUFACTURERS LEAD 
LEAGUE. 

Won Lost To PI. 

Jas. Morrison 4 4 

Jones Bros 2 15 

John Inglis 116 

J. T. Brown 1 2 5 

C. P. R 4 4 



ANOTHER victory was credited to 
the team representing the Jas. 
Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Toron- 
to, in the Western Manufacturers' 
League, when they defeated the John 
Inglis Co.'s team on Jan. 27, at the 
King Edward rink, by a score of 4 to 3. 
It was quite apparent from start to 
finish that a keen rivalry existed be- 
tween the two teams, the game being 
warmly (contested during the entire play. 
Both teams expected a hard game, and 
from the first face-ofi till the finish of 
the game, the pace set was hard and 
fast. Good up-to-date combination play 
was the order of the evening. During 
the first half the Brass men scored three 
goals in quick succession, much to the 
chagrin of those supporting the boiler- 
makers. The roving of the puck indicat- 
ed that the teams were very evenly 
matched, and although several shots 
were made on each net, the teams re- 
tired at half time with the score stand- 
ing 3 to in favor of Morrison's. 
Play was of a rougher quality during 
the last half. In this half some excellent 
combination work was done by the 
boilermakers and it looked at several 
junctures of the game as if the score 
would be a tie before time was called. 
The John Inglis' men opened the game 
in this half by scoring two goals in 
quick succession. The brass men then 
took the aggressive, and within one 
minute of the face-ofi another goal was 
tallied for them. Although several des- 
perate attempts were made on the part 
of the boilermakers to tie the score, 
they failed by one goal. Geo. Perram, 
of the St. George's, did good work as 
referee. The line-up was as follows : 

John Inglis & Co. (3)— Goal, Rowles ; 
point, Curtis; coverpoint, Lang; for- 
wards, Laird, Laing, Evans, and Wil- 
liams. 

Jas. Morrison Brass Mfg. Co. (4) — 
Goal, P. Howard; point, W. Morrison ; 
coverpoint, Hewitt; forwards, Hortop, 
P. Morrison, Sjcott and Geo. Howard. 

The Jas. Morrison Brass Manufactur- 
ing Company won their fourth successive 
game in the series of the Western Manu- 
facturers' League when they defeated 
Jones Bros, on January 31, to the tune 
of 2 to 1. The class of hockey played 
by either team was slow, a marked dif- 
ference to that plass of hockey generally 
seen at these games. 



Mr. Grant McArthur, stove dealer, 
Vancouver, is visiting Southern Califor- 
nia for the benefit of his health. 



February 4, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




PRESSED, 

PED, and 
MACHINE-MADE 



HOLLOW-WARE E 

ENAMELLED, TINNED, GALVANIZED and JAPANNED 

We manufacfure every description of Hollow-ware, and we guarantee that every piece is made wholly 
on our own premises. Our average weekly capacity is over 700,000 pieces, of Tinned, Galvanized and 
Enamelled ware. Our Enamelled ware is of superior durability and finish, and is guaranteed free from 
any poisonous substances. 



Let us have your name for our illustrated lists 



The Welsh Tinplate & Metal Stamping Co., Ltd. 

LLANELLY, WALES 






Cwxfer 

(Uindow and Sidewalk 
Prisms 






Do Von Want More Business 




STORE 

FRONTS 
OUR 
SPECIALTY 


for 1905 ? 


SEND FOR 
INFOR- 
MATION 








If so, make your premises Bright, Light 
and Up-to-date. 

A Daylight Store Draws Trade. 



LUXFER PRISM CO., LTD., 100 k.ing st. w., Toronto 



Fairbanks 
Standard Scales 

They 
Live up 
to Their 
Reputation 
for 

ACCURACY, STRENGTH 

and 

RELIABILITY 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE. 

THE FAIRBANKS CO. 




MONTREAL 



TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 



VANCOUVER 




ONEIDA 
COMMUNITY'S 
h WELDLESS 

1 COW TIES. 



Illustration shows the 



NIAGARA W,RE 



LINK 



OPEN RING TYPE 



Also made in CLOSED RING, THREE CHAIN 
and DOMINION (or "Short") TYPES. 

Oneida Community Cow Ties can be had of all 
the leading jobbers. We invite correspondence 
where any difficulty is experienced in obtaining 
our goods. 



ONEIDA COMMUNITY, Limited 

NIAGARA FALLS, ONT. 



43 



Hardware and Metal. 



February 4, 1905 




Hardware and Metal would be pleased to receive from any authoritative source industrial news of any sort, the 
formation or incorporation of companies, establishment or enlargement of mills, factories foundries or other 
works, railway or mining news, etc. All such correspondence will be treated as confidential when desired. 



MACKENZIE & MANN have con- 
tracted for the erection of a pig 
iron smelter on a site in the vi- 
cinity of Fort William and Port Arthur. 
The capacity will be about 2U0 tons of 
iron ore per day, the ore being mined in 
the neighborhood of Atikokan and Mat- 
tawan on the Canadian Northern Rail- 
way. It is estimated that the works 
will cost about $1,000,000 and after 
their completion, about October next, 
will employ about 1,000 men. 

The C.P.R. are said to be negotiating 
for the purchase of 60,000 tons of steel 
rails in Great Britain. 

A stump-pulling machine factory may 
be located in Ottawa as a branch of an 
industry at Black River Falls, Wiscon- 
sin. 

Two more carloads of ore have been 
shipped from Cobalt, in the Nipissing 
district, to New York. The last ship- 
ment of 20 tons assayed $28,000. 

The Canadian Copper Company of New 
York, owning 300 acres of mining lands 
in the Thunder Bay district, are suing 
two Chicago capitalists for $75,000 for 
breach of contract. 

The Londonderry Iron Company and 
the Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Co., are 
both prospecting the iron district at 
Torbrook and Nictuax, N.S. Both have 
taken extensive options. 

The Customs revenue of Canada for the 
seven months ending Jan. 31, totals 
$24,208,967; an increase of $580,462 over 
the corresponding months of 1904. The 
gain in January alone was $30,106. 

The report that the Newfoundland 
Government intended to place an export 
duty on iron, copper and other ores is 
unfounded, according to Sir E. P. Mor- 
ris, Attorney-General of that colony. 

A company has been organized to put 
up a wood-working factory and will pro- 
ceed with its erection at once if- the 
town of Dalhousie, N.B., will exempt 
them from taxation and give free water. 

The American Institute of Mining En- 
gineers is arranging a 40-day tour to 
cover 10,000 miles from Chicago to Al- 
aska and Dawson City and return. A 
convention will be held at Victoria, B. 
C, en route, the party leaving Chicago 
on June 24. 

A Chinese capitalist is in British 
Columbia investigating the lumber in- 
ilusUy, his intention being to establish 
large saw mills near Canton, China, the 
mills to be managed by Chinamen who 
have spent several vears in British Col- 
umbia and have learned the Lumbering 



business thoroughly. The Chinese lum- ' 
ber market will be supplied by the home- 
grown timber manufactured by Chinese 
cheap labor with the aid of American 
machinery, if the plan is adopted. 

A company of English capitalists pro- 
pose erecting large cement works at 
Sydney, N.S. They are asking the city 
for a bonus of $10,000, free taxation for 
twenty years and special water rates, 
which concessions the city is prepared 
to grant. The company will begin op- 
erations in May. The plant will have 
capacity of five hundred barrels per day. 
There is to be a large cooperage in con- 
nection with the works. The cement 
will be manufactured from the slag, now 
the waste product of the Dominion Iron 
and Steel Company. The company is 
capitalized at $500,000. 

The Grand Trunk Railway Company 
have placed an order for 25,000 tons of 
steel rails with the Dominion Iron and 
Steel Company, of Sydney, N.S. In 
discussing the possibilities of the home 
market, more especially in respect to 
the carrying out of the Grand Trunk- 
Pacific project, Mr. Pearson, general 
manager of the above-named company, 
said that the market of the Dominion 
represented something like four hundred 
thousand tons, while the output of the 
whole of Canada was something like a 
million tons, but, on the other hand, 
Canada was advancing by leaps and 
bounds; the very products which his 
company could turn out were what 
would be wanted. The Grand Trunk Pa- 
cific would need something like five 
hundred thousand tons of steel rails, and 
the order for the same would probably 
be divided between the "Soo" and the 
Dominion Iron & Steel Company. 

COMPANIES INCORPORATED. 

Pioneer Mining Company of Arizona, 
Rat Portage, share capital, $50,000 ; 
purpose to develop mining property. The 
Ontario representative and attorney is 
George H. Draper of Rat Portage. 

Lake Orion Oil and Gas Company of 
Arizona, Leamington, share capital $40,- 
000; purpose to manufacture and sell 
oil. The Ontario representative and at- 
torney is Hiram Frank Slater, of Leam- 
ington. 

Richelieu Construction Company, Lim- 
ited, Toronto, share capital, $200,000; 
purpose to do a contracting business. 
The directors are: John W. McDonald, 
Robert L. Brackin, Ella A. Francis, A. 
E. A. Blackman, and Frank Denton, all 
of Toronto. 

44 



British-Canadian Supply Company, 
Limited, Montreal, share capital, $50,- 
000 ; to do a general contracting busi- 
ness. The directors are: Watson Jack, 
Joseph W. Harris, Robert C. Smith, 
William B. Powell and Ronald C. Grant, 
all of Montreal. 

Diamond Dry Powder Fire Extinguish- 
er Company, Limited, Toronto, share 
capital, $40,000; purpose to manufacture 
powder for extinguishing fire. The di- 
rectors are: George Robert Simpson, 
William D. Earngey, William J. Curry, 
Norman W. Tovell, and Joseph Whaley, 
all of Toronto. 

The Plating and Specialty Company, 
Limited, Brantford; share capital, $10,- 
000; purpose to do plating and handle 
hardware specialties. The directors are: 
George W. Markle, Charles J. Farr, 
Fanny Munro, Ellen B. Witty and Alice 
Witty, all of Brantford. 

Manitoba Peat Company, Limited, 
Winnipeg, share capital, $200,000; to 
manufacture and sell peat and other 
classes of fuel. The directors are: R. J. 
Whitla, John Woodman, D. R. Dingwall, 
Chas. W. Clark and Robert Taylor, all 
of Winnipeg. 

Rodney Casket Company, Limited, 
Rodney, share capital, $35,000; purpose 
to manufacture caskets and other wood- 
enware. The directors are: William N. 
Lusty, Albert J. Tishner, Benjamin J. 
Harris, James Ralph, and Harry L. 
Skane, all of Rodney. 

Poison Iron Works, Limited, Toronto, 
share capital, $1,000,000; Dominion 
charter; to do general iron construction 
work. The directors are: Alex. H. Jef- 
frey, William B. Tindall, John J. Mains, 
Mrs. F. B. Poison, and Mrs. John B. 
Millar, all of Toronto. 

McLennan Timber Lands and Lumber 
Company, Limited, Quebec, share capit- 
al, $50,000; to manufacture and sell lum- 
ber. The directors are: John McLennan, 
Syracuse, N.Y.; A. J. Price, Notre 
Dame de Quebec, C. E. Taschereau, L. 
A. Taschereau, and F. Roy, all of Que- 
bec. 

Defiance Iron Works, Limited, Chat- 
ham, share capital, $60,000; purpose to 
manufacture gasoline engines, farm im- 
plements, etc. The directors are: Wil- 
liam S. Marshall, Morton P. Sheldon, 
George W. Foott, L. Howard, H. S. 
Clements, and W. M. Drader, all of 
Chatham, and Robert J. Drader, of Buf- 
falo, N.Y. 

Anglia Land & Lumber Company, 
Limited, Winnipeg, share capital, $200,- 
000; to acquire and sell lands with tim- 
ber, to manufacture brick, to build and 
operate saw mills, and to build and sell 
houses, etc. The directors are: A. L. 
Himle, Minneapolis, Minn. ; E. T. 
Thompson, St. Thomas, North Dakota; 
and Thomas G. Sharpe, G. Olafson, S. 
Sveinsson, John Home, H. D. Bauer, C. 
Gilbertson and Helen Sanford, all of 
Winnipeg. 



February 4, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their ad- 
vertisement in Hardware and Metal. 




"THE EMLYN" SAW BENCH 

Made in 6 sizes. Best value obtainable. Specially 
designed for export With or without " Emlyn 
Patent Guard. Sole maker — 

CHARLE8 D. PHILLIPS, 

Cables— Emlyn Engineering Works 

"Machinery." Newport. Newpokt. Mon., England 



"The Tool Holder People" 

Armstrong Bros. 

Tool Company 

Manufacturers uf Armstrong Patent Lathe and Planer 
Tools and other machine shop specialties. 

617-621 Austin Ave., CHICAGO, ILL, 




STREET PAVING and SI DEWALK S a SPE CIAL TY 

SILICA BARYTIC STONE CO. 

OF ONTARIO Limited 

Head Office : 

Ingersoll, Ontario. 

Walter Mills.GeneralManager 
Ask for quotations for 



Wat*r Proof Floors for 
Malt Houses, Brewer- 
ies, Slaughter Houses, 
Cheese Factories, Cel 
lar, Stable Floors, etc 



Septic Tanks. 



"MAPLE LEAF" 
Stitched Cotton Duck Belting 



< 
o 
■< 
z 
< 



a 





2 

► 

ra 






l.... ...... 

"Maple Leaf" is made of the best cotton duck, 
woven to our special formula. 

" Maple Leaf" is the truest running belt on the 

market. 
" Maple Leaf" is superior to either Rubber or 

Leather, and in many places will 

do work that no other make of 

belt will. 
"Maple Leaf" is suitable for all kinds of factories. 

mills, etc., for power and carrying 

Main Drive Belts a specialty. 

Ask for " Maple Leaf" and take no other. 

Beware of Imitations 

MANUFACTURED ONLY BY THE 

Dominion Belting Company 

Limited 

HAniLTON, ONTARIO. 

Use our " Maplb Lbaf " Belt Dressing. 



THE ACME LATHE & PRODUCTS CO., LTD. 

TRAFFORD PARK, HANCHESTER. 

We have arranged to carry a large stock of Square and Hex Cap Screws. Square 

Set Screws, Bright Bolts, Washers, etc., in Canada, and can deliver from Canadian 
stock after February 1st., 1905. It will pay you, if you are a buyer of these goods, to get 
in touch with us. 

Temporary Offices 

25 Queen City Chambers, Church St., TORONTO. 



Clauss Brand 
DENTAL SNIPS 

Fully Warranted 

Manufactured from select stock. 
Steel Faced on Composition Metal. 
We suggest Dealers giving these a 

trial, as the same usually find 

an early purchaser. 

Write for Trade Discount. 

CLAUSS SHEAR CO., 169 Spadina Ave., Toronto, Ont. 

H. & R. SINGLE GUN AUTOMATIC AND NON-EJECTING 




12, 16 and 20 Gauge. 
Steel and Twist Barrels 

Superior in Design, Workmanship 
and Finish, and the most popular 
Gun on the Market. 



Simplest 
"Take Down" 
Gun Mad* 




BABBIT 




N9 o /* 

STAR 'f$M 
SPECIAL l 
HERCULES 
METALLIC 
IMPERIAL 



THE 



(anada Metal (p. 



William St.JORONTO.tskphone nun 1729. 



BUY DIRECT AND SAVE MONEY 
COLD PRESSED NUTS 

Finished, Semi-Finished, Case-Hardened, Polished, Plated, etc. 

CAP SCREWS THUMB SCREWS 
SET SCREWS MACHINE SCREWS 

Special Discounts to the Trade. 

CANADA FOUNDRY COMPANY, Limited 

HEAD OFFICE AND WORKS: TORONTO, ONT. 

District Offices : Montreal, Halifax, Ottawa, Winnipeg, Calgary, Vancouver, Rossland, 
45 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



February 4, 1905 



t7T3!E3r=n53553J^^37?C7K35T 




,GRANT-03 



t yg f) 



The only real value of money lies in 
making use of it. 

The money that lies there in your safe 
from day to day doesn't do you any good 
until you commence to use it. 

Then its value to you depends on how 
you UBe it. 

Now, if you would only invest some of it 
in advertising space in Hardware and 
Metal and then use the space right you'd 
have a valuable assistant, working to 
increase your trade with hardwaremen 
and to make yourself and your goods better 
known among them. 

Some folks would sooner save (?) the 
money— but they are "penny wise and 
pound foolish." 

But you're not. 
Are you ? 



Mi 




-m?0 

SLOANl 



gLECTRICITY SIMPLIFIED 

By Prof. T. O'Connor Sloane. 

This work is the simplest ever published on the subject of Electricity, and 
does something not hitherto accomplished. The object of "Electricity Simpli- 
fied " is to make the subject as plain as possible, and to show what the modern 
conception of electricity is ; to show how two plates of different metals immersed 
in acid can send a message around the globe ; to explain how a bundle of copper 
wire rotated by a steam engine can be the agent in lighting our streets ; co tell 
what the volt, ohm. and ampere are, and what high and low tension mean , and 
to answer the questions that perpetually arise in the mind in this age of electricity 



158 Pages. Fully Illustrated. 
THE MacLEAN PUB. CO., 



Price, $1.00. 
TORONTO 




The Sarnia Hub, Spoke and 
Bent Goods Mfg. Co. 

Sarnia, Ontario 

We are prepared to fill any orders for 
Heavy Wagon, Sleigh, Buggy, and Cutter Stock 

We make a specialty of heavy stock and can fill orders 
promptly. Made from the best of oak and hickory, as we carry a 
large stock of lumber and can make any sizes that may be re- 
quired. We make it a point to fill orders promptly. 

If you are in need of anything in our line we will be pleased 
to hear from you and we will give it our prompt attention. 

J. S. LOUGHEAD & SON. • Sarnia. Ontario 



GLAZIERS' DIAMONDS 



Sharratt & Newth 

43 and 44 Percival Street, - London. England 



Contractors to H. M. Government and the Principal English Sneetand|Plate Glass Works. 
also Established 1815 

en 



Lead Vioes, 
Carbon Toola, 



Etc, Etc., 



Agents for Canada: A R am say & Son Company, Montreal 
GLAZIER'S DIAMONDS 




Ahead of all others in quality and workmanship. If sparks of fine quality, set 
by experts, are what you require, buy Diamonds of A. Shaw & Son'* make. 
Canadian Agent 

GODFREY S. PELTON 

388 ST. PAUL ST., MONTREAL 



CELEBRATED 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS 




Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers' Shears, 
Tinners' Snips, etc. 

ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST. 

R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. WZSFffiffiX? """""" st ' 



SEYMOUR 

SMEAR CO. 



SEYMOUR SHEARS 



HAVE BEEN THE 

Standard for over Half a Century. 

"quality unquestioned." 

Each pair of our shears bears the above trad* mark. 




MACLEAN PUBLISHING CO -DCPT. OF ADVERTISING SERVICE. 



Complete Line TRIMMERS , BANKERS'. BARBERS' and TAIL 
ORS' SHEARS, Etc., Etc. 

Henry T. Seymour Shear Company. 

WIEBUSCH & HILOER, Limited, NEW YORK. Sole Agents. 
46 



SEYMOUR 

SHEAR CO. 



Latest Cata- 
logue will be 

sent in 

exchange for 

your busmen* 

card. 



February 4, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



INQUIRIES FOR CANADIAN TRADE 

The names and addresses of the firms making the 
following inquiries may be had by application to the 
Department of Trade and Commerce, Ottawa, 
or to the Editor of this paper. Parties answering in- 
quiries will be careful to mention the office under 
which said inquiry appears and the number. 

From the High Commissioner for Can- 
ada: 

196. A London firm is desirous of ap- 
pointing agents in Canada for an anti- 
sulphuric paint, and a leather cloth for 
upholstery purposes. 

199. The manufacturers of wrought 
nails of all kinds, chains, vices, ham- 
mers, etc., desire to get into direct 
touch with Canadian importers and 
users of these goods. 

201. A glue, size, glue powder and 



High Commissioner's Office, London, 
Eng.: 

121. A firm in Manchester asks to be 
placed in communication with Canadian 
manufacturers of oak barrel tops and 
bottoms and staves; cornice poles, rings 
and ends; spring blind rollers; wood 
washing boards. 

122. A London metal and mineral mer- 
chant wishes to purchase supplies of 
silex, and desires the names of Canadian 
producers of the mineral. 

-123. The proprietors of a patent appa- 
ratus for painting by compressed air 
wish to introduce same to Canada trade, 
and are prepared to appoint suitable 
resident agent for this purpose. 




Cftverhill, Learmont & Co's Hockey Team — Champions 1903-1904 of the 
Montreal Hardware League, 



soap manufacturer asks to be referred to 
Canadian buyers of these goods. 

202. A firm of syphon bottle makers 
zor mineral and aerated waters, who are 
manufacturing a new patent earthenware 
syphon, wish to interest Canadian users 
of such goods in the invention. 

204. Inquiry is made for names of 
Canadian exporters of dowels (f to 1 
inch), chair and table legs turned from 
maple or birch, cornice poles, oak barrel 
slaves and tops, and copper ore. 

205. Application is made for makers in 
Canada of wood pulp boards, in white, 
tinted and leather colors, such as are 
used for paper boxes, bookbinding and 
printing purposes; size 22 x 32 inches 
from forty to six hundred sheets to the 
hundred weight (112 lbs.). 

From the City Trade Branch of the 



EARLIER NAVIGATION. 

WHILE some of the experiments on 
the St. Lawrence with the 
Government ice breakers have 
been somewhat disappointing they have 
been by no means entirely unsuccessful. 
A few days ago a party from Montreal 
including Andrew Allan went, on board 
the ice-breaker Montcalm to witness the 
steamer attempt to break up the ice 
bridge formed at Cap Rouge. Mr. J. 
W. Gregory, Quebec, agent of the Marine 
and Fisheries Department, who was also 
on board the ice-breaker, says that the 
work is quite possible, though difficult. 
The object to break up the bridge earlier 
in the Spring and give Montreal earlier 
navigation is now an assured fact. 
47 



BOOKS FOR 
BUSINESS MEN 



Manufacturing Cost 

By H. L. C. Hall. 

Dealt with along general lines and not from the stand- 
point of any particular industry. 

The whole organization and conduct of a factory from 
the purchasing agent to the salesman are considered ex- 
haustively. An invaluable work. 

Descriptive pamphlet on request 
Cloth bound, <1» o fifi 

Price, postpaid, ^>O.UU 

Business Short Cuts 

In Accounting, Advertising, Book- 
keeping, Card Indexing, Corres- 
pondence, Management. 

Compiled by a Board of Experts. 

These methods are practical ; in daily use by experts who 
charge $25.00 to §100.00 a day for their services. 

Descriptive pamphlet on request 

Cloth bound, ti^i f\(\ 

Price, postpaid, N>I.UU 



Thome's Twentieth 
Century Book-keeping 
and Business Practice 

A new and model work on Bookkeeping. Not a re-written 
w rk, but an absolutely new book from cover to cover. Not 
an old or out-of-datejnethod or illustration in it. 

It constitutes an Illustrated Dictionary. It contains 
Thrne Sets of Accounts— Models— worked out in detail, and 
a host of special forms for special uses. Corporation 
Accounts are treated with special care and thoroughness. 
There is no other book which will so easily teach you to be a 
good bookkeeper. 

Descriptive pamphlet on request 
Bound in half leather, d» ^ r%r\ 

Price, postpaid, ¥<5-"U 

Hardware Store 
Business Methods 

Compiled and Edited by R. R. Williams, 
Hardware Editor of the Iron Age. 
The thorough and practical treatment of the important 
subjects discussed, the embodiment in these articles of the 
experience of men of ability and enterprise, the suggestive- 
ness of the principles and maxims thus presented, will it is 
hoped, render the volume useful to many and tend to elevate 
still further the business methods of the hardware trade 



Cloth bound, 

Price, postpaid, 



$1.00 



The American 

Hardware Store 

A Manual of Approved Methods 
of Arranging and Displaying 
Hardware. 

By R. R. Williams, 

Hardware Editor of the Iron Age. 
This book is descriptive of the best methods of accom- 
modating and displaying the large variety of goods which 
are carried in stock in representative American and Cana- 
dian hardware stores. Copiously illustrated, and worth 
many times its cost to every progressive hardware dealer. 

Cloth bound, §% x9%, C><* r\/\ 

576 page». Price, postpaid, O^-UU 



ADDRESS 
TECHNICAL BOOK DEPARTMENT, 

MacLEAN PUBLISHING CO. 

TORONTO 



LIMITED 



Hardware and Metal. 



February 4, 1905 



Will Hold Dp a Shelf! 

That's what a shelf bracket is for. 
For this purpose there can be NOTHING B et 
teb, Nothing Cheaper than the BRADLEY 
STEEL BRACKET. It is well Japanned, Strong 
and Light. The saving in freight is a good profit, 
aside from the lower price at which the goods are 
sold. Order direct or through your jobber. 

ATLAS MFG. CO., 

New Haven, Conn., U.S. A 




Subscribe to the 



for news of the Oil, Paint, Soap, Varnish 
Chemical and Drysaltery Trades. 

Subscription, $2.00 per year from date. 
Sample for 10 cents. 

SOOTT, GREENWOOD & CO. 

19 LUDOATE HILL LONDON, EN6. 

Order a stock of 

"Windmill Best" 
Galvanized Sheets 



Cut Prices 



Made by 



Quality Right 



John Summers & Sons, Ltd. 

STALYBRIDGE, ENG. 

Weekly output, 2,000 tons of sheets. 
Canadian Agent, 



F. HANKIN, 



Montreal 






When you buy 

METAL POLISH 

be sure to specify 

YORK 



It comes in Liquid or Paste, from 
10c. size upwards. 

Matchless for speed, brilliance and 
permanence. 

Your jobber supplies it. 

ANCL0-CANADIA1 SUPPLY GO 

29 Church-St., TORONTO. 



The original nna only Genuine 
Preparation for Cleaning Cut- 
lery. 6d. and Is. Canisters 



OAKEY'S 

'WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE POLISH 

JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 

MANUFACTURERS OP 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Fapers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, London, England 

Agent : 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL. 



STOVES AND TINWARE. 



" 



» Tin Plate Industry in Wales. 

BRITISH exports of tin plate, a 
dispatch from London, England, 
states, show a record breaking in- 
crease for 1904 over those of 1903, and, 
although the total quantity was not in 
itself a record, it was higher than it 
had been for nine years previously. 

The figures show that Great Britain 
itself took 40 per cent, more than in 
1903, and that juices rose steadily dur- 
ing the year. 

The works now are in full swing, and 
1905 shows signs of being another good 
year. This improvement, it is said, 
dates from the introduction ol the Mc- 
Kinley tariff in America in 1890. Welsh 
tin-plate manufacturers at the time 
feared the tariff would kill their trade, 
but instead it proved a blessing in dis- 
guise. 

The makers realized that if their 
trade was to survive they must cheapen 
the cost of manufacture and develop new 
markets. To enable them to do this 
raw materials at the lowest possible 
price were necessary, and the fiscal sys- 
tem of Great Britain gave the makers 
opportunities in this respect superior to 
those of any other country. Thus four- 
teen years of hard work has brought its 
rewaid, and the British tin-plate trade 
is in a sounder position than it ever has 
been before. 



In New Premises. 

THE Wrought Iron Range Company 
have gotten comfortably settled 
in their new quarters, the busi- 
ness office and show rooms being at 103 
Church street, Toronto, and the factory 
and warehouse at Toronto Junction. 
Twelve years ago the company imported 
a carload of ranges from the parent 
company in St. Louis, Mo., and com- 
menced manufacturing in Canada, their 
business now having grown too large for 
their former location on Pearl street. 
The company manufactures "Home Com- 
fort" ranges and complete hotel and 
kitchen outfits, but as all their goods 
are sold direct to the consumer the firm 
is not as well known to the trade as the 
other companies who use the advertising 
columns of Hardware and Metal. Mr. 
L. L. Purinton, manager of the Cana- 
dian business reports that the range 
business is growing steadily and collec- 
tions are very good, fully 90 per cent, of 
the company's paper being promptly 
met. Lip to about four years ago there 
was a periodical slack season from De- 
48 



eember to March, but these months now 
produce as much business as the other 
months in the year. His own firm ship- 
ped six carloads of goods in January, 
1904, while about seven carloads were 
disposed of during the same month this 
year by the company's 25 traveling 
salesmen. 

A Seasonable Money-Maker. 
A hot air flue for stovepipes is a 
novelty which has been put on the mar- 
ket by L. ('. Knisledt, manufacturing 
tinsmith, of Moorefield, Ont. It is a 
great money-saver in the way of heat- 
ing and ventilating rooms and it is the 
only thin- of its kind on the market. 
The appliance can also be utilized to ad- 
vantage in smokestacks for heating fac- 
tories, making' a considerable saving in 
the fuel bill. Mention Hardware and 
Metal when you write for information. 
] ii ices. etc. 

A Toronto Retailer Interviewed. 

AUSTIN EATON, formerly connect- 
ed with the Gurney retail store 
on Yonge street, Toronto,* is 
building up a large business on College 
street near Spadina avenue, his special- 
ties being heating, lighting and plumb- 
ing. Established only seven months 
ago, the business has been greater than 
• his expectations, and as the trade in 
this district is strictly high-class, he 
reports the outlook for the future as 
very bright, the great demand being for 
ranges and furnaces. An increasing de- 
mand is noted, however, for gas ranges, 
gas water heaters and furnace attach- 
ments, many new houses being equipped 
so as to be heated by furnace, the entire 
cooking being done by gas, while the 
hot water is heated by the furnace in 
Winter and by the gas water heater in 
Summer. Mr. Eaton states that he finds 
the Winnipeg heater to be a good side 
line, it being a good seller and giving 
splendid satisfaction, making a large 
saving of heat from coal or wood fires. 



COAL IN FORMOSA. 

There were 77,300 tons of coal mined 
in Formosa in 1903, of which 19,000 
tons were exported to Chinese ports, 
13,000 tons were taken for ships' use at 
the ports of Formosa and the rest was 
used by the Formosa Railway, various 
factories and plants and private house- 
holds. 



February 4, 1905 



STOVES AND TINWARE 



Hardware and Metal. 




Solarine 
ar Polish 

Best and cheapest preparation for 



Brass, Copper, Steel, 
Bar Fixtures, Kitchen 



A. PERMANENT 

and Hindaoma Roof. 



polishing :- 
Tin, Zinc, 
Utensils. 

A rapid cleaner expressly designed 
for all kitchens. 

For Ontario, Addreis 

H. F. FALKINER, 

60 George St., TORONTO 



Stove .Rip© 

SCHEIP'S PATENT 

Nested 25 lengths in a crate 
Inches: 5, 6, 7 




This is the Only Perfect Working 
Knock Down Pipe made 



WILL NOT TELESCOPE 



E.T.WRIGHT & CO., Hamilton, Can. 




Arrow Brand Asphalt Ready Roofing 

Will bring you profitable trad* and satisfied customers. Comee in rolls ready to 
lay, all ready corered with gravel. Requires no experience to lay, and laata 
for years without further attention. 

A. C. JENKING, Sole Agent, 
Room 2IS Coristlne Building, - MONTREAL. 

Sole agents being appointed in each district. Write to-day. 




Ridgely's Model B 
Trimmer 

In conjunction with our famous 
THREE-PIECE STRAIGHTEDGE 

makea an outfit for trimming paper 
that will do the work in one-iixth the 
time it takes to do it with a knife or 
shears, and do it accurately. Guar- 
anteed to give perfect satisfaction. 
For full particulars address 

THE RIDGELY TRIMMER CO., 

Manufacturers, 
Paper Hangers' Supplies, 

SPRINGFIELD, OHIO, U.S.A. 

Send for Catalogue No. 16. 



71 


72 


Death to Wood, 


It's Strong, 


Life to Iron. 


Serviceable, 


Long live Cutts' 


Low-priced. 


ALL METAL ASH SIFTER. 


Give us an order — 


No other kind worth having. 


1, 2, 3 dozen — they all count. 


C. M. CUTTS 6} CO., makers Toronto Junction, Ont. 




Our success in business, like yours, depends on th 
quality of the goods we supply. We couldn't afford 
to let the standard of our goods drop for one 
minute — neither could you. The standard of quality 
we have set for our 

Imperial 
Oxford Range 



is a high one — but it means business to us — and to 
you — to keep it there. 

There is only one reason why your customers 
should buy any other range — because they can get it 
for less money. 

Don't you think it would mean better business for 
you if you induced your customers to pay a little 
more for an Imperial Oxford Range which insures 
them cooking satisfaction ? They will quickly see it 
is to their interests if you put it to them in the right 
light. 

ill Gray Founflry Co., Limits 



TORONTO WINNIPEG 



J 
VANCOUVER 



CORRESPONDENTS : 

The Gurney-nassey Co., Limited, Montreal, Que. ; 

The Qurney Standard Metal Co., Limited, Calgary, AlU 



49 



HARDWARE AND MBTAL 



February 4, 1905 



Everything counts, and the 

POINTS IN FAVOR OF OUR GOODS 

are many 

Ready Roofing, Sheathing and Black ^§^ Diamond Tarred Felts, 
Building Papers, Fibre ^Manilla Wrappings, etc. 

Ask for our quotations they will interest you. 



FELT FACTORY 

Harbour and Logan Sts., MONTREAL 



PAPER MILLS 

JOLIETTE, QUE. 



ALEX. McARTHUR & CO., LIMITED 



32 l\/loOII_L_ 



REET, 



MONTREAL 



CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS. 



Feb. 3, 1905. 
These prices are for such qualities and 

auantities as are usually ordered by retail 
ealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. The 
Editor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list, as the desire 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

TIN. 
Lamb and Flag and Straits— 

56 and 28-lb. ingots, 100 lb. $32 00 $33 00 
TINPLATES. 
Charcoal Plates— Bright. 
M.L.8., equal to Bradley— Per box. 

I 0, UBual sizes 86 50 

it " 800 

IXX " .,„,, 9 50 

Famous, equal to Bradley— 

10 «« 

IX «25 

IXX 9 75 

Raven and Vulture Grades— 

I O, usual sizes 4 25 

ix: •■ 5oo 

IXX " 575 

IXX X " 6 50 

"Dominion Crown Best" — Double 

Coated, TisBued. p er box. 

10 5 50 

IX "50 

IXX 7 50 

' Allaway's Best "—Standard Quality. 

IC «50 

IX 550 

IXX 6 50 

Coke Plates— Bright. 
Bessemer Steel — 

I.O., usual size, 14x20 3 50 

I C, special sizes, base 3 75 

20x28 7 50 

Charcoal Plates— Terne 
Dean or J. Q. Grade — 

I.O., 20x28, 112 sheets .... 7 50 

IX., Terne Tin 10 50 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 
Cookley Grade— 

X X, 14x56, 50 sheet bxs. ") 

" 14x60, " } .... 7 00 

" 14x65, " ) 

Tinned Sheets. 

72x30 up to 24 gauge 7 25 7 50- 

r - 26 " 7 75 8 00 

IRON AND STEEL. 

Montreal. Toronto. 

Common bar, per 100 lb 1 771 1 80 

Refined " " 2 02J 2 05 

Horseshoe Iron " 2 02.J 

Hoop steel, 14 to 3-in. base 

Sleigh shoe steel, " . . 1 824 .... 

Tire Bteel 1 92| 

T. Firth & Son's tool steel — 

Speedicut 60 

Annealed speedicut 65 

Self hardening 35 

Best tool sleel 12 

Warranted 09 

Best sheet steel 12 

B. K. Morton & Co.— 

"Alpha" highspeed 65 

" " annealed 70 

" M " Self Hardening 50 

" T " Standard 14 

"BC" 09 

' onas k Colver's tool steel 10 20 

"Novo" 65 

" annealed 70 

Ohas. Leonard 08 09 

Crucible Steel Co. 

" Rex high speed steel. . 65 75 

8elf Hardening 45 50 

Crucible Sp.olal 17 



Crucible Silver stee.l 13 

" Black Diamond In 11 

Sanderson's Crucible steel 03 09 

Superior " 12 13 

BABBIT METAL. 

Syracuse Smelting Works : 

Aluminum, genuine 45 

Government, " 44 

Tough, " 40 

Hard, " 40 

Dynamo 30 

Special 25 

Harmony 22 

Car Box 20 

Extra 15 

The Canada Metal Oo. : 

Imperial, genuine •.- 40 

MetaUic 30 

Hercules 20 

Star 15 

No. 1 12 

No. 2 10 

No. 3, 06 

No. 4 05 

BLACK SHEETS. 

Montreal. Toronto 

10 gauge 2 30 2 30 

12 and 14 gauge 2 30 2 35 

17 " 2 30 2 40 

22 to 24 gauge 2 35 2 50 

26 " 2 40 2 65 

28 2 40 2 70 

COPPER WIRE. 
Discount, 50 per cent. 

CANADA PLATES. 

Ordinary 2 50 

All bright 4 00 

Galvanized Canada Plates- 
Ordinary. Dom. 
Crown. 

18x24x52 4 25 4 35 

" 60 4 50 4 60 

20x28x80 8 50 8 70 

" 94 9 00 9 20 

GALVANIZED SHEETS. 
Fleur-de-Lis. Gordon Crown. 

16 gauge 3 50 

18 to 24 gauge 3 50 3 50 

26 " . . 3 75 3 75 

28 - " . . 4 00 4 00 

Comet Queen's J.C.M. 3 

Bell. Head Crowns 

18 to 24 gauge 3 75 3 50 3 05 

26 " 3 90 3 75 3 37 

28 4 05 4 00 3 60 

American brands, $4.00 for 101 oz. 
Less than case lots 10 to 15c. extra. 
CHAIN. 
Proof coil, 3-16 in., per 100 lb. 7 00 10 00 

J " 5 60 

5-16 " 4 45 

I " 3 85 

7-16 " 3 70 

j " 3 55 

9-16 " 3 45 

| " 3 35 

J " 3 25 

Halter, kennel and post chainB, 40 to 40 and 
5 per cent. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Tie out chains 65 p.c 

Stall fixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain 45 p.c. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, discount 
35 p.c. [ ^ount 40 p.c. 

Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis- 
OOPPER. 

Ingot. Per 100 lb. 

Casting, car lots 16 25 

Bars. 
Cnt lengths, round, J to J in .. 21 00 23 00 
round and square, 

1 to 2 inches 21 23 00 

Sheet. 
Plain, 16 oz., 14x48 and 14i60 .... 21 00 
Plain, 14 oz 22 00 

00 



Tinned copper sheet 24 00 

Planished 32 00 

Braziers' (in sheets). 

4x6 ft., 25 to 30 lb. each, per lb 22 

" 35 to 45 " " .... 21 

" 50-lb. and above " .... 20 

BOILER AND T.K. PITTS. 

Plain tinned | 40 per cent, off list. 

BRASS. 
Rod and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge, 10 per cent. 

Sheets, hard-rolled, 2x4 23 

Tubing, base, per lb 234 

ZINC SPELTER. 

Foreign, per 100 lb 7 00 

Domestic " " 5 50 5 75 

ZINC SHEET. 

5-cwt. casks 7 25 

Part casks 7 75 

LEAD. 

Imported Pig, per 100 lb 3 8) 

Baf, " " 4 80 

Sheets, 24 lb. sq. ft., by roll 06i 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lb. " 06 

Note.— Cut sheets 4c. per lb., extra. Pipe, 
by the roll, usual weights per yard, lists at 7c. 
per lb. and 35 p.c lis. f.o.b. Toronto. 

Note.— Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 
8-fi lengths, lists at 8c. 

ANTIMONY. 
Cookson's per lb. 104 11 

SHOT. 

Common, $6.50 per 100 lb.; chiUed, $7.00 
per 100 lb.; buck, seal and ball, $7.50. Dis- 
count, 15 p.c. Prices are f.o.b. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Terms, 2 p.c. for cash in thirty days. 
PLUMBING GOODS. 



BATH TUBS. 



Zinc 

Copper, discount 20 per cent, off rev 

BATHS. 

Standard Ideal Enameled. 

54-ft. 24 in. rolled rim, 1st quality 

5J if " " 2nd " .... 
54 3 " " 1st .... 

5j 2nd " .... 

5 ?4 ',; ;: \»\ •••■ 

5 '• " " 2nd 

5 3 " " 1st " .... 

5 " " " 2nd " .... 

Plate 116 D, lavatories 1st quality. . .. 

" 116 D, " 2nd " .... 

" 118 D, " 1st " .... 

" 118 D, " 2nd " .... 

" 120 D, " 1st " .... 

" 120 D, " 2nd " .... 

" 122 D, " 1st " .... 

•' 122 D. " 2nd " .... 
Sinks 18 x 30 in flat rim 

CLOSETS. 

Fittings 

Plain Simplex Syphon Jet 

Erob. " 

Fittings 

Low Down Elgin or Teutonic, plain. 
Low " " " emb.. 

Connection 

Plain Richelieu 

Emb. " 

Connections 

Basins, P.O., 14-in 

Basins, oval, 17 x 14-in 

Baains, " 19 x 15-in 



00 
ised list. 



21 25 

17 25 
23 6'J 

19 00 

18 40 
17 25 

20 75 
17 25 

8 90 
7 50 
5 70 

4 80 

5 60 

4 70 

5 40 
4 50 
2 50 
Net. 
1 00 

9 00 
9 50 
1 25 

6 00 
6 50 
1 25 
4 25 
4 50 
1 25 

63 

1 50 

2 <k, 



Galvanized pipe — 

(inch 2 86 

" 2 89 

, " 3 15 

I " 4 03 

1 " 5 78 

11 " 7 18 

1} " 9 45 

2 " 12 60 

Malleable Fittings— Canadian discount 20 per 
cent.; American discount 35 percent. 

Cast Iron Fittings— Standard bushings 60 
per cent. ; headers, 60 ; flanged unions, 
and lipped, 60; malleable bushings, 60; 
nipples, up to 6 in., 70 and 5. 

PLUMBERS BRASS GOODS. 

Standard Compression work, dis. 60 & 10 p.c. 

Cushion work, discount 50 per cent. 

Fuller work, discount 70 per cent. 

6 dozen lots and over of the above, extra dis- 
count 10 per cent. 

Lever handle Stops and Waste, discount M 
per cent. With in lots of 2 dozen and over 
an extra discount of 10 per cent. 

J. M.T. Globe, Angle and Check Valves, dis- 
count 55 per cent. 

Standard Globe, Angle and Check Valves, 
discount 65 per cent. 

Kerr's special standard globes and angles 
discount 55 percent. 

Kerr's Jenkin disc, copper-alloy diso and 
heavy standard valves, discount 55 percent. 

Kerr's standard brass checks, discount 55 p.c. 

Kerr's standard brass disc steam radiator 
valves, discount 65 per cent. 

Kerr's Jenkin disc, copper-alloy disc radia- 
tor valves, discount 65 per cent. 

Kerr's quick - opening hot - water radiator 
valves, discount 65 per cent. 

Weber's (Kerr) patent straightway gate 
valves, brass, discount 50 per cent. 

Weber's (Kerr) patent straightway gate 
valves, I. B. B. M. , discount 60 and 10 per cent. 

J. M. T. Radiator Valves discount 55 per oeut. 

Standard Radiator Valves, discount 65 per 
cent. 

Patent Quiok - Opening Valves, discount 70 
per cent. 

No. 1 compression bath cork net 1 75 

No. 4 " " " 1 90 

No .7 Fuller's " 2 10 

No. 44, " " 2 25 

Patent Compression Cushion, basin 
cock, hot and cold, per doz. , $31 ; 5 and 10 
per cent, discount. 

Patent Compression Cushion, bath 
cock, No. 2208 2 25 

Square head brass cocks, discount 55 peroent 
" " iron " "50 to 60 " 

Thompson Smoke-test Machine $25.00 



IRON PIPE. 



Black pipe— 
i inch 



Per 100 feet. 



H: 



2 04 
2 OH 
2 30 
2 88 

4 13 

5 63 

6 75 
9 00 



RANGE BOILERS. 



Copper, 30 gallon . 
r ' 35 ' . 



" 22 00 

" 24 00 

40 " 28 00 

Discount off copper boilers 15 per cent. 



GALVANIZED IRON RANGE BOILERS. 



Capaoity. 
Gals. 

12 

18 

24 

30 

35 

40 

52 

66 

82 
100 
120 
144 



Standard. 

4.50 

4.75 

4.75 

5.00 

6.00 

7.00 
11.00 
18.00 
21.00 
29.00 
34.00 
47 00 



Extra heavy 

6.50 

6.75 

6.75 

7.50 

8.50 

9.50 
14.00 
20.00 
24.00 
3400 
4000 
55 00 



February 4, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



American Steel & Wire Co. 



New York 

Empire Building 



Montreal 

N. Y. Life Building 



Chicago 

The Rookery 



BARBED WIRE GALVANIZED PLAIN WIRE 

PLAIN TWIST CABLE FENCING 

Telegraph and Telephone Wire; Mattress, Broom, Weaving Wires of 
every description; Rail Bonds, Bale Ties, Special Wires for all 
purposes, Springs, Horse Shoes, Wire Rope, Cold-drawn Steel 
Shafting. 



SOIL PIPE AND FITTINGS. 

Med. and Extra heavy pipe and fittings, dis. 60 

per cent. 
7 and 8-in. pipe, discount 40 and 5 per cent. 

solder. Per lb 

Bar, half-and-half, guaranteed 17] 

Wiping 15j 

Refined 16J- 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

COLORS IN OIL. 
1-lb. tins, pure. 

Venetian red, per lb 

Chrome yellow 

Golden ochre 

French " 

Marine black 

Chrome green 

French permanent green 

Sign writers' black 



08 
15 
68 
06 
04 
10 
13 
15 

WHITE LEAD. Per 100 lb. 



Pure 

No. 1 

No. 2 

No. 3 

No. 4 

Munro's Seleot Flake White. . 
Elephant and Decorators'Pure 

Monaroh 

Deoorator's Pure 

Essex Genuine 

Sterling Pure 

Island City Pure 



4 75 
4 50 
4 25 
3 874 

3 50 

4 75 

4 75 

5 00 
4 75 

4 25 

5 00 
5 00 

Ramsay's Pure Lead 4 75 5 00 

Ramsay's Exterior 4 50 4 75 

RED LEAD. 

Genuine, 560 lb. casks, percwt $4 25 $4 50 

Genuine, 100 lb. kegs, " ... 4 75 

No. 1, 560 lb. casks, per owt 100 

No. 1, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 4 25 

WHITE ZINC. 

Extra Red Seal 06 08 

French V. M 06 06} 

Lehigh 06 06} 

DRY WHITE LEAD. 

Pure, casks 4 25 

Pure, kegs 4 50 

No. 1, casks 4 00 

No. 1, kegs 4 25 

PREPARED PAINTS. 

In }, J and 1-gallon tins. 

Pure, per gallon 

Second qualities, per gallon . 

Bam (in Dbls.^. 

Tin-Willis 



The Sherwin-Williams paints 

Canada Paint Co.'s pure 

Toronto Lead & Color Co's pure 

Sanderson Pearcy's pure 

Standard Co.'s " New Era.". . 

" Globe " barn 

Francis-Frost Co.'s "Ark" B'd 

" British Navy deck 

Henderson & Potts's "Anchor" 

Ramsay's paints. Pure, per gal. 

" Thistle, " 

Outside, bbls 

Island City House Paint .... 

" Floor " .... 

Sterling House Paint 

Floor " 

Vatinnal 



55 



1 20 
1 00 

90 

1 35 
1 25 
1 25 
1 20 
1 30 

70 
1 25 
1 50 
1 35 
1 20 
1 00 

65 

1 25 
1 25 
1 20 
1 10 
1 05 



PARIS GREEN. 

BERGEHS' ENGLISH. 

Petroleum, barrels, per lb 151 

Arsenic, kegs 15J 

50 and 100-lb. drums .... 016 

25-lb. drums 16-J. 

1-lb. paper boxes 17 

1-lb. tins 18 

i-lb. paper boxes 19 

J-lb. tins 20 

Terms— 2 per cent, off 30 days, or 90 days 
net. 



PUTTY. 

Bulk in bbls 1 45 

Bulk in less quantity 1 70 

Bladders in bbls 1 '/0 

Bladders in kegs, boxes or loose 1 85 

25-lb. tins 1 80 

12J lb. tins 2 05 

Bladders in bulk or tins less than 100 lb. 1 85 

VARNISHES. 

In 5-gal. lots. Per gal. Net. 

Carriage, No. 1 1 50 1 60 

Pale durable body 4 10 4 25 

rubbing 2 85 3 20 

Gold size, japan 150 160 

No. 1 brown japan 85 90 

Elastic oak 150 

Furniture, extra 110 125 

No. 1 90 100 

Hardoilfinish 135 150 

Light oil finish 160 170 

Damar 175 2 00 

Shellac, white 2 40 2 50 

orange 2 30 2 40 

Turpentine, brown japan 1 10 1 20 

black japan 1 10 1 20 

'' No. 1. 85 90 

Elastilite Tarnish, 1 gal. can, each. . 2 00 

Granitine floor finish, per gal 2 75 

Maple Leaf coach enamels ; size 1, $1.20 ; 

size 2, 70c; size 3, 40c. each. 
Sherwin-Williams' kopal varnish, assorted 
case, from to 1 gal., $2.50. 

GLUE. 

Common 08 084 

French medal 10 14 

White, extra 18 22 

Gelatine 

Strip 18 20 

Coopers 19 20 

Huttner 

Ground 12 16 

Cologne, genuine 



10J 
09} 
11} 



ADZES. 

Discount 20 per cent. 

ANVILS. 

Wright's, 80-lb. and OTer 1 

Hay Budden, 80-lb. and oyer 

Brook's, 80-lb. and OTer 

APPLE PARERS. 

Woodyatt Hudson, per doz., net 4 50 

AUGERS. 

Gilmour's, discount 65 and 5 per cent, off list. 

AXES. 

Chopping Axes 

Single bit, per doz 7 00 10 00 

Double bit, " 10 00 18 00 

Bench Axes, 40 per cent. 
Broad Axes, 25 per.cent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boys' Axes 625 700 

Splitting Axes 7 00 12 00 

Handled Axes 10 00 

AMERICAN AXE AND TOOL CO. 

Red Ridge, boys', handled 5 75 

" hunters 5 25 

Underhill American Bench Axes, 40 p.c. 

AXLE GREASE 

Ordinary, per gross 6 00 7 00 

Best quality 10 00 12 00 



BELLS. 

Hand. 



HARDWARE. 

AMMUNITION. 
Cartridges. 

B. B. Caps Dominion, 50 and 5 and 25 per cent. 

American 32.00 per 1000. 

C. B. Caps American, $2.60 per 1000. 

Rim Fire Pistol, discount 30 p.c, American. 

Rim Fire Cartridges, Dominion, 50 and 5 p.c. 

Central Fire, Military and Sporting, Amer- 
ican, idd 20 per cent, to list. B.B. Caps, 
discount 40 per cent., American. 

Central Fire Pistol and Rifle, list net Amer. 

Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes, Domin- 
ion, 30 per cent. 

Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary, Dominion, 15 per cent. American 

10 per cent, advance on list. 

Loaded and empty Shells, "Trap" and 

" Dominion " [Trades. 25 per cent, discount. 

American 20 per cent, discount. Rival 

and Nitro, 10 per cent, advance on list. 
Brass Shot Shells, 55 per cent. 
Primers, Dom., 30 per cent.; American, $1.75 
Wads. per lb. 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

J-lb. bags $0 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 
Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 35 

rhin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 each, 

12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge 25 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each — Per M. 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9 and 10 gauges 70 

7 and 8 " 90 

5 and 6 " 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 ,r 1 65 

i end C " 1 90 

51 



Brass, 60 per cent. 
Nickel, 55 per cent. 

Cow. 
American make, discount 634 per cent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 
Door. 

Gongs, Sargant's B SO 8 00 

" Peterboro', discount 50 tnd 10 
per cent, off new list. 

Farm. 

American, each 1 15 3 00 

House. 
American, per lb 35 40 

BELTING. 

Extra, 60 per cent. 

Standard, 60 and 10 per cent. 

No. 1, not wider than 6 in., 60, 10 and 10 per 

cent. 
Agricultural, not wider than 4 in., 75 per cent. 

BITS. 

Auger. 
Gilmour's, discour t 60 per cent. 
Rockford, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings Gen., net list. 

Car. 
Gilmour's, 474 P er cent. 

Expansive. 
Clark'B, 40 per cent. 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Diamond, Shell, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Nail and Spike, per gross 2 25 5 20 

BLIND AND BED STAPLES. 

All sizes, per lb 07! 12 

BOLTS AND NUTS 

Carriage Bolts, common ($1 list) Per cent. 

" 3-16 andl 60 and 10 

" " 5-16 and § 55 and 5 

" " 7-16 and up . . . . 55 and 5 

" full sq. ($2. 40 list) 60 
" " Norway Iron ($3 

list) 60 

Machine Bolts, all sizes, i and 

less 60 

Machine Bolts, 7-16 and up ... . 60 

Plough Bolts 55 and 5 

Blank Bolts 55 and 5 

BoltEnds 55 and 5 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 70 

Coach Screws, cone point 70 

Nuts, square, ad sizes, 4c per lb. off. 
Nuts, hexagon, all sizes, 4}c. per lb. off. 
Stoye Rods per lb. , 54 to 6c. 
BOOT CALKS. 

Small and medium, ball per M. 4 25 

Small heel " 4 50 

BRIGHT TTIRE 300DS. 

Discount 624 ner cent. 

BUTCHERS' CLEAVERS. 

German per doz. 6 00 9 00 

American " 12 00 18|00 

BUTCHER KNIVES. 

Bailey's per doz. 60 I 30 



BUILDING PAPER, ETC 

Tarred Felt, per 100 JJ) 1 85 

Ready roofing, 2-ply;'not under 45 lb. 

per roll o 90 

Ready roofing, 3-ply, not under 65 lb., 

per roll l 15 

Carpet Felt per ton 45 00 

Heavy Straw Sheathing per ton 35 00 

Dry Sheathing per roll, 400 sq. ft. 40 

Tar " '• 400 " 59 

Dry Fibre " 400 " 55 

Tarred Fibre " 400 " 65 

O. K. &I. X. L.... " 400 " 70 

Resin-sized ' 400 "' 45 

Oiled Sheathing " 600 •' l to 

Oiled "■ .... " 400 " 6 70 

Root Coating, in barrels. . . . .per gal. 17 

Roof " small packages " 25 

Refined Tar per barrel 5 00 

Coal Tar " 4 00 

Coal Tar, less than barrels per gal. 15 

Roofing Pitoh per 100 lb. 1 00 

Slater's felt per roll 60 



BULL RINGS. 
Copper, $2.00 for 24-inch, and $1.9 or 2-inct). 

BUTTS. 
Wrought Brass, net revised list. 

Oast Iron. 
Loose Pin, discount 60 per cent 

Wrought Steel. 

Fast Joint, discount 70 to 70 and 5 per cent. 
Loose Pin, discount 70 to 70 and 5 per oent. 

CARPET STRETCHERS. 

American per doz. 100 150 



Bullard's 



1 50 
« 50 



CASTORS. 
Bed, new list, discount 55 to 574 per cent. 
Plate, discount 524 to 574 per cent. 

CATTLE LEADERS. 
Nos. 32 and 33 per gross 7 50 8 50 



CHALK. 

Carpenters' Colored, per gross 45 7J 

White lump percwt. 60 65 

Red-; 05 06 

Crayon per gross 14 18 

CHISELS. 

Socket, Framing and Firmer. 

Broad's, discount 60 and 10 per cent. 

Warnock's, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 

P. S. & W. Extra, discount 60 and 10 per cent. 

FOODS— STOCK. 

Colonial Stock Foods, 50c. packages, 

per doz I 4 00 

" " " 25c pkgs., " 2 00 

'• " " 10c. " '■ 76 

" " " 25-lb. pail, each 1 80 

Poultry Foods, 25c packages 1 25 

Cough Powders, per doz 1 2s 

Worm " " 1 28 

Internation 1 Stock Foods, $1 packages, 

perdoz 100 

International Stock Foods, per pail .... 255 

" " perbbl... 10 50 

" Poultry " $lpkgs.,perdz. 8 0* 

" Worm Powders, 50c.pkgs. 4 00 

" Pine Healing Oil, per doz ... t 00 

Pheno-Chloro,$lpkgs. ,per doz 8 00 

" Hoof Ointment 8 00 

" Compound Absorbent, 16 00 

Also 25c. pkgs. at $2 per doz. 50c. pkge. at 
4 per doz 

CLOTHES REELS. 

DaTi.= Clothes Reels, dis. 40 per or 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



February 4, 1905 



It Isn't Our Fault 

if you don't sell Paterson's Wire Edged Ready Roofing to your customers 

who wish to buy that material. 

We advertise liberally in the Farming Journals, and ask all customers to 
order our Roofing from their local Hardware Merchants. 



The Paterson Mfg. Co., Limited 



"Toronto and Montr< 



CONDUCTOR PIPE. 
Plain or Corrugated. 

1-inch per 100 feet 3 00 

• « " " 4 00 

« •• " " " 5 25 

£ " i " " 675 

6 » " " 900 

CRADLES, GRAIN. 
Canadian, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

OROBSOUT SAW HANDLES. 

8. * D., No. 3 per pair 9 174 

8. & D.. " 5 r ' 22? 

S.4D., " 6 " 15 

Boynton pattern V 20 

DOOR SPRINGS. 

Sorrey » Rod per doz 1 85 
oil, J to 11 In " 95 165 

English.... " 2 00 4 00 

DRAW KNIVES. 

Ooaoh and Wagon, discount 50 pet cent. 
Carpenters' disoount 60 and 10 per eent. 

DRILLS. 
Hand and Breast. 
tlillar'i Palls, per doz., net list 

DRILL BITS. 

Horse, disoount 374 to 40 per cent. 
gtandard, discount 50 and 5 to 55 per cent. 

FAUCETS. 
Common, cork-lined, discount 35 per cent. 
EAVETROUGH8. 

10-lnob per 100 ft. 10 00 

elbows (stovepipe.) 

6 and 6-inoh, oommon per doz. 1 20 

T-inoh " 1 35 

Polished, 15c. per dozen extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 

Disoount 50 and 10 per cent., new list 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 

Iron, discount 40 per cent. 

FACTORY MILK CANS. 
Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 

PILES AND RASPS. 

Oreat Western 70 and 10 per cent. 



Arcade. 
Kearney & Foot 

Diss ton's 

American 

J, Barton Smith . 



loClellan 70 

tfagle 70 

Nicholson, 60 and 10 to 60, 10 and 5 

Royal 80 

Globe 70 to 75 

Black Diamond. 6j and 10 to 60, 10 and 5 per 

oent. 
Jowitt's, English list, 25 to 27^ per cent. 
Nicholson File Co.'s " Simplicity " file handle, 

per gross 85c. to $1.50 

GLASS. 
Window. Box Price. 

Star D. Diamond 

Size United Per Per Per Per 

Inches. 50 ft. 100 ft. 50 ft. 100 ft. 

Under 26 380 .... 506 

26 to 40 4 00 .... 5 44 

41 to 50 4 50 .... 6 56 

51 to 60 4 75 .... 7 50 

61 to 70 5 00 .... 8 62 

71 to 80 5 30 .... 9 38 

81 to 85 10 75 

86 to 90 12 30 

91 to 95 15 00 

««to 100 18 00 

96to 100 18 00 



GAUGES. 

Marking, Mortise, Etc. 
Stanley s. discount 50 to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 
Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33 ....each 165 2 40 

GILLETT'S POWDERED LYE. 

1-case, $3.70; 3-case, $3.60; 5-case and over, 
$3.50. 

HALTERS. 

Bope, f-inoh per gross i 00 

Rope, I " " .... 12 00 

Rope, j to }-inch . . . . " .... 14 00 

Leather, 1-inch per doz 4 00 

Leather, 1J " " .... 5 20 

Web " .... 2 45 

HAMMERS. 

Nail. 

Maydole's, discount 5 to 10 per cent. Canadian 

discount 25 to 274 per cent. 

Tack. 

Magnetio per doz. 110 120 

Sledge. 

Canadian per lb. • 074 9 084 

Ball Pean. 
English and Canadian, per lb. 22 9 25 

HANDLES. 

Axe, 2nd growth, per doz. net 3 00 4 00 

Store door ...per doz. 100 150 

Fork. 

C. 4 B., discount 40 per cent., revised list. 

Hoe. 

0. & B., discount 40 per cent., revised list. 
Saw. 

American per do» I 00 1 25 

Plane. 

Amerioan per gross 3 15 3 75 

Hammer and Hatchet. 
Canadian, discount 40 per cent. 

HANGERS. doz. pairs. 

Steel barn door 8 00 10 00 

Stearns, 4-inch 4 50 

" 5-inch 6 00 

Zenith 9 00 

Lace's covered — 

No. 11, 5-foot run 8 40 

No. 11J, 10-foot run 10 80 

No. 12, 10-foot run 12 60 

No. 14, 15-foot run 2100 

Steel, covered 4 00 1100 

" track, 1 x 3-16 in(100 ft) .... 3 75 

" 1} x 3-16 in(100 ft) .... 4 75 

HARVEST TOOLS. 

Disoount 60 per cent. 

HATCHETS. 
Canadian, discount 40 to 424 per cent. 

Shingle, Red Ridge 1, per doz 4 40 

2, " 4 85 

Barrel, Underhill 5 00 

HAT ENAMEL. 
Henderson & Potts' ' Anchor Brand " 

HINGES. 

Blind, Parker's, discount 60 per cent. 

Heavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb 064 

5-in., " 06} 

6-in., ' 06 

8-in., " 05! 

10-in., " 054 

Light T and strap, discount 65 and 5 per oent. 
Screw hook and hinge — 

6 to 10 in per 100 lb 4 50 

12 in. up " .... 3 25 

Spring, No. 20, per gro. pairs .... 10 50 

Spring, Woodyatt pattern, per gro.. No. 5, 

$17.50; No. 10, $18; No. 20, $10.80; No. 

120, $20 ; No. 51, $10 ; No. 50, $27.50. 

HOES. 

Garden, Mortar, etc., discount 60 per cent. 
Planter per doz. 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE. 

Tinned cajt, 35 per oent. 

HOOKS. 

Oast Iron. 
Bird sage per doz. IK lit 



Clothes line, No. 61.. " 00 70 

Harness " 60 12 00 

Hat and coat per gro. 1 10 10 00 

Chandelier per doz. 50 1 00 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought hooks and staples Canadian dis- 
count 60 per cent. 

Wire. 
Hat and coat, discount 60 per cent. 

Belt per 1,000 .... 60 

Screw, bright, discount 60 per cent. 

HORSE NAILS. 
"P.B." Brand, 55 to 60 per cent. 
"C brand, 40, 10 and 74 per cent, off list f Oval 
"M" brand, 55, per cent. I head 

"Monarch," 50 and 74 per cent. 
"Peerless " 50 per cent. dis. 

HORSESHOES. 

F.O.B. Montreal 

"P.B." brand, new pattern, base $3 50 

"M." brand, base 3 65 

Add 15c. Toronto, Hamilton, Guelph. 

JAPANNED WARE. 

50 percent. 
PICKS. 
Star ,... per doz. 3 00 3 25 

KETTLES. 
Brass spun 74 per cent, discount off new list. 

Copper per lb. 30 50 

American, 60 and 10 to 65 and 5 per cent. 

KEYS. 
Lock, Canadian dis. 40 to 40 and 10 per cent. 
Cabinet^ trunk and padlock, 
American per gross 60 

KNOBS. 
Door, japanned and N.P., per 

doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin per doz. 2 75 3 25 

Bronze, Genuine .... " 6 00 9 00 

Shutter, porcelain, F. & L. 

screw per gross 1 30 2 00 

White door knobs per doz 2 00 

HAY KNIVES. 

Net prices. 

LAMP WICKS. 

Discount, 60 per cent. 

LADDERS, EXTENSION. 
Waggoner Extension Ladders,dis.40 per cent. 

LANTERNS. 

Cold Blast perdoz. 7 00 

No. 3, "Wright's" " 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner. ... " 4 00 

Dashboard, cold blast " 9 00 

No. - 5 75 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

Porcelain lined per doz. 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized " 187 3 85 

King, wood " 2 75 2 90 

King, glass " 4 00 4 50 

AH glass ... " 50 90 

LAWN MOWERS FOR 1905. 

Woodyatt, 104-in., 14-in. cut $ 8 50 to $11 00 
Star, 9 -in. " 6 00 to 6 50 

Daisy, 8 -in. " 5 26 to 5 75 

Philadelphia,74-in. " 6 00 to 7 50 

Woodyatt, lOJin., ball bearing 13 25 to 18 00 

Grass Boxes 1 75 to 2 00 

King Edw'd, 12-in., 14-in. cut 9 00 to 10 00 
Horse Lawn Mowers, "Special." 
Discount, 50 per cent., with freight conces- 
sions in quantity shipments. 

Maxwell & Sons : 

10'/ 2 -in. high wheel 7 50 10 00 

9-in 5 50 6 25 

8-in 4 90 5 50 

Discount 50 per cent. 

LOCKS. 

Canadian, 50 to 50 and 10 per oent. 
Russell k Erwia ...per doc 

52 



Cabinet. 
Eagle, discount 30 per cent. 

Padlocks. 

English and Am per doz. 50 (00 

Eagle, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

MACHINE SCREWS. 

Iron and Brass. 
Flat head, discount 25 per cent. 
Round head, discount 20 per cent. 

MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths' perdoz. 1 26 1 50 

Carpenters', hiokory, " 1 25 3 75 

Lignum Vitae " 3 85 6 00 

Caulking, each 0(0 100 

MATTOCKS. 
Canadian per doz. 5 50 ( 0C 

MEAT CUTTERS. 

American, discoun 3J per cent. 

German, 15 per cen 

Gem each 115 

MILK CAN TRIMMiNO.. 

Discount 25 per oent. 

NAILS. Cut. Wire. 

2d 3 SO 3 « 

3d 2 95 2 90 

4and5d 170 165 

(and7d 2 60 2 55 

8and9d 2 45 2 40 

•10 and 12d 2 40 1 35 

16and20d 2 35 2 30 

30, 40, 50 and 60d (base) 2 30 2 26 

F.o.b. Toronto. 
Cut nails in carlots 5c. less. 
Wire nails in carlots are $2.20 (base). 
Steel cut nails 10c. extra. 
Miscellaneous wire nails, discount 15 per oent. 
Coopers' nails, discount 30 per cent. 

NAIL PULLERS. 

German and Amerioan 1 75 2 50 

NAIL SETS. 
Square, round and octagon, 

per gross 1 38 

Diamond 1 00 

POULTRY NETTING. 
2-in. Mesh, 19 w.g., dis. 60 percent. 
2-in. Mesh 16 w.g. and heavier, 50 p.o. 
OAKUM. 

U. 8. Navy per 100 lb (76 

Plumbers " .... 3 00 

OILERS. 

McClary s Model galvanized 

oil can, with pump, 5 gallon, 

per dozen 10 00 

Davidson oilers, disoount 40 per cent, 

Zinc and tin, discount 50, 50 and 10 per cent. 

Copper per doz. 1 25 3 50 

Brass " 1 50 3 50 

Malleable, discount 25 per cent 

GALVANIZED PAILS. 
Dufferin pattern pails, discount 474 per cent 
Flaring pattern, discount 474 per cent. 
Galvanized washtubs, disoount 474 per cent 

PIECED WARE. 

Discount 40 per cent off list, June, 1899. 
10-qt. flaring sap buckets, discount 40 per cent 
6. 10 and 14-qt. flaring pails dis. 40 per cent. 
Creamer cans, discount 40 per cent. 

Per dozen 600 900 

PICTURE NAILS. 

Porcelain head per gross 1 35 1 50 

Braes head " 40 100 

PICTURE WIRE. 

Tin and gilt, discount 75 per cent. 

PINE TAR. 

4 pint in tins per gross ... 7 80 

I " " ' s ... 9 (0 

PLANES. 
Wood bench, Canadian discount 40 per cent., 

Amerioan discount 50 per cent. 
Wood, fancy Canadian sr America 37 

40 per ••si 



February 4, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



WE HAVE REMOVED 

Readers of The Hardware and Metal 
please note, that we have removed to 

97-105 Wellington Street West, Wear York St. 

Ve Have a Full Line of Office Furniture and Labor-Saving Devices for Correspondence and Record Filing In Stock. 

COME AND SEE US PHONE 4240 

The Office Specialty Mfg. Co., Limited 




PLANE IRONS. 

English per doz. 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 

Button's genuine, per doz. pairs, discount 
371 to 40 per cent. 

Button's imitation per doz. 5 00 9 00 

German " 60 «0 

PRESSED SPIKES. 

Discount 20 per cent. 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse per doz. 55 100 

Axle " 22 33 

Screw " 27 1 00 

Awning " 35 2 50 

PUMPS. 

Canadian cistern 1 80 3 60 

Canadian pitcher spout 1 40 2 10 

PUNCHES. 

Saddler's per doz. 1 00 1 85 

Conductor's " 3 00 15 00 

Tinners , solid perset — 72 

" hollow per inch .... 100 

RAKES. 

Wood per doz. net 1 20 up. 

razors. per doz. 

Elliot's 4 00 18 00 

Geo. Butler's & Co. s 4 00 18 00 

Boker's 7 50 11 00 

King Cutter 13 50 18 50 

Wade & Butcher's 3 60 10 00 

Carbo Magnetic 15 00 

Griffon Barber's Favorite 10 75 

Griffon No. 65 13 00 

Griffon Safety Razors 13 50 

Griffon Stropping Machines 13 50 

Lewis Bros '" Klean Kutter" 8 50 10 jO 

Hindoo 10 50 14 00 

Orgsteom's Swedish 3 50 10 00 

Henckel's 7 50 20 00 

Clauss, 50 and 10 percent. 
ClausB Strops, 50 and 10 per cent. 

REGISTERS. 

Discount 40 per cent. 

RIYET8 AND BURRS. 

Iron Rivets, black and tinned, 60 and 10 p o. 
Iron BurrB, discount 60 and 10 per cent. 
Copper Rivets, with usual proportion burrs, 45 

per cent. 
Copper Burrs only, discount 30 and 10 per cent. 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivets, 4-lb. 

packages lc. per lb.; }-lb. packages 2c. lb. 

RIVET SETS. 

Canadian, discount 35 to 374 per cent. 
ROPE, ETC. 

Sisal 11 

Pure Manilla 14£ 

"British" Manilla 11 

Cotton, 3-16 inch and larger 21 23 

" 5-32 inch 25 27 

J inch 25 28 

Russia Deep Sea 16 

Jute 09 

Lath Yarn, single 10 

double 104 

Sisal bed cord, 48 feet per doz. 65 

" " 60 feet " 80 

" 72 feet " 95 

RULES. 

Boxwood, discount 70 per cent. 
Ivory, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

SAD IRONS. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished. ...per set 80 

No. 50, nickle-plated, " 90 

Common, plain 4 50 

" plated 5 50 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 

R. fc A. sand, discount, 40 and 5 per cent 
Emery, discount 40 per oent. 
uMnat (Burton's) 6 to 10 per oent. advance 
Mbt 



SAP SPOUTS. 

Bronzed iron with hooks per 1,000 7 50 

"Eureka" tinned steel, hooks " 8 00 

SAWS. 

Hand, Disston's, discount 124 per cent 

S. k D., discount 40 per cent. 

Crosscut, Disston's. . ..per foot 35 55 

S. & D., discount 35 per cent, on Nos. 2 and 3. 

Hack, complete each 75 2 75 

" frame only each 50 125 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional per 100 lb. 2 00 2 25 

Solid " 1 50 1 75 

SASH CORD. 

Per lb 28 30 

saw sets. per doz. 

Lincoln and Whiting 4 75 

Hand Sets. Perfect 4 00 

X-Cut Sets, " 1 50 

scales. 

Gurney Standard, 40 per cent. 

Gurney Champion, 50 per cent. 

Burrow, Stewart & Milne- 
Imperial Standard, discount 40 per cent. 
Weigh Beams, discount 35 per cent. 
Champion Scales, discount 50 per cent. 

Fairbanks standard, discount 35 per cent. 
" Dominion, discount 55 p.er cent. 

" Richelieu, discount 55 per cent. 

Warren's new Standard, discount 40 percent. 
1 Champion, discount 50 per cent. 
" Weighbeams, discount 35 per cent. 

SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's per doz. 65 100 

SCREEN DOORS. 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, walnut 
stained, 4-in. style per doz. 6 50 

Common doors,2 or 3 panel, yellow and 
green stained, 4-in. style per doz. G 75 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, in natural 
colors, oil finish per doz. 8 75 

3-in. style 20c. per dozen less. 

SCREWS. 

Wood, F. H, bright and steel, discount 871 

per cent. 
Wood, R. H, bright, dis. 824 pei cent. 

" F. H., brass, dis. 80 per cent. 

" R. H., " dis. 75 per cent. 
' F. H., bronze, dis. 75 per cent. 
' R. H., " dis. 70 per cent. 
Drive Screws, dis. 871 per cent. 
Bench, wood per doz. 3 25 4 00 

" iron " 4 25 5 00 

Set, case hardened, dis. 60 per cent. 
Square Cap, dis. 50 and 5 per cent. 
Hexagon Cap, dis. 45 per cent. 

SCYTHES. 

Per doz. net 600 900 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 

Canadian, discount 40 per cent. 

SHEARS. 
Clauss, nickel, discount 80 per cent. 
Clauss, Japan, discount 671 percent. 
Clauss, tailors, discount 40 per cent. 
Seymour's, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 

Canadian, discount 45 per cent. 
SINKS. 

Castiron, 16x24..'. 85 

18x30 100 

18 x 36 1 40 

SNAPS. 
Harness, German, discount 25 per cent. 
Lock, Andrews' 4 50 11 50 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

1, 11-lh perlb 37 

2-lb. or over " o 34 

SQUARES. 

Iron, No. 492 ••••.... per doz. 190 2 25 

" No. 493 " 2 40 2 55 

" No. 494 " 3 25 3 40 

Steel, discount 60 and 5 to 65 per cent. 

Try and Bevel, discount 50 to 521 Per cent. 

STAMPED WARE. 

Plain, discount 75 and 121 per cent, off re- 
vised hat. 
Retinned, discount 75 per cent, off revised list 

53 



STAPLES. 

Galvanized 3 00 

Plain 2 80 

Coopers', discount 45 per cent. 

Poultry netting staples, discount 40 per cent. 

STOCKS AND DIES. 

American discount 25 per cent. 

STONE. 

Washita per lb. 28 60 

Hindostan " 06 07 

" slip " u9 09 

Labrador " 13 

Axe " ... 11 

Turkey " .... TO 

Arkansas " 150 

Water-of-Ayr " .... 10 

Scythe per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind, 40 to 200 lb., per ton 25 00 

" under 40 lb., " 28 00 

" 200 lb. and over 3100 

STOVEPIPES. 

5 and 6 inch, per 100 lengths 7 00 

7 inch " ' p .... 7 50 

TACKS, BRADS, ETC. 

Carpet tacks, blued 80 and »5 

tinned 80 and 20 

" " (in kegs) 40 

Cut tacks, blued, in dozens only 80 

i weights 60 

Swedes cut tacks, blued and tinned— 

In bulk 80 and 10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk 85, 121 and 121 

" brush, blued and tinned 

bulk 70 

Swedes, gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 and 121 

Zinc tacks 35 

Leather carpet tacus 55 

Copper tacks 50 

Copper nails 521 

Trunk nails, black 65 and 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 1U 

Clout nails, blued 65 and 5 

Chair nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finishing 40 

Lining lacks, in papers 10 

" in bulk 15 

" " solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle naile, in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in doz- 
ens only 60 

Zinc glaziers' points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers . . 90 and 10 

bulk.... 40 

Clinch and duok rivets 45 

TAPE LINES. 

English, ass skin per doz. 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather 5 50 9 75 

Chester man s each 90 2 85 

steel each 80 I 00 

TINNERS' SNIPS. 

Per doz 3 00 15 00 

Clauss, discount 35 per cent. 

THERMOMETERS. 

Tin case and dairy, 75 to 75 and 10 per cent 

traps (steel.) 
Game, Newhouse, discount 25 per cent. 
Game, H. & N., P. S. & W., 65 per cent. 
Game, steel, 721, 75 per cent. 

TROWELS. 

Disston's, discount 10 per cent. 

German per doz. 4 75 6 00 

S. & D., discount 35 per cent. 

TWINES. 

Bag, Russian perlb 27 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply 24 

" " 4-ply 27 

Mattress perlb. 33 45 

Staging " 27 35 

VISES. 

Wright's 131 

Brook's 12J 

Pipe Vise, Hinge, No. 1 3 50 

K " " No. 2 5 50 

Saw Viae 450 900 

Columbia Hardware Co. 
Blacksmiths' (discount) 60 per oent. 

" o&railel (discount) 46 par oent. 



ENAMELLED WARE. 

White, Princess, Turquoise, Blue and White 

discount 50 per cent 

Diamond, Famous, Premier, discount 50 and 

lOper cent 

Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent, discount 

50, 10 and 10 per cent. 
Premier steel ware, 40 per cent. 
" Star " decorated steel and decorated whit 

25 per cent. 



Smooth Steel Wire. 
No. 0-9 gauge (2 25 



10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
Add 60c 



12o. 
20c. 
30c. 
40o. 
55o. 
70o. 



for coppering and £2 for tinning. 

Extra net per 100 lb. —Oiled wire 10c., 
Bpring wire 31.25, special hay baling wire30o., 
best steel wire 75c, bright soft drawn 150., 
charcoal (extra quality) 81-25, packed in cask! 
or cases 15^-., bagging and papering 10c. 50 
and 100-lb. bundles 10c, in 25-lb. bundles 
15c, in 5 and 10-lb. bundles 25c, in 1-lb. 
hanks, 50c, in 1-lb. hanks 75c, in i-lb. 
hanks $1. 
Fine Steel Wire, discount 271 per cent. 

List of extras: In 100-lb. lots: No. 17, 

$5— No. 18, 85.50-No. 19, *6-No. 20, 86.65- 

No. 21, $7-No. 22, $7.30-Nb. 23. $7,65-No. 

24, 88-No. 25, $9-No. 26, $9.50-r 

810-No. 28, Sll-No. 29, 

No. 31 '■ 

$17 

$2-Nos. 26-31, $4-Nos 



26, $9.50"-No. 27, 
w,$12-No. 30, $1J- 
J14-No. 32, 8,15-No. 3J, $16-No. SI 
Extras net— tinned wire. Noa. 17-25, 
Tos. 26-31, $4— Nos. 32-34, $6. Coppered, 
5c— oiling, 10c— in S5-lb. bun<ues,.loo.— in» 
and 10-lb. bundles, 25c— in 1-lb. hanks, 35o. 
— in 1-lb. hanks, 38c— in J-lb. hanks, 60c — 
packed in casks or cases, 15c— bagging or 
papering, 10c 

Brass wire, discount 60 per cent, off the list. 

Copper wire, discount 60 per cent, net oa*> 
30 days, f.o.b faotory. 

Galvanized wire, per 100 lb.— Nos. 4 and 6, 
$3.70 to $3.70-Nos. 6, 7, 8, $5.15 to S3 lj 
-No. 9, $2.55 - No. 10, 83.20 to 83 30 
-No. 11, $3.25 to 83 25 -No. 12, •*«« 
-No. 13. $2.75-No. 14. $3.75 to $3.75-N© 
15, 84.30-No. 16. $4.30. Base sizes, Not. 
6 to 9, $2,371 (o.b. Cleveland. In oarlota 
121o. less. 

Clothes Line Wire, regular 7 strand, No. 17, 
$4.65; No. 18. 82.90; No. 19, $2.60. Hollow 
« strand, No. 17, 84.30 ; No. II, $2.70 ; No. 
1», $2.35; No. 20, $2.30, f.o.b. Hamilton, 
Toronto, Montreal. 

WIRE FENCING. 

Galvanized barb 2 50 2 75 

Galvanized, plain twist 2 50 2 75 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, $2 30 fo 
small lots and $2 20 for carlots. 

COILED SPRING WIRE. 

HighCarbon, No. 9 $2 70 

No.U 8 36 

No. 12 Hi 

WIRE CLOTH. 
Painted Soreen, per 100 sq. ft., net. . 1 51 
Terms, 2 per cent, off 30 days. 

WASHING MACHINES. 

Round, re-acting per doz 56 00 

Square " " 5» 00 

Eclipse, per doz 48 00 

Dowswell " 36 00 

New Century, per doz 73 00 

Connor Improved 33 00 

Daisy 48 00 

WRINGER*. 

Leader per doz. 30 00 33 00 

Royal Canadian " .... 24 00 

Royal American .... 14 00 

Sampson .... $4 OB 

Lightning " V 00 

Terms, 4 months, or 3 per cent. 30 di#t 

WROUGHT IROIT WiHIHlg. 

Canadian make, ejeoouat 40 per oent 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



February 4, 1905 



EASY HONEY 



RETURNED 




Our bicycles are made so perfect that 
they do not give you any more trouble 

to handle than a regular line of hardware. 

And the profits are large. 



The Cushion Frame Bicycle is the largest seller. 
The Cushion Frame has lost its identity as an optional improvement to 
a bicycle. It is just what pneumatic tires are to that vehicle — a 
' necessary part of it. 

A little hustling sells the Cushion Frame. It creates new interest in wheeling- 
brings you trade— is clean business. 

WRITE FOR PARTICULARS AND CATALOGUE 

CANADA CYCLE & MOTOR CO., Limited 

TORONTO JUNCTION 



MAKERS OF THE WORLD'S BEST WHEELS 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS. 



A 

Acme Can Works inside back cover 

Acme Lathe 4 Products Co 45 

Alabastine Co 40 

American Shearer Mfg. Co 56 

American Steel and Wire Co 51 

Anglo-Canadian Supply Co 48 

Armstrong Bros 45. 

Atlas Mfg. Co 48 

B 

Barnett. G. 4 H. Co outside back cover 

Batty Stove and Hardware Co 19 

Bayliss, Jones 4 Bayliss 1 

Bennett Mfg. Co 35 

Bird, J. A. 4 W., 4 Co 21 

Birkett, Thos., 4 Son Co 1 

Bradstreet's »6 

Bullard Automatio Wrench Co 19 

Burman 4 Sons 8 

c 

Canada Cycle and MotorCo 54 

Canada Foundry Co 45 

Canada lion Furnace Co 31 

Canada Metal Co 45 

Canada Paint Co 42 

Canada Paper Co 32 

Canadian Cordage and Mfg. Co — 37 

Canadian Heating 4 Ventilating Co . . . 22 

Canadian Rubber Co 24 

Canadian Sewer Pipe Co 18 

Olauss Shear Co 45 

Concrete Bdg. Block 4 Machine Co ... . 35 

Connor, J. H., & Sons 35 

Consumers' Cordage Co 9 

Covert Mfg. Co 56 

Oullen, Orlan Clyde 6 

Outti, 0. M. 4 Co 49 

D 

Dana & Co 1 

Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co 2 

Dennis Wire and Iron Co 6 

Deseron'o Iron Co 31 

Dod», P. D„ 4 Co 41 

Dominion Belting Co 45 

Domlnion,Wire Mfg Co 4 

Dorken Bros. & Co outside front cover 

Dowswell Mfg. Co 4 



E 

Erie Specialty Co 56 

F 

Falkiner, H. F 49 

Fairbanks Co 43 

Frothingham 4 Workman 7 

G 

Gibb, Alexander 40 

(iies, Philip 19 

Gilbertson, W., 4 Co 32 

Gillett, E. W., Co., Ltd 22 

Glauber Brass Co 18 

Greening, B., Wire Co 4 

Grose, Walter 32 

Grove Chemical Co 41 

Gurney Foundry Co 49 

Gutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. Co 

outside back cover 

H 

Hamilton Cotton Co 6 

Harrington 4 Richardson Arms Co 45 

Heinisch, R., Sons Co 46 

Henderson, J. A 6 

Hobbs Mfg. Co 39 

Howland, H. 3., Sons 4 Co 15 

Hyde, F. 4 Co 31 

I 

Imperial Varnish and Color Co 38 

International Stock Food Co 

inside back cover 

Ironside, Sons & Co 56 

Iver Johnson Arms and Cycle Works. . 14 

J 

Jackson, C. F, * Co 31 

Jamiesou, R. C, 4 Co 39 

Jardine, A. B., 4 Co 18 

Jenking, A 53 

Johnston, Rd., Clapham & Morris 22 

Jones & Barclay 35 



K 



Kemp Mfg. Co . . 
Kerr Engine Co. 



Lamplough. F. W, 4 Co 35 

Leslie, A. C, & Co 31 

Lewis Bros. & Co 3 

Lewis, Rice, 4 Son inside front cover 

London Rolling Mill Co. .inside back cover 

Loughead, J. S. Co 46 

Lufkin Rule Co inside back cover 

Luxf er Prism Co 43 

Lysaght, John outside front cover 

M 

Maple Leaf Harvest Tool Co 5 

Mast, J. M., Mfg. Co 32 

Maxwell, D., 4 Sons 6 

Merrick, Anderson & Co 35 

Metallic Rooting Co 33 

Morton, B. K., 4 Co 31 

Morrison, James, Brass Mfg. Co 16 

Morrow. John. Machine Screw Co 32 

Munderloh 4Co 20 

Mc 

McArthur, Alex., & Co 5U 

McCaskill, Dougall & Co 41 

McClary Mfg. Co 24 

McDougall, R., Co ' 31 

McGregor-Banwell Fence Co 22 

N 

Newman, W., 4 Sons 6 

Nobles 4Hoare 41 

North Bros. Mfg. Co 1 

Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Co 31 



Oakey, John, 4 Sons 48 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co 53 

Oneida Community 43 

Ontario Silver Co *> 

Ontario Tack Co 12 

Ontario Wind Engine and Pump Co 45 

Owen Sound Wire Fence Co 35 



P 

Page-Hersey Iron and Tube Co 19 

Page Wire Fence Co 22 

Paterson Mfg. Co 52 

Penberthy Injector Co 21 

Phillips, Chas. D 45 

R 

Ramsay, A.. & Son Co 21, 46 

Ridgely Trimmer Co 53 

s 

Sadler 4 Haworth outside back cover 

Samuel, M. 4 L.. Benjamin, 4 Co i 

Sanderson-Harold Co 39 

Sayer Electric Co 22 

Scott, Greenwood & Co 48 

Seymour. Henry T., Shear Co 46 

Sharratt 4 Newth 46 

Shaw, A., 4 Son 46 

Sherwin-Williams Co 13 

Silica Bary tic Stone Co 45 

Smith 4 Hemenway Co 19 

Solarine Metal Polish 53 

Standard Ideal Sanitary Co 16 

Standard Paint and Varnish Works... 41 

St. George, H. E 40 

Summers, John, 4 Sons 48 

T 

Tarbox Bros 56 

Taylor-Forbes Co outside front cover 

Technical Book and Advt 56 

Thompson, B. 4 S. H. , Co. outside back oover 

Thome, R. E 16 

Turnbull & Henderson 40 

w 

Wallace Barnes Co 6 

Walter, E. F., 4 Co 4 

Welsh Tinplate 4 Metal Stamping Co.. 43 

Western Wire Nail Co 32 

White Mountain Freezer Co 37 

Wilcox Mfg. Co 21 

Wright, E. T., 4 Co 49 

Wynn. T. H 6 



5 4 



February 4, 1905 



Hardware and Metal 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Accountants and Auditors. 

HoBkics, David, Toronto. 
Jenkins k Hardy, Toronto. 

Aluminum Castings. 

Canadian Aluminum Works Montreal. 

Anvils. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Art Glass. 

St. George, H. E., London, Ont. 

Ash Sifter. 

Cutts, C. M., k Co., Toronto Junction. 

Axes. Hatchets, Scythes, etc, 
American Axe k Tool Co. Montreal. 

Babbitt Metal. 

Canada Metal Co. , Toronto. 
Fairbanks Co., Montreal and Toronto. 

Barristers, Solicitors, etc. 

Atwater, Duclos k Ohauvin, Montreal. 
Tupper, Phippen k Tupper, Winnipeg. 

Belting, Hose, etc. 

Canadian Rubber Co. of Montreal. 
Dominion Belting Co.. Hamilton. 
Gutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. Co., 

Toronto. 
Sadler & Haworth Montreal 4 Toronto. 

Bicycles and Accessories. 

Canada Cycle ami Motor Co. , Toronto 

Junction. 
Millen, John, k Son, Montreal and To- 
ronto. 

Bird Cages. 

Wright, E. T., k Co., Hamilton. 

Box Straps. 

Warmiuton, J. J)., Montreal. 

Brass Goods. 

' Jones k Barclay, Birmingham. 
Lewis, Rice, & Son., Toronto. 
Morrison, Jas. Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Nicklin, J., k Co., Birmingham, Eng. 
Penberthy Injector Co., Windsor, Ont. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Brushes and Brooms. 

Ramsay, A., & Son Co., Montreal. 
United Factories. Toronto. 

Business Brokers. 

The Locators, Winnipeg. 

Carpenters' and Builders 1 Tools 
and Supplies. 

Covert Mfg. Co., West Troy, N.Y. 
Fairbanks Co., Montreal and Toronto. 
Howland, H. S. Sons k Co., Toronto. 
Hyde, F., k Co., Montreal. 
Lamplough, F. W. k Co., Montreal. 
Lewis Bros, k Co., Montreal. 
Lewis, Rice, k Son, Toronto. 
Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, Mich. 
Merrick, Anderson &Co., Winnipeg. 
Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto. 
Newman k Sons, Birmingham. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Ontario Tack Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Phillips, Chas. D., Newport, Eng. 
Smith k Hemenway Co., New York. 
Silica Barytic Stone Co., Ingersoll, Ont. 
Stanley Rule k Level Co., New Britain. 

Conn. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 
Waggoner Ladder Co., London, Ont. 
Wilcox Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 

Carriage and Waggon Ac- 
cessories. 

Covert Mfg. Co., West Troy, N.Y. 
Lougheed. J. S., 4 Co., Sarnia, Ont. 

Cattle and Trace Chains. 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 
Oneida Community Co., Niagara Falls. 

Chains — Hea vy. 

Frothingham k Workman, Montreal. 

Churns. 

Maxwell, David, k Sons, St. Marys. 

Clippers — All Kinds. 

American Shearer Mfg. Co., Nashua, N.H. 
Burman k Sons, Birmingham, Eng. 

Clothes Reels. 

Waggoner Ladder Co., London, Ont. 

Concrete Block Machines. 

Conorete Block Machine Co., Toronto. 

Cordage. 

Canadian Cordage and Mfg. Co., Peter- 
borough, Ont. 
Consumers' Cordage Co., Montreal. 
Hamilton Cotton Co., Hamilton. 

Cork Screws. 

Erie Specialty Co., Erie, Pa. 

Customs Brokers, 

Turnbulli Henderson, Vancouver, B.C. 

Cutlery — Razors, Scissors., etc. 

Birkett, Thos, & Son Co., Ottawa. 
Butler, Geo., k Co., Sheffield, Eng. 
Olauss Shear Co., Toronto. 
Dorken Bros. k Co., Montreal. 
Heinisoh's, R., Sons Co., Newark, N.J. 
Lamplough, F. W., & Co., Montreal. 
SUbentein, A. L., New York. 
Smith k Hemenway Co., New York. 
Walter, S. F_, k Co., Montreal. 
' Wiebueoh k Hilgtr, New Y<- 



Educational. 

Belleville Business College, Belleville. 
Metropolitan Business College, Ottawa. 
St. Margaret's College, Toronto. 

Electric Fixtures. . 

Canadian Aluminum Works, Montreal. 
Falk, Stadelmann k Co., London, E.C. 
Morrison James, Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
M underbill & Co., Montreal. 
Sayer Electric Co., Montreal. 

Engravers. 

Legg Bros. . Toronto. 

Files and Rasps. 

Barnett Co., G. k H, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Disston, Henry* Sons, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Grose, Walter, Montreal. 

Financial Institutions. 

Bradstreet Co. 

British America Assurance Co .Toronto. 
Canadian Bank of Commerce, Toronto. 
Confederation Life Ass., Toronto. 
London Guarantee and Accident Ins. 

Co., Toronto. 
Metropolitan Bank, Toronto. 
Reed, Jos. B, k Sons. Toronto. 
Western Assurance Co., Toronto. 

Firearms and Ammunition. 

Hamilton Rifle Co., Plymouth, Mich. 
Harrington k Richardson Arms Co., 

Worcester, Mass. 
Iver Johnson's Arms and Cycle Works, 

Fitchburg, Mass. 
Walter, E. F., k Co., Montreal. 

Food Choppers. 

Enterprise Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lam plough, F. W., k Co., Montreal. 
Smith k Hemenway Co., New York. 

Gas Lamps and Sundries. 

Auer Light Co., Montreal. 

Falk, Stadelmann|& Co., London, E.C. 

Glaziers' Diamonds. 

Sharratt k Newth, London, Eng. 
Shaw, A., k Son, London, Eng. 

Glue. 

Grove Chemical Co., Lancashire, Eng. 

Hardware Specialties. 

Erie Specialty Co., Erie, Pa. 

Harvest Tools. 

Maple Leaf Harvest Tool Co., Tillson- 
burg, Ont. 

Hollow Ware. 

Welsh Tinplate and Metal Stamping 
Co., Llanelly, Wales. 

Horseshoe Pads. 

Canadian Rubber Co. of Montreal. 

Horseshoes and Nails. 

Canada Horse Nail Co., Montreal. 

Hot Water Boilers. 

Gies, Philip, Berlin, Ont. 
Gurney Foundry Co., Toronto. 

Ice Cream Freezers. 

Dana Mfg. Co., Cincinnati, Ohio. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
White Mountain Freezer Co., Nashua, 
N.H. 

Ice Cutting Tools. 

Erie Specialty Co., Erie, Pa. 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Injectors — Automatic. 

Penberthy Injector Co., Windsor, Ont. 
Iron Pipe. 
Page-Horsey Iron and Tube Co., Guelph. 

Iron Pumps. 

McDougall, R., Co., Gait, Ont. 

Keys. 

Millen, John k Son, Montreal. 

La dders — Ex tension. 

Waggoner LadderCo., London, Ont. 

Lamps. 

Falk, Stadelmann k Co., London. E.C. 

Lanterns. 

Kemp Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Ontario Lantern Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Wright, E. T., k Co., Hamilton 

Lawn Mowers. 

Maxwell, David, & Sons, St. Marys Ont. 
Taylor-ForbeBCo., Guelph, Ont. 

Ledgers and Office Stationery. 

Weese.G. A. k Son, Toronto. 

Lumbermen' s Supplies. 

Birkett, Tlios . b Son Co., Ottawa. 

Lye. 

Gillett, E. W., Co., Limited, Toronto. 

Machinery. 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Co., Chicago, 111. 
Canada Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Fairbanks Co , Montreal and Toronto. 
Jardine, A B, * Co., Hespeler, Ont. 
Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville, Ont. 
Morrow MaohineScrew Co., Ingersoll, Ont. 
Ontario Wind Engine and Pump Co., 

Toronto. 
Penberthy Injector Co., Windsor. 

Mantels. 
Batty Stove and Hardware Co., Toronto. 

Manufacturers' Agents. 

Oibb, Alexander, Montreal 



Metals. 

Booth Copper Co., Toronto. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co., Midland, Ont. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 

Deseronto Iron Co., Deseronto, Ont. 

Gibb, Alexander, Montreal. 

Gilbertson, W., Pontardawe, Wales. 

Hankin, F., Montreal. 

Ironside. Sen k Co., London, Eng. 

Jackson, C. F., k Co., Vancouver, B.C. 

Johnston, Rd. t Clapham k Morris, Man- 
chester, Eng. 

Kemp Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Leslie, A. C. & Co., Montreal. 

London Rolling Mills Co., London, Ont. 

Lysaght, John, Bristol, Eng. 

Morton, B. K, k Co., Sheffield, Eng. 

Nova 8cotia Steel and Coal Co., New 
Glasgow, N.S. 

Samuel, Benjamin & Co., Toronto. 

Thompson, B. k S. H. k Co., Montreal. 

Metal Lath. 

Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto. 

Metal Polish, Emery Cloth, etc. 

Anglo-Canadian Supply Co., Toronto. 
Solarine Company, Chicago. 
Oakey, John, k Sons, London, Eng. 

Metallic Window Screens. 

Cutts, C. M., k Co., Toronto Junction. 

Milk Cans and Trimmings. 

Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Kemp Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
McClary Mfg. Co.. London, Ont. 
Wright, E. T., & Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Mops. 

Tarbox Bros., Toronto. 

Office Furniture. 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co.. Toronto. 

Paints, Oils and Glass, 

AlabaBtine Co. . Paris, Ont. 
American Window Glass Co., Montreal. 
Berry Bros., Detroit and Walkerville. 
Canada Paint Co. , Montreal. 
Consolidated Plate Glass Co. , Toronto. 
Dods, P. D., k Co., Montreal. 
Dominion Linseed Oil Co., Montreal. 
Imperial Varnish and Color Co., Toronto. 
Jamieson, R. C. k Co., Montreal. 
Lucas, John, fc Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Luxfer Prism Co., Toronto. 
McArthur, Comeille k Co Montreal. 
MoCasklll, Dougall ft Co., Montreal. 
Merrick, Anderson k Co., Winnipeg. 
Nobles t Hoare London, Eng. 
Queen City Oil Co., Toronto. 
Ramsay & Son, Montreal. 
Sherwin-Williams Co., Montreal. 
Standard Paint and Varnish Works, 

Windsor, Ont. 
Thome, R. E., Montreal. 

Painters Tools and Supplies. 

United Factories, Toronto. 
Waggoner Ladder Co., London, Ont. 

Patent Solicitor. 

Cullen, Orlan Clyde, Washington, D.C. 

Perforated Sheet Metals. 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton 

Plumbers' Tools and Supplies. 

Bullard Automatic Wrench Co., Provi- 
dence, R.I. 
Fairbanks Co., "Montreal. 
Gauber Brass Co.. Cleveland, Ohio. 
Gies, Philip, Berlin, Ont. 
Jardine, A. B., k Co , Hespeler, Ont. 
Millen, John, k Sons, Montreal. 
Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Page-Hersey Iron k Tube Co.. Guelph. 
Standard Ideal Sanitary Co., Port Hop», 

Portland Cement. 

Hyde, F., k Co., Montreal. 
Thompson, B. k S. H. k Co., Montreal. 
Poultry Netting. 

Page Wire Fence Co., Walkerville, Ont. 
Greening, B., wire Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Refrigerators. 

Davidson, '''hos., Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Sanderson-Harold Co., Paris, Ont. 

Roofing Supplies. 

Bird. J. A & W.. A Co., Boston. 
Jenking. A. C. Montreal. 
McArthur, Alex.. A Co., Montreal. 
Metal Shingle k Siding Co., Preston, Ont. 
Metallic Roofing Co.. Toronto. 
Paterson Mfg. Co., Toronto k Montreal. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Saws. 

Disston. Henry, k Sons, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Bhurly k Dietrich, Gait, Ont. 

Sap Buckets and Spouts. 

Kemp Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Scales. 

Fairbanks Co., Montreal and Toronto. 
Gurney Scale Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Merrick. Anderson k Co.. Winnipeg. 
New- Warren Scale Co. , Montreal. 

Screen Doors and Windows, 

Sanderson-Harold Co., Paris, Ont. 
United Factories, Toronto. 

Screws, Nuts, Bolts. 

Acme Lathe ProductsSOo., Manchester 
Baylies, Jones k Bayliss, Wolverham- 

ton, Eng. 
Canada Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Morrow, John, Machine Screw Co., 

Ingersoll, Ont. 

Sewer Pipes. 

Canadian Sewer Pipe Co., Hamilton 
Hyde, F., k Co., Montreal. 

ShelfBoxes. 

Bennett Mfg. Co., Piokering, Ont. 



Shelf Brackets. 

Atlas Mfg. Co., New Haven, Conn 

Ship Chandlery. 

Lewis, Rice, k Son, Toronto. 

Silver-Plated Ware. 

Ontario Silver Co., Niagara Falls. 
Toronto Silver Plate Co., Toronto. 
Standard Silver Co., Toronto. 
Weeton, G., Mfg. Co., To-tonto. 

Sporting Goods. 

Fisher, A. D., Toronto. 
Lewis, Rice, k Sen, Toronto. 

Stable Fixtures. 

Greening, B. Wire Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Oneida Community Co., Niagara Falls, 

Ont. 
Metal Shingle* Siding Co., Preston, Ont 

Stamps, Stencils, etc. 

Superior Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Steel Rails. 

Algoma Steel Co— Drummond, McCall 

& Co., Agents, Montreal. 
Jackson, 0. F., k Co., Vancouver, B.C. 
Morton, B. K., k Co., Sheffield, Eng. 
Nova Scotia Steel k Coal Co., New Glas- 
gow, N.S. 

Stock Food. 

Colonial Stock Food Co., Toronto. 
International Stock Food Co., Toronto. 
Naisbitt Co., Toronto. 

Store Lighting. 

Auer Light Co., Montreal. 
Grose, Walter, Montreal. 

Stoves and Tinware, Radia- 
tors, Furnaces, etc. 

Batty Stove k Hardware Co., Toronto. 
Canadian Heating k Ventilating Co., 

Owen Sound. 
Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Gies, P., Berlin, Ont. 
Guelph Foundry Co., Guelph. 
Gurney Foundry Co. , Toronto. 
Kemp Mnfg. Co., Toronto. 
McClary Mfg. Co., London. 
Merrick, Anderson & Co., Winnipeg. 
Stewart James Mfg. Co., Woodstock. 
Telephone City Stoves, Brunt ford. 
Western Foundry Co., Wingham. 
Wright, E. T..& Co., Hamilton. 

Stove Polish. 

St. Arnaud Freres, Montreal. 

Tacks. 

Ontario Tack Co., Hamilton. 
Wynn, T. H., Hamilton. 

Traps. 

Mast, J. M., Mfg. Co., Lititz, Pa. 

Vises. 

Lamplough, F. W., k Co., Montreal. 

Wall Coating. 

Alabastine Co., Paris, Ont. 

Wall Paper. 

Staunton's Limited, Toronto. 

Wall Paper Trimmer. 

Ridgeley Trimmer Co., Springfield, 

Warehouse Trucks. 

Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 

Washing Machines, etc 

Connor, J. H., & Son, Ottawa. 
Dowswell Mfg. Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Taylor Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Wholesale Hardware. 

Birkett, Thos., k Sons Co., Ottawa. 
Canada Hardware Co., Montreal. 
Frothingham k Workman, Montreal. 
Howland, H. S., Sons k Co., Toronto. 
Kennedy Hardware Co., Toronto. 
Lewis Bros. & Co., Montreal. 
Lewis, Rice, k Son, Toronto. 
Merrick, Anderson k Co., Winnipeg. 

Window and Sidewalk Prisms. 

Hobbs Mfg. Co , London, Ont. 
Luxfer Prism Co., Toronto. 

Window Cards and Signs. 

Martell-Stewart Co., Montreal. 

Wire Springs. 

Henderson, J. A., Montreal. 
Wallace, Barnes Co. , Bristol, Conn. 

Wire, Wire Rope, Cow Ties, 
Fencing Tools, etc. 

Bayliss, Jones k Bayliss, Wolverham- 

ton, Eng. 
American Steel and Wire Co., New 

York, Montreal, Chicago. 
Dennis Wire and Iron Co., London, Ont. 
Dominion Wire Mnfg. Co., Montreal and 

Toronto. 
Greening, B , Wire Co., Hamilton. 
Ironside, Son k Co., London, Eng. 
McGregor - Banwell Fence Co., Windsor, 

Ont. 
Merrick, Anderson k Co. , Winnipeg. 
Oneida Community, Niagara Falls. 
Owen Sound Wire Fence Co. . Owen Sound 
Page Wire Fence Co., Walkerville, Ont. 
Walter. E. F. k Co., Montreal. 
Western Wire k Nail Co., London, On 

Woodenware. 

Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 
United Factories, Toronto. 
Waggoner Ladder Co., London, Ont. 

Wrapping Papers. 

Canada Paper Co., Toronto. 

Mc Arthur, Alex.,* Co., Montreal. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



February 4, 1905 




COVERT MFG. CO 

West Troy, N.Y 

Auto Screw Jack 

Harness Snaps, Chain, Rope and Web 
Goods, etc. 

FOR SALE BY JOBBERS AT MFR8. PRICE 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 

la»U-... *^<*JPL«igest Variety, 

~ Toilet, Hand, Electric PowerJ 

r ARE THE BEST. 

Highest Quality Grooming and 
8b eep- Shearing Machines. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

BEND FOR CATALOGUE TO 
American Shearer Hfg. Co., Nashua, N.H..C8A 

Wiabuaoh & Hllger, Limited, special New York 
representatives, 9-15 Murray Street. 





TO MANUFACTURERS' 
AGENTS : 

Hardware and Metal has enquiries 
from time to time from manufacturers and 
others wanting representatives in the leading 
business centres here and abroad. 

Firmi or individuals open for agencies in Canada 
or abroad may have their names and addresses 
placed on a special list kept for the information of 
enquirers in our various offices throughout Canada 
and in Great Britain without charge. 



Address 



Business Manager 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

Montreal and Toronto. 



Want Ads. 



In this paper cost 2 cents per word first 
insertion, 1 cent per word subsequent in- 
sertions. Contractions count as one word, 
but five figures (such as $1,000) may pass 
as one word. Cash remittance to cover 
cost must in all cases accompany orders, 
otherwise we cannot insert the advertise- 
ment. When replies come in our care 5 
cents additional must be included for for- 
warding same. Many large business deals 
have been brought about through adver- 
tisements of 20 or 30 words. Clerks can be 
secured, articles sold and exchanged, at 
small expenditure. 

MacLEAN PUBLISHING CO., Limited 
Montreal and Toronto. 



IRONSIDE FOR IRON 

SlirTfsVV.Vr'oVi'lK IRON, STEEL. METALS, BARS, PLATES, 
SHEETS. BOLTS and NUTS, TIN PLATES, Etc. 

Sole Licensees for PAGE'S PATENT WIRE STRETCHER, and we 

are willing to sell the right of manufacture in Canada on a Royalty basis. 

IRONSIDE'S PATENT WIRE CUTTERS, guaranteed to cut any wire 

We publish a "Canadian Metal Price List" monthly. Quotations In Dollars and Cents. 
(C.I.F.) We will send this, and our "Weekly Market Report" on receipt of address. 



IRONSIDE, SON & CO.. MR* London, Eng 




THB ^^ 

nop %m* 

THAT — — — — ^ — — — ^^^~ 

SUN are not to be compared for cleansing quality 
sets'* w ^k tne s P ec * a My woven cotton cloth in a 

TARBOX 
SELF WRINGING MOP 

It is the perfection of a Tar box Mop that makes 
it sell in preference to any other. 

YOUR JOBBER SUPPLIES THEM 



TARBOX BROS., 



Toronto. 



.ESTABLISHED 1849... 



Capital and Surplus, $1,500,000. Offices Throughout the CivUiied World, 

Exeoutive Offices : Nos. 346 and 348 Broadway, New York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers information that reflects the financial condition and 
the controlling circumstances of every seeser o mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the 
merchants, by the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information nc 
effort is spared, and no reasonable exp«nse considered too great, that the results may justify its claim as an 
authority on all matters affecting commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have 
been steadily extended, and it furnishes information concerning mercantile persons throughout the 
civilized world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, jobbing 
and manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and business corporations. 
Specific terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of its offices. Correspondence Invited. 

OFFICES IN CANADA 



HALIFAX. N 8. 
OTTAWA, ONT. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



HAMILTON, ONT. LONDON, ONT. 

QCEBKC, QUE. 8T. JOHN, N.B, 

WINNIPEG, MAN. 

TH0S. C. IRVING, Gen. Mas. Westers Canada. Toronto. 



MONTREAL. QUE. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



Walker Cork Screws 

Over seventy varieties to select from. Every one 
tested and guaranteed. Write for Cork Screw 
Catalogue with new and original illustrated poem, 
11 Sir Cork Screw's Soliloquy." 

ERIE SPECIALTY COMPANY, Erie, Pa., U.S.A. 



February 4, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



IIRON 



Bars in Flats, Rounds, Squares, 
Ovals, Half-Ovals, Half-Roundsand 
Bauds. Also Wrought Washers. 

OOOD QUALITY. PROflPT SHIPMENT. 



London Rolling Mill Co. 

Limited, 
LONDON, CANADA. 



STEEL 





MEASURING TAPES 

Steel, Metallic, Linen, Pocket, Iss Skin, 

Pit Leather, Bend Leather, Etc. 



ARE THE BEST AND MOST POPULAR TAPES IN THE WORLD. 
YOUR STOOK IS NOT OOMPLETE WITHOUT THEM. 

LUFKIN RULE CO., Saginaw, Mich, U.S.A. 

London Office and Warehouse— 48 Lime St. New York City Branch - 280 Broadway. 

For sale by ALL PROMINENT CANADIAN HARDWARE JOBBERS. 



MANY OF YOU 



Have done just what we have asked — 
written us concerning an agency for 

INTERNATIONAL 
STOCK FOOD 

And your reports are most gratifying. 
We are quoting your success to others 
who have written us but who have not 
yet closed an agreement with us to re- 
present us. 

If we could get every hardware 
dealer to do as you have done, we 
would be perfectly happy. 

INTERNATIONAL STOCK FOOD CO. 

TORONTO 




When in Need of Cans, Serve Your 
Best Interests and Consult Us. 



Acme Can Works 



make the largest as- 
sortment of any fac- 
tory in America of 
TIN CANS by the 
latest up-to-date automatic machinery. 



We are the only makers in Canada of 

KEY-OPENING MEAT CANS, POULTRY CANS. 

They are our specialties. 
Manufacturers for Canada of — ^s—^- 

Jewett's Self-Heating Can. 



We solicit inquiries for prices on 

Baking Powder, Oil, 
Syrup, Lye, Paint, 
Varnish, Condensed Milk, 
Poultry, Fruit, Vegetable 



Cans ESS? Pails 



ACME CAN 
Ontario Street East, 



WORKS 

MONTREAL, P.Q 




AND METAL 



February 4, 1905 



\ Black Diamond File Works 



6. & H. Barnett Company 

PHILADELPHIA 

Twelve - c efc ""■ Medals 




I 



Awarded 
By JURORS at 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 



99 




WALTER GROSE, sellimg agent for 

THE DOMIH 



"Redstone 
Sheet Packing 

For use in highest pressures for 
Steam, Hot or Cold Water and 
Air. Packs equally well for all 
No trouble with leaky joints 
when they are packed with 
" REDSTONE. " The most 
satisfactory packing on the 
market. Try a sample lot and 
be convinced of its merits. 

Manufactured solely by 

THE GUTTA PERCH* & RUBBER MFG. CO. 

OF TORONTO, LIMITED. 
Temporary •■•••: 

15 East Wellington Street, Toronto. 

Bnnohts-MONTRIAL, WINNIPEG. 



The Newmarket Power 
Horse Clipper 

Made by 
Burman & Sons Ltd., Birmingham, Eng. 

This machine is strongly and soundly built, 
guaranteed perfect and has been adopted by His 
Majesty's War Office. The Driving Wheel is 
28 inches, giving a speed of 2800 cuts per minute. 

The Flexible Shaft is 6 feet long, covered 
with waterproof canvas hose and long enough for 
operator to get at all parts of the horse. 

Write for Prices and Other Particulars 

B.&S.H.THOMPSDN&Co. 



LIMITID 



53 St. Sulpice Street, MONTREAL 



SADLEteHAWORTH 

( ~~~ ' ~~^ 

V..'n„,'" _ ., . _ . ' ■ '■ ■ 



EtftVMs 



Standard 





CIRCULATES EVERYWHERE IN CANADA 

.Also In Great Britain Unitad States, "West Indies, South Africa and Australia. 

HARDWARE-METAL 

A WeeKly Newspaper devoted to tKe Hardware, Metal, Machinery, 
Heating and Plumbing Trades in Canada. 



VOL. XVII. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, FEBRUARY II, 1905 



NO. 6 



V 



3 




'*. 



MANUFACTURER 

OF 



ARROW* BRAND 

REGISTERED TRADE MARK 

HARDWARE 



e ^y SPECIALITIES OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 



<P 



:«E 



U 



FOR SALE BY LEADING WHOLESALE HOUSES 



> 



FOR CORRUGATING 



"Redcliffe" Sheets are soft, flat, 
uniform weight and well galvanized. 



JOHN LY8A0HT, Limited, Makers, * A. C. LESLIE ft CO., MONTREAL 
BRISTOL, ENO. Managers Canadian Branch. 



TWO THINGS 

that will soon be seasonable. 



Spouts 




Pruners 

The Time to Sell is Very Near. 
The Time to Buy is NOW. 

Order from your Jobber. Send for our 1905 Catalogue if you have not a copy. 

Taylor -Forbes Company 




Montreal Branch : 
9 De Bresoles St. 



The Largest Manufacturers of Hardware in Canada. LIMITED. 

~ GUELPH, CANADA 



CLASSIFIED UST OF ADVERTISEMENTS ON P»6C 55 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



February 11 4 1905 



NICKEL- 
PLATED 



Bathroom Supplies 







ETURNE 

lift U 19 



Soap and 
Sponge Rack 




Soap Rack 



Soap and Sponge Rack 



RETUR 

rcR 11 




GET OUR PRICES and LISTS of 

Soap Holders Paper Holders 

Bath Seats and Shower Rings 

Towel Bars Robe Hooks 

Match Holders, etc. 



TURNE 

b ii »o 



RETURNED 



Tumbler Rack 





Tumbler and Soap Rack 



RICE LEWIS 




Tumbler Rack 



SON 



LIMITED 



TORONTO. 



February li, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



ALWAYS 
READY 
FOR USE 




Full Hollow 
Oround $2.5o Each 
Double Concave for 
extra hard beards, $3.00 
Send for free book, "HINTS TO SHAVERS." 



The 



RAZOR 




No Honing ! No Grinding ! 

No Smarting af tcs Shaving. With ordinary careful use will 

KEEP AN EDGE FOR YEARS WITHOUT HONING. 

Booklet coming — if you will ask for a copy, with trade discount. 

FOR SALE BY LEADING JOBBERS. 

FIRM OF //Oil 

A.L.SILBERSTEIN, &10M& Cutlery 

MAKERS OF /y^VV 

459-461 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. 



Don't forget to get our 
prices for,. 



SPRING GOODS 



o 



BEFORE BUYING 

Lawn Mowers, Lawn Rakes, 
Rubber Hose. Harvest Tools, 
Shovels and Spades, Paris 
Green, Green Wire Cloth, 
Churns, Wheelbarrows. , . . 



Builders' and Lumbermen's Supplies Always 
on Hand 



THOS. BIRKETT & SON CO., 

OTTAWA, ONT. 



LIMITED 



Other Tools are very 



a 



Good Tools, but 

SCREW DRIVERS 



YANKEE TOOLS 




No. 10 & II— RATCHET, right and left hand and rigid 




-- ARE 

BETTER 

The NEWEST. CLEVEREST and QUICKEST SELLING TOOL 
of the KIND. 

DRILLS 



No. 30— SPIRAL RATCHET-rightaud left hand and rigid. 
No. 31— " " (heavy pattern.) 

No. 20 - " " right hand only. 




Chuck and 8 Drill Points, 

for s. iral ratchet 
screw driver. 



Countersink, 

for spiral ratchet 
screw driver. 



No. 12 RAICHET. 

with stub blade- 





No. 43-AUTOMATIC DRI LL, for light drills only. 
No. «4— AUTOMATIC DRILL, with adjustable tension on spring. 






No 60 POCKET 
SCREW DRIVER. 



No SO— RECIPROCATING DRILL, for wood or metals. 
SOLD BY LEADING JOBBERS 
SEND FOR OUR NEW "YANKEE" TOOL BOOK 

NORTH BROS. MFG. CO 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



February 11, 1905 



SAP SPOUTS 

STEEL 



Patented 1896 




Supplied with or without hooks 



™" EUREKA '%„., 

Sap Spouts are ever popular, be 
oause they are economical and 
durable, safe and secure, no leak- 
age, easilir inserted, do not injure 
the tree, secure full flow of sap 
All packed in oardboard boxes, 
100 each 




* SAP BUCKETS 




Cuts show 
Full Size 
of Spouts. 



• » 



IMPERIAL" 

TAPERED 



SUBSTANTIALLY MADE 



Long Pattern 




Western Pattern 



SLIGHTLY FLARING. FITS CLOSELY TO THE TREE 
AND WILL NOT OVERFLOW UNTIL NEARLY FULL. 



Made from heavy tinned sheets 
especially adapted 

FOR COVERED 
SAP 
BUCKETS 



The THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., Limited, . . . MONTREAL 



COPPER 
SHEETS 



ot Rolled 



Cold Rolled 



WRITE F-OR PRICES 



M. & L. Samuel, Benjamin & Co. 



503 Temple Building 

English House— 16 Philpot Lane, LONDON, ENGLAND. 

t 



TORONTO. 



February 11, 1905 



HARDWARE ANb METAL 



The Current of Trade 

HPHERE are still some Hardware Dealers who are letting the trade in Plumbers' Tools go to 
the other fellows ; and again, a few who limit their stock in this line, and accordingly limit 
their profit. It is useless for us to tell you that the current of trade invariably flows to the 
greatest assortment. We simply wish to refer you to our thousand-page catalog, and ask if 
we may name you any prices. 




Trimo Trlmo 

Pipe Cutter. Pipe Wrench. 



Stlllson's 
Pipe Wrench. 



Lewis Bros. & Co. 

Importers and Distributers 

MONTREAL 

TORONTO OTTAWA VANCOUVER 

Communications to Montreal* 




No. 39. -Hot Blast. 

Extra heavy and very powerful. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



February 11, 1905 




Fencing 
Ply. 



4V», 6, 8, 9, 10 in. 



Write for quotations. Order now and avoid annoying delays in the spring. 
Correspondence solicited from the Jobbing and Retail Trade. 

E. F. WALTER & CO.,T.Sm K Montreal 




THE GREAT ECONOMIZER 

of Fabric, of Time, of Woman's Strength, is 

The "New Century" Washing Machine 

Built on new lines, reducing the necessity of physical effort to a minimum. It works 
as nearly automatically as possible. No dealer should be without the New Century 
if he is genuinely concerned about having the best machine obtainable. 

S END FOR CATALOGUE . 



THE DOWSWELL MANUFACTURING CO., Limited, 



HAMILTON, ONT. 



The "White Mountain 



» 




TEIE ONLY 

TRIPLE MOTION 

ICE CREAM FREEZER 



No Experiment Thoroughly Known 

Many Year* Tested 

&ALES INCREASING ALL THE TIME 

New Illustrated and Descriptive Catalogue, together with prices, upon application 

The MoOlsry Manufacturing Co. 

LONDON TORONTO MONTREAL WINNIPEG VANCOUVER AND ST. JOHN, N.B. 



February 11, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Have You Seen THem ? 

For Beauty, FinisH and Quality, tKe 
"Maple Leaf** Harvest Tools are unexcelled. 




No. 122. Manure ForK. 





No. 2 4-3. (.-Beet ForK. 




No. 10&. Hay ForK. 




TO THE HARDWARE TRADE 



No. 43. Patent V Blade Hoe. 



When placing your order for harvest tools with your jobber it will be to your advantage 
to specify for the "Maple Leaf" Harvest Tools. Should your jobber be unable to supply 
them, send your order to us and it will receive prompt and careful attention. 

The Maple Leaf Harvest Tool Co., Limited, Tillsonburg, Ont. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



February 11, 1905 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their ad- 
vertisement in Hardware and Metal. 



ONTARIO SILVER GO, 

Limited, 



NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA. 

u , . , FLATWARE. CUTLERY a 

Manufacturers of ELECTRO PLATE. 

Ask for our Catalogue and Quotations. 



Oon't Forget the Name. . . 

NEWMANS INVINCIBLE 

FLOOR SPRINGS 

Strong, Quick, Reliable, Effective. 

Will close a door against any pressure of wind. 
Far ahead of ordinary door springs, pneumatic or 
otherwise. Ask your wholesaler. 

W. NEWMAN & SONS. Birmingham. 



Qrlan Clyde Cullen.G.E.L.L.M. 

Counsellor at Law U.S. Supreme Court. 
Registered Attorney U.S. Patent Office, 

U.S. and Foreign Patents, Caveats, Copy- 
rights and Trade Marks. Military and 
Naval Inventions a specialty. Address, 

Box 264, Station (i, Washington, D.C. 

CUN SHOP and MODEL SHOP 

Warren White Sulphur Springs, 

Totten P.O., Virginia. 



$Gl ^C ^ ti2 (C ^ ^ ^ & 
*P *P *P »P »P *P 4) »P 4* 

CONTRACTS 



mean dollars for the pockets of 
contractors. The weekly re- 
ports in the 

CANADIAN 

CONTRACT 

RECORD 

tell where contracts may be had. 

|2 per vear buys them. Address 

The Contract Record 

Toronto, Montreal, and Winnipeg. 



************************ 

DO YOU KNOW US? 

Get Acquainted. 

We cut BRASS AND 
COPPER SHEETS 

to any size. 

Promptly, too. 

The Booth Copper Co., 



LIMITED, 



» 



^ 119-123 Queen St. East, ^ 

TORONTO. * 




DAVID MAXWELL & SONS 

ST. MARYS, ONT., CANADA. 



"Maxwell Favorite Churn." 



Steel Frame Support. 



PATENTED 
FEATURES: 

Improved Steel 
Stand, Roller 

Bearings, and Foot and Hand Lever Drive, and Detachable Driving 
Link. Improved for season of 1904. Steel or Wood Frame as desired. 



Lawn Mowers. 



High and Low Wheels, from 12 in. to 
20 in. widths. Cold Rolled Steel 
Shafting, Crucible Steel Knives and 
Cutting Plate. 

If your Wholesale House does not offer you these articles 

SEND DIRECT TO US. 





MAXWELL MOWER 



8-in. Low Wheel. 



Wheelbarrows, tt 

^^^^^^^_^^^^____ Sizes. 



I1VGS 





Send Samples or Specifications 
for Prices 





The WALLACE BARNES CO., - BRISTOL, Conn. 



TACKS 


Factory equipped with the Make Inquiries 
latest Improved machinery. Get our prices 


AGENTS WANTED 


THOS. H. WYNN, - - HAMILTON 



Do NOT accept "Just as good." 
INSIST upon getting 



SWORD and 



ROM 



when buying galvanized sheets. 
Lowest L^rice for F"ir»e Quality. 

Agent for 

J. A. HENDERSON, T. W. & J. WALKER, 

Board of Trade Bid?., MONTREAL, WOLVERHAMPTON 



6 



February 11, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Improved 

Steel 
Wire 
Trace 
Chain* 



Every chain guaranteed. 
Gives universal satisfaction. 



The 



B. Greening Wire Co. 

Limited 

Hamilton, Out., Montreal, Que. 



Dillon-Hinge-Stay 

Why handle Barb and Coiled Wire at no profit when you 
can have a fair margin on our 

DILLON FENCING. 




Got up specially for the hardware trade. 
Easily put up and at the most moderate prices. 

Write for Prices in Car or Small Lots. 



OWEN SOUND WIRE FENCE CO., LIMITED, 



Owen Sound, Ont. 



CAVERHILL, LEARMONT & CO., 



Eastern and Western Agents, 



Montreal and Winnipeg. 



DOMINION WIRE MANUFACTURING CO. 



MONTREAL and TORONTO 



Limited 



WE 
MANUFACTURE ALL KINDS OF WIRE 



BARB 
WIRE 



WIRE NAILS 




GALV'D 
WIRE 



WOOD SCREWS 



BRIGHT WIRE GOODS, JACK CHAIN, COAT and HAT HOOKS, COTTER PINS, 

STAPLES 

STEEL WIRE BARREL HOOPS 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



February 11. 1905 



<f. 



<^y^ 







NOS. 338 AND 818, FOUR SIZES 




Cutlery is the most profitable line of goods you can carry. 
Keep note of the new goods. 

The illustration shows a new, all-steel Barber's Shear, very light and 
neat, best temper, full nickel plated, lower blade serrated or plain. 

Sizes ; 7, 1V 2 < 8, %V % inches* 

Barbers will buy them eagerly. 

Remember we have the largest and best selected stock of 
Cutlery in Canada. 

Frothingham & Workman, Limited 

Wholesale Hardware and Iron Merchants, 

Montreal, Canada. 

For 96 years sellers of hardware. 



BOSS EXTERNAL GEAR 




The World's Most 
Famous 

WASHERS 



1904 AUTOMATIC 



Made by the largest Washing 
Machine Factory in the world. 

New Boss Rotary-shieided Gears Capacity, boo machines per day. 

They Are Not Cheap Goods 

as goods of such quality would not have permitted of 
thriving success and present standing of our Washers, and 
daily capacity. 

Ask your nearest Hardware Jobber for samples, and 
Insist upon his furnishing Washers bearing our stamp. 



They are the most profitable to handle, because they se 
readily. Write to us for catalogue. Address 

BOSS WASHING MACHINE CO 

CINCINNATI, OHIO, U.S.A. 




February 11, 1905 HARDWARE AND METAL 












: 



i 



Binder Twine 

BLUE RIBBON, 650 ft to the lb. 
REDCAP, - 600 ft. to the lb. 
TIGER, - - 550 ft. to the lb. 
STANDARD, 500 ft. to the lb. 

GOLDEN CROWN, 500 ft. to the lb. 



Still the Favorites of both FARMERS and DEALERS. 



If SHEAF BRAND is preferred to any of the above, we are prepared to supply 
it, as we are the Proprietors of this Trade Mark. 

Nothing but Select Fibre Used. 
\ Skilled Canadian Labor. 

Our Twine is not only evenly spun, but is WELL BALLED. 
This is very important, prevents tangling in Twine Box 

Write for prices. 



CONSUMERS CORDAGE CO., Limited 



MONTREAL. 



Western Agent : W. A. C. HAMILTON, Mills— MONTREAL and HALIFAX. 

II Front St. E., Toronto, Ont. 



9 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



February 11 : 1905 



Its Kem|> Cold Blast Lantern 



IS SUPERIOR EOR THE 



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fOLLOWING REASONS: 









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Manufactured by KEMP MANUFACTURING CO., TORONTO, Canad; 



xy 11, 1905 



Hardware and Metal. 



* # TIMELY TRADE TOPICS ^ * 



^•V*V"** v "* , **'l/ w 



AN up-to-date hardware store is 
that of the Smythe Hardware 
Company, near the corner of 
College street and Spadina 
ave., Toronto. This store was 
written up and illustrated in a recent 
number of Hardware and Metal. The 
Smythe brothers, who compose the firm, 
are Canadians who, after spending sev- 
eral years in the United States, have re- 
turned to their native city to put into 
practice the progressive ideas learned in 
other spheres. 

A representative of Hardware and 
Metal called upon Messrs. Smyfhe a few 
days ago and questioned them as to the 
wisdom of offering goods at such low 
prices as are displayed in the windows 
and in front of the store. "This is the 
dull season," said Mr. Smythe, "and 
if we waited for business to come to 
us we would show a balance on the wrong- 
side of our books at the end of the 
month. We prefer to get out and make 
business rather than to sit waiting for 
it to come to us. Our experience is that 
by ottering special lines at reduced 
prices, by buying well and by paying 
cash for what we buy, we can turn the 
dull months into money-making seasons. 
For example, we bought 251) dozen of 
brooms the other day from a firm who 
were going out of that line and we are 
able to offer them at px-ices that bring 
us a profit, cause them to selj quickly,' 
and bring our store before many new 
customers. Another instance is that 
during the holiday season we sold a line 
of sleds at 90c, while our competitors 
were selling similar sleds at 75c. When 
the dull season came on we had only a 
few left and rather than carry them over 
we cleared them out at 60c, making a 
good profit on the entire line. Do we 
give credit? No, we have been in busi- 
ness four months and we haven't $4 on 
our books. When we want to lend 
money we will go into the banking busi- 
ness. When a retailer sells his goods 
< n credit he lends his money without 
interest and he does so without a particle 
of security. Bankers refuse to lend 
money without interest and good security 
and we see no reason why we, as re- 
tailers, should not do the same. And 
we find that when we exnlain this to 
customers asking for credit that we earn 



imt^^m 



« ^ » O h«/||W » "l^ 



wt^m 



their respect and retain their business on 

a cash basis." 

* * * 

Travelers report that stock taking is 
about over, the majority of merchants 
throughout Canada taking stock during 
January. Until this is over little can 
be done in the way of selling goods al- 
though a considerable number of orders 
are being booked now for Fall delivery. 
That all travelers do not have the same 
experience with the same goods is well 
illustrated by the sale of such a novelty 
as the Universal Bread Machine. One 
man, who covers the territory east of To- 
ronto for a local wholesale house, has 
ment with a considerable demand for 
this article, its merit being recognized 
and quite a sale being recorded for it. 
On the other hand, travelers in other 
districts report the article to be almost 
unsaleable owing to its high price, re- 
tailing at about $2.25. The principle of 
the machine is good and it will probably 
continue to work its way into public 

favor. 

* * , 

Mr. W. A. Drummond. of the Whitten- 
Drummond Co., 173 King street east, 
Toronto, leaves this week on a fort- 
night's trip to New York, 'Philadelphia. 
Boston and other eastern cities, his ob- 
ject being to close a deal towards intro- 
ducing a new feature in connection with 
his business. Mr. Drummond states 
that trade has been exceptionally good 
during the dull season following the 
holidays, partly owing to the good sleigh- 
ing which enables the farmers to visit 
the city, and partly to his mail order 
trade in dairy supplies, etc. He in- 
tends spending about $1,500 during the 
coming Summer in improvements to the 
store, both interior and exterior, the 
store front to be of a practical and orig- 
inal design, built particularly for the 
display of hardware. Special attention 
will be given to the installing of the 
glass for lighting purposes. Mr. Drum- 
mond 's experience in departmental 
stores and in the construction of store 
fronts is standing him in good stead in 
the management of the retail business 

he is now conducting. 

* * * 

The fact that a meeting of creditors 
of the Shepherd Hardware Co. will be 
held on February 15 will be learned with 
11 



regret by many, this firm having won a 
good reputation for itself in its former 
stand on Dundas street, prior to their 
removal to the store on Spadina avenue 
near College street. It is probable that 
arrangements will be made to continue 
the business at the present stand. 

* * 

An attractive window was shown this 
week by the Russill Hardware Co., King 
street east, Toronto, the main line shown 
being that of gold enamel. The central 
arrangement was a series of circular 
shelves on which was displayed tins of 
bronze, bottles of banana oil and liquid, 
tins of aluminum paint and other classes 
of fine oils and paints, the whole being 
surmounted by a small statue done in 
gold enamel. Above the shelves and 
filling- the top of the window were cards 
or metallics and flitters, showing the 
various colors carried, and picture 
frames done in Kussill's gold leaf sub- 
stitute and aluminum paint. On the floor 
of the window additional samples of 
these lines are shown as well as jugs 
done in copper bronze and papers of 
metallics and bronzes, the whole mak- 
ing a catchy display of fine paints and 
colors . 

* 

Now is the time to prepare for the 
rush of Spring trade. Stocktaking has 
shown the retailer that he has many 
lines of goods which are not selling as 
they should. Perhaps they have not been 
pushed, or, having been on a back shelf, 
have not been seen by customers. Make 
a window display of them, draw atten- 
tion to their good qualities, name a spe- 
cial mice on them and turn them into 
cash. Floor and shelf space is valuable 
— too valuable to be used by dead stock. 
In addition to making an effort to clean 
out unsalable stock some energy might 
be directed to brighten up the store for 
the coming bright Summer weather. 
Give the store and warehouse a Spring 
tonic. Brush down any cobwebs which 
may have gathered in out of the way 
corners ; clean out the unnecessary boxes, 
old calendars, and rubbish- of all kinds j 
clean the warehouse windows, and most 
important of all, spend a few hours and 
some money on giving the counters, 
shelves and store fixtures a coat of 
varnish and a general brush up. Give 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



February 11, 1905 



the store a prosperous look and make 
il a bright and cheery place of business 

and your customers will appreciate it. 

* * 
* 

While the writer does not advocate 
•'bargain sales" as a regular occur- 
rence, enough lias probably been said to 
prove their worth at the dull seasons of 
the year. The first thing to do is to get 
the goods out in sight, brush off the 
dust, arrange the small stuff as neatly 
as possible on tables or counters and 
with a liberal supply of hand printed 
cards show the prices in plain figures. 
It isn't necessary to sell these goods 
way below cost, but it is better to get 
them off your hands at once with a 
small margin than to keep them on the 
shelves. Select a few of the most at- 
tractive bargains and put them in your 
windows; spend a little time and brain 
work on this window arrangement, just 
as the angler carefully fixes the bait to 
his hook. Your window is vour bait— 
or part of it — and if it is full of unat- 
tractive goods it will be no more of a 
success as bait than a mangled minnow 
on the fish hook of the sportsman. Don't 
fail to use plainly printed price cards 
in the window — the price is, in this case, 
the thing to draw attejition. And don't 
fail to advertise your "After Inven- 
tory" sale in your local paper and by 
sending some well printed circulars to 
the farmers in your district as well as 
to your town customers. Watch the 
printer and see that good, plain type is 
used and the special lines are properly 
displayed. Make a special emphasis of 
a few well-known lines which are offered 
at a cut price and state that stocktaking 
has disclosed a number of broken lots 
mi 'iim' hands which must be cleai'ed out 
to make way for new goods. Announce 
that more bargains will be found at the 
store, and, once having gotten a new 
customer there, make a special effort to 
please him and induce him to come back 
again. 



Trade Conditions in 
Birmingham 

By H. B. 



A NEW CONCERN. 
In the announcement of the formation 
in Montreal of a new company of im- 
porters and manufacturers' selling 
agents, the name of the firm was given 
as the St. Armand Co. This was plain- 
ly a typographical error, and should 
have appeared as the St. Arnaud Co., 
Mr. A. M. St. Arnaud, the head of the 
linn being well-known to the whole 
trade. 



Manning & Vincent, agricultural im- 
plement agents, Stonewall, dissolved 
partnership. 



Birmingham, Jan. 26, 1905. 

WHILE, undoubtedly, there is im- 
provement in the heavier trades 
of the Birmingham district, 
manufacturers of lighter articles are 
still experiencing the effects of the gen- 
eral depression; and the tone of hopeful- 
ness which ushered in the New Year re- 
mains tempered by a spirit of caution, 
that renders it very difficult to obtain 
orders except on hand-to-mouth lines. 
The engineering trades and manufactur- 
ers of electric plant, railway and other 
heavy requirements for export, and firms 
who lay themselves out for government 
contracts, appear to be best off, and al- 
though the general feeling is better, busi- 
ness in the new year is by no means in- 
creasing bv leaps and bounds. 

Military guns are in demand, and the 
local factories, including the Birmingham 
Small Arms Company, are fairly well 
employed. But I hear that owing to at- 
tempts to make the cutting machinery 
do that which has eventually to be dealt 
with by hand filing, considerable quanti- 
ties of finished military rifles are being 
returned on the hands of one large firm, 
as not being in all particulars of the re- 
quired gauge. The defects are in details 
that do not affect the general efficiency 
of the weapon, so there will presently 
be fine opportunities for buyers of sport- 
ing rifles to obtain a finely-made, servic- 

able gun at a low price. 

* * 
* 

Speaking at a social gathering of the 
employes of Westley Richards & Co., one 
of our foremost makers of high-class 
sporting guns, Mr. Leslie B. Taylor, the 
managing director, said it was general 
knowledge that the home gun trade had 
been suffering from many hostile influ- 
ences during the past few years. In the 
first place there were restrictions in In- 
dia and Africa, brutal tariffs in Amer- 
ica, and unfair competition from the 
lower cost of production by Belgium and 
other countries. But the trade was also 
suffering from the meddlesome inter- 
ference of would-be legislators in this 
country. The Pistols Act was 'a case 
in point; it had prevented the legitimate 
sale of revolvers without affecting the 
purpose the author of the Act had in 
view. The Birmingham proof house re- 
turns showed that there were some 8,- 
000 odd foreign guns proved in this 
country. That was, there were guns im- 
ported here from Belgium, France, Ger- 
many and the United States of Amer- 
ica. What ihev wanted in England was 
a preferential tariff in order to protect 

12 



them in these markets of the world 
which were their best, namely, Canada, 

Australia and Africa. 

* * 
* 

Gradually gun and pistol makers arc 
beginning to realize the increasing op- 
portunities which Canada offers to Birm- 
ingham makers of better-class firearms. 
The writer has been in touch with two 
Birmingham firms within the last few 
days which may be taken as samples of 
how enterprise in exploiting the Cana- 
dian market meets with adequate suc- 
cess. In the one case, that of a firm of 
world-wide reputation, Canada has re- 
cently become a market of first conse- 
quence, while in the second instance, 
what in contradistinction may be term- 
ed a private firm, one of the partners 
admitted that but for their Canadian 
trade, business at the present time 
would be in a very bad state indeed. In 
the one case the manager of the com- 
pany has visited the Dominion and is 
taking energetic steps by appointing 
representatives and advertising to cover 
the country; and in the other, the suc- 
cess of the firm's representative has in- 
duced one of the principals to arrange to 
go out this Summer to thoroughly view 
the land. In this instance, also, judici- 
ous advertising will be employed to back 
up the firm's representatives. 

* * 
* 

Mr. Joseph Chamberlain represents the 
Birmingham parliamentary division, in 
which what is known as the "Jewelers' 
Quarter" is situate. He attends the 
annual dinner of the Jewelers' Associa- 
tion and generally makes a pronounce- 
ment which is of national importance. 
This year the death of a daughter made 
it impossible for him to attend the an- 
nual function, a misfortune that was 
generally deplored. The gathering was, 
nevertheless, well attended. In the 
course of *the meeting Mr. Charles E. 
Mathews, one of our most prominent 
legal and literary luminaries, in refer- 
ring to the opposition which Mr. Cham- 
berlain's fiscal policy had encountered, re- 
minded his hearers of the memorable 
words of the great John Bright, uttered 
in his own hearing: "that the man who 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 



WIRE 



Prompt Shipment 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited. 
HAMILTON, ONT. 



February 11, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



is faithful to the dictates of his own 
hones I convictions can never be unfaith- 
ful either to his constituents or to his 
country." And in applying these words 
1o Mr. Chamberlain's recent actions, he 
said, that their illustrious representative 
had given hostages to fortune in the 
furtherance of his main object. Mr. 
Chamberlain had resigned the splendid 
position of Secretary of State for the 
Colonies, a position which he made al- 
most unrivalled by his insight and force 
of character; and in addition to that, he 
had given up a stipend of £5,000 a year. 
Did they not think, he asked, that a 
man who was capable of such an act of 
self-sacrifice ought to be spared the 
amazing vituperation of which he had 
constantlv been the victim in recent 

years? 

* * 

* 

Personally I have had opportunities of 
watching Mr. Chamberlain's career, from 
the time when he dominated the Birm- 
ingham City Council until the present 
moment, when he has abandoned a high 
position in the Cabinet and a lucrative 
office of the State, and, however one 
may have differed from his opinions and 
actions at certain stages of his career, 
this fact has always been impressed up- 
on one's mind as evidence of the great- 
ness and indomitable character of the 
man, — never, to my knowledge, has he 
failed to attain the political object he 
once set his mind to attain. And, should 
his life be spared, sooner or later, it 
may be taken for granted that the far- 
seeing imperial policy Mr. Chamberlain 
has formulated in regard to the fiscal 
reform of Great Britain and her colonial 
possessions, will become an accomplished 
fact, and that to the smallest detail ; 
for he is still, as he always has been— 

"The Man that Does." 

* * 
* 

The German miners' strike is affecting 
the home iron trade in two directions. 
That and the Russian crisis have largely 
restricted business with the north of 
Europe, but local manufacturers are ex- 
periencing the effects of a slackening in 
German competition. Still a continued 
improvement in the iron trade of the 
district is reported on to-day's market, 
and as upon this industry depends more 
or less the conditions of the hardware 
trades of the Midlands, it may be fairly 
assumed that when adjusted, and Russia 
has emerged from her present state of 
anxiety, the noticeable improvement re- 
corded, will expand into a general re- 
vival of commercial prosperity. 



B. A. Prytes Company, Limited, To- 
ronto, share capital $750,000; purpose to 
carry on mining in all its branches. The 
directors are : A. R. Moore, J. W. 
Cheeseworth, C. Smith, W. Stonge and 
J. (i. Mowat, afl of Toronto. 



flOORHNISlS 
Flo or lac J 



A Money Making Corner 

of any paint stock is the corner devoted to 

Sherwin-Williams 

Modern Method Floor Finishes 

A complete line of Floor Finishes for any floor — 
any style. 

Every article in the line is backed by the 
Sherwin-Williams reputation for best quality and by 
the Sherwin-Williams push. 

Be prepared to meet the extra demand for these 
specialties during the spring house cleaning season. 
Modern Method Floor Finishes include : 

FOR PAINTED FINISH 

Inside Floors— THE S-W. INSIDE FLOOR PAINT. 
Porch Floors— THE S-W. PORCH FLOOR PAINT. 

FOR VARNISHED FINISH 

Natural — MARNOT. A durable floor varnish. 
Stained — FLOORLAC. Stain and varnish combined. 

FOR WAXED FINISH 

The S-W. Floor Wax. 

FOR UNSIGHTLY CRACKS IN OLD FLOORS 

The S-W. Crack and Seam Filler. 
Write for prices today. 

%The Sherwin-Williams Co. 

Canadian Headquarters, 639 Centre, St., Montreal. 
Warehouses — 86 York Street, Toronto. 

147 Bannatyne St. East, Winnipeg. 





INQUIRIES FOR CANADIAN TRADE 

The names and addresses of the firms making the 
following inquiries may be had by application to the 
Department of Trade and Commerce, Ottawa, 
or to the Editor of this paper. Parties answering in- 
quiries will be eareful .to mention the office under 
which said inquiry appears and the number. 

From the commercial agent at Birm- 
ingham : 

110. A firm in the Midlands wishes to 
get in touch with Canadian fhins open 
to ship mica and asbestos. 

117. A commission agent with influ- 
ential connections wishes to represent 
Canadian firms in a position to supply 
nickel, antimony, manganese, zinc, as- 
bestos and mica. 

119. A large firm of carriage lamp 
manufacturers wish to find a market in 
Canada. W T ould appoint an agent. 

120. A well known firm manufactur- 
ing pumps is desirous of appointing an 
agent in Canada. 

121. A firm in Birmingham wishes to 
find a market in Canada for their guns, 
medium and cheap price. 

13 



122. A firm in the Midlands wishes 
to place in Canada their box, ivory, 
steel and brass rules. 

123. A Birmingham firm wfcshes to 
appoint an agent in Canada for the sale 
of all kinds of brushes. 

124. A firm making a specialty of 
electrical instruments wishes to find a 
market in Canada. 

126. A large firm manufacturing brass 
tubes and brass cased tubes wish to ap- 
point an agent in Canada. 

127. Several firms are open to pur- 
chase all kinds of wooden handles, par- 
ticularly hammer and shovel handles. 

128. A firm in the Midlands wishes to 
appoint an agent in Canada for the sale 
of their aluminum culinary utensils 
table-Avare, water bottles, fancy goods, 
cigar and cigarette boxes. 

129. A large firm in Birmingham 
wishes to place their cycles on the Can- 
adian market. 

130. A firm manufacturing stampings 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



February 11, 1905 



and tnc\}£ ".islios to appoint an agent in 
C nada. 

From the High Commissioner for Can- 
ada: 

129. A firm of engineers and mer- 
chants in Glasgow would be pleased to 
ret as buying agents for contractors or 
fiims in Canada, and also wish to repre- 
sent Canadian manufacturers of ma- 
ehinery tools and engineering appliances 
seeking an export outlet. 

From the commercial aaent at Leeds: 

83. A large manufacturing firm of 
electrical accessories, switches and 
switch-boards in iron or brass fittings for 
ships, houses and warehouses desire to 
be put in direct communication with 
principal buyers in large Canadian towns 
and cities. 

84. A large manufacturing firm of 
electrical lighting and bell accessories 
dealing in very large quantities of wood 
casings therefor, desire 'to be put in 
direct communication with Canadian 
lumber mills ready to export the same. 

Agencies Wanted. 
J. L. Nichols, of the Anglo-Canadian 
Supply Co., 29 Church street, Toronto, 
would be glad to hear from manufac- 
turers of light lines suitable for the 
hardware or grocery trade. Mr. Nichols 
reports an excellent demand for York 
Metal Polish, his own specialty. He 
finds, however, that he can handle a few 
other lines advantageously. His sales- 
men call on the hardware, grocery, har- 
ness and jewelry dealers. 



CATALOGUES AND BOOKLETS. 

For the conyenience of its readers Hardware and 
Metal has opened its columns for the reriew of catalogues 
booklets or other such publications issued by manufacturers 
or wholesale dealers selling to the hardware, plumbing, 
machinery or metal trades. Retailers desiring such publica- 
tions may also have inserted a note to that effect. It is re- 
quested that when any of the trade write for any booklet 
mentioned in these columns that they credit Hardware 
and Metal as the source of their information. 

Motor Car Information. 

JOHN BIRCH & COMPANY, of Lon- 
don, Eng., have issued a catalogue 
dealing with the price list of cars, 
beside showing by cuts the different pat- 
terns of cars, and parts of cars. The 
first thirty-three pages are taken up 
with the different styles and prices of 
cars. The next forty-four pages are 
composed of illustrations of different 
patterns of cars, while the remaining 
four pages comprise the index. The 
catalogue is neatly bound in an artistic, 
heavy paper cover, and should find a 
place on the shelves of every Canadian 
dealer of motor cars. Readers mention- 
ing Hardware and Metal, upon request 
for this catalogue, shall receive it free 
of cost. 

"MAXimum Light Glass," is the title 
of an exceedingly interesting and well- 




HAS A "GRIP" 
ON THE TRADE. 

IVER 
JOHNSON 

Revolver Grip. 

Progressive dealers instantly recognized its value — the demand was spontaneous 
As the result of extensive advertising there is already a large demand for this 
revolver. 

Have you placed your order ? 

"DON'T CARRY IT" — "WILL SEND AND GET IT"- 



Hammer 

the 

Hammer 



Accidentals 

Discharge 

Impossible! 



New York Office: 
No. 99 Chambers St. 



INTEND TO HAVE IT" 



are sisjns that $ point to the door of your competi- 
tor, who. being alert and keen, realizes that "New Things" 
impart life and activitv to his business and who instantly 
recognizes the practicability and selling virtues of the 

IVER JOHNSON Revolver Grip 

Send for new catalogue just issued — a work of art — 
mailed free upon application. 

IVER JOHNSONS ARMS & CYCLE WORKS, 

FITCHBURO, MASS.. U.S.A. 



illustrated booklet issued by the Hobbs 
Manufacturing Company, Limited, of 
London, agents for Canada for E. J. 
Dobbins, owner of the patents for this 
modern illuminating glass. "The mod- 
ern building must have light," says the 
pamphlet, and it proceeds to show a 
series of buildings which have been mod- 
ernized by the use of MAXimum light 
glass, which is said to be the only day- 
light-increasing window glass combining 
lenses and prisms. The cuts showing 
rooms in basements under ordinary con- 
ditions, artificial light being absolutely 
necessary, and after the installation of 
MAXimum glass are splendid examples 
of the "before and after taking" idea. 
The glass is smooth on one side and 
saw-toothed on the other, this system 
making it possible to utilize every par- 
ticle of daylight and project it to every 
part of long rooms, a uniform white 
light being thrown into every corner. 
Light passing down shafts between 
buildings is gathered and used to light 
rooms satisfactorily, one example of this 
being noted where light from a shaft 105 
feet deep is gathered and diffused through 
a room 40 feet long. The light can be 
used to advantage by retailers, manufac- 
turers and by builders and all who in- 
tend erecting new buildings or re-con- 
structing their present premises should 

14 



investigate this new light. When writ- 
ing for information, mention Hardware 
and Metal. 

A Magnificent Production. 

Catalogue E, just issued by The fames 
Robertson Co., Limited, Montreal, To- 
ronto, Winnipeg and St. John, is a stu- 
pendous piece of work. It contains 
nearly 400 pages of heavy coated paper, 
making a very bulky and imposing vol- 
ume. It is bound in heavy green cloth 
boards and is a sturdy piece of book- 
making. The contents cover the range 
of plumbing goods and high-grade mod- 
ern sanitary appliances manufactured 
by the firm. These are all beautifully 
illustrated with fine engravings. A 
comprehensive index at the back of the 
book gives the clue to the contents, be- 
ginning at the front of the book, there 
a're shown baths, bath receptors, bath 
decorations, shower baths, lavatories, 
drinking fountains, sanitary earthen- 
ware, closets, sinks, range closets, urin- 
als, boilers, bath fittings, hath room 
trimmings and all manner of fittings. 
Prices and descriptions accompany each 
plate, so that the prospective purchaser 
can have no difficulty in locating just 
what he requires. The book is a mag- 
nificent exhibit of everything that is re- 
quired by the plumber. 



February 11. 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO. 



Wholesale 
only 



HARDWARE MERCHANTS 
138-140 WEST FRONT STREET, TORONTO 



LIMITED 



Only 
Wholesale 



horse: cli 



RS and MACHINES. 




THE " 20th CENTURY 
HORSE CLIPPERS. 





Chicago Horse Clipping Machine. 




It is suspended from the ceiling 

by a rope permitting all parts of 

the horse to be reached with. 

facility. 

Turns easy. 

Cuts as fast as any machine 

made. 

Requires no experience to work 

it. 




1 


Vw Sk* "Ws 



" STEWART'S" PATENT 

CHICAGO KNIFE 

AND HANDLE. 



It is made with all cut gearing 
from solid metal. 
The teeth are milled, not cast, and 
engage with hardened steel pin- 
ion. 

It has positive power, no belts to 
slip, no lost motion, every turn of 
the wheel is sure to b:ing 28 
vibrations of the knife blade. 



BOKP.R'S 

Horse Clippers 

DANDY 
KEEN CUT 
PERFECTION 
SOVEREIGN BALL BEARING 




Burman & Sons, 

ENGLAND. 

THE NEWMARKET 
HORSE CLIPPER. 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., 



LIMITED, 



Toronto. 



Our prices are right. 



GRAHAM NAILS ARE THE BEST 

Feotory: Dufferin Street, Toronto, Ont 

15 



We Ship Promptly 




HEATINQ AND PLUMBING 



February 11, 1905 

\ 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



MADE IN CANADA." 



Write us at once if you desire to secure A CATALOGUE 
of the latest designs of — — ^^^^^ 



Porcelain Enameled Bath Tubs, Lavatories, 
Sinks, Urinals, Latrines, etc. 

Now in the hands of the printer ready for distribution in two weeks. 

THE ONLY MANUFACTURERS OF ENAMELLED WARE IN CANADA 



Head Office and Factory : 

Port Hope, Out. 



Sales Office: 

50 Colborne St., Toronto. 



Get acquainted at 
once with the Morrison 
Line of Bathroom Fixtures 

They include a score of quick selling 
specialties which offer a good profit to Hard- 
waremen— Soap Dishes, Sponge Holders, 
Towel Racks, Portable Showers, etc. We 
are also headquarters for The Nethery 
Patent Closet Valve which does away with 
the closet tank. 

Superior Lighting Fixtures combining 
greatest beauty and highest efficiency. 

Write for information and get ac- 
quainted with our liberal propositions. 

The JAMES MORRISON 
BRASS MFG. CO., 

LIMITED 

Toronto, 
Ont. 





Steam 
Specialties 

The Morrison line of Steam 
Fixtures and Specialties is the 
most complete in the Dominion. 
It includes "J.M.T." Injectors, 
Hancock Inspirators, Lubricators, 
Oil Cups, Steam and Vacuum 
Gauges, Iron and Brass Pipe Fit- 
tings — everything in steam goods. 

Our Brass work is made from 
pure ingot Copper and best im- 
ported Tin. We guarantee it to 
be satisfactory 



The James Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Limited 

Toronto, Ont. 




16 



February 11, 1905 



Hardware and Metal. 




THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF 
MASTER PLUMBERS AND STEAM 
AND HOT- WATER FITTERS OF 
CANADA. 

OFFICERS. 
President— Robt. Ross, Toronto. 
Vice-President — A. J Hammond, Winnipeg. 
Secretary — J. A. Gordon, Montreal. 
Treasurer — F. G. Johnson, Ottawa. 

PROVINCIAL VICE-PRESIDENTS. 
Ontario— H. Mahoney, Guelph. 
Quebec — W. R. J. Hughes, Montreal. 
Nova Scotia— James Farquhar, Halifax. 
New Brunswick — W. Watson, Moncton. 
Manitoba— James Mold, Winnipeg. 
British Columbia— James Coughlan, Victoria. 



ONTARIO PROVINCIAL ASSOCIA- 
TION. 

OFFICERS. 

President— Wm, Mansell, Toronto. 

Vice-President— W J. Walsh, Hamilton. 

Financial- Secretary — Lewis LeGrow, Toronto. 

Treasurer— J. K. Wilson, Toronto. 

Secretary -W. H. Meredith, Toronto. 

Executive Committee— The officers and H. 
Mahoney, Guelph ; S. Mellon, Hamilton, and E. 
H. Russell, London. 

MONTREAL. 

President— Thos. O'Connel. 
Secretary — J. Gordon. 

TORONTO. 

President— Robert Ross. 
Vice-Preiident — Geo. H. Cooper. 
Secretary-Treasurer — W. H. Meredith. 

HAMILTON. 

President — S. Mellon. 
Secretary — T. H. Davies. 

OTTAWA. 

President— Gil. Julien. 
Secretary— J. Thorpe Blyth. 

LONDON. 

President— B. Noble. 
Vice-President — Wm. Smith. 
Secretary-Treasurer — E. H. Russell. 

THE PLUMBING SUPPLIES 

MARKET. 

Quebec. 

Office of Hardware a_nd Metal, 
232 MoGill Street. 

Montreal, Fell. 10, 1905. 

MUCH surprise is manifest anions 
the local supply houses on the 
continuation of a strong demand 
for plumbing and heating goods. The 
only reason that ean be given is the fact 
that the open weather has allowed build-, 
ers to continue to a certain extent with 



their work. Iron pipe has a good de- 
mand and the outlook is for an advance 
in prices. The firm price of iron has 
warranted the American manufacturers 
of enamelware in advancing the price, 
and it is feared that a general advance 
will go into effect here shortly. A fair 
number of orders for "solder and iron 
pipe are being received from the eastern 
portion of the province, which implies 
that a fair quantity of jobbing work is 
being accomplished. A large number of 
assorted orders for immediate shipment 
have been received from the eastern part 
of Ontario and the western and north- 
ern part of Quebec. 

Range Boilers— A good trade con- 
tinues and prices remain unchanged. 
Quotations are as follows: Iron clad, 
HO gallon, $6, and 40 gallon. $7.50 net: 
copper. 30 gallon. $22; 35 gallon, $24; 
40 gallon, $28. The discount on copper 
boilers is 15 per cent. 

Lead Pipe— Some laree orders for lead 
l>ipe have been received from the eastern 
part of the province. We quote: 
Discount 30 per cent, f.o.b. Montreal. To- 
ronto. St. John, N.B., and Halifax ; f.o.b. 
London, 15c per 100 lbs extra; f.o.h. 
Hamilton, 10c per 100 lbs extra. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings— These articles 
have the strongest demand of any at 
present. Prices continue unchanged 
although firm. Quotations are: Soil pipe, 
standard, 50 per cent, and 10 per cent, 
off list: standard fittings, 50 per cent, 
and 10 and 10 per cent, off list; medium 
and extra heavy soil pipe, 60 per cent, 
off: fittings, 60 and 10 per cent. off. 

Iron Pipe Fittings— Demand continues 
steady. Prices remain unchanged. Our 
quotations are: Discounts on all sizes of 
nipples up to inch, 671-2 to 70 per 
cent. 

Iron Pipe — A strong demand is cur- 
rent on this market. Prices are firm and 
continue unchanged. Our quotations 
are as follows: Standard pipe, per 
100 feet in length under 19 feet. 
Black, 1-8 inch, $2.30: 1-4 inch. 
$2.30; 3-8 inch, $2.55; 1-2 inch, $2.85; 
3-4 in., $3.65: 1 in., $5.20; 11-4 in.. 
$7.35; 11-2 in., $8.95; 2 in., $12.55. 
Oalvanized— 1-4 in., $3.30; 3-8 in 
$3.45; 1-2 in., $3.90: 3-4 in.. $5: 1 in., 
$7.20; 11-4 in.. $10.05; 11-2 in., $12.20: 
2 in.. $16.85. In the above the discount 
on 1-8, 1-4 and 3-8 in black and 1-4 and 
3-8 in galvanized is 121-2 per cent.; and 
on 1-2 to 2, inclusive, in black and gal- 
vanized is 15 per cent. Extra heavy 
pipe, plain ends are quoted per 100 feet 
as follows: Black. 1-2 in.. $4.20; 3-4 in., 
$5.25; 1 in., $7.55; 11-4 in., $10.55; 
11-2 in., $12.75; 2 in.. $17.60. Gal- 
vanized— 1-2 in., $5.25; 3-4 in., $6.65; 
1 in.. $9.55: 1 1-4 in.. $13.25; 11-2 in.. 
$16; 2 in., $21.90. The discount on all 
sizes of extra heavy pipe is 121-2 per 

17 



cent. Coupling, 1-2 in. to 2 in., 55 per 
cent, discount; nipples, 1-4 and 3-8 
in., 65 per cent., discount, and 1-2 to 
(i in., 70 per cent, discount. 



Ontario. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
10 Front Street East, 

Toronto, Feb. 10, 1905 

CONSIDERABLE improvement has 
__ manifested itself during the past 
week and while no large business 
can be expected for some weeks, yet fair- 
sized orders are being received by the 
wholesalers for present delivery," they 
having adopted the rule that no orders 
will be booked for delivery a month or 
six weeks after booking. 'Many of the 
orders are from out o ftown merchants 
although a fair proportion come from 
city dealers who are kept busy at this 
season with repair work. Little was 
doing at this time hist year owing to 
the snow blockade. 

The market for fittings is still un- 
settled, there having been a drop in 
prices in most lines. Other lines have 
remained steady with the exception of 
iron pipe, which has also experienced 
a slight reduction in prices quoted. There 
has as yet been no change in baths al- 
though an increase is expected. The 
jobbers were caught short last year and 
to avoid a recurrence of this evil they 
have placed orders early this season. 
Trade, therefore has been very good, 
more goods having been sold in January 
this year than in the first three month's 
of 1904. 

Lead Pipe— Trade conditions continue 
unchanged. Demand is fair, and prices 
remain as before. We quote: Lead, 
7c: lead waste pipe, Sc: discount 30 per 
cent. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings— Quotations 
remain unchanged as follows: Medium 
and extra heavy pipe and fittings, 60 
per cent.; 7 and 8 inch pipe, 40 and 5 
per cent. 

Iron Pipe Fittings— The unsteady con- 
dition of the market has caused a fall- 
ing off in orders and reductions in price 
have resulted. We quote as follows: 
Malleable fittings 20 to 25 per cent, for 
American and 35 per cent, for Canadian : 
cast iron (standard), bushings. 65 per 
cent.: headeis, 60 per cent.: flanged, 
unions, 00 per cent.; lipped unions, (il) 
and 5 per cent.: malleable bushings, (in 
per cent.; nipples up to 6 inch inclusive, 
75 per cent. 

Copper Range Boilers— Trade is quiet. 
The discount continues unchanged at 15 
per cent. 

Galvanized Iron Range Boilers— Trade 
is quiet. Prices continue unchang- 
ed. Our quotations are: 12 gal- 
lon capacity, standard, $4.50; extra 
heavy, $6.50: 18 gallon, slandard, $4.75; 



Hardware and Metal. 



HEATING AND PLUMBING 



February 11; 1905 



extra heavy, $6.75; 24 gallons, stand- 
ard, $4.75; extra heavy, $6.75; 30 gal- 
long, standard, $5; extra heavy, $7.50; 
35 gallons, standard, $6; extra heavy, 
$8.50; 40 gallons, standard, $7; extra 
heavy, $9.50; 52 gallons, standard, $11; 
extra heavy, $14; 66 gallons, standard, 
$18; extra heavy, $20; 82 gallons, stand- 
ard, $21; extra -heavy, $24; 100 gallons, 
standard, $29; extra heavy, $34; 120 
gallons, standard, $34; extra heavy, $40; 
144 gallons, standard, $47; extra heavy, 
$55. 

Iron Pipe— A slight drop in prices has 
been experienced, the demand, however, 
remaining steady. We nnote: Black, 
1-4 inch, $2.03;' 3-8 inch $2.06; 1-2 
inch. $2.29; 3-4 inch, $2.87; 1 inch, 
$4.12; 11-4 inch, *5.62; 11-2 inch, 
$(! 75; 2 inch, $9. Galvanized, 1-4 inch, 
$2.86, 3-8 inch, $2.89; 1-2 inch, $3.14; 



3-4 inch, $4.02; 1 inch, $5.77; 1 1-4 inch, 
$7.87; 11-2 inch, $9.45; 2 inch $12.60. 

Solder— -Trade is brightening up. 
Prices have advanced 1 cent. We quote: 
car solder, half and half, guaranteed, 
is quoted at 18 3-4c ; wiping solder at 
16 1-2c, and refined 171-4c. 

Enamelled Ware— The quotations on 
Standard Ideal enamelled ware remain 
as follows: Baths rolled rim 51-2 
feet, 21-2 in. rim, A quality, $21.25; B 
quality, $17.25; 3 in. rim, A quality, 
$23.60: B quality, $19; 5 feet, 21-2 in. 
rim, A quality, $18.40; B quality, 
$17.25; 3 in. rim, A quality, $20.75; B 
quality, $17.25. Lavatories, plate 11 6D. 
A quality. $8.90:.B qualitv $7.50; USD, 
A quality, $5.70; B, $4.80; 120D, A 
qualitv, $5.60; B qualitv. $4.70; 122D. 
A oualitv. $5.20: B qualitv. $4.50. 
Sinks, 18x30 in., flat rim, $2.50. 



ADVANCE METHOD OF WARM AIR HEATING 



By W. H. 



ARTICLE I. 

KNOWING people look for some new 
and improved methods of heating 
and ventilating buildings of every 
description, especially in these colder 
climates and where fuel of every kind is 
so expensive, I will endeavor to lay be- 
fore the readers of Hardware and Metal 
the most successful and economical 
methods of heating yet known to the 
writer. Many furnace men may disagree 
with these articles, as it will take some 
time for me to make myself thoroughly 
understood. But I gladly invite my 
readers to forward any opinions they 
may have or ask for any information 
they may require, such letters to be ad- 
dressed to the Editor of this paper. 

We all know the great diversity of 
opinions that exist about the different 
methods of heating and ventilation; so I 
must appeal at the outset to the reader 
to understand that my contention is 
that it is the cold air pressing down 
that forces the hot air up. This is very 
important and each reader should sat- 
isfy himself that this is correct. This 
being so, how can we put too much cold 
air into our furnace when we are taking 
it from the inside of the very rooms we 
are wanting heated? 

I am trying to make this first letter 
as plain as possible, because there are 
many things to be written on these in- 
tricate points. The great trouble with 
many furnaces put in is that the air is 
too hot when pressed into some of the 
rooms, while in others it is not. What 
we want is more warm air in every 
room, and how to accomplish this is 
what I will endeavor to explain. 

Hot air heating is more healthy than 
hat water, if put in properly. The ac- 
companying cut shows rooms on first 
and second floors heated from one pipe 
and both registers in partitions. No hot 



air register should be put in floors if it- 
can be at all avoided, and no "stack" or 
register should be put in any outside 
wall. When heating first, second and 
third floors from one supply pipe, this 
pipe is 12 or 14 inches in diameter to 
suit the rooms to be heated. This re- 
duces the number of pipes from the fur- 
nace, while it does not necessarily in- 
crease the capacity. It reduces by more 
than half the great amount of friction 
that would accrue from the almost 
double number of smaller pipes. Then 




the great amount of cooling surface 
must be considered. When the cold .air 
is taken from inside the house, as many 
or more inches should be put into the 
furnace as are taken out. The object is 
that, depending on the pressure of cold 
air down and knowing that we are only 
heating the air inside, this gives more 
air pressure. If the capacity of your 
furnace is sufficiently large, it will force 
the air up and through all the regislers 
and will heat your house more perfectly, 
18 



BRONZE POWDER AND LIQUID 

is used by every steam-fitter. Ask your supply house 
for our goods for best results. Or, if they have not 
got them, write direct to 

R. E. THORNE 



768 Craig Street 
MONTREAL 



29 Melinda Street 
TORONTO 



. . FULL STOCK . 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWEIOTE 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

« CANADIAN SEWER PIPE 00 

HAMILTON. OUT. TORONTO. ON?. 

«T JOHNS OUF 




To make blacksmithing pay, you must 
have labor-saving tools. By using 

JARDINE'S 

HORSE-SHOE 

VISE 

in sharpening a set of shoes you will cut 
your time in two. 



A. B. JARDINE & CO. 

Mjrs. TAPS and DIES. 

HESPELER - - ONTARIO 



GLAUB 



GUARANTEED 




i 

0) 

(I) 

i 


T 

n 

0) 
(D 
< 






BE8T IN THE WORLD 



February 11, 1905 

THIS IS OUR BRAND 

P-H 




HEATING AND PLUMBING 
IE TIHI^T IS ZPI3PIE] 



' 



Hardware and Metal. 



THIS IS OUR TAG 



You Want It. 
See that You Get It. 



v. 




PAGE-HERSEY IRON 



BLACK AND GALVANIZED. TAKE NO OTHER. 

AND TUBE CO., LIMITED, GUELPH, oanada 



Have you 
tried it ? 

Tried what ? 




This is in your line of business, and it will 
pay you. 

Tbe Batty Stove 4 Hardware Go. 

76 YORK ST., TORONTO. 




Gate Valves 



are recognized as the leading gate valves 

"MADE IN CANADA." 

Every valve is tested and packed before 
shipment. Send for Catalog. 



KERR ENGINE CO., limited 

Manufacturers, 
WALKERVILLE, - ONT. 



THE BULLARD AUTOMATIC WRENCH 



Instantaneous ad- 
justment to any size 
within its range. 

No cramping or 
wedging. 



PATENTED OCT. 27, 1903 




Increased Leverage, 
Strength and Efficiency. 

No lost motion. In- 
stantly locks and un- 
locks. 

Will not crush the 
lightest pipe. 

Cannot slip. The 
harder the pull the 
stronger the grip. 



Expert mechanics pronounce it 
THE STRONGEST WRENCH ON THE MARKET. 

A Monkey, Ratchet, and Pipe Wrench combined. 




I 



Sold by all Jobbers in United States, Canada, and Foreign Countries. 
Manufactured only by 

BULLARD AUTOMATIC WRENCH CO. WRIT A E ND F0 P R RI S KLEr 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. 



SIDE CUTTING aniSPLICING PLIERS 




We make the most complete line of Nippers 

and Pliers in the world. 
Factory— Utica. N.Y. Write for Catalog. 



Utica Drop Forge & Tool Co. 

296 BRO IDWAY, NEW YORK, U.S.A. 




CONSUMES LESS COAL 

That is, it raises the temperature quicker. 
This is why 

THE ECONOMICAL 
HOT WATER BOILER 

Excels all other boilers. The principle of its 
construction is new and sound. We seek 
agents. Get Our Booklet first. 



P. GIES, Founder, BERLIN, ONT. 




19 



Hardware and Metal. 



HE ATI NO AND PLUMBINO 



February 11, 1905 



keeping your furnace cooler and making 
it last so much longer. The air coming 
in faster and not so warm keeps more 
moisture in the air, thus making it 
healthier for the occupants. 

For example, when you heat with hot 
water you put a radiator in the room. 
Consequently vou only heat the air that 
is in the room. With hot air you have 
to press it into the room, thus creating 
a circulation of air through the building. 
Of course the reader will understand 
that in this method of heating he will 
onlv require four or five pipes from one 
furnace to heat from nine to eleven 
rooms. It must also be remembered 
that the cold air must be carried in 
separate pipes to the furnace and dis- 
tributed around on the bottom the same 
as carried out on top. The trouble has 
been with some furnace men that they 
carry small pipes to stacks and" large 
ones to first floor. In my next article I 
will show a furnace installed and will 
endeavor to make my points a little 
plainer. 

Registers placed in floors only make a 
receptacle for dust, tobacco, mice, and 
every conceivable thing, the odors from 
which provide sulhcient cause to have 
registers in walls. It also saves the 
cutting of carpets as well as taking less 
pressure to force hot air into the room 
when the register is above the face of 



the floor. Of course double headers for 
two rooms on the second floor can be 
operated as well as three floors high. 
We will also show these with sizes of 
stack pipe, different styles of shoes, 
headers, bends and elbows, of the latest 
designs from time to time and will dis- 
cuss hot water heating, steam heating 
and ventilation. 

Increased Lead and Zinc Output. 
As the output of zinc and lead in the 
United States is increasing, the produc- 
ers are turning their attention toward 
increasing the consumption, it is pro- 
posed to introduce galvanized iron where 
painted iron is now used, to increase 
the use of lead. The promoters propose 
to work through large contracting firms 
until the new method becomes common. 
Reports from the Joplin (Mo.) district 
for the first six months of 1904 show 
thai the output of zinc is 10,040 tons 
more than in the same period in 1903, 
and the lead production 2,1 68 "tons more 
than in 1903. 

Polishing Pastes for Copper and Brass. 

(1) Fuse together 2 lbs. of olive oil 
and 2 lbs. of tallow, and stir into the 
hot liquid 8 lbs. of pumice, 4 fts. of 
rouge, and 4 lbs. of chalk, all finely 
powdered. (2) Mix 3 lbs. of chalk with 



3 lbs. of vaseline perfumed with a little 
mirbane. Then mix in 1 lb. of rouge, 3 
His. of emery, and 1 lb. of pumice. All 
the solids must be finely powdered. (3) 
Fuse together 4 Its. of vaseline and 2 
lbs. of tallow, and then stir in 8 lbs. of 
brickdust, 4 lbs. of pumice, 4 lbs. of 
chalk, and 1 lb. of emery to the con- 
sistency of an ointment. All the solids 
must be in the finest possible powder in 
each case. 

Drinking Water for Public Schools. 

A UNIQUE system of water supply 
for drinking purposes has been in- 
stalled in the public schools of 
Cleveland, Ohio, under the direction of 
J. W. Nixon & Son, 62 Frankfort, street, 
that city. The different pieces of the 
apparatus are, of course, well known to 
all plumbers, but their application is 
rather unusual. 'Hie rainwater from the 
roof is conducted to a cistern in the 
school yard, which is arranged with an 
overflow, allowing the surplus water to 
flow directly into the sewer. In the 
bottom of this tank are three large pat- 
ent filters, and the water, after passing 
through these, is led to a tank placed 
below the cellar floor, which serves to 
cool the water. In the basement is a 
tank containing compressed air, which, 
bv means of suitable connections, raises 
the water to all the floors of the build- 
ing. This plan is an interesting one, 
and the results will be closely watched 
bv those interested in the supply of pure 
drinking water in schools and other 
places. 



ALUMINUM 

CAKE AND PUDDING 

PANS 

ARE THE BEST. 




No Greasy Paper 
Necessary. 

A Nice Brown Appearance 
Without. 



Cakes 



and 



Pies 



ALUHINUM 

PIE PLATES 

ARE 
THE BEST. 




They Produce 

NO BURNT TASTE 

to the pie 

under ordinary conditions. 



MANUFACTURED BV 



CANADIAN ALUMINUM WORKS, LTD. 



CHAMBLY CANTON, QUE. 



20 



February 11. 1905 



HEATING AND PLUMBING 



Hardware and Metal 



RAMSAY'S 
BARN PAINTS 



r There's a field for 
money - making in 
RAMSAY'S BARN 
PAINTS. Every 
barn should be paint- 
ed. So should every 
roof, every fence and 
every out-house. Offer 
your customers a good 
paint at a reasonable 
price, and you can 
sell quantities of it. 



•-RAMSAY'S ••OUTSIDE" PAINTS in splendid 
reds and a fine black just fill -this want and yield 
you more money at Si. 00 per gallon than you can 
get out of house paints. 

Ash us for our card — you can Have it. 

A. RAMSAY & SON COMPANY, 




Est. 1842 



MONTREAL 



Paint Makers 



<"•••••••«•■•••••••••••"•••••••-•••••••••••••••♦•-•-••" 



CIFY GENUIN 




SIMPLE! 



"THE BEST" 



Automatic Injector 



MADE IN CANADA 



ASK YOUR DEALER. 



THIS IS THE 

OLD STAND-BY 

None better on the mar- 
ket unless it is the 
Triumph. 

If your Jobber cannot 
supply, write us for 
prices. 



NO. 233 -WILCOX TACKLE-BLOCK WIRE STRETCHER 




WILCOX IN/IF"©. OO. OF - ONTARIO, Limited 



OUR CATALOGUE "A" 

Descriptive and illustrative of 

INTERIOR METAL COVERINGS 

places within your reach the choicest aggregation of Sheet Metal art 
creations and designs vet offered to a discriminating public and it 

IS YOURS FOR THE ASKING. 

GALT— THE GALT ART METAL CO., Limited— OXT. 

21 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Your Customers 

the farmers are looking for a strong, serviceable and 
durable Fence at a reasonable cost. You can supply! 
it to them in the 

IDEAL. 



HET 

m 




A GOOD SELLER 

The IDEAL is made of No. 9 Hard Steel Galvanized 
Wire throughout, and has many distiw tive features which 
make it absolutely the best fence ever produced. 

It pays dealers to handle fencing that gives best value 
obtainable. Write for our catalogue of Fencing and Gates, 
showing styles for every purpose. 

COILED-SPRING WIRE 

and other Fence Wire unexcelled in quality, shipped 
promptly. 

The McGregor-Banwell Fence Co , Limited, 

WALKERVILLE, ONT. 
Merrick, Anderson & Co., Winnioeg, Man. 

Sole agents for Man. and N.W.T. 




ED 



Gas Sullies 



14 190 





Gas Pillars 

$1.25 per gross. 



Gas Brackets 

No. 100, Stiff Bracket - - - 18c. 

No. 104, Single Swing Bracket - 29c. 

No. 105, Double " " - 48c. 



Aluminum 

Gas Tjps^^ 

$3.00 per gross. 

Lava Gas Tips 

$1.10 per gross. 



These Prices Net to the Trade Only. 



POR EVERYTHING ELECTRICAL MRITE TO- 



Thc 



Saycr Electric Co'y, mont^u 



Rd. JOHNSON, CLAPHAM & MORRIS, LTD, MANCHESTER, ENGLAND 

Before you place your orders for GALVANIZED, CORRUGATED AND DEAD FLAT 
SHEETS, CANADA AND STOVE PLATES, COKE AND CHARCOAL TIN 
PLATES. BAR. HOOP AND SHEET IRON OR WIRE RODS, ask us for quotations. 

Special and prompt attention to Canadian orders. 
Cable Ad.: " Metallicus, Manchester." Coles: Liebers, A. B.C. 425th, Al and Private Codes. 



PAGE "ACME" NETTING 

150-foot roll, 4 feet high 94.00 For poultry and garden. Better than old style. Of local dealer or us. Freight paid. 

150-foot roll, 5 feet high 5.00 THE PAGE WIRE FENCE CO. LIMITED 208 

150-foot roll, 6 feet high 6.00 Walkerville, Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg, St. John. 





D 



S 



Unequalled throughout 
the world, for style, finish 
and quality. 

The most complete 
Catalogue (fully illus- 
trated) of all goods re- 
quired in the Oil Lighting 
line, mailed free to the 
trade with terms on ap- 
plication. 



FALK, 
STADELMANN 

& CO., LIMITED 

'VERITAS" LAMP WORKS 

83, 85 and 87 Farringdon Rd., LONDON, ENG. 



No. 11277. —Polished brass, oxidized 
copper, or oxidized silver ftnUQ. 



PURE MANILA ROPE, 

Highest Quality Made, 

BRITISH MANILA, 
SISAL ROPE, 

Pure Sisal, 

LATH YARN, 

BINDER TWINE 

New twine in flat packs of every description. 

Lowest Prices and Highest Quality. 



Wire, Write or 'Phone 

Canadian Cordage & 




.Co. 



Loner Distance 'Phone 162. LIMITED 

PETERBOROUGH, ONTARIO, CANADA. 



The latest and finest machinery is operated 
in this factory and although not the largest, it is 
the finest mill of its size in the world. 



February 11, 1905 



HEATING AND PLUMBINO 



Hardware and Metal. 



Building Notes. 

Max IJeyden, Rosthern, Man., is erect- 
ing \ large frame machinery warehouse. 

Charles McHugh is building two brick 
veneer houses on Richmond street in 
Ottawa. 

A new church is to be erected at Del- 
mer, Oxford County, Ontario. Tenders 
are being asked for by W. H. Kipp. 

Campbell & Campbell, furniture deal- 
ers, Brandon, Man., intend erecting a 
new four-storey warehouse this Spring. 

A building permit has been issued for 
the new additions to be made to the 
Egerton street Baptist church in Lon- 
don. 

Tenders are being called for the erec- 
tion of a three-storey brick block, 75 x 80 
feet, to be built by T. D. Stickle, Car- 
berry, Man. 

The new skating rink to be built for 
the Royal Military College, Kingston, 
will have an ice surface of 205 x 95 feet, 
and will cost about $7,000. 

Work on the superstructure of the new 
bridge over the River Thames at Byron, 
below London, has been commenced. The 
abutments were built last year. 

B. E. Smith, Moncton, N.B., intends 
erecting a new brick building on Main 
street. The store will have a frontage 
of 46 feet and will be three? storeys 
high. 

The Dominion Government has pur- 
chased the northwest corner of Yonge 
and Charles streets, Toronto, for $14,- 
238. A branch postoffice will be ere,cted 
there. 

A new church will be erected this vear 
for the Holiness sect in Ottawa, the 
site to be on the corner of Bank and 
Flora streets and the cost to be about 
$8,000. 

Capt. J. W. Troup, Victoria, B.C., has 
given a contract to F. J. Mesher to 
build a fine residence on the Esquimalt 
road at a cost of $10,000. The first 
storev will be of stone. 

Galbraith Bros, have given an order 
for a first-class grist mill to be erected 
in Atwood next Summer on the site 
purchased from A. D. Dickson. The 
mill is to have a capacity of 100 bbls. 
per day. 

P. W. Gardiner <& Son, Gait, have 
purchased some land adjoining their 
premises on Mill Creek and intend to 
build a saw mill and install a modern 
plant for the manufacture of sashes, 
doors, etc. 

Three large new churches will be erect- 
ed in Peterboro* this year. The Park 
street Baptist, All Saints, Anglican and 
the Methodist will each build one. They 
will all be built in the south end of the 
town to reach the needs of that rapidly 
growing section. 

The plans for the new normal school 
to be erected in Winnipeg by the pro- 
vincial government have been completed, 
and as soon as they have been approved 
by the Minister of Public Works, ten- 
ders for the erection of the structure 
will be called for. 

The contract for the erection of the 
new public buildings at Prince Albert 
lias been awarded by the Dominion 
Government. The successful tenderers 
were Messes. Lemoine & Fortin, of Pem- 
broke, and the contract price is under- 
stood to be $80,000. 

The Montreal Land and Improvement 
Company has just authorized its man- 
ager, Mr. U. H. Dandurand, to proceed 
with preparations to erect in Alexandra 
Park, adjoining the Angus Shops, 
twenty workmen's houses, to contain 



two dwellings each, and ten self-contain- 
ed houses. The buildings will be brick 
and stone fronts and will be well and 
substantially constructed. They will lie 
between Sherbrooke and Nolan streets, 
ten being design?d for Cuvillier street, 
ten for Aylwin and ten for Joliette 
street. The cost will be between $65,000 
and $70,000. 

The Sons of England of Winnipeg in- 
tend erecting a new building this Spring 
for which plans have been completed by 
W. B. Lait, architect. These show a 
four-storey building with a commodious 
basement, the cost of which will be 
about $40,000. Provision is made for a 
large lodge room that should accommo- 
date the society for years to come for 
lodge purposes, as well as the social 
functions that enter largely into the life 
of the brotherhood. The lower floors 
will be rented for wholesale warehous- 
ing, while the top flat will be laid out 
into bachelors' apartments. 



Building Permits. 

TORONTO. 

Dunkley Bros., dwellings, McDonell 
avenue, near Union street, $3,400. 

D. A. Williams, dwellings, east side of 
Hamburg street, near Hallam, $2,300. 

M. S. Kellow and Thomas Holmes, 
dwellings, 929 and 931 Bathurst street, 
$5,000. 

Robert S. Anderson, machine shop, 
corner Farley avenue and Esther street, 
$7,000. 

R. C. Vaughan, dwellings, east side of 
Bathurst street, near Barton avenue, 
$6,000. 

Consumers' Box- Company, factory, 
north side of Earnest avenue, near 
Perth, $8,000. 

Wm. Davies Company, Limited, store, 
southwest corner of King and Cowan 
avenue, $3,800. 



Table of Alloys. 

The following is a list of the principal 
alloys in use and should be kept for ref- 
erence: 

A combination of zinc and copper 
makes bell metal. 

A combination of copper and tin makes 
bronze metal. 

A combination of antimony, tin, cop- 
per and bismuth makes britannia metal. 

A combination of copper and tin 
makes cannon metal. 

A combination of copper and zinc 
makes Dutch gold. 

A combination of copper, nickle and 
zinc, with sometimes a little iron and 
tin, makes German silver. 

A combination of gold and copper 
makes standard gold. 

A combination of gold, copper and 
silver, makes old standard gold. 

A combination of tin and copper makes 
gun metal. 

A combination of copper and zinc 
makes mosaic gold. 

A combination of tin and lead makes 
pewter. 

A combination of lead and a little ar- 
senic, makes sheet metal. 

A pombination of silver and copper 
makes standard silver. 

A combination of tin and lead makes 
solder. 

A combination of lead and antimony 
makes type metal. 

A combination of copper and arsenic 
makes white copper. 

23 



CONDENSED MACHINERY ADVERTISE- 
MENTS. 



YEARLY CONTRACT RATES. 

100 words each insertion, 1 year $30 00 

" " " 6 months 17 00 

" " " 3 months 10 00 

50 " " 1 year 17 00 

" " " 6 months 10 00 

25 " " 1 year 10 00 



MACHINERY WANTED. 



Items under this heading inserted free for readers of 
Hardware and Metal 



STRONG Column Drill — To swing about 36-in.; 
must be in good order and cheap ; also a port- 
able engine and boiler, about 10 h-p, Bridge 
Works, Mitchell, Ont. 

\\/ ANTED — One second-hand clam shell digger, 
* ' with traveling derrick, complete ; and one 
second-hand locomotive, from 15 t<-> 20 tons ; must 
be in good condition. A. G. Creasor, Owen 
Sound 

WANTED — Sawing Machine — new or second- 
hand ; for sawing stove wood Box 278, 
Port Elgin. 



w 



ANTED — Screw-cutting lathe — in — for motor 
cycle. Horton, London, Ont. 



A MARINE ENGINE— about 12 x 12— tn good 
order ; second-hand. Full particulars Box 
232, Barrie. 

U/AMTED — At once — Gasoline engine — 4 to 6 
* horsepower; rtwor seend-hahd, in good 
condition ; slate maker, h w long in use. and low- 
est cash price. Ad-ress Box 78. Elmvale, Ont. 

WANTED— A small Sawmill O Jtfit that will cut 
from eight to twelve thousand per day. 
John Thompson, McKellar, Ont. 

WANTED — Slide Valve Engine for mill use ; 
about 24x30. Parry Sound Lumber Co., 
74 Home Life Building, Toronto, Ont. 

WANTED — One Matcher and Planer for floor- 
ing and ceiling. Imperial Veneer Com- 
pany, Limited, Sundridge, Ont. 



MACHINERY FOR SALE. 



Bates for first insertion 2c. a word, and for subsequent 
insertions lc. a word. 



ONE second-hand gap lathe; swings 40 in. and 
26 in.; 12-ft. 6-in. bed. Address Box 748, 
Montreal. 







NE second-hand shafting lathe, 26-in. swing, 
20-ft. bed. Address Box 748, Montreal. 



STANDARD SCALES, valves, trucks, steam 
specialties; W. I. pipe and fittings, machine 
tools, mill supplies, scale repairing a specialty: 
prompt delivery from stock; write for prices. The 
Fairbanks Co., Toronto. 



MARINE Engines and Boilers — Large assort- 
ment ; send for stock list Doty Engine 
Works Co., Limited, Goderich. 



MACHINERY for Sale— Two large die presses; 
one large iron drill ; cheap for immediate 
sale ; in first-class order. United fr actories, Lim- 
ited, 164 Adelaide West. 

FOR SALE— Factory on Lachine Canal, Mont- 
real, equipped for felt hat manufacturing, but 
utilizable for any oiher purpose ; for sale with or 
without machinery ; water power is four hundred 
inches, increasable to one thousand inches; new 
American 48-inch wheel ; shipping by rail and 
water; exceptional opportunity. H. Laurencelle, 
230 McGill Street, Montreal. 



HARDWARE AND MBTAL 



February 11, 1905 



TACKS 



ALL DESCRIPTIONS OF CUT, GIMP AND CARPET 
TACKS, SHOE NAILS AND TACKS. UPHOLSTERERS', 
CHEESE BOX AND COPPER TACKS, CLOUT NAILS, 
TRUNK NAILS AND TACKS. ETC., ETC. 



Bar Iron and Steel, Wire Nails, Cut Nails 
Horse Shoes, Horse Nails, Railway Spikes, Ship Spikes 

Sleigh Shoe Steel, Tyre Steel. 

RETURNED 

JUN 23 190 

the PECkIrOLLING MILLS limi 

MONTREAL 




HEAD OFFICE: CORISTINE BLDG. 



WORKS: LACHINE CANAL. 



SAP PAILS and SPILES 

These goods will be needed before long, and your 
customers may ask for them any time now. 

If you require either spiles or pails, we can ship 
you any quantity the same day the order reaches us. 

Sap Pails 

Made in six sizes, in both straight and flaring patterns. 

"Eureka" Cast Iron and Steel Spiles 

The superiority of these spiles over all others is well known to the trade. 
Tinned and Galvanized Iron in the following sizes and gauges, for sap pans always 





STRAIGHT PATTERN. 




FLARING PATTERN 



Tinned Iron 

48x96x20 
48x96x22 
48x96x24 
36x84x22 
36x84x24 



in stock. 

Galvanized Iron 



48x96x22 
36x96x22 
36x96x24 



Prompt 

Shipment 

Guaranteed. 



The McClary Manufacturing 

LONDON. TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG, VANCOUVER, 

" Everything for the Tinshop." 

2t 



ST. JOHN, N.B 



February 11, 1905 



EDITORIAL 



Hardware and Metal. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Praia" eni : 

JOHN BAYNB MACLEAN. 

Montreal. 

The HacLean Publishing Co. 

Limited 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circu- 
late in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. 
Island and Newfoundland. 



CANADA- 
MONTREAL ... - 23a McGill Street. 
Telephone Main 1355. 
TORONTO - - - 10 Front Street East. 
Telephone Main 2701. 
Winnipeg, Man. - Room 515, Mclntyre Block. 

Telephone 1846. 

F. R. Munro. 

ST. JOHN, N.B. - - No. 3 Market Wharf. 

J. Hunter White. 
Vancouver, B.C. - Geo. S. B. Perry. 

united states- 
new York - Room 1241 New York Life Bldg. 

W. T. Robson. 
Telephone 19 Franklin. 



GREAT BRITAIN- 
LONDON, Eng. 

Manchester, Eng. 

AUSTRALIA- 
ADELAIDE, Australia, 



88 Fleet Street, E.C. 
T Meredith McKim. 
Telephone, Central 12960. 

?a Market Street. 
1. S. Ashburner. 



Steamships Building, 
W. H. Sharland, Jr. 



Subscription, Canada and United States, 82.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere - - 12i 

Published every Saturday. 
CabLAddres. | J-gPt. London. 



New Advertisement* : 

Boss Machine Co., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Hanover Port Cement Co., Hanover, Ont. 

Ham & Nott Co., Brantford, Ont. 

Gait Art Metal Co., Gait, Ont. 

Thos. Staniforth & Co., Sheffield, Eng. 

UNION LABEL AGAIN. 

NO session of Parliament can very 
well pass without the introduc- 
tion of a union label bill. With inde- 
fatigible persistency, Mr. Ralph Smith, 
M.P., has again brought forward his 
pet measure, and its provisions are once 
more before the legislators of this coun- 
try. 

We admit that the adoption of this 
measure, aiming as it does to give a 
legal recognition to the trademark of 
union labor, would be a fine thing for 
the unions. It would immensely 
strengthen their hand in their apparent- 
ly ceaseless conflict with capital. 

But viewing the matter from the 
standpoint of the public, the question 
naturally arises, what advantage will we 
gain from having the union label legal- 



ized? Will it be any more than .it is 
now, a guarantee of quality? If so, by 
all means let us have a legalized label. 

But the measure does not make any 
reference to this point: In fact it ac- 
cepts the label in its present significance 
as merely the indication that a piece of 
work has been done by a union work- 
man. It does not mave any provision 
that a standard will be set and legally 
enforced bv a legally-constituted body. 

We come to the conclusion, then, that 
Mr. Smith's measure is but another of 
the countless moves and countermoves 
in the struggle between capital and la- 
bor and that, as it does not seem to be 
of any particular advantage to the long- 
suffering public and will not tend to 
smooth out industrial difficulties, it need 
not call for our support. 



RETAIL HARDWARE MEN'S 
ASSOCIATION. 

THE dull season is the opportune 
time to discuss problems for the 
good of ihe trade, and the meeting of 
the retail hardwaremen of Manitoba and 
the Northwest in Winnipeg next week 
suggests a matter which should be taken 
up by readers of Hardware and Metal in 
Ontario and the other provinces in Can- 
ada where there are no strong organiza- 
tions capable of dealing with trade mat- 
ters satisfactorily. Should there not be 
organized in every Canadian province a 
similar association to that already or- 
ganized in Manitoba and the Northwest? 

There are innumerable advantages to 
be secured from the organization of men 
in one trade into one body. It has been 
often said that "competition is the life 
of trade," but it can more truly be said 
that co-operation is its salvation. In 
these days of departmental stores, par- 
cels post and rural mail delivery sys- 
tems, of combinations in all branches of 
industry, it behooves the retail merchant 
to be up and doing and co-operate with 
his fellow hardware, stove, tinware or 
plumbing dealers for the mutual ad- 
vantage of all in the trade. 

Whether or not a purely Hardware- 
men's Association should be organized is 
a matter worthy of discussion, and 
Hardware and Metal would be glad to 
open its columns to a discussion on this 
point. We have no hesitation in saying, 
however, that for the present we believe 
2"> 



it would be far better for the retailers 
in the hardware and kindred trades to 
be well organized in a strong body of 
their own than to be formed into 1 1 u 
tail of an organization comprising re- 
tailers of a dozen or score of different 

trades. 

* * 
* 

To show the extent of the moVemenl 
towards organization in the retail hard- 
ware trade we have only to note the 
fact that the following bodies in the 
Northern States hold their annual ga- 
therings during February: Wisconsin Re- 
tail Hardware Association, North Da- 
kota Retail Hardware Association, 
Nebraska Retail Hardware Dealers' 
Association, Colorado Retail Hard- 
ware Dealers' Association, Ken- 
tucky Retail Hardware and Stove 
Stove Dealers' Association, Illinois Re- 
tail Hardware Dealers' Association, 
Pennsylvania Retail Hardware Dealers' 
Association, Indiana Retail Hardware 
Dealers' Association, Minnesota Retail 
Hardware Dealers' Association, Missouri 
Retail Hardware and Stove Dealers' As- 
sociation, Ohio Hardware Association, 
Connecticut Hardware Association, New 
York State Association of Retail Hard- 
ware Dealers, New England Retail Hard- 
ware Dealers' Association, and the Na- 
tional Retail Hardware Dealers' Asso- 
ciation. 

In addition to these bodies, many as- 
sociations in other states held their con- 
ventions in January, while others meet 
in March. Most of the organizations 
have been organized from six to twelve 
years, and are stronger than ever before. 
Amongst the topics discussed at one of 
the meetings are the following: "Why 
should a Hardwareman be a Member of 
the Association?" "Advertising a Retail 
Hardware Store in a Country Town," 
"A Few Insurance Pointers," "The 
Science of Salesmanship," "Plumbing in 
Connection with the Hardware Busi- 
ness," "From a Jobber's Standpoint," 
"Co-operation," "As Seen by a Trav- 
eler," etc. The Minnesota Association 
gathering will probably have 600 dele- 
gates in attendance, while the recent ga- 
thering of the Western Retail Implement, 
vehicle and Hardware Association in 
Kansas City was attended by about 
3,500 manufacturers, jobbers and retain- 
ers. Certainly these figures show that 
the organization is very extensive in the 



Hardware and Metal. 



EDITORIAL 



February 11 4 1905 



Northern and Western States, and if 
there is found to be a need for the asso- 
ciations there, a similar need exists in 
Ontario and other provinces. 

* * 
* 

The associations have become a part 
of the hardware business and their 
gatherings are invested with peculiar 
interest to the great mass of merchants 
they represent and to the manufact ur er 
and wholesalers from whom the merch- 
ants secure their goods. In former years 
the associations have exerted a powerful 
influence on measures before Congress 
looking to the establishment of a par- 
cel post system and while the matter is 
again before Congress there would be 
little hope of the elimination of the bad 
features of the bill if it were not for 
the influence brought to bear on the 
legislators by the representatives of the 
organizations. If the bill goes through 
as proposed it will allow all third and 
fourth class matter to pass through the 
mails at 8 cents per pound, thus involv- 
ing- the carrying of merchandise from 
the departmental stores and catalogue 
houses at a serious loss and entailing 
a still larger deficit in connection with 
the postal administration. 

* * 

* 

Another phase of the organized move- 
ment on the other side of the boundary 
is the co-operative system of mutual in- 
surance in operation in many of the 
States. Some of the fire insurance or- 
ganizations in connection with the deal- 
ers' associations allow outsiders to insure 
but as a general rule only members of 
the association are allowed to take out 
policies. They have been successes from 
the start and are operated on safe, con- 
servative lines at a minimum cost. The 
charges are the same as those of the so- 
called old-line companies, but at the end 
of the year the surplus, instead of go- 
ing into the pockets of a few stock- 
holders, is turned back to the members, 
and history has shown that they pay 
dividends of from 25 to 40 per cent. 
This is certainly a saving worth mak- 
ing. The insurance society also helps 
the hardware associations and increases 
the interest, membership and profit. 



GOOD BUSINESS PROPOSITION. 

THAT Canada is at last to have a 
mint of her own, where her gold 
can be converted into bright coins, is 
matter for favorable comment. When 
we have the necessary production of the 
precious metal, it seems a shame .that 
we should have to market it in the 
United States and bring in our currency 
from England. 

Though Sir Wilfrid Laurier remarked 
in the debate on an appropriation for 
the mint, that he did not think as a 
commercial venture there was any money 
in it, we are inclined to think that in 
time there will be a revenue from its 
operations.' The seigniorage which is 
levied by the mint on its output is a 
constant source of revenue. 

There is also another consideration. 
At present the gold of the Yukon, 
whence the bulk of the Canadian pro- 
duction of the precious metal comes, is 
almost entirely marketed in the United 
States. In fact, two-thirds of the out- 
put is controlled by United States in- 
terests. The progress of the city of 
Seattle is directly attributable to Yukon 
gold. In view of these facts it is evi- 
dent that the marketing of the gold in 
future in Canada will prove highly bene- 
ficial to Canadian trade and commerce. 
The stream of trade will then set in to- 
wards our own Canadian cities instead 
of going to build up Seattle and other 
American cities. 



U. S. LAMPS IN CANADA. 

AN inquiry was recently made of 
Hardware and Metal as to the 
possibilities of developing a busi- 
ness in European lampware in Canada. 
At present the trade is largely supplied 
by manufacturers in Rochester, N.Y., 
and in Connecticut, the glass coming 
from Pennsylvania and the brasswork 
being largely manufactured in the New 
England States. 

Mr. John Kent, of Gowans, Kent & 
Co., one of the largest importers in Can- 
ada, informs Hardware and Metal that 
efforts have been made to develop a 
trade with England, but the results so 
far have been unsatisfactory owing to 
the style of goods manufactured there. 
Glass lamps are not used to any extent 
in Great Britain, they being considered 
26 



too easily broken. The most common 
type is a heavy brass lamp which will 
last for several generations and it has 
been found impossible to sell these goods 
here, the patterns being unsuitable and 
the weight of the goods too great. One 
style, the Hincks, was introduced here 
by the firm named, but the goods did not 
become popular. 

Some light, plain glass lamps are 
bought in Germany by Canadians, the 
ornaments being added here, and it is 
in this line only that there appears to 
be any opportunity to develop a trade 
with England. 

Speaking of local trade, Mr. Kent. 
states that business for 1904 and for 
January, 1005, was exceptionally good. 
The only feature of the trade which is 
not encouraging is the fact that pay- 
ments are somewhat slow in the North- 
west. From every other standpoint, 
however, the trade is in excellent con- 
dition. 



FINE GALVANIZED SHEETS. 

The advantages of galvanized sheets 
are not hard to enumerate. For in- 
stance, the brand known as "Sword and 
Torch," and made by T. & J. Walker 
of Wolverhampton, Eng., embodies such 
qualities as dead-flatness, finest of gal- 
vanizing, exactness of weight, they are 
very soft to a perfect workability, and 
are fast gaining a reputation in Canada 
which is acknowledged to be in the fore- 
front all over the world. The agent in 
the Dominion is Mr. J. A. Henderson, 
of Montreal, who is building up a solid 
trade and has made many friends both 
for himself and his wares. 



ESTABLISHED 200 YEARS. 

Among the many new advertisements 
in this issue special attention is called 
to that of Staniforth & Co., the well- 
known British manufacturers of scythes, 
sickles, garden shears, and other heavy 
cutlery. They have been in the front 
rank as makers of these goods for over 
two centuries, and it is little wonder 
that Mr. J. S. Parkes, their Canadian 
representative, speaks with such confi- 
dence of the goods he handles. Mr. 
Parkes is a strong believer in the fact 
that in making the firm's goods better 
known all over Canada an immense in- 
crease in the trade can be made this 
year. He, himself, is a hustler, and with 
fine stock to back him, the Staniforth 
Co. should make a new record in this 
colony. 



February 11, 1905 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



AMONGST THE BOARDS OF TRADE 



THE Toronto Board of Trade has 
elected its officers for 1905 by 
acclamation, only one ballot be- 
ing necessary, six nominations being 
made for representatives to the Indus- 




JAMES D. ALLEN, 
President Toronto Board of Trade. 1905 

trial Exhibition Board. The other offi- 
cers elected were as follows: President, 
James D. Allan ; first vice-president, 
Peley Howland; second vice-president, 
R .C. Steele; treasurer, George Edwards; 
John F. Ellis, Joseph Oliver, Charles S. 
Meek. John Pugsley, Hedley Shaw, W. 
J. Gage, John D. Ivey, Noel Marshall, 
W. D. Ross, C. W. I. Woodland, Hugh 
Blain, Archibald Campbell, M.P. ; R. 
J. Christie, E.J. Dignum, W. F. Cock- 
shntt, M.P. ; board of arbitration, D. 0. 
Ellis, J. N. Hay, W. E. Milner, D. 
Plewes, Jr.: H. N. Baird, J. C. Mc- 
Kegeie, Thomas Flynn, W. D. Mat- 
thews, D. 0. Wood, S. McNairn, C. B. 
Watts, John L. Fisher; representatives 
on Harbor Commission, J. H. Hagarty, 
J. T. Mathews. A resolution, moved 
by J. D. Ivey, was passed, asking that 
the railways reconsider their decision not 
to grant reduced rates for the proposed 
"traders' week" to be held in Toronto 
in the Spring and Fall. 

LINDSAY BOARD OF TRADE. 

The Lindsay Board of Trade, which 
has been in a state of suspended anima- 
tion f m- nearly three years, was re- 
organized on February 2 with a mem- 
bership of 46. The following officers 
were elected: President, Robert Ken- 
nedy; vice-president, Alexander Fisher; 
secretary-treasurer, J. P. Donald; coun- 
cil, Messrs. N. Hockin, John Carew, H. 



J. Lytle, E. Gregory, Joseph Staples, 
Richard Sylvester, R. Bryans, W. Mc- 
Walters, Thomas Brady, W. F. Sut- 
cliffe, R. M. Beal and Lome Campbell. 

HALIFAX AND DARTMOUTH BOARDS. 

A company has been formed in Hali- 
fax to promote a steel ship-building en- 
terprise at this port. The capital is 
$30,000 and the only work it is designed 
to perform is to procure a charter and 
site and arrange other preliminaries for 
. the larger undertaking to follow. The 
promoting company is formed under the 
joint auspices of the Boards of Trade of 
Halifax and Dartmouth and the Halifax 
City Council. Half the $30,000 capital 
has been subscribed by citizens, and 
Messrs. Swan & Hunter, of Newcastle- 
on-Tyne, will take the other half, and 




PELEG HOWLAND, 

Fint Vice-President Toronto Board of Trade. 1905 

also half of the increased capital later, 
$100,000 bonus has been granted by 
Halifax, $100,000 by Dartmouth and it 
is understood that Hon. Mr. Fielding, 
Canadian Minister of Finance, favors a 
Dominion bounty on steel ships. The 
site for the proposed yard is on the 
Dartmouth side of the harbor. The 
Nova Scotia Provincial Government will 
probably offer some form of encurage- 
ment. 

NOVA SCOTIA'S IRON ORE. 

The Board of Trade of Sydney, N.S., 
is asking the Dominion Government to 
commission a member of the Geological 
Survey staff to report on the iron ores 
of Nova Scotia. They also favor the 
securing of surveys and reports on cop- 
per and kindred metals. 



A NEW METAL. 

A new metal has been discovered by 
an Italian at Rome but as yet it has not 
attracted much attention in scientific 
circles in London. It has been christ- 
ened "Radioro" and as far as known is 
non-magnetic, of small gravity, hard and 
malleable, and its discoverer claims for 
it a large commercial value. He has un- 
dertaken the task of coining medals and 
duplicates of ancient coins out of it for 
the King of Italy, and will shortly ex- 
hibit at Milan specimens of machine 
fittings and firearms of the same sub- 
stance. Signor Travaglini is reported to 
be preparing a scheme for marketing his 
discovery on a large scale, and is to 
visit London within the next few weeks. 



M"! 



ONE OF THE TRADE WOUNDED. 

EDWARD C. EATON, manag- 
ing director of the wholesale 
hardware firm of Frothingham & 
Workman, Limited, Montreal, had a nar- 
row escape from death on Saturday af- 
ternoon, February 4. Mr. Eaton, who 
is well known as being one of the best 
revolver shots in Montreal, was attend- 
ing a regular practice match of the 
Montreal Revolver Club, of which he is 
a member, at the Victoria Rifles' Arm- 
ory, when the accident occurred. He had 
fired four shots when he found that the 
rear sight needed re-adjusting. It is 
supposed that the screwdriver slipped 
from the sight, hitting the trigger, 
which in turn raised the hammer far 
enough to come back with enough force 
to discharge the bullet, which entered 
his left breast,, penetrating the lung. He 
was at once conveyed to the Royal Vic- 
toria Hospital. His condition was at 
first considered serious, but within a :ew 
hours after his arrival at the hospital 
he rallied and began to improve, and to- 
day the medical men in attendance are 



lding for 


th strong hop< 


;s of a comple 


fei 








190- 






5r< 

■ 


lW < 




IMp*** 










f 





MR EDWARD C. EATON. 

recovery. Mr. Eaton is well known 
throughout the wholesale trade of Mont- 
real and the news of the accident was 
received with genuine regret by every- 
one. 



27 



Hardware and Metal. 



February 11.. 1905 




(For detailed prices see CurreDt Market Quotations, page 50.) 



QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 

10 Front itreet em»t. 

Toronto, Feb. 10, 19<)5. 







Hardware. 

RDERS arriving at the present 
time are larger and more fre- 
quent than those arriving at 
this time last year. Trade is 
brisker this year and the out- 
look is for a heavy demand for all lines 
of goods. The jobbing trade expects a 
heavy demand for carpenters' and build- 
ers' tools, and supplies, and already, 
some large orders have been received. 
Outside merchants have concluded stock 
taKing and all orders arriving now call 
for immediate shipment. Manufactur- 
ers of building paper are receiving some 
large orders from the wholesale jobbing 
trade, and they in turn claim that all 
merchants anticipate a brisk building 
season and are stocking accordingly. 
Owing to the high price of cordage no 
orders have been received and it is ex- 
pected that trade will remain quiet un- 
til outside merchants are compelled to 
purchase in order to satisfy their custom- 
ers. Despite the cold weather cement 
is being used in large quantities for in- 
side work, and dealers in general are 
satisfied with the amount of business 
that is being accomplished. An increase 
in the amount of repair work has bright- 
ened the trade in firebrick. Scotch are 
scarce and prices are expected to remain 
firm. A keen competition has warranted 
annother decline of 25c on cold blast 
lanterns. 

Axes— Trade continues good with an 
unchanged price list. We quote: Chop- 
ping axes, unhandled, $6 to $9.50 a 
dozen: double bit! axes, $9.50 to $12 a 
dozen; handled axes, $7.50 to $9.50: 
Canadian pattern axes, $7.50 a dozen. 

Handles — Prices remain unchanged. 
Our quotations are as follows: Axe 
handles, No. 3, $1.25; No. 2, $1.50; No. 
1, $1.90 a dozen; adze handles, 34 inch, 
$1.85 a dozen; pick handles, No. 2, $1.70; 
No. 3, $1.50 a dozen. 

Sewing Machines — The demand con- 
tinues fair. Prices remain the same. 
We quote: Hand sewing machines, $11 
each net; complete machines with stand, 
$18 and up, according to quality. 

Lanterns — A keen competition is the 
reason for a decline of 25c on cold blast. 
We quote: Cold Blast, $4.50; No. 
Safely, $8.50. 

Barb Wire— Demand for this article 
has strengthened. Prices f.o.b. Cleve- 
land have declined from 12 to 15c. Our 
quotations are: $2.75 for 100 Ihs, f.o.b. 
Montreal; $2,371-2 f.o.b. Cleveland. 



Carlots of 15 tons, $2.25 fo.b. Cleve- 
land. 

Fence staples — A fair volume of 
orders is arriving in anticipation of a 
brisk trade next season Our quotations 
are : $2.65 per 100 lbs, Keg for bright, 
and $3 for galvanized ; 25 to 50 lb pack- 
ages 25c extra. 

Rivets and Burrs— A good movement 
continues in rivets and burrs. The fol- 
lowing discounts are being quoted : Best 
iron rivets, section, carriage and wagon 
box, black rivets, tinned do., copper 
rivets and tin swede rivets, 60, 10 and 
10 per cent.; swede iron burrs are quot- 
ed at 60 and 10 and 10 per cent, off 
new lists; copper rivets' with the usual 
proportion of burrs, *5 per cent, off: 
and coppered iron rivets and burrs in 
5 lb carton boxes at 60 and 10 and 10 
per cent.; copper burrs alone, 30 and 
10 per cent., subject to usual charge for 
hlf pound poxes. 

Screws — A brightening up of the trade 
is noted. A good demand is current for 
all sizes. Our quotations are: Round 
head, bright, 82 1-2 per cent.; flat head, 
bright, 871-2 per cent.; brass, round 
head, 75 per cent.; brass, flat head, 80 
per cent. 

Bolts and Nuts— Trade is brisk and 
juices continue unchanged. Wholesale 
houses report the arrival of large orders. 

Wire Nails — Prices are firm and con- 
tinue unchanged. Our quotations are as 
follows: $2.25 a keg f.o.b. Montreal. 

Cut Nails— The demand for cut nails 
continues quiet. Our quotations are: 
$2.20 a keg f.o.b. Montreal. 

Horseshoes — Large orders are being- 
received. Prices remain the same al- 
though firm. We quote as follows: 
"P. B." new pattern, base price 
$3.50 per 100 lbs. ; other brands iron 
shoes, light and medium pattern, No. 2 
and larger, $3.65; No. 1 and smaller, 
$3.90: snow pattern, No. 2 and larger, 
$3.90: No. 1 and smaller, $4.15; light 
steel shoes. No. 2 and larger, $3.80; No. 
1 and smaller, $4.05; featherweight, all 
sizes. to 4, $5.35; toe weight, all sizes, 
1 to 4, $6.60. Packing— Up to three 
sizes in a keg, 10c per 100 lbs. More 
than three sizes, 25c. 

Horsenails— Trade continues brisk in 
horse nails and it is expected that black- 
smiths throughout the country are stock- 
ing. 

Sporting Goods— A quietness in trade 
is noted this week and no large sales are 
expected to be made until the hunting 
season opens next Summer. Our quo- 
tations are as follows: American centre 
fire cartridges, list net: sporting and 
military, 10 per cent, advance on list; 
primers, $2.05 per thousand: American 
loaded shells, 20 per cent, discount; 



I!. B. caps, $2 per thousand; C. B. caps. 
$2.60 per thousand; standard shot, 
$6.50 per hundred lbs; chilled, $7 per 
hundred lbs; buck and steel, $7.50 per 
hundred lbs; ball. $8 per hundred lbs. 
We quote discounts 15 per cent on shot 
f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton. 
Li ndon, St. John and Halifax. 

Building Paper— Manufacturers are 
receiving larger orders from the whole- 
sale jobbing trade. Trade is expected 
to continue brisk until the close of the 
coming building season. 

Cordage — On account of the firm price 
of cordage no orders are being received. 
None are expected until merchants are 
compelled to purchase. 

Cement and Firebrick— Large amounts 
of cement and a fair amount of firebrick 
is being used for inside and repair work 
respectively. We quote the following: 
English cement, $2 to $2.10; Belgium, 
$1.70 to $2.10 per barrel, ex store, and 
American, $2.15 to $2.85 ex cars. Fire- 
brick, English and Scotch, 18 to 22c; 
American, 30 to 35c. 

Coil Chain— Trade continues quiet. 
We quote the following: 5-16 inch, $4.25; 
3-8 inch, $3.75; 7-16 inch, $3.55; 1-2 
inch. $3.35: 9-16 inch, $3.30; 5-8 inch. 
$3.20: 3-4 inch, $3.05; 7-8 inch, $3: 1 
inch, $2.95. 

Green Wire Cloth— A fair amount of 
orders have been booked for Spring de- 
livery. Quotations are $1.50 per hun- 
dred square feet. 

Poultry Netting— Reports state that 
there is a large demand for poultry net- 
ting this season. Discount for 2 inch 
19 gauge standard, extras at 60 and 5; 
for 2 inch 16 gauge the discounts are 
55 and 5 per cent. 

Spring Hinges— A better demand is 
noted. We quote as follows: No. 5, 
$7.25 per gross; No. 19, $18 per gross: 
No. 20, $18.80 per gross; No. 120, $20 
per gross; No. 51, $9.25; No. 50, $27.51 1. 

METALS. 

Several changes are noted in the 
metal market this week, which are al- 
most without exception in the direction 
of an advance. In pig iron Carron No. 
1 and special, Ayresome No. 1 and 3, and 
Summerlee have all advanced 50c per 
ton. The price is being held at a firm- 
er figure until the opening of naviga- 
tion, the freight at the present time from 
the Lower Provinces making a difference 
in cost of from $2 to $3 a ton. Bar iron 
and merchant steel are both quoted high- 
er, the jobbers price being given. 

In Canada plates, black sheets and 
galvanized iron, the market is steady 
with numerous orders. Large quantities 
of tin plates are being booked for the 
sugaring season. Ingot tin is slightly 



28 



February 11, 1905 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and MataL 



easier, having been reduced one-half 
cent. 

Small size boiler tubes are quoted 
higher by one cent. In scrap metal and 
old material, the market is more active 
than it has been for some time and a 
general advance in scrap metal is noted. 
There is little rubber moving', as a mis- 
understanding exists between the deal- 
ers and rubber manufacturers as to 
prices. 

Pig Iron— Pig iron is considerably 
firmer at present than is likely to be the 
case a couple of months hence. The 
blast furnaces in Canada are busy sup- 
plying the present demand. An advance 
of 50c per ton is noted in Carron No. 1 
and Special; Ayresome No. 1 and 3 and 
Summerlee. We quote : 

"Disc," No. I $16.50 delivered Montreal. 

"Dom.," No. 1 1750 " " 

Usual difference in price for lower grades. 

Ferrona No. i $1800 delivered Montreal. 

No. 2 1750 " " 

No. 3 16 50 

No. 4 16.00 

Londonderry. $18. 50 to $19.00 delivered Montreal. 

Glengarnock 20.00 " " 

Gartsherrie 19 25 " " 

Carnbroe 18.50 " " 

Carron No. 1 20.00 delivered Montreal. 

" (special) 19.00 " " 

Ayresome No. 1 18.50 " " 

No. 3 18.00 " " 

Summerlee 20.00 " " 

Clarence No. 1 18.00 " " 

No. 3 17.50 

No. 1 Cleveland 18.00 " " 

Bar Iron — There is a good demand at 
present for first boat delivery. We 
quote an advance on previous prices, the 
change being due not to an advance in 
price, but to a change from manufac- 
turers' to jobbers' list. Quotations are 
as follows: Merchant bar, $1.80; horse- 
shoe iron, $2,021-2; forged iron, $2.05; 
best refined iron, $2.20 net cash thirty 
days. 

Tool Steel— There is no unusual ac- 
tivitv in tool steel this week. Our quo- 
tations are: Colonial Black Diamond, 8 
cents to 9 cents; Sanderson's, 8 cents 
to 45 cents, according to grade; 
Jessop's, 13c; Jonas & Clover's, 10 to 
20c; "Air Hardening," 65c per lb; 
Conqueror, 71-2c; Conqueror High Speed 
steel, 60c. 

Merchant Steel— Advanced prices are 
given on merchant steel. The new prices 
are: Sleighshoe, $1.90; tire, $2; spring, 
$2./-i; toecalk, $2.55; machinery, iron 
finish, $2.05; square harrorw, $2; reeled 
machinery steel, $2.75: mild, $1.85; 
rivet, $1.85, net cash thirty days. 

Cold Rolled Shafting— An unusually 
large amount of this will be required 
for industrial purposes in the near fu- 
ture and preparations are being made for 
a big trade in this line. We quote : Cold 
rolled shafting, 3-4 inch, to 1 7-16, $3.85 
per 100 lbs; inch and a half to 3 inch, 
$3.50 per 100 lbs. 

Canada Plates— Orders are being 
freelv received for Canada plates, no 
further advance is noted. Our quotations 
are as follows: 52s, $2.45; 60s, $2.50; 
75s, $2.55; full polished, $3.60; galvan- 
ized, 52s, $3.90 to $4; 60s, $4.15 to 
$4.25. 

Black Sheets— There is a good de- 



mand with a steady market. The prices 
quoted being a minimum. We quote: 28 
gauge, $2.15; 26 gauge, $2.10; 22-24 
gauge, $2.05; 19-20 gauge, $2.20; 8-10 
gauge, $2.30. 

Galvanized Iron— There is no change 
in the market for galvanized iron, which 
continues steady. We quote: Queen's 
Head, 28 gauge, $4.15; 26 gauge, $3.90; 
22 to 24 gauge, $3.65; 16 to 20 gauge, 
$3.55; Apollo, 28 gauge, $4; 26 gauge, 
$3.75.; 22 to 24 gauge, $3.75; 16 to 20 
gauge, $3.40; Fleur-de-Lis, 28 gauge, 
$4; 20 gauge, $3.75; 22 to 24 gauge, 
$3.50; 16 to 20 gauge, $3.40; Comet, 28 
gauge, $3.95; 26 gauge, $3.70; 22 to 24 
gauge, $3.45; 16 to 20 gauge, $3.40; 
Bell brand, 28 gauge, $4; Gorbal's "Best 
Best," 28 gauge, $4.15; "Windmill 
Best, ' ' 28 gauge, $3.95 ; Sword and Torch 
28 gauge, $4.05; in less than case lots,, 
25c extra. 

Antimony— There is no change. Quo- 
tations are 91-2 to 9 3-4c. 

Sheet Zinc— Sheet zinc continues firm 
but without any advance. Quotations 
are: Case lots, $7; small quantities, 
$7.25 upwards. 

Tin Plates— Large orders for tin 
plates have been received within the past 
week to supply the demand for the 
sugaring season throughout the country. 
We quote: .Cokes, $3.75; charcoal, $4. 

Ingot Tin— The market is somewhat 
easier this week, a reduction of one-half 
cent a pound being noted. The price is 
now 321-2 to 33c. 

Ingot Copper— The copper market is 
very uncertain and predictions made re- 
garding the verv high price in this have 
not been realized. There is every indi- 
cation that present prices will be main- 
tained for some time. We quote : 16 l-4c 
to 16 l-2c ; no concessions whatever be- 
in"- obtainable on these prices. 

Ingot zinc— No great quantity of in- 
got zinc is beina- booked at present. We 
quote: 6 3-4 to 7c. 

Pig Lead— This market continues firm, 
but without any advance. The demand 
is good. We quote: $3.50 to $3.60, no 
concessions being obtainable. 

Boiler Tubes— An advance quotation 
is noted in boiler tubes of smaller size, 
namely 1 .-2 inch, the advance being lc. 
Quotations are: Highest grade soft 
steel, British and American tube, 11-2 
inch, 81-2c; 2 inch, 81 -2c: 21-2 inch- 
10c: 3 inch. 121-4c; 31-2 inch, 16c; 4 
inch, 20c; 5 inch. 45c. Price per foot 
net. 

Scrap Metal and Old Material— The 

market is much more active this week 
and considerable copper and brass and 
wrought scrap are moving. There is a 
deadlock between the dealers in old rub- 
bers and rubber manufacturers as to the 
price and consequently little stock is 
changing hands. We quote: Heavy 
copper and wire. 12 l-4c : light copper, 
lll-4c: heavy red brass, 101-4c; heavy 
yellow brass, 7 3-4c H 8c: light brass, 
Cic; lead, 3 l-4c : zinc, 3c; No. 1 
country rags. 65c to 75c per 100 lbs; 
old rubbers, 51-2 to 6c. 

29 



ONTARIO MARKETS. 
Hardware. 

Office of Hardwakk xNDUitil, 
10 Front Strut But. 

Toronto, Fell. 10, 1905. 

BUSINESS continues brisk in gener- 
al hardware, exceptionally so for 
this season of the year. Some 
lines are not moving to any extent, but 
such lines as chains are having a great 
demand owing to the rush of the lumber- 
ing season, the sleighine being good and 
logs having commenced to move. Other 
lines, such as screws, rivets and burrs, 
and bolts and nuts, are in good demand, 
although no chances in prices have oc- 
curred. Washing inachjinejs afre allsio 
meeting with a steady call. Retailers 
are stocking up as rapidly as could be 
expected. 

Price lists show no chanee this week. 

Lawn Mowers— The demand is normal 
for this time of the year. 

Guns and Ammunition— There is no- 
thing much doing. Trade is normal. 

Washing Machines— There is the 
usual demand. 

Chain— The demand for chains has de- 
veloped considerably owing to large 
orders from lumbermen. Our quotations 
are as follows: 1-4 inch, $6.50; 5-16 
inch, $4.45; 3-8 inch, $3.85; 7-16 inch, 
$3.70; 1-2 inch, $3.55; 9-16 inch, $3.45; 
5-8 inch, $3.35; 3-4 inch, $3.25. 

Step Ladders— We quote at 10c per 
foot for 3 to 6 feet, and lie per foot for 
7 to 10 feet ladders. 

Extension Ladders— Waggoner, 40 per 
cent, off list. l 

Galvanized Wire-The recent advances 
hold firm and trade is quite active. Quo- 
tations are: $2,371-2 f.o.b. Cleveland 

Coiled Spring Wire-Prices have been 
confirmed but are subject to change 
without notice. Trade is normal 

Barb Wire-Nothine- much is doing 
in barb wire as yet. 

Wire Nails-Situation shows little 
change. Nominal quotations are $2.25 
f.o.b. Toronto. 

_ Cut Nails -There "is a fair trade be- 
ing- done. Prices remain firm. Quota- 
tions are $2.40 per keg f.o.b. Toronto. 

Horseshoes-A very good demand for 
horseshoes is reported for this time of 
the year. We quote as follows: "PB " 
base, $3.65; other brands are: Iron 
shoes hght and medium pattern, No. 
2 and larger, $3.80; No. 1 and smaller, 
$4.0o; snow No. 2 and larger, $4.05: 
No. 1 and smaller, $4.30;" light steel 
shoes. No. 2 and larger, $3.95; No. 1 and 
smaller, $4 20; featherweight, all sizes, 

? ^t ' $ °-t2 ; \ oe wei £ ht > all sizes, 1 to 
4, $6./!). If shipped from factorv 15e 
less. 

Horsenails- There is a very good de- 
mand, and prices remain unaltered. 

Screws-Business is very good in this 
line and prospects are also very bright. 
Prices remain unaltered. 

Rivets and Burrs -Trade is quite ac- 
tive and there is every indication of a 
good demand throughout the year. 

Bolts and Nuts— A large volume of 
trade is being done, the demand being 
lare'e f or this season of the year. 

Wooden ware— Market conditions re- 



Hardware and Metal. 



THE MARKETS 



February 11, 1905 



main unchanged, and the normal busi- 
ness continues. 

Cordage— Orders are being booked. 
1 rices remain unchanged. We quote as 
f< Hows: Binder twine, Blue Ribbon, 
12 l--c ; Red Cap, 11 l-2e : Tiger, 10 l-2c ; 
and Standard, 91-2c; manila, 141-2c; 
British manila, lie; sisal, 101-2c; double 
lailivarn, 101-2c; single lathyarn, 10c; 
sashcord "Hercules," 30 to 32c; 
•'Mar," 36 to 38c; cotton twine, 3-ply, 
24c; i-'ply, 29e; calking cotton, 161-2 
to 17c; cotton waste, colored, 6 3-4c; 
white, 11 to 13c. 

METALS. 

The local metal market remains firm 
and active, there being a disposition on 
the part of buyers to place orders, this 
giving a strengthening undercurrent to 
the business. No large orders have, 
however, been placed during the past 
Jew days and no changes in prices are 
noted. ' ' 1 

There being little demand for old ma- 
terial the dealers are holding their 
stocks for increased prices. 

Pig Iron— There is no great activity in 
pig iron on the local market, although 
a Pair number of orders are being book- 
ed. The fact that the blast furnace at 
Midland is making a several months' 
run on Bessemer steel may decrease the 
stocks in the dealers' hands. We quote: 

Middleaboro, f.o.b., Toronto J21 00 

Hamilton, No. 1, at, furnace 18 00 

No. 2, '-• « 50 

Midland, No. 1, " 18 00 

No. 2, " " 50 

Radnor, at furnace . . . . 27 50 

Londonderry, at furnace 16 50 to 17 00 

Bar Iron— There is a very good de- 
mand, and prices remain unchanged. 
Our quotations are as follows: $1.80 
f.o.b. Toronto, with discount of 2 per 
cent.; for extras as cut to length, while 
rolling, . 2 feet and over, 10c per 
100 lbs: 1 foot and under 2 feet, 15c; 
under 1 foot. 20e; over 20 feet, by spe- 
cial agreement according to length and 
size. 

Tin— There is a strong and active 
market, the demand being good and 
prices unchanged. Quotations are from 
32 to 34c per lb. 

Galvanized Sheets— The market shows 
a more active aspect this week. Prices 
are firm. 

Tin Plates— This market continues 
active and recent advances hold firm. 

Canada Plates— The market remains 
quiet, there being little demand. Prices 
remain unaltered. 

brass — There has been more doing in 
brass this week, the demand being strong. 
Advances of recent date hold firm. Dis- 
counts are 10 per cent. 

Lead — The market is active and con- 
tinues firm. Prices remain unchanged. 
We ouote: Pis lead, $3.80 per 100 lbs; 
and bar lead, $4.80 per 100 lbs. 

Zinc Spelter— There is a decreased 
demand, and the market is less active. 
(•notations are as follows; 7c per lb for 
Foreiem and 51-2 to 5 3-4c per lb for 
domestic. 

Copper— The demand for copper in- 
puts continues firm, prices remaining as 
before. Quotations are as follows: In- 



got copper, 16 l-4c per lb and sheet 
copper, 21c per pound. 

Antimony.— The market is quiet, and 
prices remain unaltered. 

Cement— Little activity is shown at 
present in the cement trade, the frosty 
weather discouraging all classes of 
building except the laying of cellars in 
breweries, etc., for which a few carloads 
have been sold recently. The expected 
advance in prices has materialized al- 
though it is not general as yet. Most 
dealers, however, have advanced their 
prices about 10 cents per barrel, and if 
the talked of rise in prices takes place 
on the American market there will be a 
further advance here. There is not 
likely to be any further change, however, 
for some weeks. W quote : For carload 
orders f.o.b. Toronto. Canadian Port- 
land, $1.80: American Portland, $1.80. 
For small orders ex warehouse: Can- 
adian Portland. $2 to $2.10; American 
Portland, $2 to $2.10. 

Firebrick— There is a fair demand for 
the various classes of firebrick, although 
the supply is limited. There has been 
no change in prices. We quote as fol- 
lows: English and Scotch firebrick, 30 
to 35c; American, low grade, 25 to 30e: 
Mb <>rade 321-2 to 40e. 

Building Paper— As in other lines, 
I here is little doing in building paper 
at this time of the vear. Many orders 
me being received, however, for delivery 
on April 1 to Ontario noints. The only 
district where there is any activity is 
the West, large orders coming from 
Winnipeg and other points in prepara- 
tion for a large buUdine season next 
Summer. There was a considerable 
shortage in the supph 7 on the Western 
market last season, and present indica- 
tions are that this condition will not 
prevail again, although there is some 
dipficultv in procuring cars to make the 
large shipments ordered. 

Old Material— The general demand for 
scrap iron and other old materials con- 
tinues firm, there being a scarcity of 
zinc. No changes have taken place in 
the prices offered although an increase 
mav result, owing to the cutting off of 
the supplv from the country districts. 
Our ouotations are as follows: Heavy 
copper and wire. 13c per lb- light cop- 
per. 12c per lb: heavv red brass, 10c 
per lb: heavv yellow brass, 8e per lb: 
lisht brass. 6c per lb: tea lead, $2.25 
ver 100 lbs: heavv lead. $2.50 to $2.60 
ner 100 lbs: scran zinc. 4c per lb: iron. 
No. 1 wrought. $11 : No. 2 wrought, $3; 
machinery cast scrap. $13: stoveplate. 
$8 to $0: malleable and steel. $5; old 
rubbers. 51 -2c per lb; eoimtrv mixed 
ra°s. 65c pev 100 lbs. 

Coal — The market fov coal continues 
steady, the usual number of orders being- 
booked. No abnormal conditions have 
developed and it is nnlikelv that any 
marked changes will be made for some 
time in the prices ouoted below. Our 
ouotations are as follows- Anthracite in 
cars at Bribes: Orate. $5.50 per gross 
ton: erst stove and nut. $5.75 per gross 
ton : pea, $3.50 per gross ton. 

Standard Hocking, soft coal, in cars, 
30 



f.o.b. at mines: Lump, $1.35; 3-4 inch, 
$1.25; run of mine, $1.05; nut, 90c; N. 
P. and S., 60c; coarse slack, 40c; box 
cars 10 cents per ton additional. 

Youghiogheny soft coal in cars, 
bonded, at the bridges : 1 1-4 inch, $2.55 ; 
3-4 inch, $2.45; mine run, $2.35; slack 
at $1.95 to $2. 

LONDON METAL MARKETS. 

From Metal Market Report, Feb. 8, K05. 

Pig Iron— Middlesboro No. 3 foundry 
is quoted at 48s and Scotch warrants at 
52s 6d, making prices as compared with 
last week 5s 9d lower for Middlesboro 
and Is 3d lower for Scotch warrants. 

Tin— Spot tin opened firm at £131 15s, 
futures at £130, and after sales of 160 
tons of spot and 50 tons of futures, 
closed easy at £131 5s for spot and £130 
for futures, making price as compared 
with last week £1 2s 6d lower on spot 
and £1 lower on futures. 

Copper — Spot copper opened quiet at 
£67 3s 9d, futures at £67 10s, and after 
sales of 400 tons of spot and 600 tons 
of futures closed steady at £67 5s for 
spot and £67 lis 3d for futures, mak- 
ing price as compared with )ast week 8s 
3d lower on spot and 5s 9d lower on fu- 
tures . 

Lead— The market closed at £12 lis 
3d, making price as compared with last 
week 6s 3d higher. 

Spelter— The market closed at £24 15s, 
making price as compared with last 
week 2s 6d higher. 

UNITED STATES METAL MARKET. 

Advance proofs furnished Hardware and Metal by 
The Iron Age, Feb. 9, 1905. 

OCR monthly blast furnace statistics 
show that in January production 
of the works in the United States 
beat all records, having been 1,776,500 
tons, exclusive of charcoal iron, which 
has been running at the rate of 20,000 
tons a month during the past six months. 
This carries the production very close 
to 1,800,000 tons, or at the rate of 20,- 
750,000 tons per annum. Yet the fur- 
naces have not been in full swing in 
January, since the weekly capacity has 
advanced from 377,879 tons per week 
on January 1 to 404,292 tons on Febru- 
ary 1. In spite of the heavy production 
the stocks of the merchant furnaces de- 
clined from 403,000 tons on January 1 
to 372,000 tons on February 1, thus in- 
dicating a rate of consumption of fully 
21,000,000 tons a vear. That such a 
figure should be reached in midwinter 
is astounding. 

There have just been closed purchases 
by the United States Steel Corporation 
of Basic and Bessemer pig iron in the 
Pittsburg district aggregating 25,000 
tons, equivalent to $15.50 at Valley fur- 
nace, for prompt delivery. In eastern 
Pennsylvania further round lots of basic 
pig, aggregating about 15,000 tons, have 
been taken lry steel works, while reports 
from the South indicate that one Binn- 
ingham interest has marketed about 25,- 
000 tons during the past few days. In 
the New York market a number of the 
larger founders have been feeling the 
situation. This is in contrast with the 



February 11, 1905 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and MetaL 



PORTLAND CEMENT 

DRAIN PIPES, CULVERT PIPES, 
SEWER BRICKS, INVERTS, 
FIRE BRICKS, FIRE CLAY, 
BUILDING BRICKS, 

FIRE PROOFING, 
ROAD PAVING BRICKS 

and BLOCKS. 
Correspondence Invited 

F. HYDE & CO. 

KINO, QUEEN and WELLINGTON STS. 
MONTREAL 



Deseronto Iron Co, 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers 01 



Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND " DESERONTO." • 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler lubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery wh-re grrat strength 
is r quired ; Strong, High Silicon Iron, f or Foundry 
Purposes. 



ii 



MIDLAND 



u 



BRAND. 



Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as Fuel, "Mid- 
land " will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Writ* for Prle* to Salos ftfonts 

Drummond McCall & Co. 

MONTREAL, QUE 
or to 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 

MIDLAND. ONT Limited 

Got our prices for 

GALVANIZED 
FLAT SHEETS 

THE "VANDA" BRAND 

For all purposes requiring the best quality. 

It is "deadflat," well galvanized, true to gauge 
and specially soft for working-up. We guarantee 
every sheet bearing our brand. 



C.F. JACKSON & CO , Limited 

Wholesale Merchants 

Ormidale B ock, Vancouver, B.C., and 

Liverpool, England 

Direct Importers of: 

Metals of every description, Wire Rope, Portland 
Cements, Firebricks, Ore Sacks, Grain Bags, etc.. etc 



attitude of buyers in the principal dis- 
tributing centres of the West, who have 
been holding off lately. 

In the rail trade additional tonnage 
has been placed, this including some 
larger orders for Chicago, the 25,000 ton 
contract of the Baltimore & Ohio Com- 
pany and a modest share for the lines 
in this country of the 25,000 ton Grand 
Trunk order. 

The manufacturers of structural ma- 
terial and of plates are expected to hold 
a meeting next week. While leading in- 
terests will probably be arrayed against 
any advance in prices it is possible, if 
not probable, that the smaller makers 
will carry through their desire for a 
somewhat higher range of prices. They 
point to the advance in raw materials 
and to the upward tendency in all other 
lines of finished iron and steel. It is 
urged that the demand would not be 
checked by such a move. 

The principal makers of sheets have 
announced an advance of $2 per ton on 
certain sizes, to go into effect at once. 

The international markets are grow- 
ing stronger. During the week the Eng- . 
lish plate makers have put up prices 10 
shillings per ton without any co-opera- 
tion. Steel rails and billets and bars 
are from $3 to $4 per ton higher than 
they were three months ago. 

PITTSBURG iyujTAL MARKETS. 

Iron Trade Review, Feb. 9, 1905. 

Pig Iron — Some resale foundry iron 
is offered in this market by foundries 
that overbought during October and No- 
vember and has disturbed the foundry 
iron market to some extent. Bessemer 
is held at $15.50 to $16, furnace, and No. 
2 foundry at $16 to $16.25. Forge iron 
is held at $16 to $16.10, Pittsburg, while 
Southern producers are willing to accept 
$13.50, Birmingham for No. 2. We re- 
vise quotation sas follows: 

Bessemer, Valley $15 50 to $16 00 

Bessemer, Pittsburg 16 35 to 16 85 

No. 1 Foundry 17 25 to 17 50 

No. 2 Foundry 16 8.5 to 17 35 

Gray fargp. Pittsburg 16 co to 16 25 

Basic, Vnlley IS 75 to 16 00 

Basic, Pittsburg 16 60 to 16 85 

Steel— Bessemer and open hearth bil- 
lets for prompt delivery in small lots are 
held at $25 f.o.b. mill", Pittsburg, while 
sheet bars are held at an advance of $2. 
Bessemer and open-hearth rods are held 
at $31 to $31.50, Pittsburg. 

Plates— Plate mills are gradually fall- 
ing behind on deliveries on account of 
the heavy specifications of the steel car 
works. Other lines are also increasing 
their plate orders and the plate situa- 
tion generally is very much improved. 

Bars— Specifications on steel bars are 
heavier than they have been at any time 
in the past year. On iron bars 1.70c 
Pittsburg continues to be firmly main- 
tained. Steel car plants in this district 
have covered iron bar requirements on 
only a small number of cars on fheir 
books and heavy buying from this source 
is anticipated in the near future. 

Sheets— Demand for sheets continues 
heavy and jobbers are laying in heavy 
stocks. In a few instances slight prem- 

31 



IRON 
STEEL 

and 

METALS 

Close prices to wholesale buyers only. 

A. C. LESLIE & CO. 

509-518 Merchants Bank Building, 
MONTREAL. 



Ask your customers 

if they don't need new pumps. 

If they do, sell them our 

Standard Anti- Freezing Pumps 

They'll appreciate getting a 
pump that doesn't have to be 
thawn out every zero morning. 



McDougall Pumps 
— Made in Canada. 



Write for Catalogue and Prices 
The 

E. McDougall Co. 
Limited 

Gait, Ont. 




B4INES £» PECKOVER 

TORONTO. 

Ontario Agents for 

B. K. MORTON & CO.'S 

"ALPHA" 

tllGtl SPEED STEEL 

AND 

Crucible Cast Steel 

Large stock on hand. Send for Stock 
List 



Nova Scotia Steel 
& Coal Co., Limits 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 

Manufacturers o f ™ ■ 

Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIEMENS MARTIN 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



Hardware and Metal. 



TUB MARKETS 



February 11 : 1905 



linns have been paid for prompt ship- 
ment, but most of the business is bein» 
•lone at prevailing prices. 

"Wire and Wire Nails— On February 
1 wire nails ami wire products were ad- 
vanced $1 a ton. This advance restores 
the prices on nails prevailing before the 
radical cut made on August 17, while 
plain wire is $1 lower and barbed $3 
lower. We revise quotations as follows: 
Wire nails, jobbers' carload lots, $1.80; 
retailers' carload lots, $1.85, and less 
than carloads. $1.95; painted barb wire, 
$1.95 to jobbers in carloads; retailers' 
carloads, $2, 'and less than carloads, 
$2.10, with 30 cents for galvanizing. 
Annealed smooth fence wire is held at 
$1.65, with the usual differentials to re- 
tailers for carloads and less- than car- 
loads. Quotations are all f.o.b. Pitts- 
burg, tiO days, with 2 per cent, discount 
for cash in ten days, iron cut nails are 
held at $1.85 Pittsbure 1 , and steel at 
$1.75. 

Merchant Steel— Demand continues 
heavy in all lines and prices continue to 
be firmly maintained. 

Structural Material— New business 
has been light, but the large number of 
new projects promise a heavy tonnage 
for the structural mills this year. Quo- 
tations are unchanged from last week. 

Old Material— We note the sale of 
5,000 tons of heavy melting stock to one 
of the large independent steel interests 
a1 $10.75, delivered at mill. The de- 
termination of one of the leading steel 
interests to take scrap on all steel con- 
tracts calling for billets on a sliding 
scale will take a large amount of scrap 
from the open market. 

Coke— On foundry coke the market is 
somewhat easier and is held at $2.75 to 
$3. Furnace coke is held at $2.50 to 
$2.60. During the week ending January 
28, the production of the upper region 
amounted to 266,436 tons, and the lower 
region produced 74,879 tons. 



A VALUABLE HANDBOOK. 

The annual report of the Department 
of Trade and Commerce has been issued 
(his week in a voluminous blue book. 
The report is very exhaustive and con- 
tains much information of value to busi- 
ness men. Copies can be procured by 
any reader of this paper, if they will 
make due application through " their 
member of Parliament. 



NEW BUILDING PAPERS. 

Mr. II. J. Wade, of the Union Fibre 
Works, Winona, Minn., is in Toronto for 
the purpose of introducing to the Cana- 
dian trade the insulation building papers 
manufactured by his firm. These papers 
arc manufactured under the brands of 
"Lith" and "Linofelt." The former is 
specially made for cold storage struc- 
tures and the latter for ordinary build- 
ings. The papers have a centre of wool 
silica and arc claimed to be impervious 
to heat and cold. Mr. Wade proposes to 
establish agencies. 



NICHOLSON FILES 

Are known all over the World. 
WARRANTED. 

QUICK CUTTING. LONG WEARING. 

SIX FACTORIES PRODUCING DAILY 120.000. 

Sold by all prominent merchants throughout the Dominion. 

PRICES RIGHT. 

DOMINION WORKS, - Port Hope, Ont. 



01LBERTS01V5__ Brand Galvanized Sheets 



COMET 

Agent: ALEXANDER GIBB, Montreal. 



are NOT a cheap grade, although the price is low. 
Every sheet guaranteed. 

Makers : M . OILBERTSON £» CO., Limited 
Pontardawe, South Wales. 



GALVANIZED FENCE HOOK ffjf r W ' T """ """""■ """" " *"" 

FENCE HOOK 



WIRE NAILS, COILED SPRING, 
BARB and PLAIN FENCE WIRE, 
OILED and ANNEALED, CLOTHES 
LINE WIRE, STAPLES, etc. 



THE WESTERN WIRE & NAIL CO., Limited, 



-LONDON, ONT 




THE JOHN MORROW MACHINE 
SCREW COMPANY, Limited 

Manufacturer* oi 

Set and Cap Screws, Special Hilled Work, Engine Studi. 
Etc Cold Fnnohed Nuts of every variety of flniih. 
INGERSOLL, ONT. 




Th i§ design a guar- 
antee of quality 



DO YOU PUBLISH A CATALOGUE ?A 

IF VOU DO YOU SHOULD USE " CAN ADIAN. MADE " PA 
All grades, from the highest "Glossy Finish" to the 
rough "Antique" and bulky "Featherweight." 

Canada Paper Co, 



YOUR PRINTER 
CAN SUPPLY IT, 



TORONTO 



MONTREAL 



The Hanover Portland Cement Co., Limited 



Manufacturers of • • 
the celebrated 



HANOVER, ONTARIO 

Saugeen Brand" 



OF PORTLAND CEMENT. 



Prices on application. 



Order a stock of 



"Windmill Best" 
Galvanized Sheets 



Cut Prloes 



Made by 



Quality Right 



John Summers & Sons, Ltd. 

STALYBRIDOE, ENO. 

Weekly output, 2,000 tons of sheets. 
Canadian Agent, 



F. HANKIN, 



Montreal 



THE 



"PERFECTION" 

Pleated 

Stove Pipe Elbow 




Will not get out of place. Guaranteed to fit and 
wear. Prices lower than any of the elbows now on 
the market, and is better value. A strong seller. 
Write to-day. Be in time for spring house-cleaning. 

St. Arnaud Freres 
425 St. Paul St., Montreal 



32 



February 11. 1905 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal. 



HARDWARE CONDITIONS IN MANITOBA. 

(Market quotations corrected by telegraph up till 11 a.m. Friday, Feb. 10, 1905.) 

Offlo* ot Hardware and Metal 

Room 515 Mclntyre Block, 

Winnipeg, Man. 



BONSPIEL week is always the occa- 
sion of the gathering in Winnipeg' 
of business men from all parts of 
Manitoba and from many points in the 
Territories and consequently it is looked 
forward to by the wholesale houses with 
anticipations of brisk sales. This year, 
although the curling contests began in 
the middle of the week the influx of 
non-curlers will not commence until un- 
til the second week during which the 
railways are offering reduced rates to the 

city. 

* * * 

As announced last week, it was 
thought advisable in view of this action 
on the part of the railways to postpone 
the conventions of the Western and 
Manitoba Retail Hardware and Stove 
Dealers' Associations until the after- 
noon and evening of February 14th. In 
view of these conventions it is probable 
that the hardware merchants will visit 
Winnipeg in greater numbers than will 
the grocers and dry goods men. The 
meeting of so many retailers in the city 
at this time affords an opportunity for 
the wholesale and retail branches of the 
trade to come into personal contact and 
any little misunderstandings can usually 
be adjusted at such times. 
* * # * 

Bonspiel week is the week of trade 
conventions. In addition to the meet- 
ing of the Retail Hardware Association 
there is to be a convention of the Mani- 
toba General Merchants Association on 
February 14th, loth and 16th. No doubt 
some readers of Hardware and Metal 
with whom hardware is only one of the 
lines carried in a general store are as 
much interested in this convention as 
in that of the Retail Hardware Asso- 
ciation. The General Merchants' As- 
sociation meet in the Trades and Labor 
Hall and the Retail Hardware Associa- 
tion in the Scott Memorial Hall. 

* * # 

Wholesale business is becoming a 
trifle more active. Values seem steady 
the most important change being a fur- 
ther reduction in petroleum. 

Wire — Spring delivery orders are now 
more numerous as prices seem to be set- 
tled for the season. We again quote: 

Barbed wire, ioo 10 J2 85 

Plain galvanized 6 to 8 3 39 

92 50 2 90 

Plain galvanized 10 3 50 

ia 3 10 

13 3 20 

14 3 90 

IS 4 45 

16 4 60 

Plain twist a 85 

Staples 3 35 

Oiled annealed wire , 10 2 96 

11 3<u 

ia 3 10 

13 3 ao 

14 3 3° 

15 3 45 

Annealed wires (unoiled) 10c. less. 

wire and Cut Nails— Prices are steady 
and, for the season, business is active. 



Some orders for Spring delivery are 
booking now. We again quote : 



Cut Nans — 

2d 1 in {4 00 

3d Fin. 1)^ in., t 09 

3d iH in 3 65 

4<i 1 % in 3 40 

id 1 \i in 3 40 

Sd 2 in 3 30 

8d 1% in 3 15 

iod 3 in 3 10 

aod 4 in 3 05 

3od 4K in 3 00 

4od 5 in 3 00 

<od 5Ji in 3 00 

ood 6 in 3 00 

Screws — Discounts 
We again quote : 



Wire iNaiis— 

1 in 4 

i}4 in 4 



1% 
iK 

a 

2% 

3 

3* 

4 

4* 

5 

5* 

6 



3 00 



are unchanged. 



Screws, flat bead, iron, bright 85 and 10 p.c. 

Round " " .. 80 p.c. 

Flat "brass 75 and 10 p.c. 

Round " " 70 and 10 p.c. 

Coach 70 p . c. 

Horseshoes — Prices are steady and 
trade quiet. We quote: 

t lul^caliuco, uuu, i\w« w iu »*u 1 $4 5 ' 

No. 2 and larger 4 30 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 480 

No. 2 and larger 4 55 

Steel , No . o to No. 1 4 70 

No. 2 and larger 4 45 

Horsenails— We quote list price and 
discounts as follows: 

ii. r .ia. , »\o. 4. — ,/i i.,., ii»i price o 48 

' 5 — 2 " o 32 

" 6— 2% " o 28 

' 7— aK " o 24 

" 8 — 2^ " O B2 

' 9 — 2% " " o 20 

" 10— 2H " o 20 

" II— 2*4 " O 20 

12 — 2% "• " O 20 

" 14— i 1 /* " <> 20 

Discounts on these prices are for "C" brand 
40, 10 and 7Vi per cent., for other brands 55 and 
60 per cent. Add 15c. per box. 

Nuts and Bolts— There are no new 
features. Trade is fairly active. We 
quote discounts as follows: 
BjIis,, carriage, H <->i smaller 60 and 5 p.c. 

7-16 and up 55 p.c. 

Bolts, machine, H and under 55 and 5 p.c. 

7- 16 and over 55P-C. 

Bolts, tire 65 p.c. 

Bolt ends 55 P-c 

Sleigh shoe bolts 65 and 10 p.c. 

Machine screws 70 p.c. 

Plough bolts 55 p c. 

Square nuts, case lots 3c. discount. 

" " small lots 2}ic. 

Hex " case lots 3c. 

" smaller lots 2&c. 

Rivets — Discounts continue as follows: 

Rivals, non 60 and 10 p.c. 

Copper, No. 8 a$y t 

" No. 12 33 

Coil Chain— We quote again as fol- 
lows : 

Coil chain, 3-16 inch 

H inch 

5-16 inch 

H inch 

7-16 inch 

H inch 

H inch „ 

H inch 



9-a5 

7.25 

5.20 

1 4 60 

445 

4 3° 

4-i<> 

4-3° 

Shovels— The discount on spades and 
shovels continues 40 and 5 per cent. 
Harvest Tools— Discount GO per cent. 
3.t 




Corrugated Iron 

For Sidings, ^Roofings, 
Ceilings, Etc. 

Absolutely free from defects — made 
from very finest sheets. 

Each sheet is accurately squared, 
and the corrugations pressed one at a 
time — not rolled — giving" an exact fit 
without waste. 

Any desired size or gauge — galvan- 
ized or painted — straight or curved. 

Send us your specifications. 

The cMetattic Roofing Co, 

WHOLESALE MANFRS. LIMITED 
TORONTO, CANADA. 



Axe Handles— We quote : 

Ajkc Ijc&nUiea, milled, s.g. i.iLhu! > , doz. . $3 15 

No. 1 1 90 

No. 2 1 60 

Octagon extra 2 30 

No. 1 1 60 

Files, — We again quote as follows: 

A. cade 70 mi a iu p.c. 

" Black Diamond " 60 p.c. 

" Nicholson's " 62V4 p.c. 

Building Paper— For the Winter sea- 
son present delivery business is brisk 
and Spring business is good. We quote 
1 rices again as follows: 

Anchor, plain 65c. 

" tarred 70c. 

Pure fibre, plain 67XC. 

" tarred 80c. 

/ammunition, Etc.— We again quote: 

AmiuuulUou, cai inures, ixjiiiiliioli K.r . 

50 and s p.c. 

Dominion.C.F., pistol 30 p.c. 

military m p.c. 

Ammunition, cartridges, American R.F. ?3H p.c. 

C. F. pistol 5 p.c. 

C.F. nvlitary 10 p.c. advance. 

Loaded shells : 

Eley's and Kynoch's soft, 12 gauge 

black 15 00 

chilled , 12 gauge 1 o 00 

soft, 10 gauge 18 00 

chilled, 10 gauge 1900 

Shot, Ordinary, per 100 ib 6 25 

Chilled o 75 

Powder, F.F., keg, Hamilton .. 4 75 

F.F.G., Dupont's 5 00 

Tinware, Etc. — We quote again as 

follows : 

l m ware, pressed, returned 70 ana 10 p.c. 

" plain 75 and 2% p.c. 

" pieced 30 p.c. 

Japanned ware 37 % p.c. 

Enamelled ware, white 45 p.c. 

Famous 50 p.c. 

Imperial 50 and 10 p.c. 

Cordage— Since the advance in sisal 

some weeks ago (here has been no fur- 
ther change in the local cordage mar- 
ket. Prices are steady. We quote: 

Rupc, sisal, 7-iO and laigel, basis II 25 

Manila, 7-16 and larger, basis 15 25 

Lathy arn 1 1 25 



Hardware and Metal. 



THE MARKETS 



February 11, 1905 




ON TOP FOR 

40 YEARS 

and looks good for 
another term. 

One Dealer wanted 
for each town in the 
West. A good live pro- 
position for a live man. 

If there is no agency 
in your town, write 

for our Color Cards, 

etc., or if already handl- 
ing Elephant Paints, 
revise your special Col- 
or Card for 1905, and 

mail it to us. We are 
now ready for it. 



OUR 
Stock is complete. 

Quality the best. 

Prices are right. 



MERRICK, 

ANDERSON 

<gb CO., 

WINNIPEG, - - MAN. 



Axes — Quotations are: 

Axes, chopping f 6 75 to 12 00 

" double bitts 12 00 to 18 00 

Solder— Quoted at 21c. 

.biuestone — Steady at recent advance 
to $5.75. 

Iron and Steel — Prices continue as 
follows : . 

Bar iron (basis) 2 50 

Swedish iron (basis) 4 75 

Sleigh shoe steel 2 65 

Spring steel £ 00 

Machinery steel 3 50 

Tool steel, Black Diamond, ioolb 9 50 

Jessop 13 00 

Black Sheets— We quote again as fol- 
lows: 

Black sheets, 10 to 16 gauge, 100 lb 3 5° 

18 to 33 gauge 3 75 

34 gauge 3 90 

sft gauge 4 00 

28 gauge 4 10 

Galvanized Iron— We quote: 

Apollo, 16 gauge 4 co 

18 and 20 gauge 4 00 

w2 and 24 gauge,. 4 25 

26 gauge 4 50 

28 gauge 4 50 

30 gauge or 10 K or 4 75 

Queen's Head, 24 gauge 4 25 

36 gauge 4 50 

a8 " 4 75 

Tin Plates— Pi-ices continue unchang- 
ed as follows: 

Tinplate, IC charcoal, 20 x 28, box .... 10 00 

IX " :a co 

IXX " ..... 1400 

Ingot Tin— Quoted at 35 cents. 
Canada Plates — Prices are steady at 
former figures. We quote: 

Canada plaic, 10*21,10x24 3 25 

Canada plate, 20 x 28 353 

Canada plate, full polished 4 00 

Sheet Zinc — Cask lots are quoted at 
$8.25 per 100 lbs., and broken lots at 
$8.75. 

Pig Lead— Quoted at $4.50 per 100 
lbs. 

Iron Pipe— Trade is active and prices 
steady. We quote: 

Black iron pipe, 'A inch 

H " 2 45 

H " a °5 

" X " 3 °° 

H " 380 

1 " 5 50 

" IK " 7 45 

iX " 8 93 

" 3 " 13 30 

Petroleum— Another reduction of l-2c 
has been made in the Imperial Oil Com- 
pany's brands. The Canadian Oil Co. 
has made a reduction of 1 l-2e from 
figures quoted in these columns last 
week. We now quote: 

Silver Star, per gal 20V2C. 

Sunlight " ii'/ic. 

Eocene " 23',/jC. 

Pennoline " 24i4c. 

Crystal Spray " 23 Vic 

Silver Light 2i»/ s c. 

(In barrels f.o.b. Winnipeg.) 

Paints and Oils— Turpentine is steady 
at the reduction to 84c for barrel lots 
recently noted. General business in 
paints and oils is still quiet but some 
improvement is noted. We quote : 

White lead (pure) & 00 to J5 50 

Bladder putty, in bbls o ozy t 

" " in kegs o 02 X 

Turpentine, pure, in barrels % o 87 

Less than barrel lots o 92 

Linseed oil, raw o 55 

Boiled o 58 

14 



Window Glass— The glass market is 

very firm but prices are unchanged. We 
quote : 

16-oz. O.G.. single, in 50-ft. boxes — 

16 to 25 united inches $2 25 

26 to 40 2.50 

16-oz. O.G., tingle, in 100-ft. cases — 

16 to 25 united inches 4.00 

26 to «o " 4.25 

4t 'o 5° 475 

51 t° 60 5-*5 

6: to 70 " 5.75 

21-oz C.S., double, in 100-ft. cases— 6.30 

26 to 40 united inches 7.35 

41 to 50 '• 8.40 

?I to 60 " 9.45 

6t to 70 " 10.50 

71 to 80 11 55 

81 to 85 " 12.60 

86 to 90 " 1470 

91 »o 95 17.35 

96 to 100 " 



TRADE AND PERSONAL NOTES. 

J. H. Webster, Ponoka, Alta., is en- 
larging his hardware store. 

J. Boxall, of Boxall & Mattie, Lind- 
say, visited Toronto this week. 

Mr. F. G. Wooster, a well-known con- 
tractor, of Montreal, died on February 7. 

N. Healey, contractor, of Sudbury, 
called on Toronto hardware men this 
week. 

The annual meeting of the Dominion 
Coal Company will be held in Montreal 
on March 2. 

Mr. A. H. Campbell, of A. C. Leslie 
& Company, of Montreal, is in Howick, 
Que., this week on business. 

H. Keys, of Keys & Morrison, Lind- 
say, called on the wholesale plumbing 
trade in Toronto this week. 

The Canada Radiator Company of 
Port Hope expect to move to Montreal 
in the course of a few weeks. 

The Brooks-Smith Hardware Company, 
113 Bav street, Toronto, are putting in 
a modern front to their store. 

Baker & Bryans, Limited, have taken 
over the Lindsay branch of the business 
of the Rathbun Lumber Company. 

W. Dewar, representing Mackie & 
Ryan, of Pembroke, was a caller on the 
Toronto wholesalers a few days ago. 

Marshall & Bie, Oil Springs, offer 
their hardware business for sale. All 
bids must be in by Thursday, Feb. 23. 

Brown & Semple, Brockville, have 
completed their contract of plumbing 
and heating the new armory at Cobourg. 

D. K. McLaren, leather belting manu- 
facturer, Montreal, has opened a branch 
at 169 Prince William street, St. John, 
N.B. 

Mr. C. C. Ballantyne, manager of the 
Sherwin-Williams Company, of Montreal, 
has returned from a business trip to 
Ottawa. 

Hamilton City has decided to take 
over the plant of the Kramer-Irwin 
Company and will do its own asphalt 
repair work in future. 

H. F. Falkiner, Ontario agent for Sol- 
aiine Co., has found it necessarv to add 
to his space, and has leased the adjoin- 
ing premises, 58 George street, Toronto. 

Mr. W. K. George, president of the 
Standard Silver Company, of Toronto, 
attended the banquet of the Canadian 
Industrial League, held at Halifax this 
week. 

Mr. H. G. Hollis, manager of the New 
Yoik office of the Lufkin Rule Company, 
of Saginaw, Mich., was a visitor at the 
Montreal office of Hardware and Metal 
this week. 

G. G. S. Lindsey, K.C., general man- 
ager, and D. Davies, comptroller, of the 
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company, ar- 



February 11, 1905 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal 



Established Over 



SIR H. MONTAGU ALLAN, 

President. 



Fifty Years. 



A*N 



D. LORNE McGIBBON, 

General Manager 



EVERYTHING IN 



^ 



UJl 



ALWAYS UNIFORM 

ALWAYS RELIABLE 

ALWAYS IN DEMAND 



'o E «►' 



"Red Star" 

Sheet 

Packing 



HIGH QUALITY 

HONEST SERVICE 

COMPLETE SATISFACTION 

K6Q OldT is the original High 
Grade Sheet Packing, a winner all the time 

Some of the other Packings are gooc 
Packings, but — 

"Red Star" is without a Rival. 



Write for a Free Sample. 



Sales Branches and Warehouses 



172 Granville St., 
Halifax, N.S. 



Imperial Bank Building, 
Montreal, Que. 



Front and Yonge Sts., 
Toronto, Ont. 



Princess St., 
Winnipeg, Man. 



Cordova St., 
Vancouver, B.C. 



The Canadian Rubber C? of Montreal 



WHILE good Queen ANNE was still occupying the THRONE of England and the 
HEART of the nation was still fiercely throbbing with the news of the VICTORY of 
Blenheim and Oudenharde, SKILLED MECHANICS were BUSY turning out and 
IMPROVING a line of SCYTHES, SICKLES, GARDEN TOOLS, etc., in a little village 
called HACKENTHORPE, near Sheffield, Eng. 

These goods are being made and' sold to-day after nearly 200 years of EXPE- 
RIENCE and steady IMPROVEMENT by THOS. STANIFORTH & CO. 




WARRANTED "HAND FORCED 



If YOUR jobber does not keep them, write JAS. S. PARKES, 446-448 St. Paul 
Street, Montreal, and he will tell you where to get them. 



35 



HARDWARE AND METAi 



February ll. 1905 



CONDENSED OR "WANT" 
ADVERTISEflENTS. 



Advertisements under this beading, 2c. a word first 
Insertion; lc. a word each subsequent insertion. 

Contractions count as one word, but five figures (as 
11.000) are allowed as one word. 

Cash remittance to cover cost must accompany all 
advertisements. I n n o cist can this rule be overlook- 
ed. Advertisements received without remittance 
cannot be acknowledged. 

Where replies come to our care to be forwarded, five 
cents must De added to cost to cover postage, etc. 



YEARLY CONTRACT RATE8. 

100 words e»ch insertion, 1 year $30 00 

" " " 6 months 17 00 

" 3 months 10 00 

50 " " 1 year 17 00 

" " " 6 months 10 00 

26 " " 1 year 10 00 



MANUFACTURERS' AGENT WANTED. 

AN English firm who make a specialty of brass 
tubing, all kinds ; brass and copper sheets, 
German silver, rolled brass and wire, want an 
agent for Toronto and district. Address Box 209, 
Hardware and Metal, Toronto. (tf) 



CLERK WANTED. 

HARDWARE Clerk wanted at once. Must be a 
good salesman and stock-keeper. Write, 
stating salary, to Boxall & Matthie, Lindsay, (10) 

BUSINESS CHANCES 

THE LOCATORS — W. B. Herbert, general 
manager. The largest and oldest exclusive- 
business brokers in the West. Address The 
Locators, 63 Merchants Bank Building, Winnipeg. 

HARDWARE and Lumber — Well established 
business, located about two hundred miles 
from Winnipeg. Hardware stock, seven thousand 
five hundred ; Lumber, seven thousand. Real 
estate, six thousand; half ca*-h ; doing sp'endid 
business. Enquire at once. The Locators. 

HARDWARE and Tin Shop — Situated about 
one hundred and six miles from Winnipeg on 
the C.N.R. Stock twenty-five hundred; seven- 
teen hundred and fifty cash, balance arranged. 
Three elevators. Rent twenty-two. The Lo- 
cators. 

HARDWARE — Tenitories. Five thousand 
stock; four elevators ; splendid country. En- 
quire now. The Locators. 

HARDWARE — In good Manitoba town about 
sixty miles from Winnipeg. Forty-three 
hundred stock, doing fifteen thousand yearly. 
Thirty-five hundred cash. Population over two 
thousand. Rent fifteen. The Locators. 

HARDWARE — In Saskatchewan. Thirty-five 
hundred stock, doing twelve thousand, clear- 
ing thirty-five hundred yearly. Splendid invest- 
ment. The Locators. 

HARDWARE— In well settled Manitoba town of 
six hundred. Stock fifty-five hundred, doing 
twelve thousand. Five elevators, thirteen other 
stores. One of the best in the West. Write 
about this to-day. The Locators. 

OUR new book is in the printer's hands. If you 
desire to secure a copy write us now and 
your name will be registered. Address The Lo- 
cators, 63 Merchants' Bank Building, Winnipeg. 

AGENCY WANTED. 

LONDON, ENGLAND — Firm of wholesale 
merchants, energetic and experienced, estab- 
lished in London, successfully representing im- 
portant Belgian manufacturers of oil stoves and 
lamps for Great Britain and Colonies, desires one 
or two manufacturers' agencies of special lines, 
preferably such that appeal to same class of cus- 
tomers. Home trade and export. Please address 
Landau & Co., 76-78 York Street, Westminster, 
London. (7) 



rived in Toronto on Saturday from Brit- 
ish Columbia. 

J. H. Plummet', president and manag- 
ing director of the Dominion Steel and 
Iron Company, who has been ill at his 
residence, "Greenwood," Sydney, N.S., 
for the past few weeks, is improving. 

J. A. Carrick, who has been the Lon- 
don manager of the Queen City Oil Com- 
pany for the past seven years, is coming 
to Toronto, having been appointed as- 
sistant general manager of the company. 

By a typographical error in the an- 
nouncement of the Lumen Bearing Co.'s 
opening in Toronto in the last issue of 
this paper, the name of the assistant 
manager was given as Palet. This 
should have been Patch. 

Shirley Keeling, Kaslo, B.C., has been 
appointed by the Department of Trade 
and Commerce as assistant inspector, in 
connection with the supervision of claims 
for bounty on lead contained in lead- 
bearing ores mined in Canada. 

The R. H. Smith Company, St. Ca- 
tharines, manufacturers of saws, plaster- 
ing trowels, etc., state that they have 
no intention of merging their business in 
the new Canada Saw Company, which 
is taking over the saw business of sev- 
eral Canadian manufacturers. The St. 
Catharines company have no connection 
with any other concern and do not in- 
tend to enter any combination of manu- 
facturers. 



THE HOCKEY SEASON. 

The James Morrison Brass Mfg. Co.'s 
hockey team is still leading the Western 
Manufacturers' Hockey League, showing 
the other teams that they are made of 
good metal and letting them understand 
that the plumbers have a "lead pipe 
cinch" on the championship. 

Last week The James Morrison team 
again defeated the J. T. Brown skaters 
and on Wednesday night the Inglis' boys 
did battle with the Jones Bros.' team, 
the game resulting in a win for the for- 
mer. A game to have been played be- 
tween Morrisons and the C.P.R. the 
same evening was postponed owing to 
the heavy snow. 

Won Lost To PI. 

Jas. Morrison 5 3 

Jones Bros 2 2 4 

John Inglis 2 15 

J. T. Brown 13 5 

C P. R 4 4 

A match played on the Minto Rink, 
Montreal, on Saturday evening, Feb. 4, 
between the Peck Rolling Mills and 
Binks & Co., resulted in a win for the 
former by the score of 2 to 1. The line- 
up was as follows: 

Binks & Co. (1)— Pratt, Paterson, 
Hough, Benson, A. Hill, W. Hill, and 
Watterman. 

Peck Rolling Mills (2)— Laing, Jones, 
Bartram, Brine, Baker, McCrudden and 
Cameron. 

The travelers and warehousemen em- 
ployed by the H. S. Howland Hardware 
Company mixed things up in a hockey 
match recently, the knights of the grip 
proving themselves to be good travelers 
on skates, as well as travelers with 
skates, they winning by a score of four 
to three. Messrs. Wright and Martin, of 
the winning team, especially distinguish- 
ed themselves with their western vigor 
in chasing the puck between the goals. 
The warehousemen vow vengeance and 
promise to get even when Summer comes 
and thaws them out sufficiently to meet 
the travelers in a baseball match. 
36 



In the 
Year 1865 



We commenced the manufacture of 
Horse Nails in Canada, and for the 
past forty years have been continu- 
ously employed in their production. 

We have enjoyed the reputation 
— deservedly, we think — of making 
the best Horse Nails made in Can- 
ada, and equal to any made else- 
where. Our registered trade mark 
and brand (the letter " Q ") is, 
and has always been, the symbol 
and standard for the best quality. 

We are making to-day a better 
Horse Nail — if possible — than ever. 
The advance in the knowledge of 
the Metallurgy of Steel, and the 
better and more uniform production 
of same, has placed at our com- 
mand a material made especially for 
our requirements and imported by 
us from Sweden, which has no 
superior in the world for the pur- 
pose of making Horse Nails. 

When, therefore, you buy a box 
of " Q " brand Horse Nails, you 
will receive the results of forty years 
of manufacturing experience, com- 
bined with the use of the best ma 
terial known or used by any manu 
facturer in the world — and don't 
forget— "MADE IN CANADA." 



Canada Horse Nail Co. 

MONTREAL 



February 11, 1905 



Hardware and Metal. 




Hardware and Metal would be pleased to receive from any author itati?e source industrial news of any sort, the 
formation or incorporation of companies, establishment or enlargement of mills, factories foundries or other 
works, railway or mining news, eto. All such correspondence will be treated as confidential when desired. 



THE new blast furnace, coke and 
roasting ovens and pig iron smelt- 
er which McKenzie & Mann pro- 
pose to establish at Port Arthur to 
treat the ores from the mines at Ati- 
kokan, will probably be located on a 
site just south of the Mclntyre River. 
It is now announced that the railway 
company has closed a contract for the 
location by the Pittsburg Coal Company 
of immense ore docks on the north side 
of the river. This company has been 
looking for a site for over a year upon 
which to erect docks. It is said the 
docks will be of a size sufficient for the 
purposes of the railway and the coal 
company's own trade. The docks will be 
the most modern on the lakes and will 
employ several hundred men during the 
season of navigation. 

Clark & Demill, Gait, are moving 
their machinery to their new factory at 
Hespeler. 

A new electric line is proposed to be 
erected between St. Jerome and Lake 
Achigan, Quebec. 

The Standard Windmill and Manufac- 
turing Company of Michigan are arrang- 
ing to establish a factory at Whitby. 

The net earnings of the Halifax Elec- 
tric Railway for 1904 were $137,523, or 
equal to 10.18 per cent, on the capital 
stock. 

A company has been incorporated to 
build a railway from Spokane to the in- 
ternational boundary to connect with the 
C.P.R. 

J. M. Ross & Co., St. Catharines, 
have settled their differences with that 
city over the payment of a bonus of 
$20,000. 

The Niagara Falls Foundry and Ma- 
chine Company has paid a dividend of 6 
per cent, for the seven months since its 
reorganization. 

The Hamilton and Barton Electric- 
Railway Company did not declare any 
dividend for 1904, about $12,000 being 
spent in improving the property. 

The Canadian Meter Company is mov- 
ing from Windsor to Hamilton. They 
will manufacture gas and other meters 
in the old Evans mill on Caroline street. 
Japan bought goods worth $249,500 
from Canada last year, $9,137 less than 
the preceding year. Canada's importa- 
tions from Japan showed a decline of 
$281,130. 

The Ottawa Eleptric Railway Com- 
pany's net earnings in 1904 were $139,- 
097.70. Dividends of 8 per cent, were 
declared and $9,999 was paid to the city 
as mileage. 

A branch factory of the Henderson 
Roller Bearing Company will be estab- 
lished in Winnipeg. R. I. Henderson, 
manager of the company, says 60 men 
will be employed. 

The Canadian Barcalo Mfg. Co., Well- 
and, has commenced manufacturing brass 
and iron bedsteads and bed springs in 
the factory recently vacated by the 
Frost Wire Fence Company. 

The Betz Manufacturing Company, 
Hamilton, Ohio, arc negotiating regard- 
ing the establishment of a branch fac- 
tory at Hamilton Ontario. They make- 



laundry machinery and paper mill spe- 
cialties. 

No. 2 blast furnace, at the Dominion 
Iron and Steel Works, Sydney, N. S., 
produced an average of 300 tons of pig 
iron daily last month. This is more 
than both No. 1 and No. 2 furnished in 
January, 1904. 

The Penden Nail Works Company, St. 
John, N.B., are erecting a new mill. 
Each $100 share in the company has 
paid $240 in dividends in twelve years 
and, while only $77,000 of the capital 
stock was paid up, there is a surplus of 
$97,000 in the bank. 

The Simplex Railway Appliance Com- 
pany, which already has had numerous 
very large orders, with the different 
Canadian railways, has started work on 
a plant below Montreal West, which will 
cover thirty acres of land, and besides 
turning out all kinds of appliances may 
also go into car building. 

Two large enterprises are proposed to 
be established at Esquimalt, B.C., if the 
British naval station is abolished. One 
plan is to establish a monster sawmill 
and a wharf capable of accommodating 
the largest vessels, while the other is 
to erect large iron works. Local and 
English capitalists are said to be inter- 
ested. 

The Montreal plant of the Canadian 
General Electric Company, it is an- 
nounced, will be shut down in April, and 
the equipment removed to Peterboro,' 
because the cost of power is one-third 
greater in Montreal than it is in Peter- 
boro.' It is further pointed out that 
lower factory costs follow very low cost 
of power, and the company look to ef- 
fect an economy of fully 20 per cent, in 
these costs as compared with Montreal. 

A Vancouver company has been incor- 
porated for the manufacture of wire and 
wire nails. The president and managing 
director are at present on a trip through 
the United States looking up machinery. 
Contracts have been placed for a con- 
tinuous supply of steel rods and other 
raw material to insure an output of 
from 50 to 200 tons per month at the 
start. No shares in this company are 
offered to the public, all the capital hav- 
ing been secured privately. 

A company is proposed to be incor- 
porated at Sydney, C. B., to build a dry 
dock, acquire" a 200-ton wrecking steam- 
er, and establish steel shipbuilding works 
capable of turning out 15,000 tons an- 
nually. The name chosen for the under- 
taking is The Shipbuilding & Wrecking 
and Dry Dock Company. Limited. The 
city of Sydney has been asked to give a 
bonus of $250,000. Axel Johnson of 
Stockholm, and the Dominion Iron and 
Steel Co. are said to be behind the en- 
terprise. 

The new electric lighting system which 
is owned and controlled by the city of 
Moose Jaw, Assiniboia, is now in effec- 
tive operation. The electrical apparatus 
including the generator, switchboard, 
pole line and wiring system, was sup- 
plied by Allis-Chalmers-Bullock, Limit- 
ed, Montreal. The generator is a 2- 
phase 2200-volt 100-K.W. Bullock revolv- 

37 



ing field type. The power house is 
equipped with a tandem compounding 
condensing engine of lfiO h.p., built by 
the Robb Engineering Company of Am- 
herst, N.S. When the pumps are in- 
stalled the cost of the building and ma- 
chinery will be in the neighborhood of 
thirty-eight thousand dollars. The 
whole equipment is thoroughly efficient 
and modern. 

COMPANIES INCORPORATED. 

Great Northern Lumber Company, 
Limited, Toronto, share capital $50,000; 
purpose to deal in timber limits, mines, 
quarries, etc. . The directors are: J. 
Milne, E. D. Watts, W. R. Duff, J. L. 
Ross and A. W. Holmestead, all of To- 
ronto. 

Canada Folding Box Company, Limit- 
ed, Brantford, share capital $40,000, 
purpose to manufacture paper boxes and 
packages. The directors are: M. H. 
Robertson, J. H. Crompton, C. F. Ram- 
say, W. A. Russell and B. C. Bell, all 
of Brantford. 

Bessemer Iron Mines of Ontario, Lim- 
ited, S. Ste. Marie, share capital $200,- 
000; purpose to carry on mining in all 
its branches. The incorporators are: R. 
Henrv, E. C. B. Sutton, C. W. Baldwin, 
T. Bailey and B. Standish, all of S. 
Ste. Marie, Mich. 

Nico'a Valley Coal & Coke Company, 
St. Catharines', share capital $1,000,000; 
purpose to mine coal, manufacture coke, 
etc. The directors are : E. A. Jukes, 
Toronto, W. S. McNamara, H. E. Lar- 
kin, F. N. Hara and W. D. Woodruff, all 
of St. Catharines. 

Dominion Camp Equipment Company, 
Limited, Montreal, share- capital $20,- 
000; purpose to manufacture and deal in 
camp ranges, etc. The directors are : 
D. W. Lockerby, A. H. Scott, J. H. 
McComb, A. M. Wolvenden and C. A. 
Lockerby, all of Montreal. 

Commercial Rubber Company, Limit- 
ed, Montreal, share capital $20,000; pur- 
pose to develop water and electric power 
and manufacture rubber goods. The di- 
rectors are: R. D. McGibbon, D. Arm- 
our, S. J. Le Huray, K. J. Beardwood, 
and L. L. Legault, all of Montreal. 

Canadian Appraisal Company, Limit- 
ed, Montreal, share capital $50,000; pur- 
pose to make surveys, construct indus- 
trial plants, adjust properties, audit 
books, etc. The directors are: F. Paul, 
W. M. Doull, P. C. Ryan, L. Guest, H. 
Seymour and E. Dowson, all of Mont- 
real. 

Dominion Cement Block Machine Com- 
pany, Limited, Ottawa, share- capital 
$100,000; purpose to deal in (cement 
block machinery, construct buildings, 
etc. The directors are: C. A. Irvin, C. 
H. Hutchings, and II. P. Fleming, of 
Ottawa, and C. E. B. Adams and J. II. 
Hall of Toronto. 

McFarlane, Thompson & Anderson 
Manufacturing Company, Limited, Fred- 
ericton, N.B., share capital $75,000; pur- 
pose to carry on a general manufactur- 
ing business in iron and wood. The di- 
rectors are: Hon. - F. P. Thompson, W. 
Kitchen, W. T. Whitehead, C. A. Miles, 
and A. J. Thompson, all of Fredericton. 

Hill Crest Coal & Coke Company, 
Limited, Montreal, share capital $500,- 
000; purpose to mine coal, manufacture 
coke, etc. The directors are: R. H. 
Pope, Cookshire, Que.; G. W. Fowler, 
Sussex, N.B.; M. P. Davis, Ottawa; W. 
Farewell, Sherbrooke, Que. ; R. A, 
Pringle. Cornwall, Out., and C. P, Hill, 
Frank, Alberta. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



February 11, 1905 



COVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy, N.Y. 

\\ Steei Carriage and Wagon Jacks 

JJ Harness Snaps, Chain, Rope end Web 
Goods, etc. 

1^7; SOLD BY ALL LEADING JOBBERS. 



PRIEST'S CLIP PER5 

Largest Variety , 

Toilet, Hand, Electric Power J 

, ARE THE BEST. 

Highest Quality Grooming and 
Sheep-Shearing Machines. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

SEND FOB CATALOGUE TO 
■erlran Shearer Mte. Co., Nashua. H.H..USA 

Wiebusch & Hilger, Limited, special New York 
representatives, 9-15 Murray Street. 





TO MANUFACTURERS' 
AGEISTS : 

Hardware and Metal has enquiries 
from time to time from manufacturers and 
others wanting representatives in the leading 
business centres here and abroad. 

Firms or individua s open for agencies in Canada 
or abroad may have their names and addresses 
placed on a special list kept for the information of 
enquirers in our various offices throughout Canada 
and in Great Britain without charge. 



Address 



Business Manager 



HARDWARE A1SD METAL 

Montreal and Toronto. 




MAXimum LIGHT 




INNER SURFACE OF 
MAXIMUM LIGHT GLASS 



GLASS 



The only daylight-increasing window glass 
combining LENSES and PRISMS. 

Involves new applications of daylight. Should not b« confused 
with ordinary corrugated or prismatic glass. 

This product can be cut, glazed and mounted. 

In lead, copper or iron intersecting bars, from architects' special 
designs. 

Send for Valuable Descriptive Booklet — Free. 



CANADIAN REPRESENTATIVES 



THE HOBBS MANUFACTURING CO., Limited, LONDON, ONT. 

Glass Importers and Manufacturers 



38 



February 11, 1905 

WALL PAPER. 

QUAINT WALL PAPER. 

THE oldest landscape wall paper I ever saw, writes 
Frank D. Sanborn, was in the parlor of President 
Wean, of Hampton Falls, a simple hunting scene 
with three compartments; a deer above, a dog below, 
and a hunter with his horn below that. It was put on 
in 1737, when the house was built, and I think is there 
still. Colonel Whiting's house, built about 1815, had a 
more elaborate and extensive scene, what the French 
called "Montagnes Russes," artificial hills in a park, for 
sliding down toboggan-fashion, and a score of people using 
them or looking on. The oldest papers were patterned 
first after old tapestry. 

Portsmouth, New Hampshire, can boast of several an- 
tique papers. One house has its walls papered with an 
illustration of "The Lady of the Lake." The papers in 
the homes of former professors of Dartmouth College are 
carefully preserved and will probably always be allowed 
to remain. One depicts the Bay of Naples and Mount 
Vesuvius; the other the seasons. The Bay of Naples 
theme seems to have been most admired a hundred years 
ago. Rev. Wallace Nutting, of Providence, R.I., whose 



Hardware and Metal. 




i*ETU$N£a 






mmMw 






■ism 

SSJLi 




Wall Paper Design for 1904, Manufactured by Staurjtons Limited, "Toronto. 

fame as an artistic photographer is widespread, sent me 
a picture of a parlor in St. Johnsbury, Vt., where he 
found this paper. Three women dressed in old-fashioned 
style, even to the arrangement of their hair, are seated 
at table, enjoying a cup of tea. An old tabby is napping 
cosily in a soft-cushioned chair. And above, on the right, 
Vesuvius is pouring forth the usual volumes of smoke. A 
fine old mahogany sideboard, at the foot of the volcano, 
decorated with decanters and glasses large and small, 
presents an inviting picture. 













tf 









ARE YOU READY 

FOR THE 

Wall Paper 
Season ? 

IF NOT 

WRITE US TO SEND (prepaid) 

SAMPLES OF OUR BEST 

SELLING LINES FOR 



1905. 

STAUNTONS 

LIMITED 

MANUFACTURERS 

TORONTO _ 

! Cs\ 



W 



ii^' 







"LOOK FOR THE BOY' every roll 



We have made a study of the good 
qualities of 

REX FUNTKOTE 
ROOFING 

nd if vou would become acquainted with it 
rou would be as enthusiastic about its good 
qualities as we, and use it in preference to 
shingles, tar, tin, gravel, or any other roof- 
ng. It is fast superseding all of these, 
as it costs less, lasts lo:i?er, and has 
none of their faults or defects. It is 
made of the best matted wool fibre 
treated by our own compounds, and 
is waterproof and five-resisting. We *kwbhm>» c 
will seno free samples and our hand- 
ome illustrated book on re- 
ceipt of your name. 

J. A. & W. BIRD & CO., 

47 India Street, 

Boston, Mass. 



Hardware and Metal. 



February 11. 1905 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Painting Kitchen Walls. 

A PAINTER recently wrote the 
Painters' Magazine stating' that 
he had painted the sand finished 
walls and ceiling of a kitchen four coats 
of paint as follows: First coat, lead, 
oil and dryer, very thin; second coat, 
the same, but heavy; third coat, lead 
and turpentine, and fourth coat, the 
same, and is afraid that the job will not 
wear well, as it is likely to have rough 
usage and will require frequent wash- 
ing. He was replied to as follows: 
Kitchen walls and ceilings are usually 
finished in gloss, as flat finish smuts 
too much, and the best thing to do is to 
wash down the finish with soap and 
water, to which a little ammonia is add- 
ed and then give it a good coat of in- 
side varnish or oil paint. 

Decline of the Belgian Window Glass 
Industry. 

Time was when Belgium was the win- 
dow glass maker of the world, but that 
time has passed, never to return, says 
the Budget. She never utilized the ^lass 
she made, but exported it to every 
country on the globe. Her workmen 
are aiding her downfall. Spain, Italy, 
Germany, France, Holland, Russia, 
Portugal, and the United States, have 
all built up their window glass industry 
with the assistance of Belgian work- 
men, and while England alone preceded 
Belgium in the development and utiliza- 
tion of the continuous tank furnace as 
applied to the manufacture of window 
glass, it is nevertheless true that the 
Piovingtons guarded their secret and its 
advantages so well and closely that the 
world gained no knowledge on tank 
furnace construction from England. The 
window glass industry of the world is 
therefore indebted to Belgian engineers 
and manufacturers tor such advantages 
as have accrued from tank furnace per- 
fection and installation, and all coun- 
tries making' window glass (including 
England, for Bontemps went there in 
1836 and introduced the French-Bel- 
gian cylinder blowing process in the 
works of Chance Brothers, which dis- 
placed the flaring or crown glass pro- 
cess) have profited by the cylinder pro- 
cess in which she excelled, and which, 



if she did not originate, she led the 
world in. and compelled its universal 
adoption. 

The blow furnace, which in America 
has been generally ascribed to English 
origin, is a Belgian invention, and was 
introduced into England by Bontemps. 
Its advantage to the industry has been 
incalculable. 

And yet, strange as it may appear, the 
country which has made these three 
great contributions— the cvlinder pro- 
cess, the blow furnace and the con- 
tinuous tank furnace to the window 
glass industry, is losing ground, losing 
export trade, and her orderly output 
has declined to a mere shadow of its 
former magnificent proportions. And 
the strongest part of the story is that 
her skilled workmen, who are the best 
paid in Europe, by their dissentions, 
bickerings and petty jealousies, ai - e the 
willing sextons of the industry from 
which for more than two-thirds of a 
century, they have drawn their sus- 



tenance, derived their social standing, 
and gained that economic pre-eminence 
in the industrial world which they are 
now about to so lightly fritter away. 

Lustreine Floor Oil. 

This is a chemical combination of 
oils, waxes and other ingredients which 
is being pushed by the Commercial Oil 
Co., Hamilton, through their specialty 
department. The oil penetrates the wood 
and lasts from three months to one 
year according to wear. During this 
time it makes sweeping dustless, damp- 
ening the floor sufficiently to prevent 
dust rising but allowing dirt to be swept 
up after the manner of a sawdust 
sprinkled floor. Flour sprinkled upon 
a floor having been treated with Lustre- 
ine is swept up without dust and with- 
out leaving any mark or trace. Muddy 
feet leave no stain upon such a floor. 
Mud tracked and trampled into a floor 
is swept off without spot or mark. Mer- 
chants and oil dealers writing for in- 
formation regarding this specialty will 
favor us by mentioning Hardware and 
Metal. 



WHAT OTHERS SAY 
ABOUT HOLLYWOOD 




A leading hardware firm wrote us : 

" It is now four years since we first 
took hold of the brand, and we have 
had in all that time nothing but com- 
mendation of the quality." 



HOLLYWOOD PAINTS, READY-MIXED AND FLOOR, 
WEAR ON THE JOB, NOT OFF IT 



m Imperial Varnish 

§M Color CO., Limited 

TORONTO 



40 



February 11, 1905 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware and Metal. 



TO THE VARNISH BUYER 

the most serious considerations are quality, reliability and 
uniformity, and these qualifications are of special importance to 
the dealer who is trying to build up a permanent varnish trade* 

Berry Brothers' label or brand may be safely relied upon as 
ensuring the above conditions. 

Our varnishes are the safest goods to handle and the surest and 
most reliable goods to use. 

BERRY BROTHERS, Limited 

VARNISH MANUFACTURERS 

WALftERVILLE, ONT. 

Write for our J 00 page illustrated catalogue. Every dealer should have a copy for reference. 



McArthur. Corneille & Co. 



MONTREAL 



lu 



od Gelatine 



An extensive assortment, to suit all requirements. 
WILL BE PLEASED TO SUBMIT SAMPLES AND PRICES 



MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS OF . . 



^ 



White Lead, Oils and Colors, 
Prepared Paints, Window 
Glass, Varnishes, Etc. 



SELLING AGENTS IN CANADA 

And CELEBRATED 



For the GENUINE 

Imperial French Green 

of JOHN LUCAS & CO., 

PHILADELPHIA. 



English Varnishes 

of CHAS. TURNER & SON, 
LONDON. 



Please mention HARDWARE AND METAL when writing. 




Our whole factory time and energy is given to the 
manufacture of 

REFRIGERATORS 
SCREEN DOORS and 
WINDOW SCREENS 

Therefore we are in a positi